Title: Drew Field echoes
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076231/00058
 Material Information
Title: Drew Field echoes
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Post Exchange
Place of Publication: Tampa Fla
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida -- Tampa   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Drew Field Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa -- Drew Army Airfield
Coordinates: 27.975556 x -82.533333 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: "Published each Friday in the interest of the officers and enlisted men of Drew Field."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 39 (Dec. 2, 1943).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076231
Volume ID: VID00058
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24622561
lccn - sn 93063705

Full Text




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VOL. 2, NO. 7 Published Exlusively in the Interest of the Personnel of Drew Field Friday, April 23, 1943
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Cistern Twins Reunited


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The "cistern twins"-Pvt. Wim.
Allen Hamilton blue-eyed blond
soldier stationed at a sub-base of
Drew Field, and Mrs. Bettie Jayne
Catron, blue-eyed, blonde, Twin
Falls, Ia., housewife-were reu-
nited last Friday after a separa-
tion of nearly 23 years.
With a conventional "I'm happy
to meet you" and an awkward,
simple handshake, they were in-
troduced in a Bradenton hotel
room by Lt. A. G. Thompson,
Drew Field assistant public rela-
tions officer.
Not since they were nursed to
health in an Omaha hospital near-
ly 23 years ago had they seen
each other. In fact, Hamilton did
not even know he had a sister
until Mrs. Catron's desire to find
her twin led her on a 3,000-mile
odyssey which ended in Braden-
ton.
The comely sister arrived in
Tampa with her foster mother,
Mrs. Arch Shurigar, Rockport,
Mo. Army officers, who waited
patiently for three hours until
the arrivel of their train, took
them in a staff car to Bradenton.
"We hope you don't think we're
here? toamake- trouble for you,"
Mrs. Shuriaar said in meeting
Tamilton. "We just had to come.
-ttie Jayne has dreamed of
meeting you for 14 years and this
meeting is the biggest thing in
her life."
The shy soldier said he knew
they were "going to get along
swell."


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First news of his sister upset
Hamilton and he refused to be-
lieve it because until that time
he thought he was the real son
of his foster parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Allen Hamilton, of Omaha.
Difficulty in arranging their
meeting continued even after i
Hamilton was convinced Mrs.
Catron was his sister. Mrs. Catron
wired her brother she was on her
way. The telegram was sent to
Drew Field instead of to Braden-
ton and in the meantime Hamil- i
ton had obtained a furlough and
wired his sister not to come since
he was on his way to Omaha to
meet her there.
Last Thursday the soldier left
Bradenton in an Army truck en
route to Tampa to catch a train.
His commanding officer, advised
that Mrs. Catron had left for
Florida already, overtook the
Army truck in a jeep driven by
an MP and convinced Hamilton
to return to await his sister's
arrival.
Mrs. Catron had persuaded her
husband to let her take the fam-
ly savings and go to Omaha to
finr come trace of him. Contact-
ing his adopted parents, she traced
nim to Camp Crowder, Mo., then
to Drew Field and then to Camp
Bradenton. She and Mrs. Shuriger
borrowed money from the Rock-
oort band to complete their journ-
ey here.
Both twins are now in Omaha,
-isiting friends and relatives.


General Arnold Cals For The

Destruction of Jap Air Force

In a message dispatched to every air base in this country and
throughout the combat area, Major General H. H. Arnold has called
upon the personnel of the Army Air Forces to redouble their efforts
in hastening the day when perpetrators of the crime of execution of
several of the airmen who participated in the bombing of Tokyo will
be brought to justice.
The text of General Arnold's, message is as follows:
"To All Personnel of the Army Air Forces:
"In violation of every rule of military procedure and every con-
cept of human decency the Japanese have executed several of your
brave comrades who took part in the first Tokyo raid. These men
died as heroes. We must not rest. We must redouble our efforts
until the inhuman warlords' who committed this crime have been
utterly destroyed. Remember those comrades when you get a Zero
in your. sight. Have their sacrifice before you when you line up
your bombsight on a Japanese base.
'You have demonstrated the Japanese cannot match you in
aerial combat or in bombardment. Let your answer to their treat-
of your comrades be the destruction of the Japanese air force, their
lines of communication, and the production centers which offer
them opportunity to continue such atrocities."


New e islalon Provides for National

Service Insurance Whou Medical Exa

The ECHOES is calling to the used in making Class A Allot-
attention of Drew Field military ments from pay for premiums.
personnel the fact that new legis- Applications should specify insur-
lation provides any person in ac- ance and AGO Form 29 should be
tive service eshall be granted Na- used in making Class N Allot-
tional Service Life Insurance ments from pay for premiums.
without medical examination and Applications should specify insur-
without medical history statement ance is to be effective immediate-
upon application made in writing ly, and be mailed directly to Chief
within 120 days from April 12, of Finance, War Department,
1943. upon payment of the prem- Washington. D. C.
iums. All military personnel who have
This right. according to the War less than $10,000 Government
Department, can be exercised not- Life Insurance will be informed
withstanding rejection of any immediately of their current right
prior application for such insur- to apply without statement of
ance on any around whatever. It health or physical .examination
covers increases. in amounts of and be urged to take out maxi-
existing insurance as well as pro- mum insurance and be furnished
curement of\new insurance. | every assistance and facility nec-
Insurance. Form 350 should be essary.


Camera Club to Be
Operated By USO
Mee'ing each Wednesday night
at 8:30, a camera club sponsored
by Mrs. Karl B. Cuesta. well
known photographer, held its first
session at 214 N. Boulevard in
Tampa on April 14. Service men
from Benjamin Field, MacDill
Field, Plant Field and Drew Field
were present.
A darkroom is not yet ready,
but the equipment is available
and will be set up when it is
demonstrated to those in charge
:hat enough service men will use
tne darkroom to maKe its opera-
:ion worthwhile.
Because of frequent shifting of
military personnel no officers will
be elected. The club's activities
will be planned from week to
week with a program subject and
program chairman to be selected
a week in advance.
Particular stress will be laid
on fundamental knowledge of
photography and all beginners are
invited to attend Wednesday
night's meeting and to bring their
cameras. Attention will also be
given to advanced photographers
who will gain much from compe-
tition with each other and from
helping beginners.
The club will offer a safe stor-
age place for cameras, floodlights
for taking pictures at meetings; a
darkroom for developing and en-
larging ,instruction, and enthu-


Soldiers Receive
War News Daily
Un-to-the-minute news accounts
of the rapidly changing picture of
the World War is now provided
for all men of Drew Field as a
daily feature of the Special Serv-
ice Division, Washington, D. C.-
Drew Field is being supplied
daily with 1000-word summaries
which are copied and distributed
to all units stationed here.
Information is kept current
through the efforts of competent
newspapermen, together with the
cooperation of regular news
sources such as Associated Press,
United Press, International News
Service and Transradio News.
More facts, about such things
as terrain of the fighting fronts
and tactics of the forces involved,
will be given than usually ap-
pears in the average civilian pub-
lications. '
Drew Field soldiers are urged
to utilize this more realistic sum-
mary of events for their own in-
terest and education.
siastic fellow fans to show your
pictures to and to talk with about
your hobby.
The club's prime need, in order
to insure its permanence, is a
flock of members to attend the
next meeting at the N. Boulevard
USO, near Plant Field, at 8:30
Wednesday night. Can you make
it?


Drew Field Observes Palm Sunday


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Chaplain Auer presented Sgt. Joseph byrne, oz iew YqorK City,
and Miss Peggy Jeanne Bruns, of Tampa, with the symbolic crosses
made of a palm leaf blade at a Palm Sunday observance.


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Jeffrey Lynn, Now

A Shaveail, Checks

In A! Drew Field
The tall, handsome blue-eyed
shavetail, not long out of the Of-
ficers Candidate School, Fort
Monmouth, N. J., did not vary
much in appearance from any of
the countless second lieutenants
who check in at Drew Field. The
new officer registered for assign-
ment in the Army's aircraft warn-
ing training units at the large
Army air base.
True, he was a bit older than
the average shavetail, being 34,
and the name that.he penned on
the personnel register .was a bit
uncommon, having a Swedish
sound about it-Second Lt. Rag-
nar G. Lind. However, the name
was not tagged with prominence.
In fact, there was- little that
stood out sharply on his personal
history record except- the part
where he stated his occupational
background. He was born in Au-
burn, Mass., went to school in
Worcester where a large Scan-
dinavian colony resides, he
was a graduate of Bates College,
he had been a half-miler on the
college track team. Even his oc-
cupational experience just after
graduating from college was not
out of the ordinary, for he spent
the first two years selling tele-
phone service. He wasn't particu-
larly fond of that job, so he gave
it up and on advice from his
former college professor of Eng-
lish, he accepted a job as an Eng-
lish teacher in a high school in
Lisbon, Maine.
Did Not Like School Teaching
There was nothing glamorous
about school teaching, either, so
Lind gave it up for something that
he had had his heart set on for a
long time-the theater. During his
high school days the theater- bug
had bitten him and from then on
he took part in Little Theater ac-
tivities during his spare hours.
And so he penned in alongside
the space reserved for occupation
-"Contract player, motion pic-
tures."
That was the pay-off, and some-
body in the office who has seen
him in a number of films-"Four
Daughters" and "Four Wives,"
with the Lane Sisters and John
Garfield- recognized the former
film player, Jeffrey Lynn. Before
the day was far advanced, the
word spread like wildfire through-
out the field:
"Jeffrey Lynn, the movie star,
is here."
And so Lt. Lind, the former
Warner Bros. featured player,
Jeffrey Lynn, was introduced to
Drew Field, one of the largest
Army air bases in the Southeast.
Became Officer the Hard Way
The formereilm star was com-
missioned a second lieutenant in-
the Signal Corps after spending
more than a year in the Army as
an enlisted man. After induction
at Fort MacArthur, Calif., in Feb-
ruary, 1942, he was sent to Camp
Crowder, Missouri, where he re-
ceived his basic training.
From there he was sent to an
Army photography school, where
he learned to operate moving pic-
ture cameras such as are used by
newsreel men.
"I found out what it's like to be
behind the camera as well as in
fi-ont of it," Lind said.
Several interesting assignments
followed the completion of his
school course. One was at the Ab-
erdeen Proving Grounds, Md.,
where he was a member of a unit
which filmed the testing of new
war weapons. Next he spent some
time at Fort Belvoir, Va. It was,
on the whole, an exciting experi-
ence and he learned to operate
the instruments of war from pho-
tographing them.
During his year as an enlisted
man, Lind did his share of dirty
details, particularly K.P. Because
he was a celebrity, the sergeants
singled him out in order to see if
he could take it. After a year he
got his chance to take officers'
training.
"That was the toughest three
(Continued on Page 2)







Pa~r~ 2 THE ECHOES April 23, 1942


SO-Camp Show, Do You Know.
That if all the blueprints re-
e n quired to build a medium bomber
ll were laid end to end, one fool
wide, -it would take a plane twc
Here AprBi 30 hours to fly their length?
That, after years of research
W:t.h a hand-picked cast of per- the Chemical Warfare Service has
forv- '-rs who have starred in developed clothing which is treat-
Broaiway musicals, toured the ed to neutralize gases before they
cou1try with leading name bands, come into contact with the body?
played the swankiest clubs north, The method, of course, is a secret
east, west and south to Rio de
Jan:eiro and bowed "behind foot-
lig;tsi stretching coast to coast That an automatic pneumatic
across the country, FULL SPEED gun by a Los Angeles inventor
AHEAD, a very fine variety revue po1urs out 12.000 rounds a minute
wri' presented at Drew Field on compared with 3,000 rounds a
April 30, at 8:00 p. m. in RB No. minute accredited to Germany's
1. It is presented free by USO- newest weapon? In the American-
CA LP SHOWS. made gun no powder is necessary
Th", The Ns ae oe Compressed air supplies all the
Th-g Three Nonchalants are one force needed to "blow" the equi-
good reason why it is a riot. The talent of a .50 caliber bullet,
nonahalant way those madmen, which has no shell castih g. There
Thez Three Nonchalants, knock is no noise, no recoil and no flash.
each other around the stage has _
driven many an audience slap-
happ.y, with laughs. The Three TESTING, TESTING. ..
Noachalants closed a six months The electrician was puzzled.
run ii the Broadway hit, "Priori- "Hevy" he called out to his is-
ties o- 1942." before joining FULL sistant, "put your hand on one
SPEED AHEAD though their of those wires."
farne as terrifically funny enter- The assistant did as he was told.
tainers isn't limited to Broadway. "Feel anything?"
Bob Easton and Company is a "No."
moanooguist with a boy and a "Good," said the electrician. "I
girl dummy. The boy plays drums wasn't sure which was which.
and the girl does double talk. Don't touch the other or you'll
FULL SPEED AHEAD has Ed- drop dead."
die R'o as master of ceremonies,
than whom there is none funnier Lyn Drew
in th. business. Eddie with his Jeffrey ynnatDrew
marvelous knack of tying a show
together, works through the revue (Continued from Page 1)
eeith clock-sm the whole thtiming moving months I ever spent," the lieu-
t ciock moth titenant said, speaking of his ninety
Co nedian Larry Collins. who is days at the officers' school.
a trombonist of rare excellence The former film player is pleas-
wail display his virtuosity with antly surprised that he's remem-
that instrument as well as de- bered after being out of pictures
lighting with his amusing gags for about a year and a half. Once,
and patter, when he missed a train in New-
One of the chief reasons for the ark, N. J., he stopped in a restau-
amazing, i'ecord breaking success rant for a cup of coffee. Somebody
of Awmerica's all-time hit musical recognized him and it wasn't long
show, "Hellzapoppin'," was the before autograph seekers crowd-
two lovely tap and acrobatic ed around him. In order to dis-
daneers, the Sterner Sisters, perse them, some cops elbowed
whose grace and charm are only their way through the gathering,
equaled by the marvelous preci- only to wind up by getting auto-
sion of their routines. The sisters graphs for members of their fami-
have 4ust concluded a twenty lies.
week tour with Sammy Kaye and The lieutenant's last picture
his orchestra. was a film that started but as a
-- -* melodrama and wound up as a
I. 60. Comedy. Its title, strangely
Lt. Col. LoWery enough, was "The Body Disap-
New Signal Officer pears," in which he portrayed the
cer "invisible man" type.
For Third F. C. Highlights of Film Career
Before going to the film capi-
RHecen;'ly replacing Col. Benia- tal, Lind knocked on doors on
amin f.e Srn transferred to an un- Broadway. In Hollywood he began
revealidA new assignment, as Signal to be noticed for his portrayal of
Offcecr of the III Fighter Corn- a V. M. I. cadet officer in "Broth-
Tnand. Lt. CoL Robert E. Lowery er Rat."
assumed responsibility of the su- In pictures for four years, Lind
pervion and coordination of the ad advanced into the $1,000-a-
Aircr ift Warning Service of the week bracket when called for
om:nand. It includes the oera- Ary duty. It was quite a jolt,
tio onf the Information ahd FilterA
C-nters and. the Ground Obserlver being thrust down so suddenly
Cetecs and the Ground Observer Auinto the $50-a-month income class,
Co- p but he grew used to it.
A rtative of Tuscaloosa, Ala., Lind has portrayed soldiers in


COi, Lo)wery was commissioned a
second lieutenant, in the Infantry
reserve upon graduating from the
University of Alabama in 1932.
An authority on short-wave radio,
he was.connected with the Police
Department of Tuscaloosa prior
t, h-l i i'!. i" was instrumental, also,
in introducing short-wave police
in ttie South.
Wlhea first called to active duty
in 1937, he was assigned to the
radio department ofoa CCC camp
in Thibadoux. La. Later he served
as Signal Officer of District D,
CCC, at Fort McClellan. Ala.
Whie there he transferred to the
Signal Corps.
FoUowing a course at Fort Mon-
raouth. N. J., he was assigned to
M iacDif Field, where he com-
manded several signal companies
befor. his transfer to the III
Fighter Command as Assistant
Signa' Officer in May, 1941.

M MONEY LOANED
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T_MPA LOAN CO.
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PLAYING NIGHTLY

NO MINIMUM
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JAMES S. PICKARD Mgi.


eReember HER for Easter ...
DIAMONDS --- WATCHES --- JEWELRY


TERMINAL WATCIi REPAING
AT THE



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Gaaanteed Watch Repairing -:--. Opn Till i2 E ei'y Nigh


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Air-Conditioned Ph. M 1878
39c Matinee 44c Night
TODAY WEDNESDAY


SINGING .DANCING .
ROMANCING ...
on the glittering Barbary
Coast!
IN TECHNICOLOR

'Hello

Frisco, Hello'
With
Alice Faye, John Payne
Jack Oakie, Lynn Bari






Air-Conditioned Ph. 3290
9c 28c
SUNDAY AND MONDAY
"Hitler's Children"
With
Tim Holt
Bonita Granville





Tampa and Zack
Phone 3003-9c, 22c
Saturday and Sunday

"Between Us Girls"
Diana Barrymore
Robert Cummings
HIT NO 2
"Calling
Dr. Gillespie"
Lionel Barrymore
SPhillip Dern
i .m im m em-


several films. One, "The Roaring
Twenties," opened with him in a
shellhole in France. In another,
"Underground," one ofhis best, he
was cast as a Nazi officer who re-
volted against Nazi brutality.
Two years before entering the
Army he played the part of the
poet, Joyce Kilmer, in "The
Fighting 69th," which included
James Cagney and Pat O'Brien in
its cast. To assimilate the nuances
of the poet's character, Lind stud-
ied his poems and books about
him and also talked with men
and women who knew Kilmer un-
til he almost lost his own identity
in the role of the soldier author
of "Trees."
"The role of Kilmer was one of
my best," Lind said. "I acquired a
great deal of respect for him. He
was a regular guy and not just a
poet."
Kilmer's mother saw the picture
six times when it played in her
home town in New Jersey. Lind
tried to see her to find out if his
portrayal was anything like her
son, but she died before he got
to Fort Monmouth.
The former movie actor who not
so long ago faced a battery of
cameras as his daily chore expects
soon to face a battery of roaring
enemy guns in something more
realistic than the mimic battles
that unfold on the screen.
"My movie days are gone," he
said. "At least for the duration.
Right now the Army's my job."


Every Night
8 till 11
EXCEPT MONDAY

5c Fare

On Davis Island Buses
LEAVING GRANT'S CORNER
FRANKLIN AND CASS STREET'

7:15 -- 7:45 -- 8:15"


WELCOME SOLDIERS!
We Are NOT Out of Bounds
BEER -:- WINES -:- SOFT DRINKS
RELAX AT THE

L I BE R T Y BA R
Tony Italiano, Proprietor
717 Grand Ceniral Phone H 3109
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210 E. Lafayette St. Tampa
Good Food Reasonable Prices
Try Our Sunday Roast Turkey Diznner
Served From 11 A.M. to 9 P.M.
ALA CARTE SERVICE AT ALL HOURS
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
WE USE STRICTLY WESTERN MEATS


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MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT THE

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Dancing. Every ]

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Night in the Blue Room to

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Chicken and Steaks
Real Italian Spaghetti
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707 S. HOWARD AVENUE O A
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For All Your Printing and Stationery Needs ...

CALL


THE COMMERCIAL PRINTERS
GLENN R. ROSS, Owner

Publishers of Tampa Army Newspapers


1113-15 FLORIDA AVE.


..I_ _ __... .. ,_ .._ _. ..


PHONES: 2126 and 2177


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April 23, 1943


THE ECHOES


Paga 2


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pirBil 23. 1943 THE ECBHOESi0^^SaH'


FROM THE SPECIAL SERVICES OFFICE


Drew Field Presents
Monday through Saturday, WFLA, 7:05-7:30 A.M.-Drew Field Rev-
eille.
Monday, WDAE, 8:30-8:53% P.M.-The Right Answer or Else.
Tuesday, WFLA, 6:30-6:45 P.M.-The Squadronaires.
Thursday, WDAE, 8:301-8:531/ P.M.-69th AIR FORCE BAND.
Thursday, WDAE, 9:30-10 P.M.-Rookie Roy and His Musical Scrap-
book.
Thursday, WFLA, 10:30-11 P.M.-The Drew Field Star Parade.
je


Say, soldier, where have you
been? Your buddies in the day
room have been talking about
0u, but the Special Services Of-
_ce hasn't been able to get hold
of you. You see, we've been
told that there's a lot of loose tal-
ent floating around the field, and
we've tried-and have succeeded
in a way, too-to get even more
talent from the men on the field.
After all,o DREW FIELD PRE-
SENTS are your programs... You
are entitled to just as much a
share in it as that sergeant peer-
ing over your shoulder. And
we want to avail you every op-
portunity for participating in our
broadcasts.
If you think you are capable
of performing before a micro-
phohe if you think you can
sing, popular tunes or classical
music, it makes no difference .. .
if you can act if you can play
a musical instrument, whether it
be a violin, oboe or harp if
you have any sort of entertain-
ment qualifications, drop in at
Recreation Building Number One,
on K and First Street, Monday
iight, catch the broadcast of The
Right Answer or Else, and then
after we go off the air, come up
on the stage and Lt. George Kluge
will interview you and give you
an audition. From then on it's
up to you, soldier ... so hop over
to your barracks, brush up on
that voice of yours or practice on
that musical instrument, and then
Monday night, after The Right
Answer or Else goes off the air,
drop in at Recreation Building
Number One and let your particu-
lar talent loose. See you Monday
night.






S HI-HAT
1204 FRANKLIN ST
Featuring
ALL STAR
ENTERTAINMENT
Nightly 8 to 12 P. M.
Starring
Freddie Bernard
M. C.
Tampa's Newest
I Singing Sensation
WITH BIG ALL STAR
CAST


On the M Spot
RECREATION BUILDING
NO. 1
Friday, April 23, 8:00 p.m. -
Variety Show from Tampa.
Saturday, April 24- To be an-
nounced.
Sunday, April 25, 8:00 p. m. -
Old-fashioned Film.
Monday, April 26, 8:00 p.m. -
"The Right Answer or Else." 8:30
p.m. -Broadcast -of "The Right
Answer or Else." 9:00 p. m.-Sol-
dier Auditions.
Tuesday, April 27, 8:00 p. m. -
Variety Show from Tampa.
Wednesday, April 28, 8:00 p. m.
Soldier Show.
Thursday, April 29, 8:00 p. m.-
Concert by AAF Band. 8:30 p. m.
-Broadcast of Concert. 9:30 p. m.
-"Rookie Roy and his Scrap-
book."
ENLISTED MEN'S SERVICE
CLUB
Friday, April 23, 8:00 p.m.--
Dance.
Saturday, April 24, 8:00 p. m.-
Group Sing.
Sunday, April 25- To be an-
nounced.
Monday, April 26, 8:00 p. m.-
Dance.
Tuesday, April 27, 8:00 p. m. -
Concert of Recorded Symphonic
Music.
Wednesday, April 28 -To be
announced.
Thursday, April 29, 8:00 p. m.-
Bingo.

Shows of the Week
Monday evening: Lt. .George
Kluge presented his amusing
THE RIGHT ANSWER OR ELSE.
The point of this broadcast is to
entertain the audience with ques-
tions composed by Pfc. Harry Ev-
ans and Pvt. Alfred Panetz and
with answers given by soldiers
chosen from his audience.
Tuesday evening: The USO
sent us a thoroughly delightful;
colored musical revue, SWINGIN'
ON DOWN. We don't suppose that
one could find anywhere better
colored entertainers than were 9n
the stage that night. The soldiers
:" -, .iI1 and beat their feet against
1!i. lI.i.I. in response to this mag-
nificent show.
Wednesday evening: The Evans
School of the Dance brought out
a lively variety show from Tampa.
The talented young ladies were
graceful performers and charm-
ing to look at. The Evans Brothers
closed the bill with their extraor-
dinary acrobatic feats.
Thursday evening: The 69th


The LOGICAL and BEST Place
STo Buy Your Military Needs Is





917 Franklin St. 2 s or 1401 7th Ave.YB INy

917 FRANKLIN STREET STORE IS OPEN
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday Evenings


Army Air Force Band gave a par-
ticularly beautiful concert. Amqng
finely played numbers was the
brilliant arrangement of Irving
Berlin's Easter Parade, by Sgt.
Bud Estes. The men enjoyed this
number so much that the band
will play it again next week. Later
that evening there was a broad-
cast of ROOKIE ROY AND HIS
MUSICAL SCRAPBOOK. This
program showed careful prepara-
tion as to script, musical arrange-
ment and performers. The clev-
erly devised combination of band
numbers, dialogue and song re-
sulted in a sparkling half hour.
Other shows were presented in
RB No. 1 last week, bul the ones
just mentioned were in our opin-
ion the most interesting.


Service Men Welcome

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811 Tampa St. Phone M 1094
O. E. BOGART, Manager


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SERVICE MEN

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956 Twiggs M 1339


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April 23, 1943


THE ECHOES


,aCJC 3


__


7E








Page 4 THE ECHOES April 23, 1943


ECHOES


GLENN R. ROSS, Publisher
TAMPA ARMY NEWSPAPERS
Business Office:
1113 FLORIDA AVENUE
P. O. Box 522 TAMPA, FLORIDA Phone 2177
All advertisements contained in this newspaper are also contained
in the Fly Leaf, published in the interest of the personnel of MacDill
Field. Minimum joint circulation, 10,000 copies.
ADVERTISING RATES FURNISHED ON REQUEST
A newspaper published exclusively for the personnel of Drew
Field and devoted to military interests and the United Nations
Victory.
Opinions expressed in this newspaper are those of the individual
writers and under no circumstances are they to be considered those
of the United States Army. Advertisements in this publication do
not constitute an endorsement by the War Department or its per-
sonnel of the products advertised.

Operating Equipment of the Air Base Bus Lines
Last week's article was concerned with the ownership of the
Air Base Bus Lines and helped dissipate spurious rumors to the
effect that some officers or enlisted men, or both, were profiting per-
scnally from the operation of this transportation system. This, of
course, is entirely false.
In an exclusive interview with Mr. A. Pickens Coles, president
of the company, a good picture of the equipment situation was se-
cured. According to Mr. Coles, the bus company is doing everything
possible to give good service, and will continue tc do this. There are
grave difficulties, however, as Mr. Coles pointed out-difficulties
concerned with a rapidly expanding military personnel and with a
practical impossibility of getting more equipment. However, he as-
sured the Echoes representative that everything possible would be
dcne-that as fast as more equipment could be obtained, it would
be put into service.
At the present time, serving both Drew and MacDill Fields, there
are 29 buses in operation, divided according to type, as follows:
Twelve "Cattle Cars," which are tractor-trailers (converted new
trailers), seating 50 men.
Eight "Dive Bombers," which are 33-passenger buses, which will
ultimately be equipped with air-doors.
Seven "Butt-Heads," which are regular city-type buses, seating
from 29 to 44 men.
Two "Pride of the Fleet" buses, which are rebuilt inter-city buses,
seating 44 men.
Of course, it is a military secret abaut how many men are a I
Drew and MacDill Fields, but it is no secret that there are plenty of
men. It is obvious that transporting thousands of men into town-
every night is a very definite problem. For example, in February of
this year, the company had 145,000 passengers, including civilian
riders to both fields. In February of 1942, the figure was only one-'
third that. Naturally, with this tremendous expansion, operating
problems are difficult.
In order to help solve this problem, on December 12th, the bus
line moved its terminal from the Union Bus Terminal to the present
location at the other end of the downtown district. Cutting down the
travel through the congested business area increased the number of
possible trips to Drew Field by 15 per cent, with the same amount
of equipment available. Speedier repair service has reduced the
length of time a truck is laid up-the average time now is less than
two days. The bus lines maintain their own repair shop to expedite
this angle of the situation. The number of buses out of service at'
any one time because bf repairs is very low.
Service schedules: To each gate every 30 minutes during the day,
every 15 minutes during the hours before and after the actual rush,
and as fast as the buses can be rushed back during the rush hours.
The company is now operating to absolutely full capacity, and run-
ning the buses as fast as possible consistent with safety regulations.
They have always been willing to get equipment as needed, when-
ever it is available. Unfortunately, at the present time, it is practi-
cally impossible to buy either buses, or old truck bodies on which
bus tops can be built. There are now two more buses in sight, but
that is all.
At any rate, in the face of terrific expansion, the Air Base Bus
Lines have rendered as good service as is possible, under the circum-
stances. They have bought all the equipment they could get, and
would like to buy more if it was available. They have speeded up;
their repair work to keep as many buses as possible in constant oper-
ation. They will continue to do as good a job as humanly possible.,
Next week we will discuss what the Army has done to alleviate
the transportation situation.


Band Notes budding birthday boys in the per-
sonages of Sgt. Bud (kickapoo joy
juice) Estes, Sgt. Woody (he's a
By Cpl. Will Krewson lover) Harwich, and Sgt. Luke
(what's the square root of Sed-
Thursday, April 15, 1943, was lake's head) Luukkonen. Well, any-
a long awaited day for S/Sgt. hoo, happy birthday, fellows.
Johnny Suszynski and Pfc. Sam And if you hear a terrific com-
Schiavone. Suszynski went breez- motion as you pass our ole home-
ing out of old T-272 with his hair sted, don't be alarmed; it's just
flying in the wind (both of them), one of our baseball games. So far
and Sam can boas of being the no one has been killed, but I've
only Pfc. to get a Military Band noticed vultures circling the ball-
escort down 4th Street. field on several occasions if that
Yes, it was furlough day for means anything.
those two happy lads. My only Pfc. Joe (Pancho) Wright and
thought is did Suszynski make Cpl. Ralph Sudjian managed to
the train this time? Last week drag themselves back after spend-
also brought forth a couple of ing a pleasant furlough at home


gProtestant Easter
Services

Emphasizing the eternal hope
and faith of Christianity through
the resurrection of Jesus Christ,
Sthe Chaplain's Corps of Drew
iField, have arranged colorful and
inspiring services for Easter Sun-
day morning, April 25, 1943. Spe-
cial organ music, typical of this
festival season will be played in
each chapel. Floral decorations,
The following pictures will play traditional to Easter, have been
in Theaters 1 and 4 on the dates arranged.
listed: The services will be held in
Fri., Sat., April 23-24: Chapel, and in Theater No. 3, at
HANGMEN ALSO DIE Brian the regular church hour of 1-0:30
Donlevy, Walter Brennan; Too a. m. The location of the Chapels
Weak to Work. and the speakers for the morning
Sun., April 25: are as follows:
SPRINGTIME IN THE ROCKIES Chapel No. 1, 8th and "C" Ave.
Revival) Betty Grable, John -Chaplain Henry W. Opperman,
Payne; Flop Goes the Weasel; 314th B.H.Q. and Air BaseA Sq.
Ski Soldiers. Chapel No. 2, 7th and "D" Ave.
Mon.. April 26: -Chaplain W. J. Bielitz, 552nd
RHYTHM OF THE ISLANDS S.A.W.
Allan Jones, Jane Frazee; Chapel No. 3, 2nd and Tampa
SHANTYTOWN Mary Lee, Bay-Chaplain Charles W. Fix,
John Archer. 84th Bomb Group.
Tues. Wd., April 2728: Chapel No. 4, 2nd and "L" Ave.
Tues., Wed., April 27-28:
EDGE OF DARKNESS Errol
Flynn, Ann Sheridan; The Case some thoughtless soldier has "bor-
of the Missing Hare. rowed" the lenses of the enlarger,
Thurs. April 29: and other pieces of movable
AT DAWN WE DIE-John Clem- equipment, thereby rendering the
ents, Greta Gynt; Eagles of the entire darkroom useless to every-
Navy; The 500 Hats of Barthol- one else. In the event that you
omew Cubbins. are the soldier who "borrowed"


THEATERS 2 AND 3
Sat., April 24:
SPRINGTIME IN THE ROCKIES
Revival) Betty Grable, John
Payne; Flop Goes the Weasel;
Ski Soldiers.
Sun., Mon., April 25-26:
EDGE OF DARKNESS Errol
Flynn, Ann Sheridan; News of
the Day No. 263.
Tuse., April 27:
RHYTHM OF THE ISLANDS -
Allan Jones; SHANTYTOWN-
Mary Lee.
Wed., Thurs., April 28-29:
REAP THE WILD WIND-Ray
Milland, John Wayne, Paulette
SGoddard; News of the Day No.
264.
Fri., April .30:
AT DAWN WE DIE-John Clem-
ents, Greta Gynt; Eagles of the
Navy; The 500 Hats of Barthol-
omew Cubbins.


Addressed to Man

Who 'Borrowed'

Photo Equipment
Let's be good neighbors-If
you have borrowed photogra-
phic equipment, return it im-
mediately.
The Navy Mothers' Club, at
305,2 Water Street, Tampa, has
been- kind enough to provide a
completely equipped dark room
for use by soldiers in the Tampa
area. Excellent equipment was on
hand for the asking, and many
soldiers who were photo fans,
were able to make some very fine
pictures at practically no cost to
themselves.
We say-"were able"-because


-well, Ralph did, anyway. Joe
is still going up and down from
a ten 'day ride on the train. As
for Del Purga well, what
hope can you have for a fellow
that came back from furlough a
day to soon? He just had to get
his hands on that fiddle again .
or was it Hal Richman?


this equipment, value oy mne
Navy Mothers' Club at over $200,
please return them at once to the
Public Relations Office, Base
Headquarters. No questions will
be asked-but we would like to
make the facilities of this dark-
roon available to those who want
to use it.
Let's be good neighbors. When
people are kind enough to lend
us equipment of any kind,' let's
return it in the same shape we
found it. Let's show people that
we are grateful for the kindnesses
they have done'us in the past,
and that we are worthy of their
consideration in the future.

Found
Found on Drew Field-One
lady's fountain pen engraved
with the name of Faith Batter-
shall. The owner can call for it
at the Public Relations Office,
Base Headquarters, or phone
extension 218.


-Chaplain Earl F. Johns, 501st
S.A.W.
Chapel No. 5, 1st and "N" Ave.
Chaplain Fred A. Delashaw,
653rd S.A.W.
Theater No. 3, 2nd and "K"
Ave.-Chaplain F. J. Lanlashaw,
405th Bomb Group.
Due to the Band Shell being
unavailable for the contemplated
Sunrise Service, an urgent invita-
tion is extended to all officers.
enlisted men, civilian personnel,
and their families to attend the
services in the above Chapels.-
Come to Church Easter Sunday.

Church Call
Good Friday
The commemoration of the
Passion and Death of Jesus Christ,
the only day in the year Catholic
Priests do not offer the Sacrifice
of the Mass. On this day is cele-
brated what is called the Mass
of the Pre-sanctified, called Mass
because it resembles a Mass, and
called Presanctified because at
the ceremonies a host, resery; '
in a repository from Holy Th
day's mass, is consumed by t
officiating priest. This Mass of
the Presanctified will be held in
Chapel No. 3, at 7:00 p.m.
Holy Saturday
Day of anticipated Easter Joy.
At 7:00 p.m. in Chapel No. 3
there will be Blessing of the
Easter Fire and Candle followed
by Holy Mass.
Easter Sunday
Resurrection of Jesus Christ
from the dead. The Holy Week
ceremonies in the open air, at
9:00 a. m., at the Band Shell be-
side Chapel No. 2.
On Sunday, April 25, at 7 a. m.,
early morning watch service will
be held for the 84th Bombard-
ment Group. Chaplain Charles J.
Fix will officiate.
JEWISH
Religious services for Passover,
will be held at Chapel No. 3 on
Monday, April 26, at 8 a. m., and
Tuesday, April 27, at 8 a. m.
7:15 p.m.-Wednesday in
Chapel 3.
8:30 p. m.-Fridays in Chapel 3.
8:00 a. m.-Saturdays in Chapel
No. 3.
"Yiskor," memorial service for
the dead, will be recited on April
27 at.Chapel. No. 3 at 8 o'clock in
the morning.


Chaplain Morton C. Fierman, Jewish Chaplain for "Drew and
MacDill Fields, holds special Passover. Seder for boys just arrived
at Drew Field. Over 800 boys attended regular Seders, held at thp
Hillsboro Hotel, the YMHA, and private homes in Tampa as gues
of local people. Chaplain Fierman was formerly Civilian Chaplavy
at Bolling Field, Washington, D. C... where he was Director of Re-
ligious Education at the Washington Hebrew Congregation.


THE


The Chaplain Speaks


April 23, 1943


Page 4


THKE ECH HO E







April 23, 1943 THE .ECHOES PageS


SWING TIPS


301st Squadron News 303rd Bomb. Sq. News


At the rate furloughs are being
given out in the 301st, it won't be
long until most everyone in the
squadron will have had one, or
do I hear some, "Oh, Yeah's?"
Well, anyway, everyone due a
furlough will have had one. The
latest furloughs start April 20 and
yours truly is one of the lucky
guys for that date. There are more
coming up, so don't feel too badly
as you may be in the next bunch.
Keep on trying.

Orders have come out recently
that all limited service men will
be taken out of the squadron, and
from what I hear the squadron
will be losing some good men.
one of the first men to be trans-
ferred is Cpl. Elmer Marshall of
the Engineering department, and
many of us will miss his enthu-
siastic dashing around the line,
di*pg his many jobs. Elmer is one
( .Ile old men in the squadron,
t. e started with the squadron
when it was first formed, and no
doubt he will miss his outfit, but
he is getting a break, in that he
is being transferred to his home
state Alabama, and to Marshall
there is no place like Alabama,
no place like home.
The Engineering department
has gained three new officers-
Lts. Ralph G. Young, Chester
Cooper, and Morton L. Levy.
Warrant Officer Staik is at-
tending a course of study at
Chanute Field, Illinois.
Engineering has gained and In-
telligence has lost an Officer, but
we are getting used to this cons-
tant change, as it is an everyday
occurence in all departments.
Cpl. William Barbieri has
completed his examinations for
OCS, and it shouldn't be long
before he will be leaving us for
training. Lots of luck, corporal.
What a time they are having to
get a good system for feeding the
men of the Group without too
much confusion and delay. Each
squadron marched to chow in
formation at a designated time,
and although it reminds us of our
basic training days will work out
satisfactorily if everyone co-
operates. From what is heard if
this system doesn't work, they
will start one that will really be
very bad so perhaps it will pay
us all to try and do our best to
work this one out.
---- -K----- ,
302nd Bombardment Sq.-
By Al Gorman
Our physical training pro:giaLni
is in full swing, and puffing -t I a:
in shorts litter the squadron area
at ten and four. Some of the fel-
lows that bragged the most about
goofing out of exercise since the:,
have been here can be seen sprint-
ing the last hundred yards of-the
run, swinging lustily at the soft
ball, or banging the volley ball
over the net with terrific energy.
The mortal stream ebbs and
flows, and Pvt. George Kohl-
barcher from basic at tent city
joins the intelligence section. -
Two radio men have gone from
our quaint little sparks shack
-Annrick to Birmingham, and
r'msza to Tallahassee. How-
|r, Pfcs Shontz, Azzato, Bar-
\j' Bohn. Byrne. Carlisle.
Combs, Sanders, Seidel, Wall-
ser, and White have come in
to keep the boys company.
-Besides being-moviegoers-'for a
day, we spent an enjoyable morn-
ing or afternoon, as-the case may.
be, being reclassified. We can just
see the clerks going into battle.
First they take position with their,
forms, then they lay down a spit-
Ball barrage and charge forward
u'rling paper clips with deadly
accuracy. By the time the me--
chanized staplers move in, the
battle is over. But they're good
kids just the same.
Things are getting pretty bad
when Neely, Russel, and Gor-
man go to a USO dance and
spend their time cutting in on
the same girl. Barbash managed
fo get to Sulphur Springs and
meet some girls from the blue
grass country, and Mims went
through his usual cut-up rou-
tine in Tampa. If only you'd
flood this office with tales of
various adventures we could
make up a more personal, more
interesting column.


Several new faces are seen in
the Intelligence Section as they
are enlarging their training pro-
gram. Those added so far are Cpl.
Samuel Rudolph, Pfc. Emanuel
L. Gordon and Pvt. Selden I.
Peugh.
Pvt. Joseph Parri left on an
furlough to New York City be-
cause of the serious illness of
his Grandmother.
Quite a change has taken place
in the Day Room. The Orderly
Room personnel moved in the
East end of the building while
the west end is now the Day
Room. The change is a great help
to the clerks as they have so
Much more room now.
Pvt. Wm. Lemming became
the father of an eight-pound
son and left at once on a fif-
teen-day furlough. Congratula-
tions, Pvt. Lemning.
Who was the lovely blonde
with the yellow dress that Pvt.
Ventsias was seen skating with
at the Coliseum?
Lt. Wm. J. Thompson was trans-
ferred from 303rd Intelligence
Section to the same section in
the 302nd Squadron.
*-------*----
304th Squadron News
Sunday, March 11, will live
long in the minds of the 304th
Bomb Sq. An afternoon off, and
a jaunt to Rocky Point, where
beer, sandwiches, swimming and
boating were enjoyed by all.
There were no tablecloths and
_niceties with the usual dose of
ants, but a good old fashioned
picnic replete with beer and
hot dogs. The boys amused
themselves with whatever was
Shandy which turned out to be
boats, a fairly good beach for
swimming, and the athletic
equipment which was brought
along. Also noticed among the
bcys were that a few resembled
Isaac Walton.
Intelligence lost its "wheel," as
the saying goes. 1st Lt. Raymond
.Fahn is among the missing in that
department. He has joined that
new and energetic group, the
339th Bomb Group. However, the
department is consoled in that
it has two swell and capable men,
LI7. Montoya and Moss, who will
-carry on. Best of luck is expressed
.:. Lt. Fahn from the entire 304th
Squadron.


Pvt. Frederick Wyker was a
noticeable loss also; he was trans-
ferred to another outfit some-
". hrire in Florida.

The Three-Thirty-Ninth
The opening of a new PX and
i-h ai rival of double deckers
:'i,,:,,.ght some broad smiles from
the fellows of the 339th Bomb
Group this week. We look with
regret on some of the late comers
to our Group as we're afraid
they'll find the upper bunks more
available but not so easy to get
to.
By the time the ECHOES have
come off the press our new PX
will have opened. And what an
..opening!! We fellows certainly
welcome the new-PX and would


BANK OF


DIAL 7470


not mind it at all of one or two
of the female sex were put in to
sort of give it a feminine touch.
What about that boys???.
SOur Special Service Officer, Lt.
Ashworth, better known about
Drew Field as "Lawrence Tibbet,"
left yesterday for some advance
schooling. We've a suspission why
he had such a smile on his face
just before he-left. Your reporter
has it from the "know" that his
girl friend lives not so far from
where he is attending school. .
Well, who wouldn't smile?
Reports coming back from Lt.
Terry, now DS at Fort Logan,
Colo., have a note of cheerfulness.
He says the weather is fine, school
is fine and the social life is extra
fine.
The past week has seen a lot
of new faces added to the 339th
Bomb Group. We all welcome
them and hope they'll like their
'new' home as much as we do.
Speaking of new faces and trans-
fers Lt. Colburn, Statistical Of-
ficer for the Group, has put in a
requisition for an interpreter to
enable him to classify his new
basics. We can't say we blame
him in the least. .
SIGNS OF THE TIMES .
He who drinks and drinks with
grace,
Is ever welcome at this place,
But he who drinks more than his
share,
Is never welcome anywhere.

482nd Bombardment Sq.
It is farewell and goodbye to
Cpl. to Cpl. Al Sayre and happy
landings from every man in the
482nd. His application for Flying
Cadets has been approved and he
is now on his way. We took great
personal pride in his numerous
ring activities which were in a
measure our victories. While in
the 482nd he won the title of
champion of the 3rd Air Force
Welterweight Division. He will
soon be squaring off with the
Axis in the air and we confi-
dently predict that he will emerge
from the "bouts" still the Cham-
pion. Again we say "Happy Land-
ings, Cpl. Sayre."
While we have lost our cham-
pion boxer, we still have the
champion singer of Drew Field,
our First Sergeant Edgar Craiger.
He has a remarkable singing
voice. He does well with any
S(Continued on Next Page)

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'Page 55


rr~+~++hElhEE~E~r~C~CCCICCCIC ~


k


T----------'-~-' I


April 23, 1943


THE-ECHOES


- 1


WELCOME TO (LEARWATER
A delightful place to spend an hour, a day 1
or a week-end. BATHING -- BEACHING --
FISHING. You haven't seen the West Coast
of Florida until you see Clearwater.
m ~--- .- -.....a.. I.







April 23, 1943


Page 6


(Continued from Preceding Page)
number but his real delight is
Kentucky mountain music. You
should hear him give forth on
"Coming 'Round the Mountain."
How our hearts have longed
for the soft caress of mattresses
such at the ones we had at home.
Every GI has fond dreams, and
maybe even has included the de-
sire (in his -prayers) for such mat-
tresses. Our prayers were answer-
ed last Monday (without the
home). And now Sgt. Craiger
complains that. he can't get 'em
up in the morning. Ah, sweet
Morpheus.
We notice that Sgt. Stupp be-
lieves in the comfort of life being
given the first consideration. He
was observed in a most comfort-
able position while pulling C.Q.
recently. Or maybe he was recu-
perating from the devastating
aftermath of his furlough. It
could be that the rifle range is
.responsible for his condition.
The timely return of our CO,
Lt. Hemphill, probably prevented
a casualty in the 482nd. Even at
that we understand Lt. Bowman
is taking thyroid extract to repair
the damages accruing to his phy-
sical well being after his brief
tenure as the able substitute for
Lt. Hemphill. We wish you a
speedy recovery, Lt., you did a
grand job as Acting.CO.

483rd Bombardment Sq.
Several of the men in this
squadron are going around with
that furlough gleam. I wonder
just how a fellow gets one?
We are putting up double
decker beds and the main discus-
sion at this moment is just who
will sleep in uppers, etc. I believe
that in the summer time it might
be just a bit hot way up thar.
Our versitile gunner, Mike
Comarnisky, is now working with
the communications section and
when last seen was climbing a
pine tree preparing to string' com-
munication lines. -Wonder if he
carried a parachute with him?
Cpl. Botkin has been playing
mother to thr late "Susie's" pups,
and it is 'rumored that most of
them have already found a good
home. _

484th Bombardment Sq.
T/Sgt. Milo E. Briggs is the
484th's new line chief now that
M/Sgt. Edward McFadden has
been transferred to Group Hqs.
Sgt. Briggs has had pleffty of ex-
perience on the line, and is fully
qualified to carry the responsi-
bilities of such an important posi-
tion. Best of luck and congratula-
tions, Milo!
The boys who have been carry-
ing most of the K.P. and guard
load are really happy, to see the
new transfers come in. Can't say
we blame them.
Lt. William A. Greene, supply
officer of this squadron, has taken
a short leave in order to get mar-
ried. Best wishes, lieutenant.
The best one we have heard yet
concerns a certain private in our
squadron. He was in line for a
dental inspection the other day.
All of a sudden he left the line,
went to' the barracks and rushed'
back to the- line. When asked
where he had been he said he
went to the barracks and put in
his false teeth for the inspection.
Beats us.
Lt. Marvin D. Norris, the 484th
Co., has just .returned from Vero
Beach where h; took a ten day
course in dive bombing tactics
under the instruction of Navy
pilots. Lt. Norris say the Navy
boys can really lay those bombs
on the target.
S/Sgt. Leigh V. Freeman, one
of the original members of the
484th cadre, has been transferred
to a combat unit. See you in
Tokyo, Sgt.

S485th Bombardment Sq.
The 485th nobly braved the rain
storm during the past week. First
Sergeant Murray brought along
his birch-canoe and we all had
turns around the Squadron Area.
Don't ask our top-kick where he
got the canoe. That is none of
your business anyway.
We wonder what it is that
makes Corporal Sussmann's eyes
misty when he hears that song,
"I Had the Craziest Dream Last
Night?" There's a story behind
that-but you try to get it out
of Sussmann. He just complacent-
ly smokes his El Ropo, King Size
-looks wise and says noth-
ing.
Judging from the number of
requests for furloughs, spring is
here and the boys are thinking
of heaven and home .or at
any rate they're thinking of home
--well, O.K., they're thinking.
Spring with soft southern breezes
and delicate scents and birds on


the wing and none in the
bush Spring! the Season of
the e'ernal re-awakening of mos-
quitoes and dandelions and asth-
ma.
On reading last week's Drew
Field. ECHOES concerning the
making of another Mo,"ie at Drew,
this remark vwas hurtled into the
midst of an otherwise quiet gath-
ering in one of the barracks. "So.
they want to use this as a back-
Pround for a jungle!! Well-if
they ever film Dante's Inferno
they ought to know iust where
to come!!" Of course the gentle-
man wasn't serious.
Our Adjutant. Lt. James H.
Hayden. has perfecltd a walk-o-
meter. They're available at cost
to anyone who would like to
discover how many miles a day
he walks to keep off an undesir-
able detail! Or. they can be at-
tached to an automobile for dis-
covering how many miles of
Franklin you travel looking for
a place to park. As if anyone had
any tires-let alone gas.

Four-Oh-Fifth
Headquarters
Easter Sunday falls this week-
end, and it will be very interest-
ing to note the boys and their
ladies participating in the Easter
Parade-in sunny Tampa. The boys
have polished their brass, G.I.'d
their uniforms, and polished their
shoes and it seems the girls have
somewhat overcome their clothes-
rationed problems' so that all will
be under way as usual on Easter.
Our golden-voiced tenor, Lt.
Forest B. Stith, will participate
in services at the First Christian
Church. By the way, Lt. Stith is
an excellent tenor with excep-
tional personality and a scholar
of music.
Sgts..Duff and Whitford take
off Thursday (furlough time) for
their respective homes and are
counting the hours for the well-
earned welcome home.
Cpl: (Shorty) Oringer is enjoy-
ing trips to Tampa these days.
His nocturnal visits are becoming
more frequent and we are just
wondering the nature of same.
Now that everyone seems to en-
joy riding rather than hoofing to
town these days we are wonder-
ing if all safety precautions were
considered in the construction of
our bus line. It seems some
thought should be given for safety
doors in the rear of these immense
buses! IF one should turn over
on its right side when loaded with
soldiers thereby blocking exit on
that side, we question how many
could escape injury. How about
a correction?

624th Bombardment Sq.
The question that very often
pops up in the course of conver-
sation amongst soldiers is whether
or not they intend to stay in this
Army after the war is over.
Ninety percent will give you a
very definite NO. In that 10 per-
cent that intends to stay, we have
one, Mike Elizondo. Sgt. Mike is
our propeller specialist and was
an instructor in the 84th for sev-
eral months. He has quite a me-
chanical background, h having
worked on automobile engines for
several years prior to becoming
attached to Uncle Sam. Mike al-
ways had a soft spot in his heart
for airplanes and would like to
follow along these lines after the
war ends. He believes that the
Army affords the best opportu-
nity. We think he will go a long
way. Mike is always studying
something in his spare time in an
effort to' acquire a thorough
knowledge of the flying machine.
His hobby is building model air-
planes and at the present moment
is' working on a miniature dive
bomber which he intends to pre-
sept to the Squadron.
Speaking of hobbies, several of
the boys here in the squadron
have them. Anytime you 'catch
Sgt. Bruce Shown and S:Sgt. Haqs
in deep conversation you can bet
your bottom dollar that they are
discussing pigeocs. Sgt. Vernon
can be seen going through all
sorts of queer exercises in an
effort to build up that physique
of his. Sgt. Beall, our sanitary
engineer spends his spare time
reading the best sellers. Sgt. Man-
ning would pass up a ten dollar
bill to work a cross word puzzle.
Sgts. Tankersley and Fream are
trying their darndest to become
golfers. Sgt. Grimm uses up his
spare time trying to think up a
good excuse why he should have
a three day pass.

625th Bombardment Sq.
By Cpl. Wilbur J. Kuhn
Everything has been quiet and
peaceful at the 625th Bomb Sq.
the past week. The outfit has the
markings of a good fighting team.
We are looking forward to the


time when we will get new men
to complete our squ'1dron person-
nel.
M/Sgt. Fricks, who has been in
the hospital for several weeks,
hopes to be sent back to our
squadron by April 22. We wish
him the best of luck and will be
looking for him.
Cpl. Saul Friedman left -last
week for Michigan, where-he. will
be attending Officers Candidate
School for Provost Marshal. For
the benefit of his friends, we will
post his address as soon as we
hear from him.
Congratulations to Cpl. Kight.
He is now a married man. If his
wife was here we would give him
an old fashion belling.
Red Slumberger, better known
as Sgt. Thomas, is one of our
cooks. He gets a kick out of
throwingg hash in S/Sgt. Griffin's
race. Laying all jokes aside, he is
a meat specialist.
It rained here Sunday in case
you fellows forgot. We understand
that Cpl. Shoup got soaked to the
skin. Why should he be out in the
rain, one might ask?
We are sending our pill chaser,
Cpl. Gallops, home on a furlough
ihis week. We know that he will
have a good time because a cer-
tain somebody has been writing
to him quite often.
We are wondering who we
might see so that we could get
our chow hours changed. Six
o'clock in the evening is rather
late to eat. Until then we will
abide by the rule.

626th Bombardment Sq.
By Cpl. W. H. Cook
The "tall tales" our men are
telling as they return from fur-
lough are something for the book.
Sgt. "Casanova" Gilbert confi-
dentially telling of not. one but
several conquests on the train.
Ah, yes! Seems that fast as one
Damsel would reach her destina-
tion, another was eagerly waiting
for our hero to come forward.
(Editor, please send copy to Mrs.
Gilbert). Sgt. Ciesielski took his
Mrs. home to Wisconsin and re-
turned alone. He is strangely
quiet these days and it could be
that he is thinking up a plan of
attack to use on his next trip to
Tampa. Look out, gals, Barney is
on the prowl.
S/SgL. "Parachute" Kress had
(Coniinued on Next Page)


SERVICE MEN-
Your


Is Located At
801 Florida Ave.
Sears, Roebuck & Company
Tampa, Florida



WHITE ROSE BAR
Paul Webber,-Prop.
LIQUORS, WINES, BEER
AND CIGARS
Cor. Cass and Marion Sts.
Phone 4502


Elliston's Drug Store
Phone H 1645
Fountain Service and Lunches
202 W. Lafayette St., TAMPA


Phones H 1925 H 3141
SODAS--SUNDRIES
2709 MacDill Ave., Tampa, Fla.


Service Men Always Welcome
La Gloria Restaurant
Fine Spanish Food and
Sandwiches
3103 Armenia Ave.
Phone H 33-521

"A GOOD PLACE TO EAT"
POST OFFICE CAFE
C. D. Kavakos, Prop. Dinners,
Plate Lunches, Beer, Wines &
Cold Drinks, Pies and Pastries.
406 Zack Street Tampa, Fla.


I-
SBOB'S OPEN EVENINGS


o ,
Army Store :i

Complete Line Military Supplies For The Needs Of
SERVICE MEN

EXPERT TAILORING
207 E. Lafayette Street Tampa



T T A R 2nd Floor Knight & Wall Bldg.
SE Cor. Lafayette & Tampa Streets.
COOL, CLEAN, COMFORTABLE BED, and Shower Bath, $1.00
You Are Invited to Use Our Reading, Smoking and Wash
Rooms All Day Without Charge.




MADISON DRUG COMPANY
FRANKLIN AND MADISON STREET
Where the Men of the Armed Service Shop and Eat
We Are Anxious to Be of Service


ONE-DAY


SERVICE


EXPERT WATCH REPAIRING


PAUL'S


Watches Diamonds Jewelry .Novelties
Our Motto: "Service Men First"
214 E. LAFAYETTE, NEXT TO MANHATTAN CAFE
OPEN EVERY NIGHT 'TIL 10 P. M.

UNITED OPTICAL DISPENSARY
Manufacturing and Dispensing Opticians
205 ZACK STREET PHONE M 5783
COURTESY DISCOUNT 20 PERCENT
Prescriptions Filled-Lenses Duplicated


Lafayette Hotel
E. A. CLAY, Manager
120 West Lafayette Street
East Side of Bride


Phone M 5588


Tampa, Fla.


CE
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NTRA OIL


NTRAL O .
MANY, I .


Tampa, Florida


'ida Avenue at
Twiggs St.


Service Men Welcome


ELITE CIGAR STORES
'The Sport Headquarters of Tampa'
WINE BEER CIGARS
400 Zack Phone M 62-072
207 Twiggs Phone M-1236


Learn to Dance Correctly
BY ONE WHO KNOWS
MAKES ONE GRACEFUL
PRIVATE LESSONS
Selma Brooks 17ears
TEL. H 32-654 207 PARKER St.


GASPARILLA TAVERN
COLONIAL GRILL


Rex Billiard Parlor
Daniel S. Bagley

1012 FRANKLIN
TAMPA FLORIDA


T. W. RAMSEY
LUMBER COMPANY
We Specialize In
Mill Work & Cabinets
We can furnish material for
hRepalr and F. I. A, Loanv
Phone Y 1219 17th St. & th Ave


HORNE'S PHARMACY H l Ho Flor
SCompleterDrg Store Hotel Hillsboro
j C Service .. MARTIN C. McNIEL, Manager


~B~i-u~-~-----r


~_~Y (___j~ __~_ ~~_~_


THE ECHOES






Anril 23. 1943


(Continued from Preceding Page)
a few tall yarns to rate but very
little bragging. Don't slip on us,
Kress.
It won't be long now before our
officers and the "wheels" will be
returning from Orlando. We have
our fingers crossed, wondering
what dire things they are thinking
up for us to do.upon their return.
Fellows of the 405th should drop
around PX No. 10 once in a while.
Some good men of the 626th are
working there in the evenings
Brother. I mean work.
In the Beer Department is Cpl.
W. H. "Budweiser" Malley. Down
in the Sandwich Dept. is Cecil
"Roast Pork" Magouyrk. In the
soft drink department (of all
things) you will find the writer
slinging the Pepsi Cola around
and farther down the counter is
to be found Peter "Candy Bar"
Flynn. Come around, fellows, and
name your poison.
Sgt. Billy "Rockefeller" Ellis is
getting writer's cramps these days
writing checks on his bank ac-
count -Billy is the financial
genius of this outfit. Our chow
has been exceptionally good for
the past few days. Should be; the
626-h cooks are doing the cooking
-rA of the time.
'- -
627th Bombardment Sq.
After a peaceful twelve day
interval-Strange Interlude-the
soporific calm of the barracks was
shattered this week by the re-
turn of Cpl. Bill Derkacz, the
"Manchester Madman," from fur-
,lough. Built like a fire hydrant,
Bill "fears no man." One of his
more cute stunts is rolling this
correspondent out of the bunk
while said scribe .is trying to
collect a little "shut-eye." For-
sooth, we find no peace. Though
it's good to have him back. Red
blood, you know.
Carl Johnson, the whispers say,
will return from his three-day
pass no longer a Benedict. In
short, he'll be eligible for a Class
A allotment. Indirect, what?
CaSualty: It's a beautiful day
in Tampa-the clouds dot the blue
like puffs of cottonballs the
grass is green (as is the corn) and
the 627th is in the midst of a
terrific softball game-the score
is tied and one man is out-Sgt.
"Pappy" Pappalardo hits a bullet-
drive to right field. The second
baseman, an unreformed soccer
layer, kicks the "blooper" around
he infield as Pappy (sawed-off
edition of Babe Ruth) rolls down
to second base in low gear. As
the afternoon air tilled with
shouts of anguish (so terribly,
terribly sad), Pappy, cursed with
a sudden inspiration, starts to
slide. 0 sad day! The sun wept
and the trees drooped lower, for
when the dust cleared, there was
our valiant Pappy stretched out
6h the ground-with an injured
ankle. At the moment Pap is
roosting up in the hospital, a
"beatific smile" on his pleasant
face. Carry on, Pappy.
Jottings: the local bookmakers
were surprised when Sgt. Elmer
Taylor turned out to be the little
man who was there. Earle re-
sembling a wilted lily these days
as his bosom (metaphorically) pal,
Cpl. Erwin Finstad, has gone on
furlough.
Where's the Anthropologists
Cpl. Ramiro Cos" a gives lie to the
theory that man requires two legs
for locomotion. Yet, with our own
eyes we saw him waltz into the
barracks on one leg. The darkness,
we grant, may have distorted our
vision. It WAS late-or early, if
you prefer.


fecial Invitations to All
Service Men

LEN'S BILLIARDS
Now In Its New Location
805 TAMPA ST.


VICTOR CAFE
BEER WINES
1324 Franklin Ph. M-7240
BILL BAILEY, Prop.
Member V.F.W. & Am. Legion


"I've fried to be Red, White and
Blue
To the boys at MacDill and Drew,
When the money is lax, I charge
no tax,
This is surely the place for youl"

M. MILLER'S BAR
1111 FLORIDA AVE. Ph. M 7215
ER' W-- WI


59th AVIATION SO. (SEP)

DISH'N DIRT
By Pfc. William A. Norris
On the night of April 10th a
farewell party was given in honor
of Cpl. James J. Mitchell, your
ex-scribe, who has left us for
OCS at Fort Benning, Georgia.
Quite a number of celebrities
were present. Pfc. and Mrs. Frank
Aaron acted as hosts. Present
were the Honoree; F/Sgt. Calvin
S. Spinner; S/Sgts. Lester Adams,
Dennis D. Green, Frank Barnaba
Jr., and Ernest Henderson; Sgt.
James C. Gray; Cpls. Eddie Lizz-
more, Joseph H. Morris-on, Harry
E. Thayer, James B. Witsell, and
Vincent J. Tutson, T/5th Frank
Stephens; Pfcs. Levy L. Byrd and
Donnie L. Underwood, who were
all accompanied by some of the
lovelier young ladies of Tampa.
A fine time was had by all.
FLASH There's cause for
celebration. On the 16th of this
month some new promotions were
announced, and we have in our
midst some new NCO's.. Sgts.
Fletcher and Gray were promoted
to S/Sgt; Cpls. Williams and
Tutson to Sgt; Pfcs. Braynon,
Dillon, Speight, and Tarver, to
Cpl. You fellas have gained these
promotions retain them .
keep on the ball.
All the fellas of the 59th Avn.
Sq. who attended the picnic wish
to thank the Officers responsible
for the outing. The picnic was
held at Rocky Point two weeks
ago, where the men participated
in fishing, swimming, boat riding,
and dart throwing. Refreshments
were served in abundance.

3rd F. C. HQ. & HQ. SO.

SEA BREEZES
By Pfc. Alvin M. Amster
Memo to First Sgt. Gosselin-
what's the latest on the wash
machines and irons? When is the
date of our Sq. party? The men
are forever asking "Winchell"
Amster for the latest.
Oddest oddity Sgt. Earl
"Mother" Duncan and Sgt. Ed
"Week-End Shackman" Knippers
washing their dirty duds and then
ironing them.
A joint welcome to the new Hq.
additions, Lt. Col. Greene, Lt.
Oestrich, and Warrant Officer
Lien. Also to those new clerks
from. Los Angeles and Ft. Logan,
Colo.
Best-Saying-of-the-Week Dept:
T/Sgt. Dale Minnick, "Whitley
and I will hire out as gigolos for
all women who have a minimum
of five bucks in .their purses."
Hot Dots
Any truth to the rumor about
Castner and Gladys? Iris keeps
the Sq. wolves away from sister
Martha... Tom Carlton marching
time until he surrenders his ton-
sils to the M.D. .'Bill Sanders
put the engagement ring on that
Tampa gal's finger.
John "Wolf" Wilson rated an
Ironing Certificate from the Tam-
pa Laundry Institute Sq.
alumnus Russ Wapensky visited
us with his Aerial Gunner's Wings
and Sgt. chevrons. Willoughby
also looking for a gal with a car
and "C" book. (Ain't we all?)


ALWAYS SAY ...

HOLSUM BREAD

EXTRA FRESH


AIR BASE BUS

LINES, Inc.

BUS STATION
Corner Tampa & Cass Streets



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Fields at All Hours


15-Minute Service

During Rush Hours




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CALL 4243
.1 1 "" 1 I "'."-- : .


THE ECHOES


SIGNAL HEADQUARTERS
III Fighter Command
By Pfc. Roy Swartz
Best of luck to Sgt. Shuey who
takes the vows Easter Sunday.
Latest trade was, made by Varnell
and Jones, who traded in their
green fatigues for "whites" of the
kitchen... Poor Nordquist has his
troubles; this time his wife puts
him on an allotment plan. Best
laugh of.the week was on H. D.
Johnson. He lined up to buy
seventeen theatre tickets for him-
self and his buddies but forgot to
get the one for himself. .. "Whis-
pering Joe" Konfrst and Galla-
pher spent Sunday night in Tam-
pa-by request!
SIDE GLANCES
Taking a cross section of the
company on a typical Tuesday
evening we find: Sgt. Queen and
Cpl. Russworm preparing for their
evening maneuvers. .. Coonrod
and Coleman deeply involved in
a game of "8 ball" at the Day-
room, while Sczurek is showing
Cliff Wise a few of the finer
points in the game of Ping Pong.
Sgt. Pittman and McGuckin sit-
ting on the steps of B-8 and lis-
tening to the tales of Cpl. Stone
and Belanger, about progress of
their new outfit... Babb lying on
his bunk and enjoying a hand of
solitaire. Krause pounding out
a letter on the typewriter and
explaining how he can think bet-
ter with a typewriter in front
of him. Cpl. Hogenson and G.
C. Johnson eating ice cream and
telling of the interesting show
they just saw.
911th Q. M.
ON THE BALL
Sgt. Simmons Speaks:
Dan Cupid, that busy little ras-
cal, is shooting his arrow truer
these Spring days, with Sgt. Ryan
the object. T/5th Gr. Theodore
Robinson (the amazing Double
Clutch) needs a rest. He wi-ks
so hard doing nothing that a com-
plete breakdown is imminent.
How about a furlough for him,
Sgt. Ford?
Poor little Whitney, the den-
tist's delight, lost all his teeth
which left him in an awful plight.
It's rumored that the 1018th QM
boys have found themselves an
exclusive section of Tampa and
named it "1018 Alley." Nice seeing
Sgt. Furgerson around and well
again. Pfc. C. Jackson is so quiet
upon returning from town that
he is going to be rewarded in the
near future. Pfc. Quinten Stanley
is so bitten by the love bug (she
works in the PX) that the man-
ager of the PX removed one of
the posts under the counter and
Stanley is now substituting. Pvt.
Charlie McKinnon is doing alright
hv his title "Drink 'Em Up."
Wonder if he knows what day it
is. T/5 Gr. Luther Woodard is in
the steel-wool market this season,
with T/5 Fred Davis giving him
competition.


Welcome Soldiers!

"TAMPA'S ONLY
MUSICAL BAR"

Hear Your Favorite Songs


CHESTERFIELD BAR
CASS & TAMPA STREETS


on Hillsborough Bay
Try the Best in Food
FINEST LIQUORS
DANCING EVERY NITE
22nd Street Causeway
Phone Y1715
PRIVATE DINING ROOMS


"COVNPA4R HAIr.
FAIi OUT FIvE
MINUTES."


IP-,;


"I'VE BUY
IONGiNlG FOP
Ttl;i WO4NWT."


BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY BY
TAMPA COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY



TERRACE


i GIFT &-ilowet op

PRESENTS
THE EASTER PARADE
OF FLOWERS
By Wire or By Presentation
PHONE 3022 M 5561


BAY VIEW


HOTEL


FIREPROOF CONSTRUCTION-EVERY ROOM WITH BATH
COFFEE SHOP IN CONNECTION
W. B. SHULER, Manager
208 JACKSON ST., Between FRANKLIN & TAMPA
TAMPA, FLORIDA PHONE M 5537


SERVICE MEN ALWAYS WELCOME ...
BAY VIEW COFFEE SHOP
Entrance from Lobby of the Bay View Hotel
Good Food Reasonable Prices
Private Dining Room for Company or Private Parties
A la Carte Service Open 7 a.m. to 11:30 p.m.
208 Jackson Street, Between Frahklin and Tampa Streets


FRANK RUTTA, CHEF-
Formerly chef at Montrose Restaurant,
Broadway and 48th, New York, came to Flor-
ida, got sand in his shoes and now has
opened his own place at


"6Soldlerm -'nvorite Ealinx I'Plae"
STREAK< AN#) CHOPSl'~
& SPIIICIriyT
E LPflI T E
ELITE
RT"ATIlEANT'
TAMPA AND TWIC.GS STS.


- Fv..


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ASKI r"E WAC
''** f.


Page 7


A OOVdNY G 1S;
FOP A PAUS! 'AD 4AN 'tE COlE
CUCA t-C"A.


c 2'


CRENSHAW'S
(Wholesale)
FRUITS :-: VEGETABLES
Phone 28


A


5,


~p~B







Page E --1-


Drew Nine Downs

MacDill in Tight

Pitchers' Battle

Drew Field's Signal Corps base-
ball team was carried 10 innings
last Sunday by the MacDill Fliers
before they finally won out, 4-3,
on the MacDill Field diamond.
For nine innings Vito Tamulis
of Drew, former major league
pitcher, and Lefty Janieck, of
MacDill, hooked up in a heated
mound duel during which Tamulis
fanned 14 and Janieck 13.
In the fateful tenth, Morris of
Drew started the winning rally
with a single. Reedy followed
w'th another to right. And Joe
Sa ,ino sent what proved to be
the winning tally across the plat-
ter with a sharp single through
the center of the infield to score
Morris from second. MacDill
failed to score in their half of the
tenin.
MacDill bunched their hits to
sco e all their runs in the fifth
inmng on a pair of doubles by
O'Brien and Kranenberg and sin-
gles by Murphy and Eiche.
The Signaleers picked up two
runs in the eighth to put the ball
game back on even terms after the
Fliers had gone out in front, 3-1,
in the fifth. Singles by Hogan
and Toomin, along with a two-
base error by the left fielder who
dropped Morris' long, looping
drive, sent two runs across the
plate.
Both pitchers kept the hits well
scattered as they bore down all
the way, with MacDill leaving 11
men stranded on the bases and
Drew nine.
Petite, Morris and Reedy led
the attack for the Signaleer nine
with tw.o hits apiece, while Eiche,
Murphy and Kranenberg managed
a pair apiece for the Fliers.
Pitching his second game of the
season for the Signaleers. Vito
Tamulis increased his strikeout
total to 28 in two games: In his
first appearance of the season at
Lakeland he got 14 by the strike-
out route and added 14 more in
the -MacDill game. Tamulis
pitched for the Brooklyn Dodgers
and the St. Louis Browns before
entering the Army.
Sunday's game was the second
straight win of the season for the
Drew nine, as it defeated the Food,
Machinery nine of Lakeland, 9-2
last week in Lakeland.
The Signaleer team will meet
the Inter-Social league All-Stars
at Cuscaden Park Saturday.
Score by innings:
Drew --__-- -100 000 020 1-4
MacDUl- _-______000 030 000 0-3

Open Calendar
The Tasco Shipyard softball
teams would like to arrange
games with any team at Drew that
desires to play. The Shipyard has
quite a number of teams ready to
go and would like any team wish-
ing to play them to contact the
Public Relations Office at the Tas-
co Shipyard.

'Soldiers Always Welcome

EL BOULEVARD
RESTAURANT
F.~EST SPANISH FOODS--BEST
OF XIQUORS 2001 Nebraska


Al Service Men Are Welcome
Barcelona Cafe
SPANISH RESTAURANT
WINES AND LIQUORS
Phone 8 2142 Open All Night
4714 Nebraska and. Osborne


A b&NS--NMONIi TO LEND
Dianumonds Watches Jewelrp
Silverware
Diasmonda at -- HitK airln
A. L ECKART
409 Tampa Stree4


Drew Sport-o-Graphs. .


ALL- PI.Ar v,/ri


C~LI 13A -PA"p-


LrJAMS&1 VA'J SsrNs"
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Sport Shorts
By Pfc. Delwin Baggett
Drew Field nas come up for
the second straight season with a
winning baseball team. The team
this year is sponsored by the
Signal Corps and will be under
the direction of that command.
The team is coached and man-
aged by Lt. Chet Thomas, former
Class B player of the Piedmont
league.
Vito Tamulis, former Brooklyn
Dodger and St. Louis Brown
hurler, is the leading moundsmen
for the Signaleers and has come
through with two fine pitching
performances in his first two
starts of the season. Against Food
Machinery of Lakeland, a semi-
pro outfit, Tamulis sent 14 back
to the bench via the strikeout
route. In his other start against
MacDill, he collected the same
amount for a total of 28 in two
games.
Other outstanding ball players
making up this year's team are
Homer Johnson and Morris, both
professional players in the minors.
Semi-pro players are Petite,
Petite, Reedy, Savino, Brown,
Staiger and Hogan. With this fine
material on hand, Drew should
have one of the outstanding serv-
ice nines in this section.


player with Northeastern College,
Boston, Massachusetts.
Ed, as he is known to the ball
players; was one of the most valu-
able men on Lt. Arthur Colley's
fine basketball team at Drew.
Playing in every game, Ed spark-
plugged the team to many of its
victories.
Although basketball is his first
love, Ed played first base on his
high school and college teams and
was also a member of the football
team.
Shooting in the 80's, Ed plays
a gobd game of golf and likes the
links as a hobby.
A slim 6 feet, 3 inches, the well-
built athlete has the character
and heart characteristic of our
American soldiers.
Ed is stationed with Hq. & Hq.
Sq., Third Fighter Command,
where he is a clerk.
We salute a fine athlete!

JANGLE
Two veterans were boasting
about their old outfits. "Why, our
company was so well drilled,"
said one, "that when we presented
arms, all you could hear was a
slap, click."
"Pretty fair," said the other.
"But when our company present-
ed arms, you could hear only
slap, slap, jingle."
"Jingle?" said the other. "What


Another big Army Boxing Show did that?"
will be put on about May 3rd "Oh, just our medals."
with the leading fighters from -- ---
Drew, MacDill and Third Air NO COMMENT
Force participating in the all- Marriage is popular because it
soldier card. It will beone of the combines .the maximum of temp-
regular monthly fight shows at nation with the maximum of op-
the Municipal Auditorium under portunity.-Bernard Shaw.
the direction of Third Air Force,
with all proceeds going to the
athletic funds of the three fields. FERNANDEZ

Softball and Volleyball are now REST A A T
being played by a large number K AU A
of men as a recreation sport. Soc- Onban Sandwiches A Specilty
cer and basketball also holds a
big following for a large number 1216 Franlk]n St.
of men. In the near future soft-
ball and volleyball leagues will OOWNSEND
be organized to create competi-
tion and more interest i intra- Sash Door 0
mural sports. & Lumber Co.
Drew Signal baseball team will
meet the Inter-Social All-Stars LUMBER & MILLWORK, ROOFING
at Cuscaden Park on April 24 at AND PAINT-FHA LOANS
5 p.m. And Tampa U., at Mac- PHONE H4891
farlane Park, on April 29th at N. Rome and Fuller Street
4 o'clock.
m..


Portrait of An Athlete
Cpl. Ed Sitarz, a member of
the Drew Field basketball team
during 1942, was a former varsity


HI, FELLOWS! Meet Your Buddies at-

GEORGE'S BILLIARD PARLOR
SNOOKER AND POCKET BILLIARDS
We Also Carry a Complete Line of
.Billiard Supplies
.2222 E. Broadway Ybor City


HENRY HOWKEE CO.
Chinese Hand Laundry

Satisfaction Guaranteed
504 Tyler St. Tampa Fla.


KNIG H T BROS.
,PAPER CO.
612 Bell Phones 4205 4204
"A Paper for Every Purpose"


Flash! Want To

Make Long Distance

Telephone Call!
"The Right Answer or Else,"
Drew Field's own quiz radio
show (WDAE, 8:3018:53 p.m.,
Monday evenings) has eliminat-
ed the usual cash award made
to the winner.
In its stead, two absolutely
free five-minute telephone calls
to any part of the United States
are made possible for the win-
ners of both this show and
those who appear in an im-
prompiu get-together after the
program is off the air. So hop
over to Recreation Building
No. 1 Monday night early and
become cne of the contestants,-
and win a free telephone call
to any part of the United States.


BUY WAR BONDS!


Max's Liquor Bar -
WINES LIQUORS CIGARS,
FREE DELIVERY SERVICE
1601 E. COLUMBUS DR.
PHONE Y-1281.
-Keep 'Fm Flying-


McAskill Music Stores
Radios and Repaiing
Sound and Inter Communicating
Systems
Authorized Capehart and Scott
Radio Service
1116 Grand Central
Phone H-3787

SEMINOLE
SOUVENIR & JEWELRY CO.
COMPLETE LINE OF
CURIOS--GIFTS
WRAPPED FOR MAILING
107 E. Lafayette Street

EAT
HENDERSON
BAKING 0 0. *

BREAD
.a TnImO A V1i.

"THE HOME OF GALLONS"
Berger & Rachelson
INC.
WHOLESALE GROCERS
HOTEL, RESTAURANT AND
BAKERS SUPPLIES

4. 4.
WELCOME SOLDIER!
"Where Your Fun Is Our Fun"

The S. M. S. BAR
Formerly "The Wonder Bar"
1210 FRANKLIN ST.


EASTER FLOWERS
ORDER EARLY
Wired Anywhere in the U. S. A.



llat^-i s w :san-t: s-triw,'H e [


"SLIP-EEZ"
CANVAS
LOCKER
SANDALS 5c
To Wear Under the Shower
To Prevent Athlete's Foot
For Use in Barracks-They
Store Easily in a Knapsack.
A. S. BECK
Shoes For Men
508 FRANKLIN STREET


STAR KOSHER
DELICATESSEN
,All kinds of Herring.
Smoked Fish. Kosher Wines.
We Carry a Complete Line of
PASSOVER PRODUCTS
Open Till 11 P.M.
805 Gr. CentraL Ph. H 29-842
men...... _


MAAS

BROTHERS



OFFICIAL ARMY

EXCHANGE

SERVICE









.4 1I

*r-;: ^M


EVERYTHING

FOR THE

MILITARY



JUST INSIDE

OUR

FRANKLIN ST.

ENTRANCE


WELCOME TO

HOTEL KNOX
TOM BRYSON, Manager
Lafayette & Jefferson Street


CULP LUMBER CO.
'Everything to Build Anything'
Millwork Made to Order
500 PACKWOOD
Phone H1862 -:- TAMPA


"Flowers Telegraphed Back
Home Under Bonded Service"

NELSON
"THE FLORIST"
Open 9 A.M. to 5:30 P.M.
Closed Sundays
514 TAMPA STREET


SWhite W
LAUNDRY- ,
S2806 ARMENIA AVE.
Phone H-3898 i

Groceries Tobacco Candy,
Notions

Adams Kennedy
Whiting and Jefferson Streets
TAMPA, FLORIDA


The Tavern Bar & Grill]
HOT AND COLD LUNCHES
Spaghetti a Specially
311 Franklin St. Phone 3940
LIQUORS-BEER-WINES


VALENCIA GARDEN
Restaurant
WE SERVE THE FINEST OF
SPANISH FOODS..
811 Grand Central Ph. H 3773


THE ECHOES


April 23, 1943


10- It


I




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