Title: Drew Field echoes
ALL ISSUES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076231/00036
 Material Information
Title: Drew Field echoes
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Post Exchange
Place of Publication: Tampa Fla
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida -- Tampa   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Drew Field Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa -- Drew Army Airfield
Coordinates: 27.975556 x -82.533333 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: "Published each Friday in the interest of the officers and enlisted men of Drew Field."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 39 (Dec. 2, 1943).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076231
Volume ID: VID00036
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24622561
lccn - sn 93063705

Full Text
















VOL. 1, No. 37 Published Every Friday Drew Field, Tampa, Florida November 13, 1942



.STA BALI. PL'A IE RS WILL TEAUH HERE


Drew field Units

Participate In

Memorial Parade

In the first wartime observ-
ance of Armistice Day, Drew Field
soldiers joined units from neigh-
boring camps and marched
through the streets of Tampa and
Sarasota. Although there was no
cheering among the thousands
who: thronged the streets to view
the growing strength of America,
a pattering of hands greeted the
passing of troop units.
Led by the MacDill Band, the
parade sung into Tampa, march-
ing with precision. The men of
the Drew Field Signal Corps units
drew vociferous applause as they
passed before the reviewing stand
in Plant Park.
At Sarasota, Drew Field was.
represented by the 69th AAF
Band and' the 59th Aviation
Squadron, colored troops from
Camp DeSoto. White troops from
the Sarasota Air Base participated
in the Sarasota parade.

Army Ordnance

Will Buy.29,000

Passenger Cars

The Tank-Automotive Center
of the Ordnance Department will
purchase 29,000 new cars for the
Army, the War Department an-
nounced today. Purchases will be
made by the thirteen districts of
the Ordnance Department and
will be confined to passenger
models of Chevrolet, Ford and
Plymouth already in the hands of
dealers.
Each Ordnance District has a
record' of the new cars in the
hands of every dealer, and each
will purchase an allocated num-
ber of cars. Dealers will bid by
dealing directly with the district
offices.
The thirteen district offices are:
Birmingham, Boston, Chicago,
Cincinnati, Cleveland, Detroit,
New York, Philadelphia, Pitts-
burgh, Rochester, St. Louis. San
Francisco and Springfield, Mass.
The Ordnance Department will
accept deliveries of the cars on
the premises of the dealer and
drive the cars to Army depots.
The Tank-Automotive Center is
,responsible for the design, manu-
facture, supply and maintenance
of all tanks, combat vehicles and
all other automotive equipment
for the Army.


Mrs. Melvin B. Asp, wife of Col. Asp, Base Commander, is shown
as she clips a ribbon officially opening chapel No. 1 at Drew Field.


Yank Contest for Soldier
Sherlock Holmes
All soldiers with Sherlock
Holmesian qualities and a flare
for sleuthing have an opportunity
to win free 12-month subscrip-
tions to YANK, the Army weekly,
according to a full-page ad on
the back page of YANK's Novem-
ber 11 issue.
The new contest, which was an-
nounced this week, calls for in-
formation leading to the arrest
and conviction of the following
military oddities: youngest mas-
ter sergeant, oldest enlisted man,
heaviest man in the Army, biggest
family of men in the Army, larg-
est feet in a pair of G.I. shoes,
marine who has served in the
mos foreign ports, sailor who can
tie the most knots.
By mailing the names of cul-
prits to YANK before December
1, 1942, soldier-detectives have a
chance to receive the Army
weekly free of charge for a whole
year. In addition, the winning
culprits" will be awarded identi-
cal prizes. Complete details of the
contest will be found in YANK.

Soldier Holds Legal
S*- I I A/ ED I


Limit in Wa

FORT SILL, Okla.-
maximum of $10,000 in
is held by Pvt. Royce
- so he cannot buy
through the payroll
plan. Pvt. Boyle apolc
owning so many bonds
officer explained the pa
recently.


Camel Caravan At

Drew. Field Tuesday

When Camel Carav, n' Uni n!t 'i
III performs at Drev Fieljd o I
Nov. 17 at the outdoor acerA- .
Bette Lee Ambler, Alma J.in
Wilsbn and Betty Jane Gilbert--
known professionally as th. Tlree i-
Debs-will bring their sophitz- -
cated vocalizing to the foljdicrs
The Three Debs, piul. n ;,ar,,
other favorites of stsag-. ,scr.,_-ri ,
and radio comprise thi. Camrr .
Caravan unit, one of th.- s-ecral
variety shows sponsored by: the:
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Companr.
now touring the Unmted Stat-: .
presenting good will entertain- '-
ment for men in the Army Air THE THREE DEB
Corps, Army, Navy and Marine
Corps. -November 17, Tuesda
Keep this pasted in your hats p.m.; place, outdoor ar


Col. Asp Receives

Keys to 5 Chapels

At Dedication

Five chapels at Drew Field
were dedicated on Sunday at ex-
ercises held at Chapel No. 1 dur-
ing which the keys were turned
over to Col. Mlvin B. Asp, com-
manding officer of the field, by
Major Reade, area engineer.
The ceremony was held in front
of Chapel No. 1. The 69th AAF
Band of Drew Field played sev-
eral hymns as a prelude. Chaplain
Carl W. Hewlett, base chaplain,
opened the ceremony with prayer.
The ribbon across the doors was
cut of Chapel No. 1 was cut by
Mrs. Asp, wife of the base com-
mander, and worshippers filed in.
Colonel Griffin preached the
dedicatory sermon and hymns
were sung by the Tampa Bay
Choristers.

Youthful C.O. Close to
Army Since Childhood


Illiterates At Drew

Taught To Read

And Write English

In keeping with the policy of
the War Departmnet, a program
for the training of illiterate en-
listed men is now in successful
.operation at Drew Filed.
In some Army posts, special
training units are made up of il-
literates. The education of illiter-
ates in the Army is a function of
the Development and Special
Training Section, Training
Branch, Adjutant General's De-
partment, which had the task of
setting up this unique type of
(Continued on Fage 6)

Obstacle Course Meet
To Be Run Thursday
The second Third Air Force
Obstacle Course meet will be
held Nov. 19 at the Third Air
Force Obstacle course. Colored
troops will run at 2 o'clock and
white troops at 3 p. m.
The winner of the white
troops receive a free end at
the Floridan Hotel, with the
two runners-up receiving ath-
letic equipment. Also for the
winner will be a corsage and
one meal for his girl friend and
the privilege to invite one cou-
ple for a meal.
Each organization is asked to
submit the names of their
entries to the Base Physical
Training Office before Nov.
14th. There is no limit on the
number of men each organiza-
tion can enter. Be sure to get
your entries.in at once.
Corp. Andy Fisher of Plant
Field carried off the honors in
the last meet to win first place
and the free week end at the
Tampa Terrace.
The three winners for the
colored troops will receive ath-
letic equipment.


Major League Stars

Conduct Baseball

Clinic At Drew

Beginning November 17, three
famous baseball players Paul
Derringer, Paul Waner and Butch
Henline-will conduct a baseball
and unpiring clinic at Drew Field.
The clinic will be under the aus-
pices "of the Base Physical Train-
ing Office.
All baseball fans of this genera-
tion are familiar with the exploits
of Derringer, Cincinnati Reds -
pitcher for years one of the star
pitchers of the National League,
and Waner, the Big Poison of the
Waner brother outfield act on the
Pittsburgh Pirates, one of the all-
time outstanding batters of the
National League. And fans of an
earlier generation are acquainted
with the baseball deeds of Butch
Henline, f o r me r Philadelphia
Phillies catcher and now a big-
league umpire.
Two softball leagues, the _Der-
ringer Flag Wavers and the
Waner Interceptors, will be con-
ducted in connection with the
baseball clinic.
Derringer will instruct on pitch-
ing, Waner will handle the out-
field and infield, while Butch
Henline will teach catching and
umpiring. They will lecture as
well as instruct in both baseball
and softball.
--------<-------
Two Air Corps Majors
Get Stars for Gallantry
The silver star for gallantry in
aerial action has been awarded to
two majors of the Air Corps in
the Solomon Islands fighting, ac-
cording to a report received from
Major General Millard F. Har-
mon, commander of the United
States Army in the South Pacific
area.
At his advanced base in New
(Continued on Page 6)


r ondis Although only 23 years old, Lt. ,
John H. Meyer, Company Com- .
- A legal mander of the Sig. Hq. & Hq. Co., .
war bonds Ninth Fighter Command, claims .' '
D. Boyle 18 years of military experience. 's^ ^' '
any more He is the son of a Coast Artillery .,
deduction sergeant, now retired, and has ,
ogized for been close to the Army since his -
when an early childhood. '
yroll plan Lt. Meyer came into the Army -. J *
via his ROTC trainnig. He hails V -, '
from California, where he com-
pleted his education. .. '
His hobbies include mathema-
tics, swimming, tennis and photo-
graphy. When finis is written to "
his Army career, he plans on a .
career in electrical engineering. ". .
Highlights of his career? Being A.
made Commanding Officer of his
outfit, Lt. Meyer says. As to girls, In addition to other duties, the officers and enlisted men pic-
well, it's the one back home who's tured above are responsible for the morning variety shows presented
always in his heart, not the Flor- over WFLA at 7:05 a.m., the evening programs over WDAE at 8:00
idan variety. Oh, they're okay, p.m. on Thursday nights, and Friday night shows over WFLA at 9:00
S naturally. But you know how p.m. The talent for these shows is gathered from officer and enlisted
those things are. personnel stationed at Drew Field.
-- The Friday night show, in particular, has caught the fancy of the
k THERE HAS BEEN criticism listening public in the Tampa area, according to WFLA officials.
of various commissioned celebri- A super-special show is planned for this Friday night, so don't
ties, football coaches, movie fail to tune in.
Stars, newspaper and radio men Left to right, Lt. Charles W. Thornton, of New York, assistant
without any comprehensive Special Services Officer and former Broadway actor; Lt. George W.
investigation of the fine jobs Kluge, of Chicago, radio production officer and a former announcer
most of these men are doing. for the NBC studio in the Windy City; Lt. James F. Brown, of Chi-
Curiously, regular Army and cago, Special Services Officer, AWUTC, and also a former sports an-
S Navy officers who have devoted nouncer for various stations in Chciago; and standing at the micro-
BS their careers to the services phone, reading from a script, Cpl. O. Z. Whitehead, of the Drew'
rarely join in the squawk. The Field Special Services Office, a former Chicago and New York stage
.y; time, 8 resentment is in the ranks. actor who enacted an important role in the Hollywood version of
arena. (Washington Post.) John Steinbeck's famous novel, "The Grapes of Wrath."







Page 2


When a Soldier

W riles To His

Supr Ration

Pigeon Loft.
Nov. 9, 1942.
Dorn' Chicken:
'This sugar report is coming
st. -, from second heaven. You
s",7uld cop a gander at the tax-
p:,.ers straggling in. This new
bur.-h of handcuffed volunteers
ha:- everything including short
pan ls, battle wagons, moss backs,
cr isers, mountain guineas and a
Hollywood Private to snow 'em
un'.er. They are some contrast to
th-, processed jeeps on the way
ouI by the numbers and bound
for Fort X. Another whistle-shy
gr, up resting by the roadside just
ju'iped to 'tenshun when the
st-pper sounded off with "Off and
o:; let's go!" They're headed for
the dispepsia factory where K.P's
,ha. e been working overtime in
Ulcer Gulch heaping flea sacks
in.ter the belt in Tent City before
th:-y stuff their grease traps with
bu lets and torpedoes. Whether
it's slop or fried crow and prop
wash with hand grenades for des-
s-L. the wolves will finish it off.
The gift box was juicy. No jaw-
bo-ing for ducks yet awhile. And
Lth cookie can makes a fine butt
trav. Many thanks.
Sure. I think it's swell bucking
for your Mom to feed five spar-
rov. s on Sunday but you, my pret-
ty frill, can do .your duty by
juis skipping the duck with your
knJiting. Sometimes I envy a
sh.ckman.
I ast Tuesday Zipper-stripe Bob
was- sad-sacking around the' hdri-
zo-l..als until he managed to grub
a couple of frog skinis and take
it on the hoof for town. Seems
lie did a little crowdin' after get-
tin' too much suds and shacked
up at the Greybar Hotel. He is
st.: sweating iT out on the honey
wagon.
Louie, the section eighter, is
b' ot-ing his top over the cooler
Tic just got. H says he has his
ow;i butcher in town and he
ine-er got such a choppin' up in
a! his life and him dated tonight
wiih the sweetest little pigeon in
Fk'o. ida. "More of your jail-bait,
T-bone!" someone just shouted.
Saw Joey Dogface this noon
apd he had just hopped up. Can
yc'-,- picture that goldbricker bunk
fnt'miuing and not enjoying it?
1;,:: buddies brought him in some
rno- juice. He'll join the sick,
lan-:e and lazy tomorrow. He's
bee c bucking for it.
S'ime for lights out. Comes Ga-
bi.rkl, we put old lady to work.
VWed'nesday morning cleanup is
so.l and polish with the old man,
bi'.l Saturday's inspection is when
we really spread the eye-wash,
Cood night and remember to'
keep cooking' with both burners.
Your big juicy striper.
DICK
(And she replied in his own
Array slanguage. His chicken
doesn't do a bad job with it,
ei.:.er).
Sti:oer dear:
Having a juicy fight with my
ju-'-bug brother. I really don't
li'"-. to belittle a Republican but
he has been short stopping like
an animal. Here's what was cook-
ie'. I sounded off that I was tak-
ing a powder in the family heap
to a stomp whereupon he started
s :'ging breeze to heck me, after
vl:ch I told him to stack it and'
tooe; it on the duffy anyway.
TMny goes in the stretch this
Tuesday. He wised up you were
a r:.ncom and thinks rookies have
to tdrow you a highball. He quiz-
zed me about morning chow and
I srad you had shoulder pads with
machine oil. shingles and mud
wilh armored cow, and of course
side arms. It's made a chow hound
of J:im already.
Dad thinks you are a black dog
to have red-lined into a root man.
He was a machinist and they
Shanghaied him as an Admiral.
Next, he bucked for Old Bess and
was also a paper. soldier for
we.eks. Uncle Bob was a shave
tai' snapper mechanic from the
sla:t, which burned Pop until he
became a ninety-day wonder him-
se;.
I'm afraid I've been cooking'
wi.h only the front burner, so I'll
a'ey your advice. Well, Colonel,
1.:--.. coming .
S. Your Sweet Cookie.

SAdams Kennedy
Whiting and Jefferson
Tampa, Fla.
Groceries, Tobacco, Candy
Notions


DE F H N 1 .94


Chaplain Demonstrates

Hobby Shop Possibilities


CHAPLAIN CARL W. HEWLETT, himself an expert wood-
worker, operates the wood lathe in the hobby shop while (left to
right) Capt. Chester K. Delano, Chaplains W. E. Beardsley and
R. M. Terry, and Col. Melvin B. Asp, Base Commanding Officer,
look on with profound interest.
Amid the whirring of band saws
and the clatter of hammers, Drew
Field soldiers work in the hobby A
shop located in the center of the
reservation. Complete, from lathe
to screwdriver, the workshop can
turn out anything from bookends g /
to bunk chests. Enlisted men are
invited to avail themselves of the
facilities, whether they desire to
make something for themselves,
friends or their barracks.
The hobby shop is under the
direction of Chaplain Carl W.
Hewlett, Base Chaplain, and Cap-
tain Chester K. Delano, Special
Service Officer. Chaplain Hewlett Air-Conditione h. M 1878
is a skilled woodworker and helps :j i r Iutinee 4-C Nii.ht
the soldiers whenever possible. I *t1tilCee -- 4-i Night
Among the first pieces to be NOW PLAYING THRU WED.
turned out in the workshop was
a set of walnut bookends with -- .
the insignia of colonel, the silver ...
eagle, set on them. They were |:'-
made 'by Chaplain Hewlett for -.'
and presented to Col. Asp, Drew's
commanding officer, at the dedi-
cation program. .
The shop is equipped also for
metal work. A soldier in the me- .-
dical corps not so long ago made
a caduceous (insignia of the me-
dical corps) for his company or- .
dearly room to prove the shop's .. .
facilities. Several soldiers have .
made souvenir metal letter open- f a' i

Wedding of the Week Po
Last Saturday, Nov. 7, Techni- .o
cal Sergeant William D. Rivers, i .o,,,
Jr., and Miss Alice Rentz, of Ft. t.
Meade, Fla., were married in a .
simple private ceremony in Wau- --"
chula, Fla. _.
Enlisting in the Army at Mac-
Dill Field, Fla., in Nov., 1940, ____
T. Sgt. Rivers was transferred to SPE
Drew Field in December, 1941. "Battle of Midwa"
Although he was only 21, he was tte
recently promoted to the rank of I
technical sergeant as assistant to i Coming: "ROAD TO M\,ROCCO"
the sergeant major at the Base
Headquarters of Drew Field.
Mrs. Laura Rentz was matron
of honor and Mr. W. A. Smith act-
ed as the groom's best man.

Air-Conditioned Ph. 3291


C'OMP I.EiET
DINNERS S
3 en:ts, I*oultr.v. Groerlies, and
l all kilinds of fish, stri-lly fresh. a
WIN E'. BEERl. SANDWICilIS I S
FINMAN'S KOSHER
MARKET
(Inily osher i I;iMarket, in Ta;impil a
i "' E. Broa wvay I'll. I)l(;-153
1, Block E:Ist of Nebraskl a Ave.


WE PAY CASH|
FOR YOUR CAR
100 Needed at Once
Drive Your Car to Either Lot
4116 Florida or 1716 Florida
Bring All Your Papers
IE. 0. CLIFTON


Servicemen Are Welcome
Day or Nite at


CHILD CAFE
501 Frainllin St.


9c---- 28c
SUNDAY AND MONDAY
"Crossroads"
William Powell Hedy Lamarr
---- Feature No. 2

Berlin Correspondent
Pana Andrews-Virginia Gilmore


Tampa and Zack
Phone 3003-9c, 22c
SATURDAY and SUNDAY
"International
Squadron"
James Stephenson
Ronald Reagan
--Hit No. 2 -
"NAVY BLUES"
Ann Sheridan-Jack Oakie


"That's the happy greeting heard today when a

new supply of Coke arrives at a cooler. Folks

wait for it... wait because the only thing like

Coca-Cola is Coca-Cola itself. Customers smile

and start moving up to pause and be refreshed.

"There's a cheerful spirit about this way of

accepting wartime restrictions. Morale is high."


BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY BY
TAMPA COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY
. .aaaisiS!K .asi.a....aga ... aai.Ba a -- ..


.,...... .....:..:.....+ .: .........:...:..:..:..:...:..:......:..:..:..::..:....: ..::....:......:+ :.: -.
UNITED OPTICAL DISPENSARY .
Manufacturing and Dispensing Opticians
205 ZACK STREET PHONE M 5783

COURTESY DISCOUNT 20 PERCENT
Prescriptions Filled-Lenses Duplicated


THE TERRACE GIFT & FLOWER SHOP
a II l Hotel Tampa Terrace -
"Flowers by Wire"
-I Open Until 11 P.M.
__.r Every Day
Phs. 3022 -DM 5561
;...;: ;.:..>.:. .:f.n: ..: f:. +;: :*+:.:..K :: :.* :


Complete Printing Service







The



Comm ercial


Printers



1115 Florida Avenue


Phone 2126


Printers of...



The MacDill Fly Leat


Drew Field Echoes


,^.e....n.nn^.n^.'nnnn^f^t-' l'


rlpplp.,


F"Srf ""Ijsf^Sr CZsfsf "


November 13, 1942


DREW FIELD ECHOES


h"Te Coke's in""


.v.


~---






.oebr.3.92.R FEL


TaiipanI'Urged Not

To Loilev On Road

Ne ar Drew Field

Contrary to reports that West
Columbus Drive had been closed
by the Army, Capt. Guy Potter,
provost marshal at Drew Field,
revealed that it is open to through
traffic to Davis Causeway.
Capt. Potter said that a tempo-
rary sign had been put up, warn-
ing persons without official busi-
ness not to loiter along the road
by the field or stop, but that
through traffic was going along
without interruption.
"We don't blame Tampans for
wanting to look at the planes on
the field from the road," he stat-
ed, "but we can't have loitering
or stopping along the road by the
field. If one car stops it won't be
long before 30 or 40 will be
parked along the field.
"To begin with, it's dangerous
-' the planes are taking off or
ending across the road, and then,
also, there are certain regulations
about that sort of thing and we
must caution the public."
SIGNAL HQ. & HQ. CO.

Iil Fighter Command
By CPL. LARRY RALSTON
The Signal Headquarters Com-
pany arrived back at the Base
after a six-week stay in Hills-
borough River State Park. They
arrived back Monday, Nov. 2,
after an all-day hike.
During their stay among the
pine trees the company had their
working hours, and also plenty of
swimming, fishing and rowing
after duty hours were over. Foot-
ball games, volley ball and stren-
uous exercises were in store dur-
ing the calisthenics hour.
All sections were intact and,
while there, instructed another
company in the principles of A.
W. S. The telephone section of
the company claim the record for
putting up a P.I.C. unit. The time
was a good bit under the time set
by another outfit which formerly
claimed the record.
Shelter halves were pitched as
the company simulated an actual
bivouac, and gas attacks came at
different times to keep the boys
constantly on the alert. A guard
was maintained twenty-four hours
a day.
The fellows showed their will-
ingness to cooperate with each
other, their officers and their re-
spective jobs.
While at the Park, the gang al-
ways looked forward to the peri-
ods when they could use their
passes to journey six miles away
to the "Pure Water City" of
Zephyrhills. Here the recreation
committee, under Mrs. Shafer,
sponsored dances for the visiting
service men and provided plenty
of girls.
The company basket ball and
volley ball teams have begun to
take shape and by all indications
it looks like a good season ahead.
Sgt. Holsomback is putting the
cagers through the paces each
evening at 4:15 p.m. on the com-
pany courts.
Signal Headquarters has the
distinction of having, as far as
they know, the. only mascot of its
kind. It's "Herbie," their pet coon,
age two and one-half months.
VERY PAY DAY BUY MORE
WAR BONDS AND STAMPS.





"



THE PALACE
YBOR CITY'S LEADING
JEW ELERS
1520 71h Ave. YBOR CITY


Laff of The Week
While taking his daily walk,
the Commanding Officer of the
Post observed a couple seated on
a bench. The soldier and his girl
companion were so engrossed in
each other's company, that they
did not notice the C.O's approach.
Finally, with him standing beside
them, the girl looked up, startled,
while her companion was too
dumbfounded to move.
"Lady, is your boy-friend a sol-
dier?" asked the C.O.
"No, sir," came the answer-
"he's my husband."

Officers' IClhing Ca

Be Bought At ieh PX

Recently remodeled, the cloth-
ing department of the Main Post
Exchange, located at 2nd St. and
"F" Ave., is now quite commodi-
ous and attractive. It is headed
by Mr. Nathan Larrie. In addition
to other clothing, it has for sale
a wide assortment of officers
wearing apparel.
Prices are reasonably low. A
very necessary facility of every
Army Post, the Post Exchange
was established primarily to sup-
ply the field personnel with arti-
cles of everyday use, wear and
consumption not furnished by the
Government at the lowest pos-
sible prices. The percentage of
profit derived from the operation
of the P-X is limited by Army
regulations.
Officers blouses and trousers to
match are available at the price
of 43.00 for the combination.
Officers trousers, 100% wool-
either pink, elastic or Barathea
(16 ozs. and 19 ozs.)-are on sale
at prices ranging from $9.60 to
$12.00.
Officers O. D. woolen shirts sell
for $5.95 to $9.20.
Officers service caps (visor
style), either elastic, wool felt or
fur felt, sell for $4.80 to $9.60.
Custom-made shoes, all styles
-Jarman, French Shriner & Ur-
ner, and Peter's International
shoes-range in price from $5.10
to $7.60.
Regulation Val packs sell for
$15.75 and regulation lockers sell
for $7.25.


Red Cross Sponsors

Picture contest

There is still time for soldier,;
sailor and civilian camera fans to
sumbit entries in the Red Cross
National Photo Awards, depict-
ing any phase of humanitarian ac-
tivities of the Red Cross. The con-
test will continue until Dec. 31,
with prizes given for the best pic-
tures of the month, as well as for
the entire contest. The prizes will
be in the form of war bonds; the
values given represent maturity
value.
Monthly awards will consist of
a firs tprize of $200; second prize
of $100; third prize, $50, and 33
special merit awards of $25 in
bonds. In the grand awards, the
first prize will be $500; second
prize, $300; third prize, $200, and
a fourth prize of $100, and 10
honorable mention prizes of $50
each. Negatives of prize-winning
pictures will become the property
of the Red Cross which also re-
serves the right to purchase at $5
each any negative that does not
win an award.
Entrants may submit as many
pictures as desired at any time
during the contest, but no pre-
viously published pictures may be
submitted. Pictures may be made
on any size film, but not on glass
plate ngeative. It is recommended
that pictures be no larger than 10
inches in the longest dimension,
and no smaller than 5x7. Pictures,
not negatives, should be submit-
ted (soldiers expecting transfer
may submit negatives with pic-
tures), mailed flat and unmount-
ed, with a brief title or-descrip-
tion of the picture on the back
with the name and address of the
contestant.
SAll entries must be sent to the
Red Cross National Photo
Awards, 598 Madison Ave., New
York City.

MONEY LOANED
ON ANYTHING OF VALUE
STAMPA LOAN CO.
"TAIPA'S OLDEI'ST AND
I MOST IIERATL"
908 FIRANKTIN STREET
E&MWHH~teHIMHsteB tl-riBE!Bffil k3


*-


SOLDIER,
Who's going to make good
if you lose your money? ,
NOBODY ... if your money was in cash! If, how-
ever, you took the wise precaution of carrying your
money in the form of spendable American Express
Travelers Cheques, American Express will refund
your money.
American Express Travelers Cheques are spendable
like cash in hotels, for transportation and in stores
and shops everywhere.
Issued in denominations of $10, $20, S50 and $100.
Cost 75T for each $100. For sale at Banks, Railway
Express and Western Union offices, at principal rail-
road ticket offices and at many camps and bases.


S AMERCAN EXPRESS
TRAVELERS CHEQUES


6 it ervn e ce!e
-r L < a
.. ,:.. ."."
..: 1

'i s for

ALTERATIONS
FOn T y T REEnd Ts

Open Tuesday and Thursday Nights


ATTENTION!

Commissioned and Non-Commissioned
OFFICERS



LIFE INSU RANE

AND ANNUITIES

Supplementing Government Insurance
Many Plans of Policies Available

Death Benefits Payable in Cash or Install-
ments as Desired to Beneficiary You Select.


Premiums Payable Monthly by U- S

Government Allotment Plan
LIBERAL WAR CLAUSE PROVISIONS

INVESTIGATE NOW!


WALTER M. SEITZ. Mgr.

KANSAS CITY LIFE INSURANCE CO


406 Morgan St.


Tampa, Fla.


(Assets over $130,000,000)
. ,, s. ...........- -_ .u--r-, .. .. ... ..am




Order Your




i hrist mas



jCaardds



S.. NO 0 W!


f Wide Range of Styles and Prices.


S The Commercial Printers i

" 1115 Florida Ave. Phone 2126 or 2177



FREE sATTs DELIVER
ESTIMATE DELIVERY


VETERAN ARMY TAILOR
JERZY HRYNKIEWICZ
Blouses, Pants, Shirts Made to Order
Laundry, 10c per Pound. Washing by Hand, 24-Hour Service
OPEN NIGHTS TILL 9 430 W. LAFAYETTE ST.


SERVICE MEN WELCOME...

GILBERT HOTEL
811 TAMPA STREET PHONE M 1094
GEORGE T. BRIGHTWELL, Manager



Buy More War Bonds and Stamps


917 Franklin St., Tampa -
872 Centrall-St. Petersburg 531 Cleveland-Clearwater


DREW FIELD ECHOES.


Page 3


November 13, 1942






November 13, 194A


Pae4DE FEDEHE


.The Drew Field Echoes

GLENN R. ROSS, Publisher
TAMPA ARMY NEWSPAPERS
Business Office:
1115 FLORIDA AVENUE
P. O. Box 522 TAMPA. FLORIDA Phone 2177
Ali advertisements contained in this newspaper are also contained
in Ihe MacDill Fly Leaf. Minimum joint circulation, 10,000 copies.
ADVERTISING RATES FURNISHED ON REQUEST
A newspaper published exclusively for the personnel of Drew
Field and devoted to military interests and the United Nations
Victory.
Opinions expressed in this newspaper are those of the individual
writers and under no circumstances are they to be considered those
of the United States Army. Advertisements in this publication do
not constitute an endorsement by the War Department or its per-
sonnel of the products advertised.


MONDAY:
7:05 a.m.-7:25 a.m., WFLA (970
kc)-Drew Field Presents.
Your Drew Field reporter pre-
senls coming events in the enter-
tainment field at the Base. Music,
songs and inspirational talks by
the chaplains.
TUESDAY:
7:05 a.m.-7:25 a.m., WFLA (970
kc)-Drew Field Presehts.
6:45 p.m.-7 p.m., WTSP (1380
kc)--Life in Khaki.
A new kind of radio show, fea-
turing the funny side of the
Army. Listen in for a laugh, and
sometimes a bit of pathos.
WEDNESDAY:
7:05 a.m.-7:25 a.m., WFLA (970
kc)-Drew Field Presents.
A good way to start the day
right. Keep in the know about
happenings at Drew.
THURSDAY:
7:05 a.m.-7:25 a.m., WFLA (970
kc)-Drew Field Presents.
8:35 p.m.-855 p.m., WDAE (1250
ke)-Variety show.
This all-soldier spot provides
variety entertainment ranging
from music through comedy to
a touch of the dramatic, featuring
an all-soldier cast. Listen in to
hear how good your pals can be.
FRIDAY:
7:05 a.m.-7:25 a.m., WFLA (970
kc)--Drew Field Presents.
9:00 p.m.-9:30 p.m., WFLA (970
kc).
A new half-hour of entertaini-
mnent with a purpose. This soldier
show, featuring singers, actors,
musicians and comics from Drew


THE THREE LITTLE RATS
Here is a new version
Of three little rats,
Hitler, Musso and Tojo,
Rodents in high hats.
Their stealthy attack
On a world at rest
Was the super blunder
Of one rodent pest.
Another rat joined,
And then a third pest,
And three little rats
Were all in one nest.

Hitler called great Musso,
"Come, come, my dear!"
But bald Musso was left
Far back in the rear.

Then Tojo decided to
Come to the front,
And cover poor Musso,
His people's affront.

Their 'days are counted,
They never shall win;
We have them running
For cover and more vim.

The United Nations
Are now on the prowl,
To hound these rats
And their ways so foul.

The story will finish.
The end will be swell,
When these little rats
Find themselves in' H-- L


Guard Challenges
Men on Kitchen Police
MIAMI BEACH, Fla.-A guard
pulled an early morning shift and
while on duty halted a gang of
KP's on their way to a mess hall.
Then he 'ordered them to advance
singly and be recognized. The
noncom in charge of the group
presented the necessary evidence
to show they were on official
business and then began to march


Field, presents a show for the sol- them on their way.
dier, by the-soldier and about the Then the guard remembered
soldier. Audiences are invited and his orders which said, "Everyone
welcomed. So far the response is to be challenged and no one
has been encouraging, for the stu- allowed to pass unless it is abso-
dio has been full each week. lutely certain they are on official
The show presents a picture of business."
the interdependence and coopera- He halted the group again and
tion that make the Army a work- made certain all were on official
ing organism. With special em- business by calling their names
phasis on the combat team spirit from the KP list.
of Drew Field, dramatizations,
written by the soldiers, show the
fighter-air-ground liaison as it af- two each week brings information
fects the individual soldier. of special interest to Army men.
Guest stars and special inter- The Special Service Depart-
views add color from time to mentisanxioustbring the best
time on the programs. If last of the Drew Field talent (and
W*ek's broadcast is any criterion
x ,hate is to coast, Drew can ex- there's plenty of it) to its broad-
pect a radio.series to be Droud of a casts. To do .this, they need your
pect a radiosees to be round of. cooperation. Write in to tell them
SATURDAY: what you liked.and would like to
hear again. If you can entertain
7:05 a.m.-7:30 a.m., WFLA (970 in any way suitable to radio, let
kc)-Drew Field Presents them have your name at the Spe-
A rseume of the week's Base cial Service Office. Do it now,
activities and a forecast of those and give yourself a chance on the
to come. A surprise interview or air.


Jeep6fTrasiers'

Are Assgned To

Regular, Scheduleb
7
The new passenger trailers now
.seen at Drew Field. have been
placed on scheduled runs to in-
crease the efficiency of personnel
and to eliminate individual use
of motor vehicles by military and
civilian personnel of the post.
Between the hours of 7:30'and
8:30 a.m. and 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.,
this transportation will give pri-
ority to the movement of civilian
Employees between the parking
lot at the main gate at Tampa Bay
Boulevard and various offices on
this Base.
The following tentative sched-
ule has been set up.regarding the
time and routing of these vehicles:
During the hours for civilian
employees' transportation: One
trailer at least every 10 minutes.
Between the hours of 8:30 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m.: One trailer at least
every 15 minutes.
Two routes have been estab-
lished: Route No. 1--From the
main gate north by way of Ave-
nue B to 10th Street; returning to
the new main gate by way of
Avenue B (South). Stops at old
east gate, Finance Office, 10th
Street, bus station and BOQ.
Route No. -From the new main
gate to the old east gate, to 2nd
street, north on 2nd Street to F
Avenue, east on F to 10th Street,
north on 10th to K Avenue, east
on K to 1st Street, south on 1st
to the old main gate, then east
to the new main gate.
Additional stops are to be pro-
vided later at designated points
for the purpose of loading and un-
loading passengers. Personnel are
encouraged to use this means of
transportation in lieu of private
cars or authorized transportation
on official business within the
post in order to conserve gasoline
and ruboor.

Army Emergency Relief
The principal object of the A.
E. R. is to collect and .disburse
funds for the purpose of .meeting
emergencies and special cases
arising from exigencies due to the
war and which require prompt
attention.
The nature of the emergency
cases with which the A.E.R. is
primarily concerned are those
arising among dependents of ca-
sualties between the time when
allotment of pay is discontinued
and insurance is received; of cases
where pay is expected but not
received; of cases arising from
hardships caused dependents by
the hidden transfer or movement
of t:-- soldier from his camp or
station; and other temporary
emergency financial distress
which arises from causes incident
to military service.
Assistance from the A.E.R. may
be in the form of a loan or in
justifiable cases, by outright
grant. In some cases it will take
the form of relief in kind. Loans
made by A.E.R. are considered to
be moral obligations of the bor-
rowers and no interest is charged.
"Relief in Kind" may be in the
form of medical or surgical care,
hositaliZaipn, the furnishing of
vital necessities such as fuel, food,
clothing, etc., or of assistance in
securing allotments of pay, ar-
rears in pay, death gratuties, pen-
sions, and insurance.
If your families are in need tell
them to go to the nearest Army
Post, Camp, or Station and see
the Army Emergency Relief Of-
ficer. Here at Drew Field that
officer is Lt. Edward B. Dailey.
He is located in the Base Library
Building in the Special Services
Office.


Report Card From
The School Building
By PFC. HARRY POLSKY
Tucked away behind the Base
Post Office is what is known to
the personnel of Drew Field as
the Base Library or School Build-
ing. From the outside it looks like
a peaceful haven of repose for the
weary. In truth it has served as
such for quite a long time, until
the advent of the newly built
Service Club.
It has been the home of a few
Bq functions- which (I,,(, to lnpc k


By Sgt. John F. Suszynski


f

1

I
I

1
i


14ARK, 7NIRC-1- A F/amaL&,
ARE95 ZRIIN6 FORAA J'M$& 2


Aft, RUT XIW515 A OIIAeRR,
MJAf A W16krP MY16 61E IE

"~"~b~~,~, ~IC77,_~


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Pags 4


e No new faces, but three neue ac
of space in the Base Headquarters No new faces but three new
and due to the type of work they corporals graced the Band Stand
carried on, needed larger quarters at last week's concert-Gordon
to accomplish the work. Now, fi- Booth, our librarian; Woodrow
nally, the school building has Harwick, our supply man; and
come into its own. The Courts and
Boards Office and the School Of- Joe Regis., your Band Noter's
fice are located in the building, chief helpmate. Right on the heels
One of the rooms has also been of his promotion, Cpl. Regis noti-
remodeled into a courtroom for fled that he has been accepted
the various courts martial that for Postal OCS; so he'll be leav-
come up. Despite the beauty and ing us and trading his stripes for
regal appearance of the above Lieutenant's bars before long. I
mentioned room, your reporter wonder if Joe will have time to
will try his best to appear there carry on his "Lonely Hearts" cor-
only as a spectator. respondence-he calls it fan mail
With the acquisition of the -while he is away at school.
Courts and Boards Office, the Did you notice, during the Uni-
building has acquired a certain versity of Tampa vs. Drew F. '
freshness and charm, due to a football game, that there wa
certain Miss R., who occupies a side contest going on between
desk in the above mentioned of- Bands of the two respective "in-
fice. Your reporter was wondering stitutions"? Nobody kept score,
why, with the O.C.S. applications but Cpl. Estes' arrangement of
being handled by the School Of- "Praise the Lord and Pass the
fice, so many of the applicants Ammunition" dre w favorable
persisted in going to the C. and comment from several sources.
B. office for their blanks. It did Incidentally, the football score
not take long to find out. Now I, was 21-13 (in favor of the other
;oo, have been thinking of apply- side or shouldn't I mention
ng for O.C.S. and making the that?
same mistake. The dedication of the Base's
------ five Chapels, late Sunday, was a
major event in .the history of
G. I. Dicti y 'Drew Field, and the 69th AAF
7. I. COnary Band was honored by the privi-
lege of participating in this col-
Ace in the hole-alibi. orful ceremony.
Admirals-medical orderlies. S Sgt. Eaton's brainchild, the
Animal-jerk. Glee Club, made its bow at the
B. B.-tough Sarge. last Band Concert, with an ar-
Band beaters-shirkers. rangement of Irving Berlin's
Battle wagon-fat guy. "Angels of Mercy" (with Band
Black Dog-one who has it soft. accompaniment High class
Bucking-trying to win ap- stuff WHO IS THIS "WAR-
proval. ING" GUY?
China clipper-mechanical dish- The Band's activities during the
washer, past week not confined solely to
Choppin'-up-haircut. things musical--the volley ball
Cookie-girl. tournament got under way with
Colonel-over-zealous non-com. the 69er's (Cpl. Sedlak, acting
Cook with both burners--do captain) besting the 314th B Hq.
your best. & AB Squadron in the first frame.
Cook with the front burner-to Along with the athletic exhibi-
take it easy but keep going. tion, some of the boys put on a
Cooler-short haircut, show that would delight any neu-
Cruiser- soldier who doesn't rologist or psychiatrist too
know much. bad I had to miss the game (?).
Duck-cigarette butt. Maybe the volleyball game had
Eyes wide open-fried eggs, something to do with it--and
sunny side up. maybe it's just a coincidence--
From wood-fake. nevertheless, the Band is going
Georgia ice cream-hominy "on the road." It all started with
grits, regular trips to Major Strickler's
Graybar Hotel-guardhouse or boys at Camp DeSoto (about a
jail. half mile down the road' came
Grease trap-kisser. Armistice Day, and we found our-
Handcuffed volunteer-Selec- selves parading away out in Sara-
tive Service man. sota. Maybe we'll have more to
Hollywood private-acting cor- tell you about that trip in next
poral. week's BAND NOTES; mean-
Honey wagon-garbage truck. while, look out for Mr. Baker's
Horizontals-h a b i t u a bunk next musical surprise package.
fatiguers. l
Jail bait-girls under age.
Jaw boning-to borrow on ere- CHURCH CALL
dit.
Muff the duck-sneak away.Cath
Ninety day wonder 0. C. S. Caolic
graduate. Mass-Sunday, __:15 a. m., Cha-
Off and on-off your tail and pel No. 2.
on your feet. Mass-Sunday, 9:00 a. m., Cha-
Old Bess-truck. pels No. 1 and 2.
Old lady-mop.
Rangooned-shipped out in a Protestant
hurry.
Red- lined -scratched from a Service-Sundhy, 11 a. m., Cha-
list. pels No. 1 and 2.
Republican-any citizen. Service Sunday, 7:30 p.
Sad sack-someone in the Chapel No. 1.
dumps. Jewish
Section eighter-mental case.
Shapin'-coming along, showing Service-Friday, 8 p. m., Cha-
improvement. pel No. 1.







Pagc S


Noebr1, 92DE FEDEHE


SIGNAL Ho & HQ. CO. way productions, is back in Ci- D AD
gartown with a cute little wife,
STH EB E Al having been welded while on fur-
E ULE CAL lough in his home town, Philadel- By Sgt. E. S. Perry
By SGT. MIKE DODD phia. ILast Sunday is a day most of
By SGT. IKE DODD Sgt. Gabriel, co-ordinator par is will remember because that
excellence at Personnel, is very w as a swell outing and crowd the
Here we go again, fellows, this much that way about an in-town as a swe outing and crowd the
time with an extra stripe, a new cutie if one is to judge by 6:30 company had at Sulphur Springs.
company of officers and enlisted phone calls that sign off wthThe married men brought their
men with the exception of a cadre "hiv" which all aides, a new face being Mrs.
drawn from the old 9th, which "honey," which all adds Lip to a
drawn from the old 9th, which place on the weekly Sweat Pa- Arthur Brown, the blushing bride
now has another number who joined Cpl. Brown in matri-
We are happy to welcome sev Pfc. "Tex" Poitevant, whose mony just a week ago. There
eral new men to our orgnaization date book makes the Chicago di- were lots of girls and pretty ones
whom you'll be hearing more rectory look like a Woolworth too who came out from the USO
about in future columns, particu- scratch pad, has tossed his Sterno and joined in all the games'and
larly our genial company com- camp stove on the scrap pile, and fun. One game had Sgts. Knecht
mander, Lt. John H. Meyer. is cooking with 110 volts on a and Hirzy so dizzy they hit the
That good time you heard being new six-burner Westinghouse, deck flat on their f aces. Of course
"broadcast" the other Tuesday this time a dark-haired senorita hot chocolate isn't beer asorigi-
night at the Floridan Hotel was in the Base Telegraph Office-a ally planned, but still it was
the swank company party we dish of chicken and rice with a g ood with the roasted (G I style)
threw that night. After a swella- dash of tabasco. Baswier kept the crowd going
cious meal, a la Cpl. Mann, the A pair that hang together these assler kept the crowd gong
natural thing happened: a series days are those two Rajahs of great.
of after-dinner speeches. The of- Repartee, Sgt. Cook and Cpl. And speaking of good things,
ficers had their say first, after Shaw, in their own peculiar lit- Corporal stripes were received by
which the non-coms did their tie way, stepped in and settled a som e hard working men; Dicker-
stuff, with some noteworthy strike at the Hav-a-Tampa cigar son, Tobami, and Mcintyre
words from a few privates. Your plant in Ybor by whisking the i an, Tobias, and Mcstripes ope
writing chum stumbled through girls off to a nearby cafe where dont forges mo sps opn
his spiel, which was probably the they promptly got them plastered.
-y in hte soup of the affair, and You girls that flirt had better be The men made that Armistice
Se saying of the comic character, on the alert, for thsee two sons Day parade looking like a crack
-Aambone, was vividly brought to of the bayous, who make timber Battalion out of West Point. With
mind, namely: "When I stand up wolves look like little Chester's Just a dry run under their belt
to make a speech, my minds sits pet white mice, cut a wide swath and a lot of men that just about
down." and you had better make certain forgot the I.D.R., that was quite
A marvelous time was had by that latches are down and shut- an accomplishment..
all, and the party boiled down to ters securely fastened when they Jots: Pvt. Parrisn is receiving
this: Success. We are looking for- pass through town, jug under candy regular from some girl-
ward to another such affair. How arm. that's a sure sign. Sgt. Britton has
about it, Lt. Schultz? Speaking of Sgt. Allen, a reserve lieutenant someone on the string or maybe
after-dinner speeches by officers, in the Salvation Army and twice Ishe's got him that way. Cpl. Soja
let me say here and now that our wounded getting coffee and is still looking and'trying. Pfc.
smiling Lt. Hillyer was on the doughnuts through Chicago fire- Pupo goes out every night spank-
beam, on the ball and everything lines, is all set for a wedding ing neat. There's a reason. Pvt.
else that makes for a lively party when he gets his furlough. Holek is making up lost time
filled to the brim with vim and The welcome mat at Headquar- restriction. Those Motor Pool men
vigor. ters is unfurled this week to greet who go places in trucks in the
Personal note: A certain young a newcomer from Gotham, whose day, go places at night, too. Wit-
fellow in this outfit would like ancestors were that famous Ark- ness Cpl. Glenn and Pvt. Hughes.
to know more about Dottie Moe, building family, with the excep- Pvt. O. Dean has been busy all
the lovely blonde announcer who tion of a dropped "h," done, no week cleaning up battalion head-
handles the "Girl You Left Be- doubt, to please some English quarters. It look like Pvt. Leasor,
hind" program, heard over WTSP stockholder in the firm, one Pvt. the ex-mailman, is going to give
each morning at 7 o'clock. Will William Noa. lessons next week in "how to
you oblige, Dottie, by imparting Pvt. "Albany" Meade, a shine walk." Pvt. Rife claims he bought
some information to ye scribe? cooker from this side of the Bir- a fiddle f he
Cpl. John T. Mann is an old mingham jail, who was finally must be trying a musical career
cow hand at drilling his platoon. collared by the revenues when for a change. Cpl. Lovelace bellies
You should see him dress 'em to he emerged from the hills to an- p to a bar and drinks 'em
the right sometime. When he swer his draft board summons, t
emits a command, G. I..heels click policed up from the bottom of his Two officers of our company
....shoes to the top of his G.I.were transferred to another out-
pronto. G.I. shoes to the top of his G.I. fit-. Lts. Nelson and Norstrom.
haircut, hotfooting it into town We sure hated to see them go.
314th B. HQ. & A.B. SO. last Sat. eve to fling a little woo Good ck a them on their new
with his inimitable Southern oo
Drawl. "jobs.
FLUN K-UPt. Trenner, sitting at the Spe- Cpl. Chaga, Dickerson, and Pvt.
Sgt. Trenner, sitting atthebpe Geiser hang out at the USO every
By J. J. O'GARA cial Order desk at Base Headquar- eie hn out t te
ters-that's where he shines night. I can't find out who she is.
It is to that Base Headquarters wondering what Vic Mature has Mentioning the big men of our
outfit, such as Goss and Garrett,
Info-please man with all the an- that he hasn't got, for he's hitting reminds me of our last muster;
swers, Pvt. Ed Planisek, who has the towels rather heavy over that mt
bought an extra large pair of Blonde Bomber in Captain Bull's n, it wasn't the heat that day,
G.I. stockings to hang up in the office, and could use a large help- be.t could be a dance the night
Message Center on Christmas, ing of it himself. o b
hoping that old Kringle will fill How can a big man like Harbin
it up with stripes, that boy with 8th Fighter Wing, Hq. & Hq Sq. keep so quit and so inconspi-
the bedroom eyes, sweating out cuous? Does it seem so far off 'till
the hours until he's back oin T nd m pay day? To me it will be the
Cleveland to gladden the hearts Te Figh i in g down of a new era.
of the dolls on Euclid Avenue who Wate
have written reams since he start- By PFC Walter Werner EVERY PAY DAY BUY MORE
ed his Cook's tour with the Air On behalf of all the fellows in WAR BONDS AND STAMPS.
Forces, has developed a crush on the Squadron we'd like to thank
that little mouse at the Billeting all our Officers for the swell
Office, and if she takes the hint, party which they threw for us at had a good time in a quiet way.
she'll be hitting the towels, too. Clearwater last Thursday. Every- He reminded us of a slightly


Miss Millie Tyler, a cute little
trick, a mistress of hounds with
the pack at her heels and eating
out of her hand, will send a good
many lads to the showers, we
think.
Corporal Leonard Rubin, man-
about-interview on the Base, to
whom-the mayor of Tampa pre-
sented the keys of the city-and
t h e n had the combination
"hanged-is another prospective
CEEYESSIR sweating it out
Ji ese days .... The 9x12 Turkish
towel with the Sultan's autograph
this week is awarded to Sgt.
Thompson, and is a confirmation
of last week's report on his trav-
els to Tampa sans the little eye-
windshields that he might better
show his profile, for that boy is
sweating a certain Tampa cutie.
Just last week, in a downtown
restaurant this reporter saw him
grope his way from an adjoining
table to what he thought was a
telephone, drop a nickel and spin
the little dial and get, instead of
the fair one's voice, a Glenn Mill-
er recording of "White Christ-
mas"-which isn't funny.
Sgt. Abel, who is sweating out
W.O., currently major-domoing at
Base Personnel, was beckoned
aside by a waiter in a downtown
bistrQ the other eve, and escorted
to the table of a blonde doll with
a come-hither look for George
Bancroftish chappies.
Pfc. Vincent McGarry, a thes-
pian of no.mean ability whom
New York theater goers will long
remember for his sterling charac-
- terization as the corpse in "Mur-
der at the Vicarage," and who,
prior t ohis induction, played mi-
nor roles in a number of Broad-


body had a great time.
The arrangement committee
really worked hard to put it over
and they certainly "delivered the
goods" which consisted of 6
kegs of beer, a couple cases' of
cokes, sandwiches, pickles, cheese,
potato salad and all the trim-
mings. Officers on this committee
were Major Huffer, Captain Sem-
mes, and Captain McLaughlin, all
of the A-2 Section. The Enlisted
Men on the committee who did
plenty of hustling were T Sgt.
Quensel, S Sgt. Dillon, Cpl. Mer-
vish, PFC Blackard & PFC Giller.
We will all remember that "Clam-
bake" for a long time to come.
In particular, we'll remember
Pvt. Tom Riley in an over-stuffed
girl's bathing suit looking like a
cross between a 40-dollar cow and
a Chorus girl from Billy Watson's
Beef Trust His running mate,
Pvt. Rudy Hoffman, looking like
"Old Man Mose' in an 1890 model
suit which hung below his knees.
That look of peace and content-
ment on the faces of those solid
beer drinkers-Pvts. Hricz, Gal-
lant, Gara, Forte, Ploskunyak, Al
& Bill Henry, Uszytko, Gross, Cpl.
Smith, "Madan" Paggi, and Pvts.
Whitehead, and "Pony Express"
Hilt.
And there was "mellow" music,
too, by the."Fighting Ninth Glee
Club led by T Sgt. Burnette, and
supported, by the lusty voices of
Pvts. Stone, Collier, Kozelsky,
Van Kruningen and Cpl. Thomas.
T Sgt. McVay, Cpl. Labun, Cpl.
Dattolo, Pvt. "Vic" Freedman and
all the rest of the "new fellows"
seemed to be having a good time,
too Ist Sgt. "Bill" Jenkins


CA AloY coA 7ED -
CHOCOLATEF










Af NOAWON S'ALEFAT 7AZYsA




I Df n.a u a NT H A H 6F U S


worried eagle watching his brood., I B 9i V 1 K 4 a I V F *
The cooks-Sgt. Griffin, Cpl.
Walden, Pfc's Adams and Gilch-
rist, and Pvt. Tillery had a party
of their own that night at the
Red Mill. From the way Yankee
Quinlan and "Reb' Adams looked
next-day, it must have been a
'doozey! "
P.S.. T Sgt. Masi and PFC l
"C e a s a r Romoro" Quattrocchi
were the lads who had the pleas- Please be sure to see or phone your local
ure of saying goodnight to the gen fur i or a-
curvesome Blonde from Georgiai TAILWAYS genfor further form
and her dark-eyed friend. tion before you travel.
A few congratulations and best PH E M 441
wishes are in order to Otto Kra-PHONE M 844
tochvil, who recently made T Sgt.
and also got married; to Pfc. Ben All Buses Leave Union Bus Station
Haviland, the Scholar & Dynamo TWIGGS AT MARION STREET
of A-2 Section, who also was mar- TWGGS AT MARON STREET
ried while on furlough; and also .-.., "' :- B- --
to the men who graduated from ....... .* .........
R adio O operations School last Sat- ... .... .t*.......... ...
urday-Pvt. Clayton J. Schmidt, T T D
W. L. Kirk, Nathan A. Ricks, p
Thomas R. Riley, PFC Louis H.
Beaulieu, and S Sgt. Paul Galanti. OPEN EVENINGS TILL 9
And welcome back to the three O
musketeers of the Transportation 43 W LAFAYETTE STREET PHONE H 45-914
Section-Pvts. "Buddy" Gannon,. LAFAYETTE STREET
Fred Quigley and Harry Pence- ....... :..:... ..:.;..:..:. .:.. .: ...*. .--:'
and SSgt. Allen. We understand
they encountered colorful and un- '
usual experiences on their trip.
LDIERS HOTEL DO WN TOW
SOLDIERS RIGHT DOWN TOWN


ALWAYS IELCOMEI
EL BOULEVARD


Marion and Zack
MANAGEMENT
-. T A ND \ T. P HOLMF


go= g w m- n ---- -A D_ A M 5 A A V -W .- ;
RESTAURANT
Finest Spanish Foods Best Buy More War Bonds andStamps
of Liquors 2001 Nebraska Buy War BondsStamps


DREW FIELD ECHOES


November 13, 1942


*^ n '* -- .






Page 6


Now the Nazis Are on the Run, Watch for Poison Gas


........ .'.'. .....
... ., .. ,


Lung irritants, defined, are Chloropicrin was discovered in field; immediate symptoms, irri-
agents which when breathed during the first half of the 19th states lungs; protection: gas mask.
cause inflammation and injury to .Century and was first used in PHOSGENE: U. S. A. Symbol
the interior cavity of the bron- battle by the Russians in 1916. and Mark-GG Gas 1 green band;
chial tubes and the lungs. This agent has the greatest per- odor: fresh hay, ensilage; color
Chlorine was the first Chemical sistency of all lung irritants. and state in field: colorless gas;
Warfare material used by the;
Germans dringthe first World The chief purpose of these gases persistency: 1 to 19 minutes; im-
War and was discovered in 1774. in Chemical Warfare is to effect mediate symptoms: burns eyes,
It is classified with phosgene, the human respiratory tract and throat and produces choking and
chloropicrin but does not have develop casualties. The modern coughing; protection: gas mask.
their persistency. The toxic sub- gas masks are so designed to af- CHLOROPICRIN: U.S.A. Sym-:
stances of this react upon the res- ford the best protection against bol: PS 2 green bands; odor:
piratory passage and is called a these agents and eliminate casual- sweet chloroform; color and state
lung irritant. tes caused by them. in field: colorless gas; persistency:
As the first World War pro- Inasmuch as we are probably 1 to 12 hours; immediate symp-
gressed, new respiratory gases nearing the day when the Nazis toms: irritates nose and throat
were used due to chemical re- will use poison gas, it is. wise to and causes vomiting; protection:
search, and phosgene was first know the properties, symptoms and gas mask.
employed by the Germans in De- first aid treatment of the gases For first aid treatment, remove
cember, 1915; in February, 1916, listed below: from.gassed area. Loosen clothes.
the French adopted it. It is more, CHLORINE: U.S.A. Symbol and Keep patient -warm and quiet.
persistent than chlorine and of a Mark-C1 Gas 1 green band; odor: Give non alcoholic stimulant.
much greater toxicity. I highly pungent; color and state Treat for shock and pneumonia.


7.: .


: ~~ ;
*i')''\


.. k
"4';








'.4,.


PAUL DERRINGER


2nd REPTG. CO. the opposing team. In two games
no less than 36 runs were scored
SI I Z off his deliveries. It's lucky that
S l A it was only an inter-company
564ih S.A.W. BN. SEP. game.
Cpl. Hammes is still displaying
By S. SGT. TOM CARUSO ihat hairy chest of his. I wonder
if there is power behind the mas-
After an absence of several sive hulk. Is there, Rube?
weeks from the Echoes, your cor- Joe Capellupo is still doing his
respondent finally has had the op- Joe Capellupo is still doing his
respondent finally has had the op- work in a very quiet manner. He
portunity to submit some chatter work ma t m ner
to this week's issue. First, I'd like is one of the best liked prviates
to congratulate Lt. Wood upon his of this company. kHoe you come
marriage this past week. We all ut ontop ths week, Joe. Lots
hear she's kinda cute, Lieutenant. of luck!
Lots of luck to you and the Mrs. S. Sgt. Jimmy Thomson is still
Lt. Yates, our. C.O strolin waiting for that OCS call and
through town with the Mstrolling working up to a pitch for it. Cool
through town with the Mrs. and off Jim, you have company.
two cute kids. Seems that was off, Jim, you have company.
about the only enjoyment he had 1st Sgt. Jones is walking around
in walking through town with in a hurry every time you look at
them. I would, too, if I had kids him. One of these days this cor-
as cute as they were. respondent is going to take him
Did you fellows notice the fa- apart and find out what makes
natic way in which Lt. Crumplar slm tick. Wonder if you'll ever
roots for Georgia? Being an alum- ow down; Sarge?
nus from Georgia, you could ex- Must extend my congratulations
pect that from the lieutenant ... to S. Sgt. Hallett upon his recent
Lt. Crumplar's pride and joy is marriage .and to a Tampa girl,
Frankie Sinkwich, Georgia's great no less.
back. The next time you fellows Hear that "Swede" Lindgren is
pass by the supply room just no- getting to be quite a Romeo.
tice the expression on Lt. Crump- Aren't you stepping out of your
lars face every time our Battalion class, "Swede?" Cpl. McGee can
Supply Officer, Lt. Graffius, teas- always be seen in the company of
ingly mispronounces Sinkwich's Pvt. Orchowski .what goes on
name by calling him Frankie here?
Stinkwich. .Lt., don't forget
that Sinkwich and Poschner both Illiterates at Drew
come from Youngstown, Ohio.
Just in case you fellows don't (Continued from Page 1)
know it, we have the swellest of-'
ficers in the battalion. Inciden- adult deucation, geared to the
tally, most of the officers are Army's practical needs, and of re-
quite athletic. Lts. Bolduc, Bo- cruising and training a staff of
land, Walker, Friendlander and teachers to carry out the program.
Armstrong seem to prefer soft- More than 70 per cent of the en-
ball. Lt. Garns is our solitaire listed men assigned to this teach-
king he's unbeatable. Lt. ing duty had experience as teach-
Wood is our "get-tough" instruc- ers in civilian life.
tor. He instructed us one day and Modern equipment for adult
got married the next. Hope he elementary education, based on
didn't forget himself. Lt. the use of visual educational
Crumplar looks like a flash on the units, is available for the use of
officers' softball diamond. Did these special training units.
you notice that flame-red cap he The class for illiterates at Drew
wears? He's all Georgia. Is Field is conducted in a room in
that why he's called "Peaches" the Base Library building by Miss
by his fellow officers. Lt. Battin Grace Bustillo, of Tampa, and an
is our "electrical whizz." He'll enlisted man. Of nearly 50 men
make electricity seem so simple included in their classes, nine are
that even a baby could under- of Mexican origin who are literate
stand it. Say, it certainly was nice in Spanish and not in English.
to ree the 2nd Reporting Company Miss Bustillo, who has taught
represented on the Drew Field Spanish to Drew Field soldiers
football team Saturday. You for nearly two years, teaches her
played a great game, Lieutenant. Caledonia, Gen. Harmon pinned
Cpl. Sisko has turned out to be the stars on Major Thomas J. J.
the star softball pitcher of the 2nd Christian, Jr., of San Antonio,
Reptg. Co. He always stars for Texas, and Major Thomas H.


SHQS. CO., REPTG. BN., 503d


REPORTS
By SGT. IRVING ROSENTHAL
SGT. LESTER SHEAR
We always wondered what the
boys did on their day off and last
Sunday we found out. T. Sgt.
Wasalewsky, Sets. C'l ..... ,. and
Mullins, Cpl. Napfel and Pfc.
Dropkin, Zemla. Schleicher and
Tucker were enjoying themselves
at the USO picnic at Lake Car-
roll. Pfc. Zemla plays a mean
game of tennis and Pvt. Tucker
has a mean tonsil.
At the football game last Sat-
urday between Drew and Tampa
U., our company was ably repre-
sented by Lt. Mueller, Lt. Caru-
so, 'irst Sgt. Dray, S. Sgt. Arm-
strong, S. Sgt. Sanders and T.5
Piccolino. Each has a memento
of the game in the form of numer-
ous bruises, scratches and tight
muscles.
T. Sgt. Anderson and T.4 Fred-
ericks are having woman trouble
again. They just can't seem to
hang onto a gal. They need some
experienced advice, so we refer
them to T.4 Weinbrun.
Congratulations to newly "ap-
pointed Cpl. Ravioli. He has done
a swell job as mail orderly and
deserves his new rating.
Tampa During a Blackout
When the siren blew, First Sgt.
Dray gulped down his drink, ran
out of the Tampa Terrace and
shouted, "Praise the Lord and
where's the transportation?" Sgt.
West was seen trying to jam into
the bus. He is recuperating at
Hutment 1285. What a mad rush
at the USO. I never saw a dance
bust up so quickly before. Black-
out, sirens and all, but T. Sgt.
Gibson managed to sleep through
it all.

Two Air Corps Majors

(Continued from Page 1)


S" I; -. . .
1 .


'. .. .. ..
.-' .
," .. . ,, .. r i .. a : ,. -

PAUL WANER
Major league stars who- will coach Drew Field baseball teams.
"Butch" Henline, not shown, will also coach.


CHANGE
The cot is not as large as my old
bed.
The fellow next to me is strange;
New sounds creep through the


A telephone back home-or pen;
Once the small hours saw them
home,
But now the eyelids close at ten.
And still T think epah ouiet ni rht.


Hubbard, of Fort Worth, Texas. day We ap h.av "sou nded l'""
With other Army flyers and in This is new, this place, this When taps have sounded, day is
cooperation with Navy and Ma- change. done,
rine Corps airmen, Majors Chris- That I am glad to do my part,
tian and Hubbard saw extensive No one says, "Lunch is ready, However small-and I am only
action over the Solomons. In de- son." one.
fense of Henderson Field, on A whistle blows, the call is
Guardalcanal Island, they repeat- "Chow." under the levity and the fun
edly fought off Japanese planes. No one says, "Any time will do." r unr te levity and the un
class the fundamentals of English The pace is quickened, the time The joking and the noisy day,
-reading, writing and spelling. is now. A silent understanding flows,
Because of varying degrees of lit- A kindred spirit that will find its
eracy, Miss Bustillo handles each There's a rifle in the hand that way.
student individually, held -Sgt. H. S. Waldron.


I


DRIEW FIELD ECHOES


November 13, 1942


c'.~



I


If


t.'
r,
~~-


* '
..

.,







3


THE ITALIAN CLUB (L'Unione Italiana) was established on April
4th, 1894 under the name of L'Unione, Societa Italiana di Mutuo Soccorso
(Union Society of Mutual Help).
It was organized by a group of fifty families with the purpose of
receiving mutual benefits through the payment of a small monthly fee,
the members receiving medical assistance and an allowance of seven dollars
a week as sick benefits for medicines and hospitalization in case of illness
and inability to work. This organization was formed due to the need of
cooperation brought about by circumstances produced by difference in
language, in cussoms and other causes among the then few members of
the Italian colony in Tampa. In this manner they were assured of being
taken care of in case of need and they evaded the danger of perhaps be-'
coming public charges when out of employment. The advantages of this
organization were soon apparent not only for its members but also for
the community at large. ffiffl( _
As the City grew and prospered and the Colony increased, the Society
increased proportionately in membership and it extended its scope and
-ctivities. Besides the medical benefits there were sablished sections in
te Society dedicated to social, civic and educational matters. The medical
division was improved and extended branchng out into all the necessary
aspects of that work, adopting the most modern and improved methods
and supplying the members with all the facilities necessary not only for
attention in their illness and cure, but also for the prevention of diseases:
and the safeguard of their health.
Social affairs were organized, constant intercourse with other clubs
and institutions were established, schools were opened both for children
and adults in which not only was given edu-
cation in the regular school courses for the
children but also, in the case of adults, night .
classes were established for the learning of the
language and of the principles of democracy \
and citizenship contained in the precepts of
the Constitution of the United States, thereby
encouraging them to acquire American citizen-
ship.
Later the name of the Society was changed
to L'Unione Italiana. The membership in-
creased from the few that organized it to 3,450
members which if has today. These members
are men, women and children. Of course, it can
safely be stated that the great majority are
workers, the income of which is not over eight
hundred dollars a year, and ninety-five percent
of them are American citizens, the majority
native born. -.
For a small monthly payment the members :
receive the following services and benefits: .
medical assistance, medicines, hospitalization, f,
X-Ray service, bacteriology service, laboratory ...
service, electro-thermic treatments, dntal atten-. \
lion and surgery, and in case of death, funeral. \ <
and burial services in the magnificent and up- .. ..
to-date cemetery that the Society owns, with- ," '.
out cost to the family. The Hospialization that
the Society pays for its members that need it
is at a cost of no less than four dollars a day per person, apart from the
surgery costs which include operations with all their incidentals and ac-
cessories. This surgery service could not be obtained otherwise by some
of the members on account of the cost of operating and also that of hospi-
talization for lack of the necessary funds for their payment.
The members also receive social benefits, recreation advantages, edu-
cation and library srvic. They have ample halls for meeting and social
affairs and amusements and club cafes for their pastime and card-parties.
The Library of the Society has in conjunction with it a branch of the
Tampa Public Library which is opened to the general public.
Relatives to the schools it is well to mention that the Society has con-
venient locations in its buildings, (with all necessary accessories at its own
expense) for the Educational Division of the Works Project Administration.
This is an Adult Education School of the W.P.A. and is attended at night
by a large number of persons, some of a very advanced age, who are
learning English, the Constitution, Democracy and Citizenship. This
school is a center of preparation for those that are to apply or have applied
for citizenship of.the United States, and is attended not only by members


but by many who are not members of the Society.
If any member, due to lack of work, cannot pay the dues of the Society,
the Society carries him or her ninety days without payment, giving them
the medical care and medical care and medicines that may be required
and other necessary benefits. In case of longer unemployment and inability
to pay, special committees are established to raise extra funds for the
payment of the dues of those that cannot pay them in order that they can
continue to enjoy the advantages of membership. These funds are raised
by means of collections among the members, entertainments, picnics,
dances, etc.
L'Unione has two very handsome buildings with all modern appliances
and improvements which are a real credit and ornament to the city. The
principal building or headquarters of the Society is located at 1725-31 E.
Broadway, and the other at the corner of Howard and Spruce Streets.
These buildings represent an investment of over one hundred and forty
thousand dollars. The Cemetery and other assets of the Society can be
estimated at a value of over twenty thousand dollars.
The Society has in the lower floors of the two buildings well equipped
and modern theatres the rental and income of which, together with the
proceeds of the social club cafes, are dedicated to cover the difference
between the expenses of all departments and the total dues collectd from
the members which are not large enough to cover all the expenses that
are required to supply all the benefits and services enjoyed by the members.
The Society is administered by a President, Vice-President, Treasurer,
Secretary and a Board of Directors of thirty members, who are elected
yearly by a general election of the whole membership called for the pur-
p se in January. None of the officers or the
members of the Board receive pay or emolu-
,s ment for their services, with the exception of
,7. the Secretary who acts as administrator of the
., '. '.' Society and its buildings and must dedicate all
Shis time to its activities and interests.
S / The Society has a splendid staff of physi-
S' cians and dentists who recognizing the neces-
S. sity and advantages of these institutions to the
S community, serve loyally and with enthusiasm
"^ ';. and are ready at all times to answer the call
of those in need. They dedicate special hours
for consultation in the clinics of the Society
S and pay constant visits to sick members at their
.homes. Their work and assistance and their
sincere cooperation has made it possible to
establish and build up this institution which
Springs help and relief to thousands which other-
S--. vwise, in case of unemployment or depression
....'-. .might become public charges with damage to
'' r t. themselves and to the community in general.
'-. -The Italian Club of Tampa has for the past
;': twenty years fought consistently against fas-
cism and its agents who have tried, time and
S again, to infiltrate the Mussolini philosophy
among the democracy loving Americans of our
colony. To date, and since the advent of fas-
S''cism in Italy, no official representative of the
Italian Government has been allowed to put
foot in our Club building. Today, with America at war, we are more
determined than ever to see that Fascism is completely crushed.
Since Pearl Harbor the Italian Club has bought $10,000 worth of
United States War Bonds and the members, along with thousands of
Americans of Italian descent, have bought many more thousands through'
the Club and other Bond selling agencies. One hundred thrity-eight mem-
bers of our Club are serving in the armed forces of Uncle Sam, and every'
day many others are enlisting in all branches of the military service as
are many thousands of Americans of Italian descent in the Tampa area.
The statesmanlike decision of President Roosevelt and Attorney Gen-
ral Biddle in lifting the stigma of "Enemy Aliens" to over 600,000 Italians
in the United States has filled the hearts of all with joy and gratitude,
because it removes from them a hateful and unjust blot. Such a gesture
will have a very healthy reprcussion in the hearts of millions all over the
word, and will incite them to fight more and to work harder to achieve
sooner the victory for liberty and democracy.


HENRY 0. PALERMO, President


PETER MANISCALCO, Secretary


SALVATORE SPOTO, Treasurer


And Other Business Men of Italian Descent


Mrs. V. P. Antinori
Henry O. Palermo
Frank J. Falsone
Corner Drug Store
Lodato's Pharmacy
G. Ferlita & Sons
Alex Demmi
Joe Barcellona
Jimmie 'Tiny) Licata


Lido Bar


S. Agliano & Sons
George's Billiard Parlor
Albano & Arcuri Grocery

C. Schiro & Co.
James Lumia
Lazzara & Valenti


American Venetian Blind Co.
Sam Ferrara
Betty Rose Bakery

Testasecca Bros. Bakery
Santo Trafficante
Silver Ring Cafe
Ferlita & Sons, Bakery


Fonte Chicken Market Seabreeze Restaurant


Dr. Anthony P. Perzia
Frank Torregiante
John Giglio
Frank Pupello

Italian Club Cafe
Frank P. Settecasi
Industrial Machine Shop
Stop & Shop Grocery
Valenii & Jamieson


Page 7


DREW FIELD ECHOES


November 13, 1942


II""


mericans


Itali'an Club







~- :.a


THIRD FIGHTER COMMAND
HO. & HO. SO.

SEA BREEZES
By PFC. ALVIN M. AMSTER
Starting off with a spiritual
note, anybody wanting a vest-
pocket-size New Testament, imi-
tation leather cover, Gideon edi-
tion, please contact either Sgt.
George Emrick or the writer.
These Bibles actually fit your
shirt pocket.
'Tis rumored that Sgt. Lee Mc-
Guire is contemplating something.
He remarked last week, "I think
I'll become a shackpappy one of
these days. But what are the pic-
tures of those six cuties doing in
your wallet, Mac?
Heres that snorers list: Castet-
ter (boy can he saw wood!), Wahl,
Bustream, Rarus (before mar-
riage), Clarke, Staiger, Bongio-
vanni, Claude Johnson, Grant.
This weeks promotions are old
stuff, but they look good in print
to the folks back home. Its now
S. Sgt. Phil Burke, Sgts. Otto
Komorous and Joe Rarus, Cpls.
Frank Guercio and Abe Sancton,
and -Pfcs. George Dorwart and Al-
vin Amster that'ss us). "Sweating
"it out" by the squadron continues.
Rosemary Groves and Aida Va-
lenti, of Hqs., now believe in "Wet
Paint" signs. They decided to rest
for a few minutes on a bright yel-
low bench marked with the ap-
propriate sign. Yes, they returned
to work with yellow zebra stripes
on their uniforms.
Can't say Bill Nosker isn't buck-
ing.. Last Monday he reported for
work at 7 a.m. Bill leaves on fur-
lough Nov. 17. He's another Ohio
boy.
Our "Mutt and Jeff comics,
Caldwell and Joyner, were invit-
ed to the home of a local divorcee
for dinner one evening. Not too
sure of the location, they asked
the street car operator how to get
to the address. The man told them
the direction and almost immedi-
ately began to fluster. It seems he
was the ex-husband and didn't
approve of his "ex" having visit-
ing soldiers over. But Joyner re-
ported a good meal.
Last Sunday, Betsy Wilson, A-5
stno, reported for work wearing
her new three-piece ensemble.
Did it go over big? Those wolves
in.A-1 and A-4 sure can whistle!
Another brother team on the
Base. includes Jim Thom and his
brother John, a member of the
12th Fighter Command.
Note to all men with G.I.
glasses. Hank Interdonati, our
former watchmaker and jeweler
(he .fixes watches very reason-
ably, too) ,will form-f G.I. glasses
to your face. See him in B-2
lower.
Joe Hresko's desk is now flush
against the wall to Col. Springer's
office. Joe was typing when both
the colonel and Capt. Holland
came out to see what caused the
tom-toms to beat. The vibrations
carried right through the parti-
tion into the colonel's office.
HOT DOTS. John Ashe is
still getting that Charles Atlas
strong-man literature, but no
mailed muscles. Who is that
girl that Emrick and Grant call
"Caroll?" DiLorenzos new
nickname is "Sleeping Beauty."
.Frenchy drinks about seven
cokes daily Shoff says, "Me,
I'm having a lot of fun as a pri-
vate."
What happened to that mus-
tache Mitchell, of Ordnance, was
raising? Driscoll calls his
newly designed airplane an "Ob-
leogobelisk." Mrockowski can
certainly drive a jeep like no-
body's business, especially around
the block. .... "B" stands for
"Blackie," also for "bullgang."
Vining and Meekins are walking
the floors these nihgts. ... New
shackpappy, "Bunny" Grossman.
Butler and Knippers take
turns mopping and waxing the
floor of the vault .... Lew Wil-
liams picked up a gal the other
evening old enough to be his
mother .... LaCount and Washe
have new pipes. Say, Pete,
how is Howard Hein? .. Duncan
can finally comb a part into his
porcupine bob. Irwin and
Caldwell claim paying off a bet
on a 2-1 football score to Joyner
is pure charity .... Wonder of
wonders, your columnist won
last week's football pool and the
poteof-ifte bucks with 17 winners.

Service Men JEWELRY and
GIFTS for Every Member of
the Family.
Wrapped and Mailed for Your
Convenience-Anywhere,
PARAMOUNT GIFT SHOP
322 Central Ave. St. Petersburg


-Z-T


.":- !'7lovehiiier 13, 1942


Welcome to St. Petersburg
tiiiia '.;i-ir .--Iir in-mffiaoin -m^^ili~--^TB~a^*p'mT^^*nB- g~~~*--


Abraham Lincoln


George Washington


L~L~


Two Great Americans whose lives were dedicated
to the sacred causes of Liberty and Freedom.

We cherish their memory, and the heritage they have left us
to preserve forever.

America stands resolute, proudly defending the precious rights
of her people, for which these two patriots have fought, and
which have survived so gloriously throughout the years.



WE ESPECIALLY EXTEND OUR WELCOME TO ALL
MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES


132 SECOND STREET NORTH


PHONE 6948


I ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. I

SB "The World's MOST UNUSUAL DRUG STORE"
SB B 128 Ninth St., South ST. PETERSBURG, FLA.
Presents BEAUTY CRAFT'S Newest Creation in Wood Purses-New
and Different-Made from the World's Largest Assortment of Fiiie


Domestic arid I imported Woods.


"A LASTING- GIFT"


10-inch PURSE



12-inch PURSE



12-inch HAND
INLAY BAG

$7.50

'__- MAIL ORDERS
QUICKLY
FILLED


"St. Petersburg's Newest and Most Modern"

THE H TEL SEVILLA
IN THE "HEART OF EVERYTHING" IN THE
"SUNSHINE CITY"
233 Second Street, North
European Plan Sun Deck Roof All Outside Rooms
Faces the Southwest
sm4 Bi i R


WELCOME TO ST. PETERSBURG FROM
TAMIAMI HOTEL
SPECIAL RATES TO SERVICE MEN


Sub-Depot Subs
Something newhas really been
added to the Supply Office in the
form of June C. Law. Since we
are so busy and things are not
going just as we would like them;
we were beginning to get on each
others' nerves-then along came
Junie, who simply oozes with per-
sonality and humor. She has us
all smiling again, and everybody
seems to be their old selves in
Supply. June was the first woman
in the United States to be ap-
pointed as active Deputy U. S.
marshal, which office she held for
seven years. We are happy to
have you, Junie. May you become
a permanent fixture. We really
need you.
Nell Rawls came prancing in
the other morning with a big dia-
mond on the third finger, left
hand. Engaged to that "Buck" we
have heard so much about. Lucky
dog Buck is a second lieutenant
out in Missouri. Nell says the exe-
cution is not to be until this damn
war is over.
Edna Linn-went and got herself
a six-week leave of absence to be
near her husband, Warrant Offi-
cer Ken Linn, who is at Myrtle
Beach, S. C.
Harris Hobby left on the tenth
for Camp Blanding. Was rather
sad upon departure. Not that he
doesn't want to do all he can for
his country, but Hobby is in love
and doesn't agree with Shake-
speare that "parting is such sweet
sorrow."
Johnnie Timmerman up and
joined the Navy. What an insult
to us.
What will "Happy Bottom"
Tate think of next? Last week we
had a new bus driver who didn't
know the stops on the Field, so
Gladyce crawled up in the cabin
of the trailer and proceeded to
direct him around the Field.
Can't say these new trailers, or
whatever they are called, are go-
ing over so. big here in Sub-De-
pot. First morning they were in
use yellow paint was spread all
over everybody's rear end, and
not one has been on time since
they went into commission. All
we are waiting for now is the
rainy season, flu, colds and pneu-
monia.
A certain young lady really
^.......-....-.--- --i
SERVICE MEN Read The

'TAMPA ARMY
i NEWSPAPERS
The MacDill Fly Leaf
The Drew Field Echoes
ST. PETERSBURG
REPRESENTATIVE

HOWARD EDSALL
416 Beach Drive, North
Phone 4989



GOLDENROD

TAFFY

KISSES
231 CENTRAL AVE.


embarrassed everyone in Sub-De-
pot last week. Seems as though
she had to stand up all the way
froc town on the bus. No officer,
soldier, or civilian was gentleman
enough to get up.and give her a
seat. Such screeching and carry-
ing on you never heard the like
of. To all officers and soldiers who
happened to be oin that bus, please
accept our apologies for this per-
son's behavior.
Forrest O'Brien and Ralph Han-
cock have requested foreign duty
(Brazil). Looks like it might go
through. Now everyone in Sub-
Depot wants to be transferred to
Brazil, where the nuts come from.
Pete Fender says she didn't
sleep a wink Sunday night. Mon-
day was her birthday, so she stays
up until 12 o'clock to open her
birthday gift from T. Sgt. Ed
Schoeneck who is stationed out
in the wilds of Oklahoma. 'Twas
a nice diamond-so now Pete is
out of circulation-darn it!
Florence Abrahams returned to
work Monday after being laid up
in the hospital for 10 days. Had
her tonsils yanked. We missed
you, Flossie now try to stay
healthy for a while.
------- --------
"Your eye looks bad. I see signs
of liver trouble or anemia, and I
fear chronic nervous affliction."
"You're looking at the wrong
eye, Doc. That one is glass."

Paramount Bowling
Alleys
You are Invlted to visit our
modern and up to date valley
860 4th Ave. S. 'lhone 75OS


S Pals Memrorial Armbulance Service
@ je 4


649 Second Avenue, South


Phone 4112


$1.00 PER NIGHT
240 First Avenue North


DREW FIELD ECHOES


MRS. E. H. MOORE, Mgr.
Phone 6558


Attention Soldiers Bargains
in Unredeemed Pledges. Dia-
mands, Watches Jewelry.
We Specialize on Watch and
Jewelry Repairing. Also En-
graving.
PROVIDENT LOAN CO.
206 Florida Theater Bldg.


Maynard A. Duryea, Managing Director St. Petersburg, Fla*


NIKKO INN
19 1st St. No. Phone 6720
Air Ciriditioned, Private
Dining Rooms, Chinese and
American Meals


Mostellar's Sundries
ICE CREAM AND COLD
DRINKS
201 9th St. So.
Opp. Seaboard Station


Gilbert System Hotel
Betty C. Mitchell, Mgr.
746 Central Ave. St. Petersburg
I'hone 7864
"Your Home Awasy from Home"
You Are Always Welcolue
A phone In Every Rioom
Hot and Cold Witter All Timles
ris""i"""~""""""""s"tI)^^sj


THE NORMANDIE
414 Fourth Ave., North
St. Petersburg
STEAM HEAT
Reasonable Rates-Day, Week
or Season.
"Only 4 blocks to Main Busi-
ness Center."


WIATSON'S
DINING ROOM
553 Fourth Avenue, North
Specializing in Steaks and
Home Cooked Meals


SHORECREST
OUTDOOR _SCHOOL
Boys and girls of all ages. Edu-
cation under ideal conditions.
1125 Beach Dr., North
1200 No. Shore Dr.
ST. PETERSBURG
"KEEP 'EM FLYING"


Welcome to the

SUNSHINE CITY
DREW AND MACDILL MEN

DOTY'S GARAGE
Every Automotive Service

PHONE 8228
799 Second Ave., South
"KEEP 'EM FLYING"

At St. l'etersbaur
Sportsman Billiard Parlor
228 Central Avenue
St. Pete, Fla., Phone 50-612
S"The Store That Value Built"
BERKMAN'S
Diamonds Jewelry Luggage
Gifts
Next to S-P Cafe
538 Central Avenue
St. Petersburg, Fla.


(FeJte YOU AOOlIAJ1 PoI (i r E SAtt,6


9th ST. CAFE & BAR
11 9th St. South. Ph. 6339
Steaks Sea Foods Chicken
Dinners
WINES AND LIQUORS
"The Coldest Beer in St. Pete"


Pagels-- ---


1 4 #,v 4'~ ^^^^~


1


-1





Page 9


November 13. 1942 DREW FIELD ECHOES


"ON THE SPOT"
EntertainmAit for the week at
the Base:
SUNDAY-7:30 -8:20- p.m., Base
Arena, Group sing.
A show that features the audi-
ence. All the songs you know and
like to sing plus a few you'll want
to learn. There is always a nov-
elty or two in the way of a guest
artist or a quiz program to liven.
up the entertainment. A surprise
is planned "for week after next
that you won't want to miss.
VMONDAY-8-9 p.m., Base Arena,
Civilian Variety Show.
These entertainments brought
from Tampa and vicinity by the
Defense Recreation Committee
feature the best dancing and sing-
ing entertainment to be had. It's
surprising how many pretty gals
there are in the town. Come out
on Monday and see for yourself.
TUESDAY-7-8 p.m., Base Arena,
Band Concert.
You won't need urging to at-
tend these concerts if you've ever
been to one. Numbers you've
wanted to hear again and again
are brought to you, plus a few
that may be new to you. All ar-
rangements are made especially
by and for the Drew Air Corps
WBand.
WEDNESDAY-8-9:15 p.m., Base
Arena, All-Soldier Show.
This is a variety entertainment
by the men and for the men. Tal-
ented soldiers from the various
outfits at the .Base give you a
rousing good time every Wednes-
day. Comedy and satire on Army
life, songs by good singers, cow-
boy numbers and an occasional
dancer round out these shows so
that there is something for every-
body. Come out and root for your
favorite Drew Field performer.
THURSDAY 8- 9 p.m., Base
Arena, Tampa Variety Show.
Primarily a musical show, this
all-civilian entertainment brings
you the kind of vaudeville you
don't often get a chance to see
these days. From time to time,
tumblers, magicians and good
popular singers and dancers add
their special talents to a full hour
of entertainment.
FRIDAY-The Special Service
Office-is beginning a play group
for Friday nights to work on
some one-act plays for future
presentation. Here's a chance for
all the camp actors who can't"fit
into a variety show to do some
real trouping. Get in touch with
the Special Service Office today
for further information about the
new plan. Do it now while you
can still get some parts.
With all the entertainment go-
ing on at Drew, you'd better tune
in "Drew Field Presents" every
morning to keep in touch with
what's going on. See the radio
column for the schedule.
____ -K ----

386th SIGNAL COMPANY



By PFC. CYRIL COATES
To celebrate the initial appear-
ance of the 386th Signal Com-
pany Wing in the Echoes, the
boys, not disheartened by our
first baseball defeat last Wednes-
day, went ahead and won a vic-
tory on Sunday from the 319th
the score being, 386th, 8; 319th,
3. Two practice games were also
won from the same company.
Not only are we tops with our
baseball teams, but are in the
same high category regarding our
Supply Room, quoting the Post
Inspector, or does he tell that to
all the boys--esprit de corps.
We welcome with pride First
Lt. Marshall Waller. our new
company commander. He is a
gentleman from West Point. We
are pi-oud and fortunate in hav-
ing such leadership. Every man
in the company, toughs and all,
are for the "Iron Man."
Many men of the company are
acquiring knowledge in radio
schools at Athens, Atlanta and
Port Arthur, as well as others go-
in to Post school. With techni-
cians of their type, we will soon
be the outstanding company of
the 3rd Fi"hter Command.
It's a sad sight to see "Tommy"
Karns during the baseball games.
It breaks his heart that he is con-
sidered too old to get in there and
pitch. "Tommy" is an ex-pro and
a member of the Denver Old-
Timers Baseball Club.
Congratulations to the follow-
ing men to whom "something
new" has been added: Privates
First Class Beckman, Block. Fu-
gate, Hanewinkel, Jenn, Kim-
mel, Lindgren, Belgrade, Carter,
Grimshaw. Hanson, Kelly, Larson
and Lavin. The boys are holding
their chests and arms out just a
little further these days.


Field Post Exchange office, and Lt. Raymond Jennings Brosch, took
place in Drew Field Chapel No. 1, with Chaplain Carl W. Hewlett
officiating.
Miss ilicce Mae Gilley, sister of the bride, was her maid-of-honor,
and Lt. J. C. O'Neill was the best man. The bride wore a beige!
crisenmble, with an off-the-face hat, and brown accessories. Her
corsaee w as of yellow rosebuds.
The couple has returned from a short wedding trip to reside at
105 S. Boulevard, Tampa.
Left to right, Lt. J. C. O'Neill, Lt. R. J. Brosch, Mrs. Brosch,
-Miss Alice Gilley, and (facing them) Chaplain Hewlett.

308fh SIGNAL CO, (WING) teams of Company I, 501st Sig.
AW Reg., defaulted on all four
SR scheduled games.
S S On Monday afternoon this out-

By CPL. ROLPH FAIRCHILD fit's teams got set to take on an-
Sother organization, the 552nd Sig.
-Biggest news this week is S. AW Bn., 2nd Reptg. Co. They
Sgt. jamnes W. Weaver's report even turned down a softball game
that "ii takes only one man to with the ever-ready 9th Fighter
get Cpl. 'Woody' Pugh over the Wing crew so as not to miss this
Obstacle Course now." new opposition. Then came the
Of course, Cpl. Pugh denies he capper-the third victory in a
needs any boosts t tall, but Sgt. row through default.
Weaver just grins and says. "Well, Sgt. James Finnigan, of Sup-
at least it doesn't take four men ply, says the current lull has giv-
the way it used to." en him a chance to get the ouija
Cpl. Pugh's real distinction as board fixed. Two of the three
an athlete lies in another field, legs on this valuable little instru-
however. He has the rare ability ment were broken during the rush
to lose a relay race when it is of cutting the company down to
practically impossible. its authorized strength of 86 last
After running the Obstacle week.
Course each morning, the boys
have been polishing off with an Prize boner of them all was not
informal relay race. Cpl. Pugh one for the ouija board, however.
got off to a flying start the other Privates transferring to that new
morning, which Sgt. Weaver in- replacement organization, t h e
sists was the result of jumping 1303d, were ordered to turn in
the gun. Pugh denies that, too, of
course. Prescriptions
Anyway, "Woody" got more r mescrip ions
than half way down the line be- Home Made Ice Cream
fore Pvt. Harold C. Lagenbach IT te
even got started. Yet Lagenbach DEITZ DRUG STORE
won the race. v'i E InIdIVERY
Some say Pugh heard a whistle ,1 c i Ave. co h. In :lo .-
and just naturally fell in at at- IS.oward e. h
tention.
It's all in fun, Pugh. WELCOifME TO
The other side of the athletic
picture isn't auite so colorful. The TE KN
Company softball and touch foot- HOT L KNOX
ball teams are 'getting disgusted TOeM BRYSON, Manager
with the lack of competition.
Last week both the A and B Lafayette & Jefferson


CENTRAL OIL
COMPANY, INC.
Tampa, Florida


OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
Tampa Bay Market
BOX FRUITS SHIPPED
ANYWHERE
A. G. Cleotelis & Son
Ph. H 3143- 204 W. Fafayetle

TIOWNSEND
Sash Door. ,
& Lumber Co.
LUMBER & MILLWORK
ROOFING AND PAINT
-FHA LOANS-
PHONE H 4891
N. Roimev & Fuller Street

SELDOMRIDGE
P I 0 T 0 G R A P H 1E R
418 TAMPA ST.
Ground Floor


Hours
8 to 6


Special
Appointments


SERVICE MEN

ALBERTUS HOTEL
A Home Away From Home
956 Twiggs M-1339


Phone H-3787
McASKILL MUSIC STORES
Radios and Repairing
Sound and Inter Communicating
Systems
Authorized Capehart and Scott
Radio Service
1116 Grand Central

CULP LUMBER CO.
'Everything to Build Anything'
Millwork Made To Order
500 Packwood
Ph. H 1862 -:- Tampa

SERVICEMEN

Alfredo Y Familia
Fancy Groceries Free Delivery
1601 N. HOWARD AVE.
DIAL H 25-564


LAFAYETTE HOTEL
E. A. CLAY, Manager
120 West Lafayette Street
East Side of Bridge
Phone M-5588


FOR PROMPT AND
COURTEOUS SERVICE

Latin-American Laundry
1505 E. Columbus Dr., Ph. Y 1673


THINK IF YOU DRINK
-(Inspired by a Saturday night
after pay day.)
It costs you most of your monthly
pay,
It makes you know not what you
say,
It leaves you bleary-eyed, with
aching head ...
So you only want to stay in bed.

Often it makes you sick as hell,
Sometimes MPs pick you up
where you fell,
At times it causes AWOL ..
What else it does, time alone will
tell.
Sure, it's O.K. to take a drink,
But for God's sake, stop and think!
Drink only as much as you can
hold,
Not as much as can be sold.

Then you will-be a better man-
To lick Italy, Germany and Japan.
-Cpl. Leonard G. Rubin.

several articles of equipment, in-
cluding the gas mask.
In walked one bright-eyed pri-
vate who presented Sgt. Finii-
gan with a haversack. "Where's
your gas mask?" Finnigan de-
manded. The private insisted the
haversack was a gas mask. He
even offered to demonstrate how
it was used.
At that point, 1st Sgt. H. H.
Hanna looked up from his work
and growled, "Wait until he gets
across and tries to use that thing
for a gas mask. He'll learn the
hard way."
AUTO-INSURANCE
S .. BUSSE Y
I INSURANCE
Ti Mi' k AGENCY
Phone M 1718
H.29122
109 E. Lafayette Street

Armenia Floral Gardens
"Really Fresh Flowers"
Corsages 'n Everything
Ph. S55-341. 4500 Armenia Ave.


ELITE CIGAR STORES
Football Scores by Direct Wire
WINE BEER CIGARS
400 Zack Phone M 62-072
207 Twiggs Phone M-1236

Flowers For Mother,
Sweetheart or Friend
POWELL'S INC., FLORIST
412 Tampa St. Ph. 2524
Open 'Til 7 P. M.


UNION BAKERY
"REAL CUBAN BREAD OUR
SPECIALTY"
1506 9th Ave. Phone Y-4399


White Way
LAUNDRY
2806 Armenia Ave., Near Michigan
Phone H-3DS9


PHOTOGRAPHS
3 -8 x10 -$5.00 NoI.".
Send a gift only you can end "YOUR PHOTO"
ROY N. GREEN, STUDIO
5 OPEN EVENINGS f
Oppose U.S.o. 503 Morgan Street
BEAR SYSTEM SERVICE

Central Mechanical
SHOP
B. T. MORRIS
Tires Balanced Tire Wear
Corrected. 1010 Central Avenue

T. W. RAMSEY
LUMBER COMPANY
We Specialize In
Mill Work & Cabinets
We can furnish material for
Repairs and F. H. A. Loans
Phone Y 1219 171h St. & 61h Ave

Special Invitations to All
Service Men
GLEN'S BILLIARDS
Now in its New Location
805 Tampa St.


WELCOME
SERVICE MEN
TRY...

N U-WAY
RESTAURANT
FOR GOOD FOOD
AT POPULAR PRICES
713 GRAND CENTRAL


'"WE LIKE TO SERVE"
Service Men and Families

Nebraska Hotel
Moderate Rates
2815 Nebraska Ave.
Ph. M 53-631

Franklin St. Restaurant
HOME OF FINE FOODS
At Reasonable Prices
SPANISH DINNERS
1406 Franklin Street



TOWNE' S
TAMPA STEAM LAUNDRY
& DRY GLEANING CO.
1105-25 Fifth Ave., 1Ph. 4663-4664

"Soldiers Favorite Eating Place"
STEAKS AND CHOPS
A SPECIALTY '

ELITE
RESTAURANT
TAMPA AND TWIGGS STS.

Member
SV. F. W.
Purple Heart

E. P. JOHNSON & SON
Watchmakers & Jewelers
OPEN UNTIL 8:30.P. M.

214 E. Lafayette -:- Tampl
Next To Manhattan Cafe




Air Base Bus

Lines, Inc.

30 Minute Service to Both
Fields At All Hours


T

15 Minute Service
During Rush Hours


V


For Further Information


Call 3286


HENRY HOWKEE CO.
CHINESE HAND LAUNDRY
Satisfaction Guaranteed
504 Tyler Street


SPECIAL ATTENTION
To Service Men's Families

Peter Grahn & Son
Meats-Produce-Groceries
Phone 3502 910 Florida Ave.

LOANS-MONIUY TO LEND
Diamonds Watches Jewelry
Silverware
Danmoinds at t a ig Saving
A. L. ECKART
40!9 Tanmpn Street

VALENCIA GARDEN
Restaurant
WE SERVE THE FINEST OF
SPANISH FOODS
811 Grand Central
Phone H-3773


DREW FIELD ECHOES


November 13. 1942






November 13, 1942


al -, 1 RWFEDEhE


BELIEVE IT OR NOT, but it's
the WBT's now! You've heard of
the WAVES and the WAACS but
you didn't know about this new
'regiment"-the WBT's or, to ease
your mind, Women Bartenders.
With so many of the boys going
to war, operators of local bars and
night spots are persuading the
girls to tie on an apron, get be-
hind the bar and sub for the
male mixologists ....
Johnnie Hess, Plant field M.P.,
was top man with Helen Belt
until a Sarge came along. Then
Johnnie said: "Okay, Sarge, you
asked for it." We hope to see
Johnnie best man at the wedding
come next pay day.
:!
It's 13 days after pay-day and
the night spots of Tampa are still
playing to full capacity.
Talking about the 13th, Friday
this week is the unlucky day,
although I can hardly say un-
luck:, for it happens to be the
birthday of Marshall (Curley)
Beasley, co-owner of the Hi-Hat.
Many happy birthdays, Marshall.
GAYEST PARTY of the week
was held at Babe Antuono's Turf
Exchange Cocktail Lounge. Sgts.
M. Susko and L. F. Pucillo, New
Jersey, and George Broderick,
Nev- York, entertained three
beautiful gals out of the front
line of George White's Scandals.
It's too bad the whole show didn't
.come down. Mebbe your reporter
would have been in the party!
All of you who, didn't see
Betty Day, singer, at the Jewel
Box, are just out of luck. She
left Wednesday for Chicago,
where she goes on the air waves
for NBC. Good luck, Betty.
A nice team, Al and Gracie
Frazier plus the Dogs, will take
her place. Gracie is the strong
woman type; Al is the come-
dian-and the Dogs well,
they're dogs.
The nite spots are using good
judgement in picking their bar-


lenders. Noticed one who turned
down a party of 10 because they
"had too much" at some other
place. That's good business, Dan-
ny Lopez.
*
Very, very good pictures at the
local theatres. Here's the line-up:
TAMPA Thru November 18,
"Springtime In The Rockies" with
Betty Grable, John Payne, Car-
men Miranda, Harry James and
his band. You will like Betty in
this picture.- If you don't like
blondes then Carmen will excite
you.
TAMPA-Starts Nov. 19, "Road
to Morocco" with Bing Crosby,
Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour.
Don't miss this one. Dorothy is
at her best.
FLORIDA Saturday, "Bandit
Ranger' with Tim Holt; Angels
With Dirty Faces," with James
Cagney and Pat O'Brien. You
can't go wrong with a James
Cagney and Pat O'Brien picture.
FLORIDA-Nov. 15 and 16,
'"Crossroads," with Wm. Powell
and Hedy Lamar; "Berlin Cor-
respondent," with Dana Andrews
and Virginia Gilmore. Here are
three hours of swell entertain-
ment.
FLORIDA-Nov. 17 and 18,
"Wings and the Woman," with
Anna Neagle and Ray Newton;
"Pied Piper,"- with Monty Wooley
and Roddy McDowall. "Wings and
a Woman." Who wants more?
VICTORY--Nov. 14 and 15,

DINE AND DANCE AT
LICATA'S

SEABREEZE
on Hillsborough Bay
Try the Best in Food
FINEST LIQUORS
DANCING EVERY NITE
22nd Street Causeway
Phone Y1715
PRIVATE DINING ROOMS


TAMPA'S ONLY NITE CLUB
Featuring 3 Floor Shows Nitely 8 10 Midnight
DANNY & DON'S

JEWEL BOX NITE (LUB
911 TAMPA STREET
TYRIL &. JULI AL & GRACIE MAXINE POWELL
S Dance Team FRAIZER Fan Dance
STONY MASON'S Strong Woman- 6 POWELL-ETTS
Orchestra Comedy As You Like Them
SDANNY BROWN M. C.
0i lllllilllillH iiIlllll illlllI I ltlllllllllllll111111111111111111 11
AIR CONDITIONED


Hotel FLORIDAN

BARR Comlete
Barber Service

SH P : Expert Barbers
Manicurists
H. 0. LEWIS, Mgr.
AIR CONDITIONED


* A
WELCOME SOLDIERS!

"TAMPA'S ONLY MUSICAL BAR"
A HEAR YOUR FAVORITE SONGS

iCHESTERFIELD BAR
CASS & TAMPA STREETS

"We Are NOT Off Limits" :i
:,:::


"Submarine Raider," with John
Howard; "Blues in the Night,"
with Priscilla Lane and Lloyd
Nolan. "Blues in the Night" will
knock the blues out of you.
VICTORY--Nov. 16 and 17,
"Syncopation" with Jackie Cooper
and Bonita Granville; "Tobacco
Road" with Gene Tierney and
C h a r 1 e y Grapewin. "Tobacco
Road" nuff said. Don't miss it.
VICTORY-Starts November 18,


5rRAC6
I pr a c C5


:. ..: *. ._::::::f::: : .. ",! : :: :':::::* .'o^ "o3r s
. MEET YOUR BUDDIES AT-

SGEORGE'S BILLIARD PARLOR
:: SNOOKER AND POCKET BILLIARDS
T 2222 E. Broadway Ybor City
S.ATING......:.... .....;..-..-.-..-- Hey There
"~"~-Tr0 ,eRii S~Soldier!


C ,,~r


COLISEUM

Davis Islands
AFTERNOON
2:30 till 5
S-' NIGHT 8 till 11
Except Monday

5c FARE ON DAVIS

ISLAND BUSES

Leaving Grant's Corner
Franklin and Cass Streets

7:15 -- 7:45 -- 8:15
Diamond Cabs 10c
THE SOUTH'S FINEST
SKATING RINK


W elcome....




Soldier ,
* *e *


THE BROKEN MIRROR IS NOT

BROKEN ANY MORE


"WE ARE NOT OUT OF BOUNDS"

BEER, WINE, AND PLENTY OF FUN

AT THE



BROKEN WIRROR
1441 FRANKLIN STREET
MANAGEMENT OF E. P. WILLIAMS


''Drinks You'll Like
and Can Afford"

PADDOCK

BAR
JACKSON AT TAMPA STREET
Open from 8 A. M. to 12:00 P. M.


SERVICE MEN
ALWAYS WELCOME
LIBERTY BAR
Tony Italiano, Prop.
WINES BEER
SOFT DRINKS
717 Grand Central
Ph. H 3109


SOLDIERS...
When you are lonesome & blue
And you don't know what to
do, come to
M. MILLER'S BAR
Where she is friendly and true
BEERS WINES
10c BEER STILL 10c
1111 Florida Ave.

Bar and Cocktail Lounge
The TURF EXCHANGE
Package Store
ORCHESTRA EVERY NITEE
Phone 2003
202 E. Lafayette St.

The Tavern Bar and Grill
HOT AND COLD LUNCHES
Spaghetti a Specialty
LIQUORS-BEER--WI NES
311 Franklin St. Phone 3940


-Rex Billiard Parlor
1012 FRANKLIN
Dan'l S. Bagley


BILLIARDS
CIGARS CIGARETTES
BEER WINES
SANDWICHES
HARRY WELLECOTT _-
912 Florida Avenue


i


DREW FIELD ECIJOES


PDQA In


"Tortilla Flat" with Spencer
Tracy, Hedy Lamar; "You're in
the Army Now," with Jimmy Du-
rante and Jane Wyman. Both pic-
tures very interesting.
::t :.: ::
Attention Cpl. Jack Taylor at
MacDill's base hospital: The man-
agement and your buddies at the
Chesterfield Musical Bar send
their best regards and hope to
see you on your feet soon.
To you, too, Tommy Chormo
in Ward 16: Benny and the boys
wish you a rapid recovery.
IF THE MANAGEMENT of one
of our night clubs doesn't watch
out it will soon lose its all-girl
band. Last week it was the drum-
mer. This week I find Pvt.
Berdie Moriarty, umpire and re-
feree at Drew field's athletic
events, making goo-goo eyes at
the trombone player; Pvt. Robert
Lawrence courting the sax blower
and staff Sgt. Chas. Walker fall-
ing fast for the little blonde
cornet. What's Mama Horton
going to say?
a a *
Tampa Terrace'and Chauncey
Cromwell were hosts to Sgt. Sal
Oltieri and Cpl. Angelo Castire
(Continued on Next Page)


:wP


E







November 13. 1942 DREW IEL COS ae1


SOME ADVICE -
IT'S ALL YOURS
FOR THE ASKING
There's nothing like following
good advice for a soldier to get
along in the Army. No doubt
thousands of letters reach Drew
Field daily from homes in all
parts of the country which con-
tain plenty of suggestions, some
"good," on military behavior.
One of the best examples, if
interpreted correctly, is this letter
allegedly received by a Drew
Field soldier. And just in case
anyone wants to follow any of
the suggestions contained, it
might be suggested that a sort of
reverse twist would not be amiss.
"I want to make your stay in
the army real pleasant, dear. And
in camp as in civilian life I'm
sure you'll find good manners
essential. If you haven't done so
already, go and get acquainted
with your general. As a private
you should make the first move.
"Be cordial and friendly, dear,
and don't let his rank frighten
vou. After all, he is a man, too;
rod as your commander he has
o look after your welfare. Being
friendly is the least you can do.
"Walk up to him and say, 'Well,
pal, here I am. How's tricks?' If
he appears a bit embarrassed, clap
him on the back and make him
see that you are his friend. That'll
Take him notice you. After that,
he'll take an interest- in your acti-
vities.
"I've been reading an army
manuel on courtesy and I must
say that it could stand a few re-
finements. It doesn't give much
chance for the soldier to express
himself and use his originality.
"I'm sure a colonel must get
awfully bored by getting the'same
sort of salute from every man in
-our uniform. Impress him some-
time with your individuality.
Every now and then salute him
With both hands. See if that does
not get results of some kind.
"'You should be thoughtful, too.
If, by any chance, you should be
called down by an officer, the
next time you meet be careful
not to salute him. He might still
be mad at you and not want to
speak.
"Show that you have a mind of
your own. Whenever you are
given an order for which you can
see no reason, demand an expla-
nation for it. It may develop that
there was no good reason for the
order.
Also try to break the monotony
of all this marching you do. It
must bore the officers as well as,
the men. Make little humorous'
comments on various commands.
For example, if the drill sergeant
ays, 'Right face!', point out tb
him that it is your right face but
you can't help it. He will be sure
to mention you to the higherups.
"Follow my advice,' dear and I
am sure all of the officers will
hear about you. Before long you'll
find they're using you as an ex-
ample for the good of the rest
of the men."

GOODY GOODY
THE PLACE TO EAT
1119 FLORIDA AVENUE
Est. 1925


TELEPHONE H 25-692
THE CRICKET
TEA ROOM
241 HYDE PARK AVE.


You'll Enjoy
OUR SPANISH FOOD
.K Cuban Sandwiches
SOysters, any style
-K Delicious Cuban Sherbets
-K Moderate Prices
Los Helados De Ybor
14th St. at 8th Ave., Ybor City

Service MIen Always Welcome
Sulphur Springs Cafe
We Specialize in Home Cooked
Food, Chicken, Steak and
Chop Dinners
Surplhur Springs, Arcade Bldg.


Around the Town


(Continued from
Preceding Page)


with Bill Bacin


* r *


and two sweet parties last Sun-
day.
Capt. J. R. Lee, of Benjamin
field, like Rbt. E., knows how
to pick them. He was seen very
busy dancing with a beautiful
companion at the FLORIDAN
COCKTAIL LOUNGE.
a *
Talking about dancing, saw
many uniforms in and out of


Dan Bagley, of Rex Billiard
Parlor, better take a few lessons
from those four soldiers who
played there Wednesday.
4
BILL BAILEY, proprietor of
Victor's Cafe had a lively group
of old and new War Vets in his
Franklin street spot Armistice
Day. Bills' a V.F.W., and a mem-
ber of the American Legion.
*


Selma Brook's Dance Studio. Was The Wonder Bar could put
it private lessons, boys? on a floor show nitely if the
*management could get come-
Pvt. Victor Kataroski, M:P. at dians like Pvis. John E. Will-
MacDill, and Seaman 2nd class hoite, Lajunta, Colo., Carl F.
Harvey Rinks, Columbia, Tenn., Bretzius, Pottsville, Pa., and C.
became so friendly at a steak din- Pawlowski, Brooklyn, N. Y.
ner at the Tavern Bar and Grille, They are the so-called "Three
that they exchanged pictures and Must Get Beers."
addresses. *
Cpl. Anthony Giordano, of Mac-
S Sgt. Jack Dunn, Springfield, Dill, is making arrangements for
Ill., had a wonderful time at the a birthday party at the Chatter-
Saratoga Bar last night.. Manuel box Nov. 27. By the way, Tony,
La Rosa, manager, told him he that's my birthday, too. Save me
stood for a lot of things-except a seat,...
long distance phone calls to Chi- *
cago. That new floor at the Sulphur
Springs Skating Palace is O.K.
The police department has lost I did fine after I hit the deck
its champion pistol shot. Sgt. R. seven times in eight trials ....
S. (Rollo) Standeau has been com- *
missioned an Ensign in the Navy. Emilio Lopez, of the Paddock
Bar suddenly left for Miami
FRIDAY NOV. 13 will be a Wednesday afternoon. Rumors
lucky day for Pfc. Sam Sanker, have it that he has gone after en-
681st Signal Corps. His boyhood tertainers. We will know upon his
sweetheart, Miss Joan Paris, New return.
York, will be here to say "I do." Frank Lopez, co-owner, left
From what I heard, the wedding Frank Lopez co fern fr Camp
party will be at the Seabreeze. Thursday afternoon for Camp
Victor Licata, the manager, will Blanding.
see that you remember this din-
ner, Sam. Good luck to you both. FERNANDE
I i FERANDEr
Attention, you'horse shoe play- RESTAURANT
ers, at Drew: Look out for Air R TAURAN T
Cadet L. S. Lyeman jr., of Chat- Cuban Sandwichs A Specialty
tanooga, holder of the world's 1216"iankiin St...
record-5756 ringers in 75 hofirs.


Experienced Waitress
Wanted
Soldier's wife preferred. Does not
have to serve drinks. High-class
place.
Apply Mrs. Tierce
THOMAS JEFFERSON
HOTEL GRILL
Franklin at Washington

Service Men Always Welcome
La Gloria Restaurant
Fine Spanish Food and
Sandwiches
3103 Armenia Ave.
Phone H 33-521


T. J.

Cocktail Bar
"WHERE GOOD FELLOWS
GET TOGETHER"
Air-Conditioned Cozy
Moderate Prices
Hotel
Thomas Jefferson
Cor. Franklin & Washington
M 5571


ELKS IN UNIFORM
Remember Every Saturday,
4 P.M. to 11 P.M. Free Soft
Drinks Food Music
Bring a Buddy
ELKS LODGE
Florida Ave. & Madison St.

Max's Liquor Bar
WINES LIQUORS CIGARS
FREE DELIVERY SERVICE
1601 E. COLUMBUS DR.
PHONE Y-1281
-Keep 'm Flying--

Attention! Dancing
By One Who Knows!
PRIVATE LESSONS
Selma Drennan Brooks
and Assistants
Tel. H 32-654, 207 Parker St.
All Service Men are Welcome
BARCELONA CAFE
SPANISH RESTAURANT
Wines and Liquors
Phone S2142 Open All Night
4714 Nebraska and Osborne


I' ANHATTAN CAFE .
210 E. Lafayette St. Tampa
t GOOD FOOD REASONABLE PRICES
DINNERS 30c, 40c, 60c
STry our Sunday Roast Turkey Dinner with all
Trimmings or Fried Chicken Dinner. Three
* Vegetables, Dessert and Drink
, Served From 11 A. M. to 9 P. M .J
[t OPEN DAY AND NITE
SWE USE STRICTLY WESTERN MEATS


MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT THE

SARATOGA BAR
Corner Fortune and Franklin
Dancing Every Night in the Blue Room
To JIMMY GARDENER
F, "South's Best Negro Rhythm"
BEER WINES LIQUORS
Sunday Matinee Dancing Phone 7988



i Service Men Officers Families
FOR REALLY GOOD FOOD AT MODERATE PRICES
PLEASANT ATMOSPHERE-FOLLOW THE CROWD TO


THE COLONNAD
BAYSHORE AND JULIA
Steak, Sea Food, Chitken Dinners
Delicious Sandwiches


MODERATE
PRICES


Madison Drug Company
Franklin and Madison Street
Where thee Men of the Armed Service Sop and Eat
We Are Anxious to Be of Service


BAY VIEW HOTEL
FIREPROOF CONSTRUCTION -:- EVERY ROOM WITH BATH
W. B. SHULER, Manager
208 JACKSON ST. Between FRANKLIN & TAMPA
TAMPA, FLORIDA -:- PHONE M 5537



SBENNETT'S DRUG STORE
1004 Franklin St.
Complete Luncheonette 0 Liquor Annex In Connection


Hotel Hillsboro lorida Avenue at
I Twiggs St.
Frank J. Hynes, Manager
GASPAILLA TAVERN Service en Welcome
COLONIAL GRILL


Palace Skationg Rink

SULPHUR SPRINGS



NEW FLOOR

NEW NMI(

NEW SKATES
Admission: Nights 30c
"SKATE ON THE SMOOTHEST FLOOR IN THE SOUTH"
5c STREET CAR AND BUS SERVICE TO DOOR 5c


FRANK RUTA-
Of New York, and Former Chef at El Trocadero *'
OPENS HIS OWN PLACE
Specializing in SPAGHETTI and RAVIOLI
Hyde Park Spaghetti House I
103 Hyde Park Ave. :: BEER AND WINES ".'.'



WONDER BARThe Longest Bar in Tampa
"WHERE YOUR FUN IS OUR FUN"
We Are NOT Out of Bounds 1210 Franklin Street


WELCOME SERVICE MEN ... Open From 10 A. M. to 6 P. M.

Swim at the SULPHUR SPRINGS POOL
Bus aiud Street Car to Pool Natural'Springs .. Temperature 720
Y,,..+ .....................


THE CHATTERBOX
Chicken and Steaks
Real Italian Spaghetti
SANDWICHES DRINKS LIQUORS
Abba Dabba & Band Nightly
707 S. Howard Ave. Phone H-3757


I avis Plate Lunch
We Serve the Best 30c Lunch in Tampa
Only the Finest Quallity of Foods Used
A LA CARTE SERVICE
306 FRANKLIN STREET PHONE M 64-913

-imun-a--alHlu muil.-'-tB-"--- -anpmililli-


IsslllrP~~


Emm


ma


"""""""~'I-'"'""'~''~'"~'~''~''~''~''~~' "`-`I'~`-`~"'''1'~''~""``""""" "" "' '~'


Page 11


DREW FIELD ECHOES


November 13, 1942








Page 1.2 1~R~W FIELD ECHOES November 13, 1~4~


Drew Pigskinners Make Good Showing


*. :
S' ;.. .,


- .~esEB~


Two Football Leagues

Are Active At Drew

Two leagues were active during
the past week in the WAUTC in
softball and touch football. There
was much interest, with plenty of
scrap being shownby the compet-
ting teams.
Results for the week:
Touch football-392nd Sig. Co.
defeated 705th Sig" Co. by forfeit.
319th Sig Co. Wing, 20; 386th
Sig Co. Avn., 0.
705th Sig. Co., 26; 676th Sig. A.
W. Co., 22.
Plotting Co. 552nd S.A.W. Bn.,
0; Co. "K", 501st S.A.W. Regt., 0.
681st S.A.W. Co. 1 defeated Co.
1 501st S.A.W. Regt. by forfeit.
Plotting Co. 552 S.A.W. Bn., 20;
Co. "K", Team "B" 501st S.A.W.
Regt, 6.
Softball results:
392 Sig. Co., 13; 705th Sig. Co., 6.
386th Sig. Co. Avn., 7; 319th
Sig. Co. Wing, 2.
951st R 1 Co., 22; 503rd S. A. W.
Plotting Co., 6.

SUNBURN


INSECT BITES- MUSCULAR ACHES
oV& vV^e 2Di/ff. SioSq q


MAAS-

BROTHERS





Complete ...

convenient


MILITARY Y


DEPT.

JUST INSIDE OUR
FRANKLIN ST.
ENTRANCE


MEN'S SHOP
MAIN FLOOR


This Christmas Send Your Pho- "Flowers Telegraphed Back


This Christmas Send Your Pho-
to-The Most Welcomed Gift.
GORDON STUDIO
PHOTOGRAPHY
Open Wed. & Sal. Till 9 P.M.
616 CITIZENS BLDG.


Here are members of the Signal unit grid squad of Drew Field which lost to Tampa
University by the score of 21-13 last Saturday. Top group: Front row-Dray Matthews,
Thatcher, Devine, Antonoff, Pane; second row-Sanders, Gilby, Garbowiak, Quinn, Ca-
ruso, Wisnicwski, Kimball; third row-Schusler, Lapromo, Given, Smelt, Brooks, Haynes.
Bottom group. Front ro.w--Sink, Thomas, Rehberg, Petitte, Brune, Jones; second row-
Whitehead, Welcher, Collins, Lennon, Brumback, Mohr, Bowman, Parrish, Armstrong,
Guida, Van Sistine; third row-Marine and Norris.


By PFC. DELWYN BAGGETT
In three lightning plays through
the line, Tampa U.'s Spartans
scored three touchdowns to down
the Signal Corps eleven from
Drew Field, 21 to 13, before 6500
fans at Phillips stadium last Sat-
urdav.
Cpl. Julio Pane, former Cali-
fornia Aggie fullback, scored both
touchdowns for the soldiers as he
ripped through the Spartans' line
consistently all afternoon. Drew
scored its first six points late in
the second period, when Pane
shot off tackle for 28 yards and
the score. He converted the extra
point from placement. Drew
scored again in the fourth quar-
ter with Pane going wide around
end and needle-threading his way
down the sidelines for the final
score.
Little U. G. Matherly, 150-
pound tailback, accounted for all
three Tampa touchdowns in the
first half when he raced for 55,
53 and 50 yards for scores.
Tampa scored in the first min-
ute of play, when Matherly took
the ball on his own 45 and raced
off tackle to score the initial
touchdown. Straub's conversion
was good.
Late in the first period, Drew
made their first threat when S.
Sgt. Tom Caruso recovered a
Tampa fumble on the 50. Pane
picked up a first down over left
guard. Again Pane tucked the ball
under his arm in a 17-yard jaunt
to his opponents' 16. At this
function Pane took to the air and
flipped a 15-yard pass to right
end Mueller, who went high in
the air to bring the ball down on
the one-yard stripe. Two line
thrusts brought the ball within
inches of the goal, but on third
down Pane fumbled and Gillett
recovered for Tampa. Matherly
ran the ball out of the danger
zone.
After a series of plays failed to
gain a first down, Drew kicked
and Matherly returned the ball to
his own 47-yard line where he
was met by a host of Drew tack-
lers. Again Matherly broke loose
and raced 53 yards for the touch-
down. Straub's kick for the extra
point was good.
Drew received the kickoff, but
failed to gain and punted to Tam-
pa's 30. Clarke CcCullough ran it
back to midfield. For the third


time, Matherly took the ball and
raced through left tackle for 50
yards and the score.
The soldiers managed their
touchdown late in the second half
when they took advantage of the
breaks and took the ball on Tam-
pa's 28-yard line. The hard-driv-
ing Pane shook off would-be tack-
lers as he raced 28 yards through
right tackle for the score.
In the second. half a spirited
Drew team took the field and bot-
tled up the opposition and man-
aged a touchdown of their own.
Early in the fourth quarter Danny
Lennon intercepted Matherly's
pass and was off for a touchdown
but lost balance and tripped on
his 45. Pane's pass, intended for
Caruso, was incomplete. Tampa
was penalized 15 yards for hold-
ing. Failing to make yardage for
a necessary first down, Arm-
strong booted the ball into the
end zone. On the'kick Tampa was
off side and penalized five-yards,
placing the ball on the 25. On the
next play Pane ran wide around
end for 25 yards to score. His
kick was wide. This ended the
scoring for the day.
The two lines played a nice
game, with Pane and Matherly
stealing the show in the backfield.
Score by quarters:
Tampa 14 7 0 0
Drew ---------_ 7 0 0 7
Scoring for Tampa: Touch-
downs-Matherly (3), points after
touchdown, Straub (3). Drew-
Pane, (2); points after touchdown,
Pane.
Subsfitutions: Drew Pettiti,
Karbowiak, Lennon, Mohr, Bray,
Devine, Bowman, Sanders,. Gil-
kay, Kimble, Brumback.
Officials: Schiro. New York
City U., referee: Colley, Temple
U., linesman; Irwin, Florida U.,
field judge; Culbreath, Florida U.,
umpire.

*

STAR KOSHER
DELICATESSEN
All Kinds of Herring, Lox and
Smoked Fish. Imported and Do-
mestic Cheeses. Kosher Wines.
All Kinds of Sandwiches
Open Till 11 P.M.
805 Gr. Central, Ph. H 29-842
'Vimumanr'Vagssm^^sH^'iwauss***sIiia


Volley Ball League

Gets Underway

The Air Corps volleyball league
got underway on Monday with
eight teams participating in the
first day games.
Results of Monday games: Det..
Med. Dept. "A" won over 309th
Service Gp. "A", 15-13, 15-10;
314th Personnel "A" won over 9th
Fighter Wing, 15-4, 15-9; 10th
Fighter Wing won over Det. Med.
Dept. "B", 15-7, 15-5; 69th AAF
Band over 314th Base Hq. & Air
Base Sq., "A", 7-15, 15-10, 15-3.
Tuesday's results: 98th Fighter
won over the 140rd Quartermas-
ter, 15-9, 7-15, 15-5; 314th Base
Hq. & Air Base Sq. "C" defeated
the Det. Med. Dept. "C", 15-10,
15-12; Det. Med. Dept. "A" de-
feated the 314th Personnel "A",
15-0, 15-3.
Standing of the teams will be
run in the next issue of the Drew
Field Echoes.
Put everything you've got into
TRAINING


WE PAY CASH
FOR
Used Cars and Trucks
FERMAN'S
1428 Florida Ave. Ph. 4236


SPOT CASH
For Your Car or Equift
Dill's Auto Exchange
3910 Florida Ave.
Phone 2052 S 2698


WILL BUY
Any Kind of Used Car
PAY YOU CASH
1501 Florida Avenue
Phone M 61-761


EAT
HENDERSON
B A K I N G C O.' S

BREAD
2702 FLORIDA AVE.

SEMINOLE
SOUVENIR & JEWELRY
Live and Stuffed Alligators
Florida Souvenirs-Curios
107 E. Lafayette St.


Manuel Garcia, Jr.'s
Spanish Restaurant
915 Tampa at Tyler
Ph. M 52-073 Tampa, Fla.

WELCOME SOLDIERS

V ICTOR CAFE
BEER WINES
1324 Franklin Ph. M-7240
BILL BAILEY, Prop.
Member V.F.W. & A.M. Legion
mm l II ,--.-.,F---


KNIGHT BROS.
PAPER CO.
612 Bell Phones 4205 4204
"A Paper for Every Purpose"


"Flowers Telegraphed Back
Home Under Bonded Service"

NELSON
"THE FLORIST"
Open 9 A.M. to 5:30 P.M.-
Closed Sundays
514 TAMPA STREET

"A GOOD PLACE TO EAT"
POST OFFICE CAFE
C. D. Kavakos, Prop. Dinners,
Plate Lunches, Beer, Wines &
Cold Drinks, Pies and Pastries.
406 Zack Street Tampa, Fla.


SAFFOLD BROS.
PRODUCE CO.
"SERVICE AND QUALITY"
Our Motto
901 Washington St.


CRENSHAW'S
(Wholesale)
Fruits -:- Vegetables
Phone 2623

SERVICE MEN
LA NUEVA ERA
Fancy Groceries Fresh Meats
3018 Armenia Ave.
Ph. H 46-174 Free Delivery


Elliston's Drug Store
Phone H1645
Fountain Service and Lunches
202 W. Lafayette St., TAMPA


If Interested in
IMPORTED FOODS
Call oPAUL I'IZZO, Y:3897
We Have Plenty, nnd Tasty, Tool
JOE CASTELTANO GROCERY
1724 8th Ave.


DIXIE
Cleaners :: Laundry
Phones: M-103G, 4232


Always Say...
HOLSUM BREAD

Extra Fresh


WAR BONDS AND STAMPS.
EVERY PAY DAY BUY MORE


BOB'DS OPEN EVENINGS



Army Store
: Complete Line Military Supplies For The Needs Of
SERVICE MEN
0 EXPERT TAILORING
S207 E. Lafayette Street Tampa :4
:.:..:..:..:..; .:*.*:.. :-..: *>.. *-:. **... ....*..:.. *.......*.. .


SPbORT'S REVTIEW~~


DRMVc FIELD ECHOES


Page 12


"."I~~B~
.hC




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs