Title: Drew Field echoes
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076231/00043
 Material Information
Title: Drew Field echoes
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Post Exchange
Place of Publication: Tampa Fla
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida -- Tampa   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Drew Field Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa -- Drew Army Airfield
Coordinates: 27.975556 x -82.533333 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: "Published each Friday in the interest of the officers and enlisted men of Drew Field."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 39 (Dec. 2, 1943).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076231
Volume ID: VID00043
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24622561
lccn - sn 93063705

Full Text

















VOL. 1, No. 44 Published Every Week Drew Field, Tampa, Florida January 8, 1943





LOCAL BANK TO 0PEN BRANCH HERE


* *


* *k *


New War Bond System Cuts Waiting Time


b ew Men Now


Buying War Bonds


At a Steady Pace


:Drew Field officials have put
into operation the War Depart-
ment's new streamlined method
of issuing War Bonds through
the Class "A" Reservation Plan.
Under the new system, bonds
will be in the hands of Drew
Field buyers much quicker than
in the past. Red tape has been
slashed, short cuts taken, and ci-
vilians working on the post have
had their bond-buying method
divorced from that of the Army
personnel.
Military personnel who hold
Class "A" pay reservations will
continue to receive bonds from
the Treasury Department in
Washington. However, civilians
will get their bonds direct from
the Finance Officer at the Fi-
nance Office of Drew Field.
This will save time because it
will relieve the congestion at the
Washington end where formerly
all such pay reservation pur-
chases were cleared.
Bonds can also be purchased at
the new branch bank of the com-
bined U. S. Treasury and First
National Bank of Tampa, located
on I Ave., between First and Sec-
ond Streets. in Bldg. T-192.
Two Million Soldiers Now
Buying Bonds
Although no quotas have ever
been set and there is no pressure
upon them to do so, nearly 2,000,-
000 soldiers, from privates to
generals, now are buying ap-
proximately $13,000,000 in War
Bonds every payday, the War De-
partment reports.
As of September 30, 1942, there
were 1,619.257 enlisted men and
officers buying War Bonds
through the Army payroll reser-
vation plan, with total monthly
deductions of $11,154,819.
On the basis of the September
reports, the War Department Fi-
nance Office estimated that, as of
October 31, 1942, the number of
military subscribers to the pay
ervation plan had mounted to
D,621, with total deductions
(-$13,145.072.
The new streamlined method
of issuing War Bonds is expected
to aid in the increase of sales.
----- -----
All-Soldier Revue,
'Hullaballoo from Drew'
Rounding Into Shape

The all-soldier revue, "Hulla-
tailoo from Drew," is fast whip-
Sping into shape with rehearsals
well under way. Some of the men
already cast in major parts in the
revue are Sgt. O. Z. Whitehead,
J ohn Hession, Cpl. Charles
Craine, Cpl. Earl Powell, Cpl.
Tommy Searles, Pfc. Harry Ev-
ans, Pfe. Anthony Caparilli, and
Pvt. Harold Waldridge.
There is still time, however,
for men who, are interested in
being- in the revue to come out
and display their wares, either
as singers, dancers or actors. All
you have to do is get in touch
,-:1- thn nPcial Services Office
and leave your name and organi-
zation number.


Billy Keen and His Rodeo

To Ride Here On Sunday


Laundry Service

For Drew Soldiers

An improved laundry service
is now in operation at Drew Field
with the collecting and distribut-
ing point in building T-152 across
the street from the main post
exchange.
Through arrangements com-
pleted between Drew Field au-
thorities and the Tampa Laundry
and Dry Cleaning Institute, the
Loilowing rules will govern:
1. All laundry must be in a
barracks or laundry bag.
2. Tne individual's name and
serial number must be plainly
printed on the outside of the bag.
3. All laundry and dry clean-
ing will be paid when it is deli-
vered.
4. Laundry and dry cleaning
slips will be printed plainly and
made in duplicate.
5. The original slip must be
placed in top of the bag.
6. The duplicate slip will be
retained by the individual and
us"d in making any claims.
7. All claims will be made
within seven days after receipt
of the bundle.
8. Laundry and dry cleaning
must be called for within one
week after it is left.
Units too far away should as-
semble and turn in bulk with
tickets. It is hoped to open an-
other collection point in the
AWUTC area.


"Ride 'im, cowboy!"
Galloping right into the Drew
Field outdoor arena on Sunday
afternoon, January 10, at three
o'clock, with an exciting and in-
teresting program of daring
horsemanship, trick roping, and
jumping, Billy Keen and his Ro-
deo will present something new
in entertainment for Drew Field
men.
nithough Keen is himself a
one-man show, he is not coming
alone. He is bringing with him
a fine combination of riders,
ropers, and trick performers.
r'or quite some time Keen, well
known in rodeo circles, has been
the champion trick rider of the
world. He has traveled all over
the country as a participant in
most of the big contest rodeos on
the circuit. His skill on the back
of a horse is astonishing. Among
other daring feats, his Roman
jump with two horses is quite
sensational.
Also outstanding is the bare-
back jump over a four- foot
hurdle, to be performed by a
Drew Field soldier, Private Nat
Arvin, a former rodeo performer.
He will also illustrate how to
rope a horse and trick riding.
Paste the dale in your hat, sol-
dier-Sunday. January 10, at 3
o'clock in the afternoon--the
place, the outdoor arena.

Fre Recordings Made
At Drew Service Club


I Since Tuesday afternoon, the
Service Club has featured a new


__ idea for Drew Field. The Pepsi-i
Listen, Ye Artists!! Cola Company has set up a voice
Listen, Ye rtrecording apparatus. From 4:30
Make yourselves known! Come to 10:00 p.m., every day except
in and let us know what you can Sundays, free recording of the
do. Want to do murals? Want to voices of the Enlisted Men will
do posters, or drawings, or water be made to send home to the
colors? We need them and have folks, or to the girl friend. Every-
places to hang your finished thing is free, including the post-
work on the base. Don't be bash- age.
ful; come in and get back into If you want your friends to
the swing of drawing and paint- hear you speak your own greet-
ing arain. See Lt. Sarkin in the ings, no matter where they are,
Special Services Office, Bldg. visit the Service Club and have
T-2i2. a record made.


ECHOES TO GET FACE LIFT
Next week the Drew Field
Echoes will -come out with a
brand-new mast head. The
original mast head, originally
designed for a single-page edi-
tion, has not progressed with


Banking Facilities


Made Available tor


Personnel of Drew


the growth of the rest of the Plans for opening a branch
paper. The drawing, made by bank at Drew Field were an-
Pvt. Ed Solomon, staff artist, nounced Wednesday by Colonel
will be more in keeping with Melvin B. Asp, commanding of-
the size and quality of the ficer of Tampa's rapidly expand-
paper. ing air base. With the building
and fixtures for the use of this
P-40 Fighter Planes institution receiving the finishing
touches now, the opening of the
Known as 'Warhawks' bank will be an event of the
coming week. This facility will
bring to Drew Field a complete
From now on you can call the banking service and prove a de-
P-40 fighter planes you see taking cided convenience to the military
off and landing at Drew Field personnel of the field.
"Warhawks."
In order that the general pub- The United States Treasury and
lic may get a better idea ot the :he First National Bank of Tam-
olanes mentioned in press dis- ,a are cooperating in supplying
patches from the battlefields of such services to Drew Field mili-
the world, the Army and Navy ary personnel. In general, the
have officially recognized the branch will furnish the same
popular names which have be- banking facilities as the down-
come associated with the various own bank. It will be located in
models. 31dg. T-192 on "I" Avenue be-
Since many of these planes tween First and Second streets
have earned fame, it was felt and will be open between 12:09
that this practice should be main- noon and 5:30 p. m. daily (except
trained rather than attempt to Sunday).
plant new and perhaps conflict- Mr. Byron O. Webb and Mrs.
ing names in the minds of the Margaret B. Lee will be in charge
civilian population. Certain minor of the branch. Mrs. Lee's husband
changes have been made, as in is a member of the military forces
the instance of the Curtiss P-40 now in Africa.
series which has been known va- Services which will be provid-
riously as the "Tomahawk" and ed include the opening and car-
"Kittyhawk," but will now be rving of individual accounts.
known only as the "Warhawk." There will be no exchange charge
The P-40 planes have gained for the cashing of checks for mili-
renown in dogfights over the tary personnel upon proper iden-
Philippines, the East Indies, Aus- tification except for out-of-town
tralia and more recently over checks. Each account will be sub-
North Africa. Most of the P-40 ject to scrutiny, for which there
fighter planes at Drew are from may be an analysis charge de-
the Third Fighter Command, pending upon the size of the ac-
.ommanded by Brig. Gen. A. H.
''l1eson. (Continued on Page 2)


Parachute Riggers at Drew Field

Find Their Jobs Very Exacting


In ttha above picture a parach ute is shown landing in a drop-
test while a ground observer looks on.
Parachute rigging calls for ac- are all civilians and all are
curacy, close and keen observa- wcmen except the manager, Mr.
tion, and absolute alertness at all Ciharies C. Webb. Before coming
times. The Drew Field force is here, the parachute riggers were
proud of the fact that its work -iven an intensive seven-weeks
nas been absolutely perfect. :ourse in the Defense Training
In 1-keping with the idea that school at Orlando, were skilled
men should be used for combat ':r my sergeants taught them how
wor'- as far as possible. the work- o do the job the Army way.
ers in the base parachute shop (Continued on Page 7)


a~c





Page 2


I r t I Inspector


SIntroducing the "Bas '-Administrative Inspector
and Staff.

S9.


DREW FIELD ECHOES


'counts up to $5000 wiv be-insured 'months, -may apply'foir' xaimiria-"
for the total amount of the ac- tion for appointment as Warrant
count. IOfficers. These men must be ad-
Other services include the sale ministrative or technical special-
of war bonds and stamps, bank ists, and be equipped to perform
money orders and traveler checks. the various specialized duties of
Loans will not be made, however, a Warrant Officer.
In the event a large amount of Warrant Officers are not ap-
cash is to be drawn by an organ- pointed from civil life except in
ization or an individual, the bank the classifications "Maritime" and
manager must be given 24 hours' "Maritime Engineer" and the
prior notice. several classifications of the
For cashing checks or drafts Army Mine Planter Service which
drawn on banks outside of Tampa are sometimes made direct from
the charge will be 10c for $1.00 civil life but these, too, usually
to $25.00; 15c for $25.00 to $50.00; are made from the ranks of en-
and 25c for $50.00 to $100.00. For listed men.
more than $100.00 there will be
a charge of 25c per $100.00. Bank A4
money orders will be sold at the MONEY LOANED
same rate listed above for cash- O ANYTHING OF VALUE
ing checks.TAMPA LOAN CO.

Army Scans Enlisted "TA OLESTAND
S90 S FRANKLIN STREETRAL"
Personnel for Warrant 50 FRANKLIN STREET
Officer Material SERVICE MEN-

A number of temporary ap- Your


January 8, 1943


, -4


The post of the Base Administrative Inspector is one of the most
important on Drew Field. Standing, discussing phases of the work
wilth ihis staff of assistants, is the B a s.e Administrative .Inspector,
Major Clarence W. Ziska, of Bedford, Ohio. Seated at the left is Lt.
Woodrow W. Jones, of Greetisboro, North Carolina; at the right,
front, Lt. R. E. Mitchell, of Cleveland, Ohio, and, rear, Lt. Arthur
F. Evans, of Brooklyn, New York.
Charged with the responsibility course there he was commis-
of seeing that all administrative sioned a second lieutenant.
procedures conform strictly to After spending three weeks as
Army regulations, the Base Ad- Squadron Statistical Officer of
miniistrative Inspector handles the 311th Fighter Squadron at
one of the most important jobs Dale Mabry Field, Tallahassee,
on the base. The post at Drew he was assigned to Drew Field
.Field is filled by Major Clarence again and placed in the Base Ad-
W. Ziska, of Bedford, Ohio. His ministrative Inspector's office.
duties, of course, entail concern On November 26, 1942, he was
at all times with almost every commissioned a first lieutenant.
phase of Army activity on the air Upon graduating from North
base. Carolina State College in 1937,
Major Ziska's Army career Lt. Jones was commissioned a re-
dates -back to the summer of 1918 serve officer. On June 2, 1940, he
when he was a private in the was commissioned a first lieu-
29th Engineers. After the war he' tenant and was called to active
enlisted in the 112th Engineers duty at Drew Field, October 15,
Regiment of the Ohio National 1942. Before assuming his pres-
Guard, in which he served as a ent position he was Base Claims
private and non-com until March and Boards Officer.
1, 1929, when commissioned as a Lt. Mitchell, who graduated
second lieutenant. He was Assist- from the University of Illinois in
ant Supply Officer from January Tune, 1942, was commissioned a
1, 1931, until called into active second lieutenant in the Air\
service on October 15, 1940, with Corps on June 8, 1942, after com-
the 37th Division at Camp Shel- pleting a four-year ROTC course.
by, Mississippi. There he was ap- He was sent to Drew Field and
pointed as S-4 to the Regimental served several months as Assist-
Commander's Staff. He held the ant Exchange Officer. On Decem-
position of Regimental Supply ber 4.. 1942. he was commissioned
Officer until his transfer to Drew first lieutenant.
Field on December 10, 1941. He The enlisted men who function
was commissioned first lieuten- as assistants to the officers in-
ant January 1, 1931; captain Feb- clude Master Sergeant Robert
ruary 5, 1941, and major August Ross, Staff Sergeant Harry Reed,
15, 1942. Sergeants Aaron Traister and
Major Ziska's Staff Julian Laigford and Private
mih R A,,,rmi; itrative Tn- First Class Samuel 3. Burrow, Jr.


spector has an able staff of three
officers and five enlisted men.
His assistant Base Administrative
Inspectors include First Lieuten-
ants Arthur F. Evans. Woodrow
W. Jones, and Richard E. Mitch-
ell. Their responsibilities include
inspection and auditing of all ad-
ministrative procedures on the
base.
Lt. Evans. a graduate of New
York University, from which he
received a BCS degree in 1936,
vias a certified public accountant
before being inducted into the
Army as a private on September
3, 1941, at Camp Upton, Long
Island. After six and one-hall
months at Camp Wheeler, Geor-
gia, and Drew Field, he was sent
to the OCS Army Air Corps Ad-
ministrative School at Miami
Beach and after completing his


Banking Facilities
(Continued from Page 1)
count. There will be no charge for
government checks.
Accounts will be opened and
carried for the Drew Field Ex-
change, Officers' Club, Bachelor
Officers' Mess, and other organi-
zations desiring such services. Ac-

Main at North Boulevard
Franklin St. Restaurant
HOME OF FINE FOODS
At Reasonable Prices
SPANISH DINNERS
1406 Franklin Street


TAMPA'S ONLY NITE CLUB
Featuring 3 Floor Shows Nitely 8 10 Midnight
DANNY & DON'S

JfWE LBOX N ITE lUB
911 TAMPA STREET


VERN YONKERS Orchestra
TOMMY RUTH JEANNIE
Season's Best in Tap
4 POWELL-ETTS


MAXINE POWELL
DANNY BROWN, M. C.
VICKI LEE
Sweet Singing


pointments of Warrant Officers
(Junior Grade) are being made
from the enlisted personnel of
Drew Field after exhaustive ex-
amination.
Enlisted men of any grade be-
tween the ages of 18 and 46 years,
who have completed at least
three months of continuous active
duty on the date of application
or have had a minimum of 6
months of cumulative active duty
in the Army in the preceding 12
lr.//


Is Located At
801 Florida Ave.
Sears, Roebuck & Company
Tampa, Florida


DINE AND DANCE AT
LICATA'S

SEABREEZE
on Hillsborough Bay
Try the Best in Food
FINEST LIQUORS
DANCING EVERY NITE
22nd Street Causeway
Phone Y 1715
PRIVATE DINING ROOMS


P ADDOC(K

BAR
"Not a Jook JointBut a place just
:ike the ona back hame-where you
Jan brin "our wife or sweetheart
or a drink, a chat and fine music."
JACKSON AT TAMPA ST.
Open From 8 A.M. to 12 P.M.


CLUB HI-HAT
1204 FRANKLIN ST.
Invites You to Dance to
"HI -HAT
RHYTHM MAKERS"
Every Nite 7 P.M.
Till Midnight

H.tH-l l


W*


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Saturday and Sunday
AFTERNOONS, 2:30 5
EVERY NIGHT, 8 till 11
EXCEPT MONDAY


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HEAR YOUR FAVORITE SONGS


CHESTERFIELD BAR
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&


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5c Fare on Davis

Island Buses
Leaving Grant's Corner
Franklin and Cass Streets

7:15-- 7:45 -- 8:15
DIAMOND CABS 10c


w The South's Finest
Q Skating Rink


.~i'II~)~CIYIYCI-LPI~U)*~rr~-~llr


Diamonds andA A Jewelry





605 Franklin St.

[Expert Watch Repairs
K^^^^J~f^Stf^^ SfSS^^^^sr)^SSS^^^


n
'~ 1, ~
,
a:






D.-FD OSPa.j -'


Commanding Officer
Of III Fighter Com. .
Promoted to Lt. Col.


On December 22, 1942, Major
scoe G. Conklin, CO of the Hq.
Hq. Sq., III Fighter Command,
.s promoted to the rank of
lieutenant colonel.
Col. Conklin's Army career be-
gan in 1915, having served then
as a sergeant on the Mexican bor-
der. He was sent to the Ground
School at Georgia Tech, where
he was commissioned as a second
lieutenant upon graduating May
11, 1918. He spent two and one-
half months at Kelly Field. Tex.,
and another three months on spe-
cial detail in Washington.
He was sent to the Balloon
School at Fort Omaha, Nebraska,
where he took an Observer's
course, spending the next two
and one-half years as Supply Of-
ficer of the Balloon Division,
Central Department, Fort Oma-
ha.
C.C.C. Commander
Col.. Conklin was made first
lieutenant in 1923; captain on
May 1'2, 1941, and major on
March 19, 1942. From 1934 to
1939 he was in the Civilian Con-
servation Corps, serving as com-
manding officer of C.C.C. camps
at Canton, South Dakota; Buck
Knob, Arkansas;- Crystal Spring,
Arkansas; Crow Creek Camp,
Chamberlin, South Dakota; and
CamroD Washington, Blair, Nebras-
ka. Later he was district inspec-
tor of the Nebraska-South Dako-
ta district of the C.C.C.
Adjutant to General Tinker'
In 1940 he participated in the
Third Army maneuvers at Jas-
per, Texas, and was called to ac-
tive duty July 15, 1940, at Mac-
Dill Field, where he served as
Adjutant and later as Adjutant to
Maj. Gen. Clarence L. Tinker, of
the Third Bomber Command,
who was killed in action in the
Battle of Midway Island.
SCol. Conklin was graduated
from the Adjutant General's
School in Washington in August,
1941.
WHEN NEEDS MUST
At Camp Walters, Texas, a Chi-
nese and a Dane-both members
of Uncle Sam's Army-are car-
rying on conversations in Japa-
nese these days, to help the Chi-
nese learn English. The Chinese
couldn't speak English, and the
Dane couldn't speak Chinese.
However, both of them know the
complicated Japanese language,
so it has become their medium
for lessons in English and Chi-
nese!
invest in Democracy by buying
re War Bonds and Stamps
every payday.


t "Let's see-uh-Gas x ~ i- by the n ers!"'
"Let's see-uh-Gas by the numbers!"


"Yanks Are Fine
Soldiers," Says South
African Line Soldier

A memo for Drew Field-
ers going overseas, fom a line-
soldier serving in the Union of
South Africa Army:
"On quite a few occasions I
have come across Yanks (excuse
the slang) and I must say that
of the troops our boys have con-
tacted, yours and the Aussies go
down the best.
"There is none of the 'superior'
air that, unfortunately, many of
.ne chaps from other countries
-have. Taken on the whole, the
Yanks are a fine body of men,
sociable and interesting."
This South African's opinion
of the way American troops
stack up in combat is worth
-omething, certainly. He helped
boot the Italians out of Italian
domaliland, and was in one of
he first British outfits to enter
Addis Ababa, capital of Ethiopia
-wnere he helped himself to a
batch of the Italian governor's
personal stationery. Since then he
oias spent some time chasing sur-
vivors of Rommel's Afrika Korps
across the desert sands of Egypt.


Authorized Bottler: PEPSI-COLA BOTTLING CO. OF TAMPA


Opening of...

SHANGRI-LA GARDENS
1212 Grand Central Avenue
SPECIAL: EVERY SATURDAY AND SUNDAY
FRESH GEORGIA SPARERIBS
BARBECUED IN OUR OWN PIT
With charcoal and palmetto butts in the old-fashioned slow-baked
process. With Special Sauce, French Fries, Hot Rolls and Honey, 50 ceniS.
Served to you from the hot coals cafeteria style.
Famous For
STEAKS SEAFOOD CHICKEN SPAGHETTI


SAIR CONDITIONED


Lt. Coward Promoted g -l eli r L.4
To Base Plans and BARBER
Training Officer


Succeeding Major Walter F.
Joyce, who has been given a new
assignment, Lt. Hasseltine C.
Coward has been appointed the
Base Plans and Training Officer
(S-3). Lt. Coward served as as-
sistant S-3 officer for quite some
time before his promotion. Prior
to his assignment to S-3, he was
the officer in charge of the Offi-
cers' Mess and Transient Person-
nel.
The new S-3 officer received
his commission as a second lieu-
tenant in the Officers Reserve
Corps in 1931 upon graduating
from Clemson College, South
Carolina. On June 17, 1942, he
began an active tour of duty at
Drew Field and has served here
since, being promoted to first
lieutenant on Dec. 1, 1942.
Lt. Coward comes from Aiken,
South Carolina. Prior to enter-
ing the Army, he was a farmer.

Safeguard your own future and
the future of the American way
of life by investing in War Bonds
and Stamps.


BENNETT'S DRUG STORE
1004 Franklin St.
Complete Luncheonette 0 Liquor Annex In Connection


!-Uwan an-...uaga


LESLIE H. BLANK, Realtor


"Defense Rental Homes"
407 Tampa Street


Telephone 3222


917 Franklin St., Tampa
872 Central-St. Petersburg 531 Cleveland-Clearwater


SHOP
H. 0. LEWIS, Mgr.


3RIDAN

Complete
Barber Service
Expert Barbers
Manicurists


I AIR CONDITIONED



M anhattan Cafe
210 E. Lafayette St. Tampa
Good Food Reasonable Prices
Try Our Sunday Roast Turkey Dinner
Served From 11 A.M. to 9 P.M.
ALA CARTE SERVICE AT ALL HOURS
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
WE USE STRICTLY WESTERN MEATS



MAADISON DRUG COMPANY
FRANKLIN AND MADISON STREET
Where the Men of the Armed Service Shop and Eat
We Are Anxious to Be of Service



BAY VIEW HOTEL
FIREPROOF CONSTRUCTION-EVERY ROOM WITH BATH'
W. B. SHULER, Manager
208 JACKSON ST., Between FRANKLIN & TAMPA
TAMPA, FLORIDA PHONE M 5537





R ENNGE ARMAC

H*3712 2//S-GRAND CENTRAL AVE.


Hotel Hillsboro Florida Aen at
FRANK J. HYNES, Manager
GASPARILLA TAVERN
COLONIAL GRILL Service Men Welcome


THE CHATTERBOX
Chicken and Steaks Real Italian Spaghetti
SANDWICHES DRINKS LIQUORS I
ABBA DABBA AND BAND NIGHTLY
707 S. Howard Avenue Phone H 3757
GASPAILLA AVEi


enon -~8s~L---.---------


~ss~a~ ------------uss~aa~es~$Bea~aP~aamRrs~~


DREWY FIELD ECHOES


~;;~-e"r~"fl~i".'"~i---:- ;L~-I -ii-lil~c~ ~-~-.


ruOPL C


ALTX?


Li -. 4 Amh1 C7T








RE W .. ECHOES January 8. 1943

The Drew Field Echoes

GLENN R. ROSS, Publisher ~
TAMPA ARMY NEWSPAPERS
Business Office: __.._
1115 FLORIDA AVENUE
P. 0. Box 522 TAMPA, FLORIDA Phone 2177 a
All advertisements contained in this newspaper are also contained r
in the MacDill Fly Leaf. Minimum joint circulation, 10,000 copies.
ADVERTISING RATES FURNISHED ON REQUEST ) R


A newspaper published exclusively for the personnel of Drew
V4. -1 A -3 i-- -I A 4 -1 l A 41-* TT l- t4 TT_ ;-* -


By Cpl. Joseph Regis Jr.


Field and aevotea to military interests ana tne unitea lNatons A Ag~
Victory. Sgt. Suszynski has requested a
Opinions expressed in this newspaper are those of the individual few words regarding my thoughts
writers and under no circumstances are they to be considered those about leaving the band.
of the United States Army. Advertisements in this publication do I guess it will be a long time
not constitute an endorsement by the War Department or its per- before I forget tte group of men
sonnel of the products advertised. "'ho -rrived at Drew Field from .
Ft. Meade, Md., in April, 1942.
Sa iooKea forward to neir stay
in Florida; since that time, most
of the group have left this field. Religious services for the men
I always will remember the of the Hebrew faith stationed at
rapid progress in the building of Drew Field are being conducted
the field to its present statute.
% REFLEC ONS TEPSevery Friday night at 8:00 p. m.
REFLECTIONS OF THE PAST, nchap 1 (near Base Head-
AT DREW: Answering the tele- in Chapel No 1 (near Base Head-
f phone while working at Base quarters). In the absence of a reg-
S/ Operations during the warming ular chaplain, services are con-
3 I up of motors Running to post ducted by Pvt. Joseph Hornstein,
during alerts-Trips to Sarasota who is ably filling in. He is also
k with the Band, and the splendid
Treatment by the people of that conducting classes in Hebrew two
city-Playing concert at Pinellas nights a week.
and not getting credit for being The response of the Jewish sol-
there (finally corrected) Band diers is very gratifying, with
formation drills Sleep walking
Sby the one and only Mike Vitale more men attending services each
(hope you get well soon, Mike), week. The third Air Force has
Sand the splendid group of boys become aware of the need for a
that comprise the band personnel, regular Jewish Chaplain, and we
SGuess I will always recall how soon will have a chaplain assign-
the band was moved around until ed to Drew Field, expected to
Swe started finally to bunk at our arrive Feb. 1.
.0w- present abode. Also the wait until Incidentally, it might be of in-
the grapefruit and oranges ripen- tIncidentally it might be of id
ed for us to eat. there t toyou to have an ldea ust
Can't overlook my dismay at where these chapels are located.
how cold I could get in the Sunny There are five chapels at Drew
South. Field, and you will find chaplains
in every one of them. If you are
soo Want to end by congratulating interested in finding a chaplain
Mr. Baker on his splendid work of your own faith, there are Bap-
"Please to waiting a minutehae just got time to buying U. S. -never enjoyed working for any- tist, Congregationalist, Catholic,
War Bonds!" one more than I have for him. Episcopalian, Disciple of Christ,
Also wish to thank Mr. Baker and Lutheran Chaplains on the
and Sgt. Eaton for their tireless base. Drop in at one of the cha-
Two Kinds of Courage able to show that courage a sec- efforts in trying to make a horn pels-any one of them, and make:
.ond time. player and soldier out of me. yourself at home.
Every cadet and every pilot Came the summer of 1898 and And finally to wish each and Their locations: "
now in training knows in his the explorer, nervous and fear- every member of the band utmost Chanel No 1 corner of C and
heart that there are two kinds ful of criticism, decided he could success for the future, and to say, th seets
of courage. One he wears jaunt- no longer await an ideal wind, "You are a swell group of fel- seets
ily, as he wears his service cap, but would take off with almost lows." Chapel No. 2 between 5th and
for all to see. The other he hides; any North wind at all. When he -JOE 6th on E street.
he knows it is courage, but he finally embarked the balloon rose Cpl. Joe Regis, one of the most Chapel No. 3 corner 2nd and
sometimes hesitates to show it valiantly for a few minutes, then popular members of the Band, is Tampa Bay Blvd.
for fear it will appear to others dipped until the gondola touched substituting for your Band Noter Chapel No. 4 between 2nd and
as cowardice. the sea. His guide ropes, upon this week. Joe left for Postal OCS 3rd on L street.
Th thin line between these which he had counted heavily last Sunday-the 69th AAF Band Chapel No. 5 between 2nd and
two kinds of courage was never for steering, parted. The moment hasn't been the same since-and 3rd on N street.
demonstrated better than in the had come for a decision in favor we are looking forward to a
cas of Andree, the air explorer of of or against what we think of "Lieutenant" Guest Columnist
two generations ago. now as a 180-degree turn. The soon). their rolling fortresses during the
two generations ago. kind of courage that lies on the -J.F.S. day, when the temperature fre-
THE CASE OF ANDREE surface prevailed. Andree's men quently may hover around 120
threw out ballast, the balloon degrees, and from just such ex-
Back in 1898 Andree took off rose and drifted away, never to He0 and (Hd treme cold at night. The ther-
in a balloon from Spitzbergen in be seen again. an mometer may drop as much as


the hope of reaching the North
Pole. He and his companions and
their craft were never seen or
heard of again until 33 years
later when their remains were
found on desolate White Island
in the Baltic.
Was it courage or cowardice
that sent Andree on that last fa-
tal voyage?
Andree, history records, passed
the summer of 1897 poised for
his take-off, awaiting only the
proper weather for his venture.
An expectant world shared his
impatience as weeks dragged
into months without the appear-
ance of a favorFble wind. The
summer passed, and with it his
chance to get away that year.
Knowing from experience what
Andree's state of mind must be,
an explorer friend wrote and con-
gratulated him on having the
courage not to attempt to fly
without the right wind. Andree
replied that he would never be


FOOLHARDY COURSE
UNFORGIVABLE
In training, especially, fool-
hardy courage cannot be con-
doned. There is plentiful proof
that many fliers in our Air Forces
who are lost in accidents would
have been far braver had they
never made the start. They did
not possess the inner courage to
face what might have appeared
to their comrades as lack of
courage.
Youth, as a rule, recognizes
only the obvious kind of courage.
The real hero is the pilot who
watches the weather reports, who
heeds all regulations, who studies
his loads and balances, who
awaits better equipment; who
flies, in short, with all the odds
in his favor. He is the man who
will reach a combat zone, fit and
ready to turn his hard-won abili-
ty on the enemy.


Early in December, at Fort
Knox, Kentucky, sixteen men of
the Armored Forces filed into a
streamlined white stucco and
glass brick medical research
building which was to be their
home for almost a month. For
26 days these human guinea pigs
appeared to be doing nothing but
loafing, reading, playing cards
and writing letters. But they
were doing it in temperatures
ranging from 120 degrees above
to 60 degrees below zero. From
time to time .they pedaled a bi-
cycle set up on a stand. Dials
and gauges recorded the amount
of energy they burned up. Doc-
tors made periodic checks, ob-
serving the men's reactions under
varying conditions of humidity
and temperature. Reason for all
this activity lies in the fact, dem-
onstrated in locales like the Af-
rican desert, that tank crews suf-
fer from extreme heat inside


ou degrees in z1 nours. Anna anKs
operate also in Arctic areas,
where it is even colder. The Ar-
mored Force is undertaking a
systematic research to learn how
men, as well as machinery, be-
have under extreme conditions,
for the Army demands efficiency
even if they have to re-design
th equipment to fit the men.

Invest in Democracy by buying
more War Bonds and Stamps
every payday.
FREE MENDING
For soldier who need mend-
ing or minor alterations of
their clothing, this is a re-
minder that the Officers'
Wives Sewing Circle is still
functioning. Bring your clothes
to Chapel No. 1 on Tuesday
mornings before 10 o'clock.
The alterations will be made
free of charge.


Church Call
Catholic Masses:
Sunday-6:15 a.m., Chapels No.
2 and 3; 9:00 a.m., Chapels No. 2,
3 and 5.
Daily-6:15 a.m., Mon.,
Fri. and Sat., Chapels No. 2 ah~.-u.
5:30 p.m. Tues. and Thurs., Chap-
el No. 2.
Protestant Services:
Sunday-11 a.m., Chapels No.
1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. -10:30 a.m., Holy
Communion (Episcopal), Chapel
No. 2.
Sunday Evening-7:30, Chapels
No. 1 and 4.
Wednesday 7:30, Chapel No.
5.
Jewish Services:
Friday-8 p.m., Chapel No. 1.


Friday, January 8--ICE CA-
PADES REVUE, Ellen Drew
and Jerry Colonna; It's Every
body's War; Tito's Guitar.
Saturday, January 9 WHEN
JOHNNY COMES MARCHING
HOME, Allan Jones, Jane Fra-
zee Dover; Sweeny Steps Out;
Eatin' on the Cuff.
Sunday and Monday, January 10
and 11-CHINA GIRL, George
Montgomery, Gene Tierney;
The Sleepwalker; News of the
Day No. 233.
Tuesday, January 12 OVER
MY DEAD BODY, Milton
Berle, Mary Beth Hughes; Pop-
ular Science No. 1; Ray Mc-
Kinley and Orchestra; Sniffle
Soldier.
Wednesday and Thursday, Janu-
ary 13 and 14-YANKEE DOO-
DLE DANDY, James Cagney,
Joan Leslie; News of the Day
No. 234.


Friday, Jan. 15 WHISTLwrl
IN DIXIE, Red Skelton, Ann
Rutherford; The Fighting En-
gineers; Speaking of Animals
and Their Families.


DREW FIELD ECHOES


January 8, 1943


Pano 4 -


i





Page 5


THURSDAY
8:00 p.m.-Service Club Bingo
Night.
8:20 p. m. Recreation Building
Number One-Variety Show.

VALENCIA GARDEN
Restaurant
WE SERVE THE FINEST OF
SPANISH FOODS
811 Grand Central Ph. H 3773

Service Men Welcome

GILBERT HOTEL
811 Tampa St. Phone M 1094
W. H. WHITE, Manager


NICK THE TAILOR
Expert Tailoring
Cleaning and Pressing
WE ALTER ARMY
UNIFORMS
208 Harrison Street


/BOB'S OPEN EVENINGS



Army Store
;: Complete Line Military Supplies For The Needs Of
SERVICE MEN
2i0 EXPERT TAILORING
S207 E. Lafayette Street Tampa :


i THE TERRACE GIFT &
FLOURS FLOWER SHOP
^ jj^/6.7Hotel Tampa Terrace, Phs. 3022-M 5561
"FLOWERS BY WIRE"
Open Until 11 P.M. Every Day

UNITED OPTICAL DISPENSARY
Manufacturing and Dispensing Opticians
205 ZACK STREET PHONE M 5783
COURTESY DISCOUNT 20 PERCENT
Prescriptions Filled-Lenses Duplicated


La Gloria Restaurant
Fine Spanish Food and
Sandwiches
3103 Armenia Ave.
Phone H 33-521

SERVICE MEN
LA NUEVA ERA
rancy Groceries Fresh Meats
3018 Armenia Ave,
Ph. H 46-174 Free Delivery

"A GOOD PLACE TO EAT"
POST OFFICE CAFE
C. D. Kavakos, Prop. Dinners,
Plate Lunches, Beer, Wines &
Cold Drinks, Pies and Pastries.
406 Zack Street Tampa, Fla.

CRENSHAW'S
(Wholesale)
Fruits -:- Vegetables
Phone 2623


'IRR BASE BUS


LINES,


BUS STATION
Corner Tampa & Cass Streets

If w

30-Minute Service to Both
Fields at All Hours


15-Minute Service
During Rush Hours



For Further Information


CALL 4243


I q
I Ih


I


January 8, 1943


DREW FIELD ECHOES


your Army radio program in action.
S We might remind all listeners that
E the following schedule will keep you
posted on Army radio programs about
.-- your field. Here it is fellas: Just tune
inon the following programs and you
can't miss.
WFLA, Monday through Saturday,
7:05 to 7:25 a.m.-Drew Field Reveille;
WFLA, Tuesday evening, 6:30-6:45--
By YOUR ARMY ANNOUNCER Te Squadronairs; WDAE, Thursday
evening, 8:35 to 8:55--Rookie Roy's
Gree ings, dial twisters! This is yu Scrapbook; and Friday evening over
On. W*n es army announcer once again-only this WFLA, 9 to 9:30-The Drew Field Star
time Drew Field presents radio news Parade. Join your Army on the air
on the printed page. and keep listening.
FRO M THE SPECIAL: SERVICES OFFICE If you listened to last Friday's broad- a
cast of the Drew Field Star Parade,
Svou heard the thrilling story of Army Invest in Democracy by buying
All-Soldier Show at Bn m or om.__ casth t n ra a moe s Dnd a Stamps
All-Soldier Show ate of e WarGaines. Enacted by an all-soldier more War Bonds and Stamps
Recreation Bldg. Is Sings on Drew Field enc out to the proving grounds about every payday.
20 miles from this field-and there,
lated bomnoing, we gave a running nar- SEMINOLE
8:00 p. m.-Service Club--Dance. rative of the battle as it actually took
On Wednesday Evening, Dec. A baritone of considerable place. And what a battle that was!! ir
On Wedns E Dec. Another of the popular dances prmis Cp. Thomas Searleso As rea as anythi ng could beva on Uo Snir S w
30, the Special Services Office te extent oi ha smoke and gas
presented an All-Soldier Show with girls from the Defense of the chief of police of Sioux attacks. The entire action took place Live and Stuffed Alligator
for the first time in Recreation Mothers and American Legion calls, South Dakota, is now con- within the hours of 8 a.n. and 4 p.m.
Building No. 1. Auxiliary tribting his singing ability to one daylat week. Todesribe a little Florida Suvenis-Curios
ANuxiliaary. th oe tLe action out there on the field 1 Lf ye tr
First to appear was Pfc. Sam the radio programs produced by -n,, T ain av what a great thing 107 E. Lafayette Street
Schavoni playing his saxophone 8:20 p.m.-Recreational Building tie Snecial Services Office of it was for all the men takingpart.
to enthusiastic applause. Corporal -Revue. Drew Field. ile awas the real action that these
Theogrammy withles accoh panide by a Mar r soldie 3--stare on sodi oer-h men may have to face in the future--
Tommy Searles, accompanied by e young soldierhe is onl oldis of the 681st and the 683rd. .
Sgt. John Suszinsky followed him. Cpl. La Marr presents a soldier 3-stated his singing career in were really going through their aces.
singing two numbers in a man- revue with original sketches, Providence, R. I., to which tox holes had to be dug, .50 caliber
ner delightfulto hear. Next came h had come in 1936 with a boy- machine gun emplacements twere n-
Pvt. John Mader who provided a songs ad dances. This d and camnouflaged, field tele- Bot
Pvt. John Mader who provided a "'od friend from Sioux Falls. phones were connected to observation ig
w moments of successful come- show you won't want to miss. Then only 16, he sold sheet music posts, soldiers were stationed at key
point ever hew entire desetsoies T ampa
Pvt. Maurice Feder followed SATURDAY .n a dime store by singing popu- po hts oin te entire defense area.
On liae attacking side, however, the
S..m, reading Stephen Vincent lar songs, situation was quite different. Plans were Nig t
Benet's "Nightmare at Noon." To be announced. Later he returned to the mid- discussed by the officers and non-
Pvt. Herbert Flinn appeared next, west and earned his livelihood commissioned officers in charge, st at-
pleasantly whistling two num- SUNDAY by hitting one-night stands with egy of attack was gone over, and a
scouting mission had to be sent out-P
bers. Cpl. Charles Crain closed a midwestern dance band. While ad that's where we got our firstfine
the program with his delightful 3:00 p.m.Base Arena Area-- singing on broadcasts over Oma- example of eood soldiering.r i Pvt.i
rendition of "The Fames Rodeo. ha station WOW, he was discov- Northrup, ofthe 681st, succeeded in
"The Farmer's crawling approximately 400 yards
Daughter." An all-star rodeo, featuring rect by Don Strickland, who through almost open countryside,
There was not a dull number world champion riders, bronco signed him for his orchestra. He rachinm a point 50 yards from the
in the show. busters, and trick ropers comes made the circuit of midwestern No. 1 machine gun position of the de-
ito Drewsnt oer hos th klan dane one of the gunners spotted him and
to Dew. band until entering the Army at lt go "it', a few short bursts of his
New Year's Eve Show 8:00-p. m.-- Service Club--Con- Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, on gun (blank ammunition, of course)LORIDA N TRI
cert. Octobet8 1941 Pvt. Northrup was the first simulated FLORIDAN TRIO
cert. October 28, 1941. sualty but his fine showing brought PLAYING NIGHTLY
Meets Good Response His Army career includes at- him to our microphone as the guest of
Meets Good esonse Del Purga, Violinist, will pre- tendance at Message Center and the evening. And that's the way the
O N a sent a recital of program pieces First Sergeant Schools at Fort batte progressed all day long. ending NO MINIMUM
On New Year's Eve, the De- and semi-popular violin music, iionouth, NewJersey where t a a ret d d position still intact.NO COUVERT
fense Recreation Committee sent accompanied at the piano by he was stationed from December got a lot of good soldiering and fun AIR CONDITIONED
us an excellent show. The audi- Bob Parsons. 1, 1941, until April 15, 1942. Then go1l of the field problem. LET'S HAVE
ence was not large, but those ne as Camp Haany CaliAMO PROGRAM: "RookieE .'""H
present enjoyed it tremendously. 8:20 p.m.--Recreation Building frnias e heno Camp Haan, Ry's Scrapbook" tor at Drew
Mrs. Sandler sang such songs .Number One--Silent Movies. June 15, 1942, when he was trans- Field. Yes, radio station WDAE has L
as "Ciribiri Bin," "Make Believe," MONDAY erred to Plant Field. na et'rantements to brine a coOn-
and "All the Things You Are" While at Plant Field, he bud- ment out to the field and set it up in
with feeling and charm. 8:00 p. m.-Service Club--Dance. died around with his namesake, Recreation Bid. No. 1. located on 1st
Mrs. Dulaney gave two dra- The Combined USO Clubs of Jackie Searls. the brat of movie Street between K and L. Watch for the JAMES B. PICKARD Mg.
Misspeto'Ya plaedpthe accorw announced and sent on to you just as
matic readings in fme manner. Tampa.present another of their fame, although not a relative of annoued brand sent. ons dto you l us
Miss O'Yama played the accor- well-attended dances his. He was cast in a minor role oon as the broadcast equipment is in.
dion and received much applause in "Air Force," the motion pc- This is your first opportunity to watch
A soldier violinist, Pvt. Del 8:20 p.m.--Recreational Building d at ew Field last T J
Purga, capably accompanied by summer by Warner Brothers, l
Sgt. John Suszinsky, concluded Number One-Variety Show. starring a FlWaing For thess nik GO DY GOODY C kt il B
the program, playing two num- A civilian variety entertainment named "Mary Ann," John Gar- ar
bers with rare skill. featuring dancing returns to field, Harry Carey and George THE PLACE TO EAT "WHERE GOOD FELLOWS
te Drew from Tampa. Tobias. GET TOGETHER"
HAIR-RAISING QUERY le started to work with the 1119 FLORIDA AVENUE GET To GATHER"
HAIR-RAISING QUERY TUESDAY Special Services Department of Est. 1925 Air-Conditioned- Cozy
One private at Harding Field, he Air Warning Units Training Moderate Prices
Lausiana, is a mighty confused 8:00 p.m.-Service Club-Con- Center in November, 1942. Hotel
man. It all came about after a re- cert.
cent inspection. In keeping with A recorded concert of the sf Thomas Jefferson
a squadron order, this soldier laid world's finest music will be
out all his GI equipment in neat presented. The new Library of & Wa
display on his bunk. It looked Music owned by the Service M 5571
strictly regulation to him, tooth- Club contains some of the
paste, soap, toothbrush, socks, greatest recordings ever made.
raincoat, everything there in Welcome Service Men
good shape. So that same after- 8:20 p. m. --Recreation Building
noon, when he discovered, his Number One-Band Concert.
Name on the."gig list," he was WEEK-END LEAVE OR FURLOUGH Nu-Way Resaurant
baffled. True, he explained, he This program is presented by WEEK-END LEAV ORFor Good Food at
hadn't laid out his comb with the the popular Army Air Forcefunded if lost or stolen. POPULAR PRICES
rest of the articles. But what's Band, and features singers spe- Perhapsyouhave,withoutrealizingit. promptlyrefunded iflost or stolen. POPULAR PRICES
the use for a comb, ran his argu- cialty solos. If you carry money around with Issued in denominations of $10, 713 GRAND CENTRAL
meant, when you have no flowing WAYs youincamporatabase, orwhenyou $20, $50 and $100, and cost 75
meant, when you have no flowing WEDNESDAY travel, youruntheriskoflosingitor for each $100. Minimum cost 400
locks to curry? He is bald. having it stolen.You can play safe by for $10 to $50. For sale at Banks,
8:00 p. m.-Service Club-Dance. carrying your funds in the form of Railway Express andWestern Union "The Place to Meet and Eat"
Service Men Are Welcome The Wednesday dance will be safe qnd spendable American Express offices, at principal railroad ticket Matthew's Corner
presented by the Business Girls Travelers Cheques which are offices and at many camps and bases.
Day or Night at of Tampa. Fountain and Luncheonette
CSLC F "bi O r a eNPRESLiquors Wines Beer
8:20 p. m. Recreation Building W ines Beer
CHILD CA F E "Bubbling Over," has delightful Lafayette & Tampa. Ph. M 1242
USO show that has been well T A E S E U
501 Franklin Street received wherever played. You "TRAVELERS ____-_-A
won't want to miss this show! Service Men Always Welcome


I n mi









-Page -"



Messing Up On K.P.


Detail

By PVT. HERBERT GORDON
Today, Dear Diary, I have a sad tale
to tell you. Yes, it happened; I was
detailed for Kitchen Police duty. What
a shock I got when I saw my name
on the day room board. It was just
like somebody had hit me on the head
with a hammer.
But it was me alright, and that
night I went to sleep a very
sad young man. What a night that was,
Dear Diary, I'll never forget it. I kept
awake all night,' just waiting for the
K.P. pusher. This fellow is the dear
lad that haunts you all day in the
kitchen, and his job is to keep the
poor unfortunate K.P.s moving about
-if he can find you. The idea is to
keep out of his way as much as possi-
ble, and most important, never let him
find out your right name. Then he
can never call you for some detail,
unless he sees you in person. Naturally
if you see him first, you can hide. But
if you're not fast enough and he sees
you, then you're stuck and no one is
to blame but yourself.
Well, to get back to where I was
lying in bed waiting for the K.P. push-
er to wake me up. Just as I fell into
a deep slumber, Bingo, Bango! in
walked the K.P.P.
He approached my bed (and it is
only 4:30 in the morning). The dear
boy seems to get a great joy and de-
light out of waking me up. Why, I
don't know. The first thing he did
when he came over to my bed was to
shine a pink searchlight square in my
face, and give me a mighty push that
almost knocked me clear out of bed.
These playful tactics practically scared
the wits out of me, and was I mad?
Of course if I want to make it tough
for the K.P. pusher to find my bunk
in the middle of the night, why all I
have to do is to forget to tie a towel
on the foot of my bed. If I had done
this, then he would have had a lovely
time finding me. Naturally he would
be happy and nice to me when he did
find me by giving me POTS AND
PANS. This is a really fine detail I
would like to give to the yellow Japa-
nese and that one-armed paperhanger,
Adolf Schicklegruber.
All the boys in my barracks will
sing my praises, also; as they are very
happy to accommodate our dear friend,
the K.P. pusher, when, in the middle
of the night, he wakes them up to ask
where he can find so and so.
Now the K.P. pusher has to run for
his life, and I have to get out on the
OUBLEDAY (Latin for fast) before the
boys commit mayhem on me for not
tying the towel on the foot of my bed,
as all good but unfortunate K.P.s are
supposed to do.
My shoes felt a little tight, putting
them on in the dark, but I figured it
was my imagination. But about an
hour later I was positive they were too
small, when I saw my barracks mate
come running madly into the kitchen
looking for me. Was he mad! You see,
I had his shoes on. Well, mistakes will
happen, and I gave him back his shoes
-but not until he went back for mine.
I had his socks on, too but I guess he
was so glad to get his shoes back that
he must have forgotten about his
socks.
Now to get back to the matter of
K.P. duties. The idea is to come as
late as possible the first morning, and
in this way all the tough details have
been given out to the other unfortu-
nate K.P.s. About a half an hour later
you stroll into the kitchen, and some-
times if you come in at the wrong mo-
ment, you find yourself detailed to
pots and pans, which makes you feel
worse than the time you broke off
with your best girl friend (and so I
guess you know how a fellow feels
when he is awarded this detail). Only
the best "Goof-offs" can get this posi-
tion, and sometimes the poor, mess ser-
geant just can't make up his mind who
he wants to bestow this honor upon.
If he doesn't like your face, you're
picked. This makes all the boys jeal-
ous, and they all start goofing off to
get a chance to work on this lovely
detail.
Well, I stroll in and by the grace of
Somebody or other, I am told that I
shall be the custodian of the stock
room for the coming week. Having
charge of this room means to keep it
in order, and spick and span, at all
times.
Now I proudly march over (in a mili-
tary manner) to the stockroom and,
lo and behold, the door is locked.
"What is this?" I say to myself. Am I
going to have trouble getting into my
own office? Well,-I never ask ques-
tions in the Army, do as I'm told
(military courtesy), so I waited by the
door. Along came the mess sergeant
and I explain to him the situation.
He listens sympathetically to my tale,
so I figure I've got him snowed under.
Well, after I get through telling him
that I cannot get into my stockroom,
I find myself out on the porch loading
up milk cases. "You see," he explains
to me in his soothing voice, "the lieu-
tenant has the key, and when he ar-
rives, you will be allowed to enter
your office."
As soon as the lieutenant arrives, I
march up-to him and give him the
good news that I am the new man for
the stockroom, and ask him for the
key. I don't get the key, but he opens
the door himself, warning me never
to keep the door open. I didn't know
what he meant, but I soon found out.
I went inside and snapped the door
shut behind me meaning to catch up
on some lost sleep. Just as I made
myself comfortable on a few bags of
onions and potatoes, I heard a faint
knock on the door. I didn't care who
was there, but when the- soft knock
became a bang, I figured I'd better
find out who was on the other side of
the door.
It was one of my fellow K.P.s and
he claimed he was hungry, and would
I give him a morsel of food before he
caved in. I invited him in and made
him as comfortable as possible under
the circumstances. He told me how
much he appreciated my not chasing
him out of the stockroom, but if I had
known that he was to haunt me all
week, I never would have fed him
that morning.
I didn't have but five minutes after
he left when I heard a lot of run-
ning in the hallway outside my door.
I opened the door in time to hear the
mess sergeant yell "CHOW," which is
the cue for all K.P.s to drop whatever
they're doing and run to the mess hall


-DREW "FIELD1fCI ES


-every man for himself, and God help
the man who gets in your way! I
food is being handed out, as caretaker
of the stockroom and chief taster, I The ho l B
see no reason why I should be exclud-
ed from tasting a little more. The School Building
By PFC. HARRY POLSKY
911th QM. PLAT. Well, our Sgt. Shreeves has finally
done it. Disregarding all advice from
your reporter, he has committed him-
self to the state of matrimony. Sarge,
ON T E BAL L we all wish you and your bride the
best of luck. May your cups of joy
By CPL. R. C. T. PEARMAN and happiness overflow for the rest
of your lives.
Well, now that the combined rigors After resting up from a strenuous
of pay day and the New Year have furlough, your reporter is back on a
iust about subsided, let's see what we somewhat weak beam. When I arrived
have left. home, I was at once attacked and
Our basketball team is beginning to chased by a bevy of beautiful girls.
shape up rather well. We knocked off It was a long and arduous chase over
the 59th Avn. fellows in a practice hills and valleys, across streams and
game. Considering that we have not rivers, with the pack in full hue and
reached our potential strength, I would cry after me. I finally caught up with
say it's nice going. her when she tripped over a stone.
Congratulations to ex-Cpl. Dave Ford Captain Hench has turned the school
for making sergeant and to Cpls. Mar- into a smooth functioning organization.
tin Furgerson, Dave Dallas, Leue Car- Also on the beam are Lt. Favorite and
ter, Robert Brown, Raymond Simmons Lt. McKendry, of the Classification
and Russell McAbee for making that Office. They know what the score is
grade. and keep batting that ball around
Say, how about it, you volleyball with nary a strike-out. The officers of
players, let's get organized and use the Courts and Boards are also on
the equipment we have for you. Don't that well-greased beam.
let the softball and basketball players Gathered from a vPrv unreliable
have all the fun. source is the information that Miss
I like that haircut that Pvt Haw- Roberts is going to stroll along that
thorne Simpson is featuring these days. flower-strewn pathway. How about it,
It is rumored that he conceived the Miss Roberts? Don't keep the boys in
idea while gazing at a cue ball wallow- suspense.
ing in a bowl of mush. We are all glad to see Cpl. Peabbles
The best of luck to Pfcs. Harold up and around again after a three-
White and John Lord and to Pvts. week sojotrn in the hospital. You
Vernon Goins, Hezekiah Riley, James can't keep a good man down.
Grant, Nathaniel McCollum, Wilmort Cpl. McArdell will be sadly missed
Wright, Quinten Stanley, Theodore by his typist whenhe leaves on a
Rbbinson and John Earle, who are furlough. And him celebrating his
now at OTU School, MacDill Field. four-month wedding anniversary, too.
Keep going, fellows. T'k. tsk. tsk.
Did you know that-our CO knows He,. Sft. Wilkinson, how come your
a thing or two about baseball, and trips to the Sub-Depot have fallen off?
handles himself like a big leaguer? Don't you see Red any more?
Cpl. Dallas is quite a guy on the Pfc. Stern really gets those sugar re-
pool table? It's going to be rts from Miss Perlmutter. I don't
mighty cozy in the mess hall when know what she writes him. but when-
those four stoves get going. It ver he gets through reading one of
won't be long before everyone our them, he walks around in a daze for
platoon will be expert truck drivers. the rest of the day.
Sgt Downing is filing an applica- e
tion for warrant officer and I cer-
tainly hope he makes it. 308th SIGNAL COMPANY (WING)


SPARKS
Sub-Depot Subs P R
By CPL. ROLPH FAIRCHILD
THREE CHEERS to Joe Quinn for
the fine job he's doing in setting up a Lt. Kennth L. Hall's instruction in
machine shop that is fast becoming ju jitsu is still taking effect. Pvt. Mil-
one of the most efficient outfits in the ton K. DeMartine recently yelled out
Sub-Depot. in his sleep, "Twist his arm! Kick him
BRONX CHEERS to those people him in the rear! Set him on fire!"
who have attained higher positions That's the idea, Milt.
and have in turn acquired heads so Champs Routed
BIG they can no longer buy hats Those "Pinochle Champs," Cpls.
LARGE enough to fit. Sudden success "Woody" Pugh and Edward Szczesny,
may tend to make one proud, but let's have met defeat. And at a blind man's
draw a line between PRIDE and CON- card table. The other evening some
CEIT. cab driver with more of an eye for
Folks in Supply are doing their cash than service drove them to the
darnedest to wear out the smile- outskirts of town, where he left them.
muscles in their faces. WHY?? Don't In due time they settled down in
you know??? Supply's OLD KING the warm kitchen of some hospitable
FISH is back. They're glad, too. Italian family. The blind uncle of the
Please don't get the rumor around family, it turned out, knew something
that they were testing a new rocket of cards. The Champs (or is it
ship the other day-that was Lt. T. E. Chumos?) naturally agreed to take him
.Jones, test pilot, making a hurried on. Cpls. Pugh and. Szczesny are still
egress' after receiving a surprising, burning over the drubbing he gave
but most effective, "HOT SEAT." them, while the "Future Champs," Sgt.
Who said that loyalty dosen't exist Weaver and Cpl. Evans, chuckle.
ye old Sub-Depot It's been rumored Pvt. Clyde E Smith wins this week's
about from very good sources that barracks bag to blow it out of, for
Edward Stevens, Insnection Depart- those magnificent "Liars' Club" yarns
ment, received some mighty fine offers he so often spins at noon. Where does
from Bell Aircraft while schooling he get those stories, anyway? The kick
there recently. However, he refused is that so many of them are really
them all because "he owed the Sub- good.
rT)not some gratitude for the fine "Simple" Savings Plan
training that it has given him." That's Incidentally, did you ever investi-

the spirit, Steve. gate the Stukelman Multiplex-Purse
Oh, boy, that cakle-vou would know Payday Layaway Savings Plan? It's all
it anywhere. June Law, of Supply, very simple. The $100 bills go into the
never lets a worry enter her mind. first compartment of the purse, the
Says she's been in practically every $50 bills in the second, the $20 bills in
nenitPntiary in thp U. S. She just loves the third, and so on.
to tell you about her visits to Chatta- But don't ask Davy to demonstrate
hoochie, too. Ask her for her opinion beyond the "Small Change" and "Dol-
of the folks at Chattahoochie. lar Bills" compartments, for in those
T.act week the Army claimed another dark recesses he keeps the foundation
Sub-Depot enmplovee-Weyman Brown, of the future Stukelman millions.
of the Supply Warehouses. What has
become the Army's aain has also be-
eneoe the cubh-Depot's loss. Best of
lurk. Pvt. Brown.
We were very happy to receive a
visit from two of .our Alumni last .r
.-~ek. P+vtt Officer. elt Class. U. S. N.,
Payton Thomas, formerly of the In-
strument Department, dropped in for
a few minutes to tell about the fine
"'erlr the Nrreal Air Forces are d cing.
Lt. Col. C. C. Harris, our first Com-
manding Officer, paid us a visit for
the first time since he left us last July.
He certainly looked fine wearing those
silver oak leaves. We're looking for- ELEPHONE -692
ward to seeing them both again in TELEPHONE H 25-692
the very near future.
*- THE CRICKET
Safeguard your own future and TEA ROO M
the future of the American way
of life by investing in War Bonds 241 HYDE PARK AVE.
and Stamps. '
1.%


WEAR THE ONE THE ONLY


"BEflU BRUmmfLL"
4FOLD UNIFORM TIE
CONS. U 5. PAT. RE 20942
FABRIC BY GOODALL
S..WASHABLE .


NONE GENUINE WITHOUT THIS LABEL
OFFICIAL O, D. KHAKI


OPEN DAY AND NIGHT' ".
Tampa Bay Market
BOX FRUITS SHIPPED
ANYWHERE
A. G. Cleotelis & Son
Ph. H 3143 204 W. Lafayette


HOTEL DeSOTO

RIGHT DOWN TOWN
Marion and Zack
MANAGEMENT
STACY ADAMS AND -W. P. H.OL M E S


FRANK RUTA-
Of New York and Former Chef at El Trocadero

OPENS HIS OWN PLACE
Specializing in SPAGHETTI and RAVIOLI ,
Hyde Park Spaghetti House
103 Hyde Park Ave. :: BEERAND WINES .


HQ. & HQ. SQUADRON
III FIGHTER COMMAND


SEA BREEZES
By PFC. ALVIN M. AMSTER
Best wishes for continued success to
John B. Gosselin, the new first ser-
geant. Sgt. Martin, who is continuing
as mess sergeant, was upped to Tech.
Pfc. Herman Cohn returned from
furlough (with several boxes of ex-
cellent cookies) and found his boss,
E. F. Williams, wearing silver leaves.
Joe Corry was given an extension in
furlough because he was caught right
in the thick of that Ohio River flood
at Marietta.
Best-Sayings-of the Week Dept. -
rom Tech. Sgt. Joe Driscoll: "No one
can come into A-1 Section and gold-
brick unless on official business."
HOT DOTS ,,. Chimney sweeps
wear soot suits. .:Sgts. Kirwin Mur-
dock and Tony Pillittere our mustachios
S. "Santa Claus" Dorwart sweating
out that furlough and apartment hunt-
ing. Bob Parsons, ex-fisherman
from Lafayette Bridge, can beat it out
on the piano. ... Butler saves odd
pennies for his seven-month-old cher-
ub back home.
Harold Palumbo had his own dance
band which played at big name East-
ern spots. Ray Janus received no-
tice of his OCS call and CQ at the
same time .. :Sgt. Ed Steelnack
transferred to the squadron the same
day he was upped to sergeant. .
Daily Prayer (over Capt. Holland's
phone): "Oh Lord; please help me to'
keep my big mouth shut." Sgt.
Holz of Signal has his phone mounted
on a toy express wagon.
Capt. Muse still"loses matching Maj.
Garber for cokes Margaret (Holy)
Smoke is being rushed by a certain
handsome Pfc. at..those Monday night
USO dances at the Service Club; come
and see "Bunny" Grossman mar-
ried one. year Jan. 10 John (Wolf)
Wilson and La CoUnt are the ticklish
boys "Alabama" Lazenby, a ro-
mantic jitterbug. '

Invest in Democracy by buying
more War Bonds and Stamps
every payday.

AUTO -- INSURANCE -- FIRE
D- B U S S E Y
INSURANCE
FI E AND l AGENCY
K CASUALTY
Phone M 1718
H 29122
109 E. Lafayette Street


0



STAR KOSHER
DELICATESSEN
All Kinds of Herring, Lox and
Smoked Fish. Imported and Do-
mestic Cheeses. Kosher Wines.
All Kinds of Sandwiches
Open Till 11 P.M.
805 Gr. Central, Ph. H 29-842



Member

V. F. W.
Purple Heart

E. P. JOHNSON & SON

Watchmakers & Jewelers
OPEN UNTIL 8:30 P. M.

214 E. Lafayette -: Tampa
Next To Manhattan Cafe



SOLD ERS...

When you are lonesome & blue
And you don't know what to
do, come to

M. MILLER'S BAR
Where she is friendly and true
BEERS WINES
lOc BEER STILL lOc
1111 Florida Ave.



"Flowers Telegraphed Back
Home Under Bonded Service"

NELSON
"THE FLORIST"
Open 9 A.M. to 5:30 P.M.
Closed Sundays
514 TAMPA STREET
ir


Attention! Dancing
CAMP BE LL By One Who Knows!
BARBER and BEAUTY SHOP PRIVATE LESSONS
308 Twiggs Ph. M54-572 Selma Drennan Brooks
Fe afuring and Assistants
IRENE GORIDON, Lady Barber Tel. H 32-654. 207 Parker St.
i I- ~ i II II


A Home Away From Home

SERVICE MEN

ALBERTUS HOTEL

956 Twiggs : M 1339


Lafayette Hotel
E. A. CLAY, Manager
120 West Lafayette Street
East Side of Bride
Phone M 5588 Tampa, Fla.


The Tavern Bar & Grill
HOT AND COLD LUNCHES
Spaghetti a Specialty
311 Franklin St. Phone 3940
LIQUORS-BEER-WINES


!WHITE ROSE BAR
Paul Webber, Prop.
LIQUORS, WINES, BEER
AND CIGARS
Cor. Cass and Marion Sts.
Phone 4502


ELITE CIGAR STORES
'The Sport Headquarters of Tampa'
WINE BEER CIGARS
400 Zack Phone M 62-072
207 Twiggs Phone M-1236


Prescriptions
,Home Made Ice Cream

DEITZ DRUG STORE
FREE DELIVERY
931 S. Howard Ave. Ph. H4185



CULP LUMBER CO.
'Everything to Build Anything'
Millwork Made To Order
500 Packwood
Ph. H 1862 -:- Tampa


ALWAYS SAY ...


HOLSUM BREAD

EXTRA FRESH


Rex Billiard Parlor
Daniel S. Bagley


1012 FRANKLIN
TAMPA FLORIDA


EAT

HENDERSON
BAKING CO.' S

BREAD.
2T02 FLORIDA AVE.


Calling All Service Men
TO GET A HOME COOKED
MEAL AT
KNOX GRILL
405 JEFFERSON ST.


WELCOME TO

HOTEL KNOX

TOM BRYSON, Manager

Lafayette & Jefferson Streets


CENTRAL OIL
COMPANY, INC.


Tampa, Florida
Tampa, Florida


I I -- '--'U


L






January 8. 1943


Base Engineers One
Of HardestWorking
Units on the Base












.... -.
L I


I .-

















APTAIN GUY B. LYNES

Don't fix that leak; call the
Engineers. Do you have a fur-
nace that doesn't work? Call the
Engineers. Is your plumbing out
of whack? Call the Engineers.
Have you got electrical troubles?
Call the Engineers. No matter
what the trouble is, just call the
Engineers and all will be taken
care of properly.
Under the supervision of Cap-
tain Guy B. Lynes, the Base Engi-
neers' is one of the hardest work-
ing units on Drew Field. Capt.
Lynes, a graduate of Georgia
Tech, spent ten year in the Ord-
nance Reserve Corps at Atlanta
as a second lieutenant. For 20
years he was employed by the
Georgia Power Company. On
July 4, 1942, he was called to
active duty at the headquarters
of the South Atlantic Division
of Engineers and was commis-
sioned a captain in the Engineer
Corps. He arrived at Drew Field
on July 10, 1942, and was ap-
pointed Assistant Base Engineer.
On October 7, 1942, he was pro-
moted to Base Engineer.
SHe is ably assisted by Capt.
Raymond W. Godfrey and Lt.
Joseph P. Miley. As Fire Marshal
of Drew Field, Capt. Lynes has
the assistance of three enlisted
men. Including the sub-bases at-
tached to Drew Field, he has a
staff of over 400 classified em-
ployees. All supervisors are hand-
picked men who are well quali-
fied to fill their respective posi-
tions.
"Our primary job," says Capt.
Lynes, "is the installation, oper-
ation, maintenance and repair of
all utilities. It's a constant job to
keep the buildings, grounds, sew-
age systems and equipment in
proper working condition."
The biggest program now on
schedule is the grassing of all
scarred areas. Emphasis is being
laid on the roadside ditches in
order to eliminate excessive dust
and to aid in the run-off of water
during the rainy seasons. The
dust and dirt in the air are ex-
tremely injurious to the health of
the soldiers, so everything pos-
sible is being done to cooperate
with the health authorities per-
taining to this matter.
Pointing to a common com-
plaint on the field, Capt. Lynes
said that this base is still under
construction and premises are
occupied that are not yet com-





The



Commercial



Printers



Complete

Printing Service




Phone 2126

1115 Florida Avenue


DREW FIELD ECHOES


pleted in full detail. However, Para e R r
the contractors under the Area
Engineer are extending every ef-
fort to conclude the job as soon
as is humanly possible. Mean- (Continued from Page 1)
time they are resorting to tempo-
rary means to have the build- After coming here, all wor
ings ready for occupancy by the are put on a 30-day probation
troops. Because of the difficulty period. If doubt exists about t
of obtaining the necessary ma- ability to do the job perfe
trials due t.o priorities and they are not kept on the job
shortages, the-work is going on From then on, each rigge
at a slower pace than desired. personally responsible for e'
"And I may add," the captain parachute she packs and insp
said, "that the Base Engineer's There are no interruptions. :
office would ;appreciate the co- her responsibility to see that
operation of the enlisted men one else handles the parach
and officers in keeping off the the blame for improper world
newly planted sod in the road- of the chute, if it should faj
side ditches."- function, will be laid directly
her door.
di e E s A case history is kept on
N lUNK- P parachute from the time i
f manufactured until consid
By PFC. J. J. O'GARA safe to use. A record is I
Pfc. DeFelice, who has poetry in his every time the parachute
veins-and realizes he'd be better off packed, inspected, tested,
with blood, the ex-printshop owner the name of the worker. Whe
whose short story, "The Miser's Daugh- used or not, the chute is ope
ter," appeared'-in-an-,=issue of Collier's
magazine when a near-sighted clerk and inspected every 60 day
dumped a waste basket into the presses necessary procedure for chec]
and whose entire flat in Jersey has on the strength of the suspend
walls papered with rejection slips from i r th f th c
the pulps and glossy paper mags, the lines, the strength of the loc
chappie who sits at the left hand of pin on the ripcord assembly
King Cook's throne in the EM Section the strength of the harness.
and fans that worthy's brow while the
Cook perspires over them torrid love Where any doubt exists al
letters which he keeps in an asbestos the safety of a parachute,
envelope-is back in the ivory tower drop-tested before actually
for the nonce, this scribe having spot-
ted him wooing the muse and jotting into use again. Taken up ir
down the little sonnets in his spare airplane, fastened to heavy
moments. Pvt. Ed Solomon, Echoes dummies named "Pop Eye"
cartoonist, an ex-newspaperman from "liv hap ro h
the City of the Angels, who worked "Olive Oyl," shaped roughly
the sheets there for a few years, but human figures and weig:
quit the laundry because the steam about 150 pounds, the I
bothered him, and who, fired with throws a dummy overboard I
ambition and often without any notice
at all, went to Hollywood where he a height of 500 feet, pulling
drew the little animated rodents for ripcord as the chute leaves
Universal, Columbia and MGM, but plane, dropping it in such a
walked out with the mice when the
AFL Screen Mice Actors' Guild went that it can be observed by grc
out on strike-did those excellent watchers below. At this low
murals on the altar background for tude, the chute must open p
Midnight Mass in the Service Club. early or not at all. The descer
Sgt. Thomson, Personnel deskie, who.
previous to Pearl Harbor, left the the chute is watched careful:
Smoky Mountain town with the the ground observers who
mayor's words, "We're agoin' to miss ect it carefully again whe
vo'all, son, but we uns is mighty proud aspect it carefully again he
of yo'all, and ah want vo'all to re- lands. If it has held up safely
member this-that if the United States der the strain of carrying
goes to war, then by the great horn dummy, it is considered safe
,ooon. Tennessee will too!", ringing in
'-is ears, is whipping the Reminqton service again.
Commandoes into line at the School Before inspection, the p
building where he instructs a class in chute is unfolded and hung
typing, so you can ,aest assured that a drying room for 24 hour
these Army clerks, the unsung heroes drying room or 24 hour
of modern warfare with its compli- be thoroughly aired. It is t
'ated paperwork, the chappies who laid out on a long table, wl
"Keep 'Em Filing," when the time convenient hooks hold down
comes, are going to be riqht uo there
behind them carriages hitting the keys chute at one end and the har:
for all they're worth at 80 words per at the other, keeping the en
minute, pouring hot lead type into assembly taut for thorough
naragranhs until the last typewriter is ti T ri r thn
shot out from under their fleet fin- section. The rigger then I
"ers, and triumphantly watching the over the entire cloth material
Jaus go down under their barrages of
neatly typed Special Orders.
And so, until next week, when we the flag and fight for a true Del
will present a few more thumbnail racy.
sketches, as cousin Chutney (cricket EXTRA- Why did somebody
bliahter, Chut) would sav. "I must be when somebody went home. .
shifting, old thing, awfully glad to have hope the cooks can hold out until
pen something of you and all that mess sergeant returns from furlc
rot. Pip-pip!"
-r
PLOTTING CO., 564th SAW BN.

Dots and Dashes A Delicious Trea

By SGT. E. S. PERRY
We hit the print this week with news
of more newlyweds: Pfc. Wm. Griffin
and Cpl. Chas. Crain, who took unto
themselves brides while on their last
furlough. More good news came in the
welcome return from the frozen north
of T. Sgt. Chas. "Garry Owen" Smelt-
zer. But then as fast as they come
they also leave,'as witness the trans-
fer of our best pinochle players and
Romeos, Cpl. Herring, Pvts, Fite, Hole-
man and Barnes.
Does Pvt. Hanson go to the beauty
parlor for that permanent wave? Just
a reminder-we're about due for a
company jamboree, eh, what? Too bad
we can't get our best basketball team
together on account of school.
How does a Southern boy, like Pfc.
Fieldman, acquire a taste for blondes?
Yes, we're jealous.
Three of our company got some tough
news from back home and had to
leave on emergency furloughs. We
hope it wasn't too bad for Cpl. Dicker-
son, Pfc. Mager and Pvt. Shaddy. ::.
We sure hope the medic we ce'led
comes around soon to examine Cpl.
Krall for his insomnia. No one knew
where the Old Ladies' Home was in
Tampa until one of our scouts fol-
lowed Tobias and Talarek. Of course,
we admit that life begins at 40.
--------C-- HH~r*
59th AVIATION SQUADRON SEP.)

DISH'N DIRT
By PVT. JAMES JASPER MITCHELL
This week I am extending congratu-
lations to Lee R. Leffler, second lieu- A r 9 en
tenant, who has been appointed first
lieutenant.
Private Miller (Alice the Goon) gave Che Wrigle'
another grand affair with the assist-
ance of S. Sgt. Adams (who, by the
way, has been squawking ever since Yes
the morning after the night before
about the money Private Miller jived know how much
out of him). gu can mean
Our top-kick has returned from gu can mean "
Ohio, where he spent a 14-day fur- you've got a tough
lough with his family and friends. I Chewing cools
don't know how he stood the five-be-
low-zero weather, because he grabs his throat moist. He
GI dog-bed (overcoat) every time we
get a strong east wind off the Gulf. during Strenuous
Lt. Herbert C. Donaghay has re- your tasks go faste
turned from a refresher course that
was held at MacDill Field, and boy, I So chew and enj
mean is he more on the ball than ever Spearmint Gum e-
since. Some of the fellows in this out- -r-- --
fit could stand some brushing up-to
come uo to the standard set by the
lieutenant.
I might mention that this is a new
vear and everyone should resolve to
be better soldiers, pledge allegiance to


kers
nary
their
ctly,
b.
r is
very
ects.
It is
t no
hute;
king
il to
y at

each
t is
ered
kept
is
with
other
ened
s-a
king
sion
king
and

bout
it is
put
n an
rope
and
like
hing
flyer
from
the
the
way
iund
alti-
rop-
it of
y by
in-
n it
un-
the
for
ara-
up
s, to
:hen
here
the
ness
tire
in-
goes
1 of

moc-
cry
I do
l the
eugh.


-"I----~
I I ;, I- -


th 'chute'paril "by pdff@le, inflpect
ing for stains, mildew, rips and
tears, and other signs of weak-
nesses. If any stains are found
the cloth is washed carefully un-
til clean again. The parachute
cloth is so brilliantly white thal
any stain, however insignificant
can be noticed immediately by
the trained rigger.
The rigger then carefully ex-
amines the suspension lines--o
which there are 24 on most of the
parachutes being used at Drew
Field, more than ample strength
protection for the flyer who has
to use them. When the rigger is
sure of its perfect condition, the
cloth chute is folded carefully by
an instrument which insures ex-
act size of the folds. The suspen-
sion lines are folded carefully and
lined up so that when the chute
is opened they will not gel
snarled.
The pack assembly is tight-
ened, so take as little space a:
possible. The harness and chute
are then placed on a frame, where
two girls check the entire harness
and sew the harness straps to-
gether in such a way that it will
hold together for carrying until
the ripcord is actually pulled, t e
parachute opens and the strain is
put on the harness. Then these
temporary stitches break, and the
harness assumes the shape neces
sary to take the flyer safely t(
the ground. .
The locking pin in the ripcorc
assembly is tested by being
placed in a tight socket on the
wall and attaching weight to it
If it bends under the strain, it i:
discarded. It is better to discard
the entire chute, if necessary
than take a chance with an
American soldier's life.
The Drew Field parachute rig
gers are proud of the role tha
they, as civilians, play in oui
war effort. They have a persona
interest in seeing that chutes are
rigged properly. Their record ha!
been perfect and they intend te
keep it that way.

SGroceries Tobacco Candy,
Notions

Adams Kennedy
Whiting and Jefferson Streets
TAMPA, FLORIDA


Manuel Garcia, Jr.'s
Spanish Restaurant
915 Tampa at Tyler
Ph. M 52-073 Tampa, Fla.


Page 7


d SOLDIERS
ALWAYS WELCOME

- EL BOULEVARD
t RESTAURANT
S Finest Spanish Foods Bed
y of Tiauors 2001 Nebraska

f OWNSEND
Sash Door r
h & Lumber Co.
S LUMBER & MILLWORK
I ROOFING AND PAINT
e -FHA LOANS-
S PHONE H 4891
N. Rome & Fuller Street
-


SHENRY HOWKEE CO.
Chinese Hand Laundry
i-s
e Satisfaction Guaranteed
504 Tyler St. Tampa Fla.

1
e Service Men Always Welcome
S Sulphur Springs Cafe
e e Specialize in Home Cooked
Food, Chicken, Steak and
o Chop Dinners
Sulphur Springs, Arcade Bldg.
g
. T. W. RAMSEY
s LUMBER COMPANY
d We Specialize In
SMill Work & Cabinets
We can furnish material for
Repairs and F. H. A. Loans
Phone Y 1219 17th St. & 6th Ave
t
r
1 Bar and Cocktail Lounge
-eTh
s The TURF EXCHANGE
o Package Store
ORCHESTRA EVERY NIGHT
Phone 2003
202 E. Lafayette Street

"Soldiers Favorite Eating Place"
STEAKS AND CHOPS
A SPECIALTY

ELITE
RESTAURANT
TAMPA AND TWIGGS STS.



Max's Liquor Bar
WINES LIQUORS CIGARS
FREE DELIVERY SERVICE
1601 E. COLUMBUS DR.
PHONE Y-1281
-Keep 'Fm Flying-


McAskill Music Stores
Radios and Repairing
Sound and Inter Communicating
Systems
Authorized Capehart and Scott
Radio Service
1116 Grand Central
Phone H-3787


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Silverware
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409 Tampa Street



FERNANDEZ

RESTAURANT
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1216 Franklin St.

All servicee Men are Welcome
Barcelona Cafe
SPANISH RESTAURANT
Wines and Liquors,
Phone 82142 Open All Night
4714 Nebraska and Osborne




BEER WINES
1324 Franklin. Ph. M-7240
BILL BAILEY, Prop.
Member V.F.W. & Am. Legion

Special Invitations to All
Service Men

GLEN'S BILLIARDS
Now In Its New Location
805 TAMPA ST.








";"; -" t I "- tI --l [ I I l I -'F r "i "lf"71"ll


Drew Cagers

Win Games In

S Tampa League

By PFC. DELWIN BAGGETT
The Western league of the
Tampa City league opened with
a bang last Monday night in the
Trailer Park gym, with four
games being run off. Seven serv-
ice teams compete in this league.
Four Drew teams are members
of this league and three of them
came out victorious in the first
night of firing. 308th Signal of
Drew defeated the Tennis Club,
66-28; 3rd Fighter Command
trimmed the Coast Guard five,
35-28, and in the final game of
the night, the 503rd Plotting Co.,
of Drew, eked out a close 29-28
win over the 76th Fighter Sq.,
also of Drew.
Moise and DeWill, with 18 and
17 points, respectively, led the
308th Signal Co. to victory over
the Tennis Club.
The 3rd Fighter Command cap-
tured the second game of the
night in defeating the Coast
Guard, 35-28. Ralston led the at-
tack with 12 points, followed by
Wojiekowskie and Carrano with
nine and seven points.
Two Drew teams battled it out
in the third game, with the 503rd
Plotting Co. shading the 76th
Fighter Sq., 29-28. Crow was high
with 14 points for the Plotting
boys and Niohn racked up nine
for the Fighters.
Line-ups and scores of games:
308th Sig. (Drew) (66)-DeWitt (17),
Rush, Haskitt (2), Keeper (9), Cescena
(6), Nestler, Moise (18), Elliott (6),
Donahoe (6).
Tennis Club (28)-Bryant (7), Frick
(4), Bevan (4), Schenault (4), Robert-
son (9), Hardee, Dall.
3rd F. C. (Drew) (35)-Ralston (12).
Carrano (7), Mason (1), Urban (4),
Wojiekowskie (9), Babb, Dixon, Long-
man (2).
Coast Guard (28)-King (2), T. Bur-
rows (3), Clear (2). Burke, Cook (6),
Gorman (6), F. Burrows (9), Muzio,
Woods.
503rd Plot. (Drew) (29)-Crow (14).)
Dunham (2). Jesse, Brooks (7), War-
ner (2). Burch (4), Vernullan.
76th Sq. (Drew) (28)-Barnum (2),
Niohn (9), Knight (4), Low (3), Ran-
kin (91. Deugate (4, Haskins (2), Ander-
son, Sanders (2).

Signal Corps Cage

Leagues Now Open

Three basketball leagues got
underway last Monday night in
Air Warning Unit Training Cen-
ter with two games being played
in each league except the Blue
league. The leagues are know as
Red, White .and Blue.
In the Red league, the 552nd
Battalion and the 566th copped
wins. The winners of the White
league were the 555th Sig. Bat-
talion and the 319th Sig Co.
Wing. 713th Sig. Co. Wing cap-
tured the only game played in
the Blue league.
League games are played on
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
in Recreation Buildings, two and
three. Three games are played on
each of these nights. The Recrea-
tion Buildings are located on M
street between 1st and 2nd Sts.
Come out and support your fa-
vorite team. *
Teams entered in each league:
Red League-552nd Bn., 556th
Bn., 5G6th, Sig. Bn.. 503rd Regt.,
553rd Bn., 564th Bn., and 501st
Rest.
White League-555th Bn., 319th
Sig. Co. Wing, 576th Sig. Co.,
575th Sig. Co., 312th Sig. Co.
Wing. 680th Sig Sep., 951st Radio
Int. Co., and 391st Sig. Co. Avn.
Blue League--713th Sig. Co.
Wing, 703rd Sig. Co., 710th Sig.
Co., 307th Sig. Co., 1303rd Sig.
Operational Tr. Co., 704th Sig.
Co.. 708th Sig. Co., 705.h Sig. Co.
Safeguard your own future and
the future of the American way
of life by investing in War Bonds
and Stamps.




DINNERS
iefiats. Poultry. CGrovrice.s, and
ficilntesse.r.. Hierri i. I.ox all
all kidsm of fish. tlri WINI, KKEERl. StNI)I'I:M
FINMAN'S KOSHER
MARKET
Only Kosher Market in Tnmnpi:
928 E. Broadway Ph. M5(i-133


m U


Drew Field Quintet Drew Basketball

Drubs Tampa U. By Team to Play Team
From Pinellas Base
Score of 60 to 41 -Drew Field No. 1 base ball


Drew Field's varsity basket ball
team staged a scoring spree
against Tampa University in de-
feating the Spartans, 60-41, at
the field gym here last Wednes-
day night for their fifth straight
win.
George Gaskell led the scor-
ing attack for the soldiers in
tossing in 13 baskets along with
two foul shots for a total of 28
points. Also playing a beautiful
floor game, he held his opponent
to five points.
Big six-footer Ed Sitarz, play-
ing a steady game for Drew,
racked up 14 points and was sec-
and high scorer for the night.
His handling of the ball was a
feature of the game.
Bob Poage and Sadler led the
scoring for the visitors with 11
points apiece.
Lt. Colley, coach of the team,
and his assistant, Tommy Tem-
ple, have whipped together a
powerful starting team, but lack
the reserves. The team showed
better handling of the ball
against the collegians and are
improving with each game.
Haskin and Webster each man-
aged six points for the soldiers,
along with a fine floor game on
defense.
Score by Quarters:
Tampa U. __12 18 11 10-41
Drew -______ 10 20 8 22-60
Officials: Davis and Orwer.

SLEEP TIGHT.
For three days in a row, at
Camp Crowder, Missouri, a brand
new recruit had turned up at in-
spection with a perfectly made
bed. Impressed, his company
commander and the sergeant de-
cided the matter deserved addi-
tional attention. So they started


team will meez me mnellas
Air Base team here next
Thursday night, Jan. 14, at 8
o'clock in Gym No. 2-
The varsity team to date has
won four out of their five
games played. Drew holds
wins over Hillsborough High,
Jefferson High, Plant Alumni
and Tampa U.
In the five games Drew has
amassd 247 points. George
Gaskell holds the individual
scoring honor with a total of
76 points.
Drew is a member of the
Southern League of the Tampa
City league and will play one
home game in Gym No. 2,
Thursday of each week. Gym
No. 2 is located on M Street
between 1st and 2nd.

Soldier Poets

Shoot for Cash

Budding poets in the service
of Uncle Sam may now have a
cnance to make their poetry pay.
P"7zes totaling $1,000 are being
offered by A. S, Barnes and Com-
pany in New York. A $250 first
prize, $100 for second and a
third prize of $50 is offered for
the best poems. In addition there
will be 120 prizes of $5 each.
Poems, both lyric and ballad,
of camp life. action or battle are
wanted. They may- be of any
type so long as they are con-
cerned with the war.


to take the bed apart to find out
the rookie's system. Its simplici-
ty astonished them. The bedding
was held tightly in place by two
dozen safety pins!


Drew


v No. 1 Team


Wins First Game

In City League

Drew Field No. 1 basketball
team defeated Florida Beer, 49-
26, in their first games in the
Southern division of the Tampa
City league. This was Drew's
fifth straight win of the season.
The soldiers outclassed their
Beer opponents all the way and
scored at will. Drew opened fast
and led 12-4 at the end of the
first quarter.
George Gaskell, the sharp
shooting ace, again led Drew in
scoring with 16 points. This game
brought his season's total of
points to 94.
Fowler was second high scorer
for the soldiers with 10 points and
played a bang-up floor game in
taking the ball away from his
opponents all night.
The Drew coaches used 10 men
and substituted frequently.
Drew will meet the Tasco five
in a league game tonight at the
Trailer Park gym. located at 2300
N. Oregon Ave.
Drew (49)- Hogan, Haskin (4),
Schendel (1), Bixby (1), Messing
(7), Sitarz (6, Evans (2), Derkacs
(2), Fowler (10), Gaskell (16),
Walters.
Florida Beer (26)-McCartney
(2), C. Todd (2), Valles (1), Gran-
ell (7), J. Todd, G. Leavine (2),
R. Fernandez (12).


-MAAS

BROTI-ERS

*


Complete ...

convenient


MILITIA R Y


DEPT.

JUST INSIDE OUR
FRANKLIN ST.
ENTRANCE


MEN'S SHOP
MAIN FLOOR


KNIGHT BROS.
PAPER CO.
612 Bell Phones 4205 4204
"A Paper for Every Purpose"


Service Men Officers Families
FOR REALLY GOOD FOOD AT MODERATE PRICES
PLEASANT ATMOSPHERE-FOLLOW THE CROWD TO

THE COLONNADE


BAYSHORE AND JULIA
Steak, Sea Food, Chicken Dinners
Delicious Sandwiches


MODERATE
PRICES


PHOTOGRAPHS FOR SERVICE MEN


Drew Field Special



for $19 o nly
tftett


BR YN-ALAN


One 8x10

Oil Colored

Portrait

You may have ydur choice
cf iwo beautiful finishes on
this SPECIAL ADVERTIS-
ING OFFER the "Old
Master" Tapestry or the
life-like Oil-Tinted finiF'-
Both are colored in oils ai
made in 8x10 size.

Because of the lower-than-
cost price of this advertis-
ing offer we are obliged to
limit this offer to only ONE
TO A PERSON IN ANY
SIX-MONTH PERIOD.

Frankly, this lower-than-
cost price is an inducement
so that we may have the
opportunity to show you
what we can do for YOU.

If we do our job well we
know you will patronize us
again and again.


ADDITIONAL PRINTS OF YOUR PICTURE
an be purchased in various sizes and finishes.


STUDIOS


416~~b Tamp Stet-Scn Flo TeehneM13


DREW FIELD ECHOES


January 8, 1943


PTa- a


Telephone. M-1439


4~16 Tampa Street --- Second F'1007-l




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