Title: Drew Field echoes
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076231/00030
 Material Information
Title: Drew Field echoes
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Post Exchange
Place of Publication: Tampa Fla
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida -- Tampa   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Drew Field Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa -- Drew Army Airfield
Coordinates: 27.975556 x -82.533333 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: "Published each Friday in the interest of the officers and enlisted men of Drew Field."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 39 (Dec. 2, 1943).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076231
Volume ID: VID00030
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24622561
lccn - sn 93063705

Full Text























ase Executive Now Lt. Colonel Attention, Model Protect Your Civil Rights; Use
ase Executive Now Lt. Colonel Airplane Builders 1
All men interested in build-
;_ ~ ing wooden model airplanes for .
ing wooden model airplanes for Soldiers' and Sailors' Relief Act
i V i use in instruction are invited
1, I to take advantage of the facili-
ties afforded bN the Hobby
Shop, If your civilian affairs are Drew Field just itching to spill
i S I Those interested are request- jammed up, dbn't listen to a his unsolicited advice without
a ed to get in touch with Captain "guardhouse lawyer." Traditional charging a fee. Nine out of ten
Delano, Base Special Services to the Army, this kibitzer is al- times he'll be wrong, and chances
ij S' .."a Officer, at his ,office in the ways on the scene when some- are you'll wind up in more trouble
SBase Library building, body's in trouble. There's one in by lending an ear to him.'
S-'3I -"" every squadron an-d company on If you're really in a jam, tell


Army's Health Is Better


Now Than Ever Before


Promotion of Major F. L. Eber-
sole, Jr., Base Executive, to lieu-
tenant colonel was announced
this week, a' further recognition
of the 'outstanding ability of this
young officer.
Lt. Col. Ebersole was commis-
sioned a captain in the Coast Ar-
tillery '(Reserve) on August 31,
1937; and saw service with the
Civilian -Conservation Corps dur-
ing ;the succeeding three years.
Called to active duty with the
Air Corps on Nov. 15, 1940, he
served as Adjutant and S-2 of the
17th -Bombardment Wing under
-command of Maj. Gen. Brereton.


UUUUI1o A I L11HI

Now In Australia

Master Sergeant John Elliott,
,of Sacramento, Calif.; reads the
war news from Australia with
more than eager interest these
days: Although a line chief and
mechanic at Drew Field,-his bud-
dies ire fighting the historic air
battles "down under."
The Allied bomber attacks on
,the Japs is' John's favorite- topic
'aind the Drew hangar. "One of
buddies shot down five Japs
::*e other day, and" several of
them have gained citations al-
ready," he proudly boasts. "Wish
I could be with 'em."
Sgt. Elliott, formerly a me-
chanic on the West Coast, enlist-
ed in the Air Corps six years ago.
In those six years he has gained
a wealth of experience, had a lot
of fun, and made some good
money. Last December, when his
bombardment group left for Ba-
taan, he remained here as a me-
chanic and engineer on the new
B-26 bomber.
In looking back over his six
years in the Air Corps, Elliott
likes to recall the time he serviced
Lindbergh's plane, the round trip
he made to Alaska (non-stop)
from Seattle last winter in a
Lockheed A-29, and the publicity
flights in a "Flying Fortress" in
1939, recruiting air cadets. On
this publicity flight the huge
bomber visited 33 airports in the
country, and, the crew was enter-
tained royally in every city.
Sgt. Elliott makes $225 a month
with flying time and has more
than 200 hours as an engineer on
the B-26 bomber.


Following participation in the
Louisiana and Carolina. maneu-
vers, Lt. Col. Ebersole was trans-
ferred to Drew Field and given
the assignment of Base Adjutant
and Executive. He was promoted
from captain to major on March
15 of this year. With the rapid
growth of activitieston Drew Field,
a full-time Base Executive became
necessary, and he was selected for
the assignment.
Before entering active service,
Lt. Col. Ebersole made his home
in Richmond, Va. He is a gradu-
ate. of the University of, Pitts-
burgh.


'Many Drew Field soldiers are
now familiar withe voice of Pvt.
Adrian Gendot, script writer and
master of ceremonies on the morn-
ing program of Drew Field Pre-
sents, heard over WFLA every
morning from Monday through
Friday, inclusive. Few, however,
know anything about this dark,
handsome soldier of .French de-
scent, a 28-year-old native of San
Francisco.
Airadio script writer, actor and
journalist, Pvt. Gendot was well
on his way to blazing out a radio
career for himself when, on May
1, 1942, he entered the Army at
San Francisco, Calif.
For one and one-half years he
worked for the Mutual Broadcast-
ing Company's station in San
Francisco -KFRC-' functioning
as script writer and producer of a
comedy and variety show. Before
that, he worked as a columnist
and radio promoter for the San
Francisco Examliner. He was also
a script writer for KYA, the Ex-
aminer's station, for one and one-
half years. In addition to his radio
activities, he acted in Shake-
spearean plays for a 'Frisco stock
company.
In the Army since May, he came
to Drew Field in August from Mc-
Cord Field, near Tacoma, Wash.
A(
Wearing the O.D. Uniform
Dates for wearing the winter
uniform by men stationed at Drew
Field are tentative. The date of
wearing the woolen winter uni-
form will be dependent entirely
upon the weather.
A bulletin, No. 253, from Base
Headquarters declares that "when
it is believed desirable to change,
sufficient notice will be given and
an optional period will be granted
for the changeover."


The United States Army in Base Photo Lab
'.raining in-this country is in bet-
ter health than ever before during Doing Bang Up
wartime, the War Department an-
nounced today. Admissions to hos- Camera Job
pitals and confinements to quar-
:ers for all causes currently are Of the many special
'ewer than at this time last year technical departments
when the Army's physical well-be- base, one which receive
ing was considered excellent. On tie credit, if any, is
the basis of the figures to date it Photographic Laborato:
is anticipated that the general ad- men functioning under
mission rate will be approximately, opy which houses it.
10% lower.in 1942 than in 1941. While their work a
Thus far in 1942, there has fore the field personnel
been no mild influenza epidemic ian population of the T
like that of early last year. Inci- day after day, it still r
dence of disease shows a marked tie recognition for itse:
recession. this is due to the nat
Venereal disease is substantial-'work which, on the
ly less than during the World not particularly glamor
War, with 'the syphilis rate now: theless it'is the job o
lowest in Army history. The total who work in the Base
venereal disease rate, on an annu- to carry out all assign
al basis, was 40.5 per 1,000 men rect reference to the fi
in 1941, and 38 per 1,000 men personnel.
for the first six months of 1942, The fine photograph
including cases arising in newly rating at Drew Field
inducted soldiers where the infec- by Lt. Robert E. Price,
tion actually was acquired in civil tographic Officer, and '
life. This means that about 19 E. Weber, both of
new infections occurred among highly skilled photo t
every 1,000 men during the first The overcrowded ten
half of this year. Soldiers thus in- the staff works is givi
fected lose an average of 18 days a building large enough
or less.from duty. their intricate equipme
Throughout 1941 and thus far building is now in the
in 1942, the death rate has been erection.
the lowest in Army history. Dur- The staff is also h
ing this period from one half to seriously by a shortage
two thirds of the deaths resulted spite of being under:
from external causes, such as traf quality and quantity of
fic accidents. Overseas forces and they turn out is praised
battle casualties are excluded, tribute they well deserve
About one meningitis case in
three was fatal during the World
War, but this death rate is now
down to one in 20. Promptness of O
diagnosis and use of newer treat-
ment are principal reasons. Men-
ingitis fatality rate in the Army is
far below that in civil life.
The malaria rate per 1000 men
per year in continental ,United
States is only 0.61 for the first
eight months of 1942, by contrast
with 1.25 in the 1941 comparative,
and the autumn rise in incidence
is expected to be less than a year
ago.
Universal vaccination has vir-
tually eliminated smallpox. Rigid
sanitary control and vaccination
has made typhoid fever almost
non-existent in the Army. Inci-
dence of scarlet fever is now ex-
tremely low.
Thus far 1942 has experienced
no true epidemics of infectious
diseases in *the Army. These nor-
mally account for a majority of all
admissions to hospitals and con-
finements to quarters.
While the health of the Army in
training at home is better than in
1941, nevertheless last year's
Army health record was unusu- Stading at the t
ally good. This experience is the Jones"of the Drew
more remarkable considering the e nsie the rewng
Army's rapid expansion. tie Insde the engl
y May, of the Base Qua
COMMUNITY SING ON SUNDAY Plans and Training g
It is a 35-ton Da'
All soldiers interested in a its tank holding 100 g
community sing, or those who just hour. It is a switching
like to sing, are invited by the brake system.
Base Chaplain to be in the arena, It was obtained by
situated to the left of the entrance and to move supply ca
to Theater No. 1, at 7:30 this a 24-hour schedule of
Sunday night, Oct. 4. freight cars at a time,


lized and
on the air
es very lit-
the Base
ry and the
r the can-

ppears be-
l and civil-
rampa area
receives lit-
If. Perhaps
ure of the
surface, is
ous. None-
of the men
Photo Lab
nents in di-
eld and its

:c staff op-
is headed
Base Pho-
'/Sgt. Paul
whom are
technicians .
.t in .which
:ng way-to
h to house
int. This
process of

handicapped
of men. In'
anned, the
Sthe work
d highly, a
re.


him to go climo a tree. See, in-
stead, your Squadron or Company
Commander and ask him about
the Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil Re-
lief Act of 1940, which became a
law October 17, 1940, and will re-
main in effect until May 15, 1945,
or until such time as the war is
terminated and for six months
thereafter.
According to the Act,\persons in
military service will be freed
from harassment and injury to
their civil rights during their
'terms of military service. The
Act provides adequate representa-
tion for the soldier during his ab-
sence, authorizing postponement
of certain proceedings and tran-
sactions until his return from
military service.
Nothing in the Act relieves the
soldier of actual payment of debts
or other obligations which he may
have incurred before entering the
military service. Relief is afford-
ed only when the soldier's ability
to meet the obligations are im-
paired by being in the Army. This
relief is principally from all pen-
alties that would be imposed for
non-payment of such obligations.
The questions of the extent of the
relief generally are left to the dis-
cretion of the .courts of justice.
When a man in military service
is unable to appear in court in a
case against him, the Act provides
for the court to supply an attor-
ney, and if necessary the court is
allowed to stay the proceedings
90 days after his release from ac-
tive service, so that he may ap-
pear. There is, in addition, defi-
nite protection against difficulties
arising from rents, installment
contracts and mortgages. That,
however, is only part of the Act's
protection for the soldier.
Give the "guardhouse lawyer"
the brush-off before he gets -a
chance to butt in. Consult the
Soldiers' and Sailors' Relief Act
of 1940 about your personal prob-
lem.


l's Gas Locomotive


throttle is Marshall D. Norman, the "Casey
Field Quartermaster's new gasoline locomo-
e room (left to right) are Lt. Anthony A.
rtermaster, and Major Walter F. Joyce, Base
Officer.
venport locomotive and is run by gasoline,
gallons. Its speed limit is about 15 miles per
g locomotive, and has a complete air A. B.

the Base Quartermaster for switching cars
ars in the warehouse area. It is working on
three shifts. It can pull approximately 25
and pulls about 40 cars per day in and out.


Drae Mechanics IDrew Field Presents
rew i MeclhanC Master of Ceremonies

-RnA;c F* iting I A Radio Writer


Drew~ Field., Tamila, Florida,


IWOL. 1 NO. 31


Published Every:1 Friday


,Fridayi, October 2, 1912


. I






Page 2


The Drew Field Echoes
GLENN R. ROSS, Publisher
Tampa Army Newspapers
Business Office:
1115 FLORIDA AVENUE
Tampa, Florida
P. 0. Box 522 Phone 2177
All advertisements contained In
this newspaper are also contained in
the MaeDill Field Fly Leaf. Minienum
joint circulation: 8,000 copies.
ADVERTISING RATES FURNISHED
ON REQUEST

A newspaper published exclusive-
ly for the personnel of Drew Field
and devoted to military interests
and the United Nations Victory.
Opinions expressed in this news-
paper are. those of the individual
writers and under no circumstances
are they to be considered those of
the United States Army. Advertise-
ments in this publication do not
constitute an endorsement? by the
War Department or its personnel or
the products advertised.

The Shield
(From "Ring of Steel")
I am the American soldier. For
the American people-my family,
my fellows, my sons to come-I
CARRY ARMS.
Remember how I began-born
of explorers, colonists, hunters in
deerskin-schooled in the wilder-
ness, fighting for a continent. Re-
member Concord Bridge, 1775!
Here at this bridge i fired the
shot heard 'round the world.
Then I was the minuteman-
,the embattled farmer, the son of
Liberty, raw militiaman, hardy
continental. I was the hope of
freedom on the frontier. I carried
arms for the Rights of Man!
.3 Remember Valley Fbrge? / I
was the winter-soldier; starving,
marching, freezing, fighting and
praying at night--alone in the
snow.
I planted the flag of thirteen
stars at the Mississippi, at the
Great Lakes;
I fought the Revolution. I won
this liberty. Marching, I made
America great. Working at peace,
I built America-exploring with
Lewis and' Clark, with Zebulon
Pike, with Kit Carson and Davey
Crockett.
1860 .. .1865 .I was the
Blue I was the Gray.
I led the way! I called to Amer-


Sica, follow the American soldier!
Follow the trail I blaze! I con-
voyed the wagon trains, moving
west patrolled the wild
American continent.
My lonely outposts grew .
my camps became crossroads .
my frontier forts tool root .
rose from the prairies into cities.
My infantry marching made paths.
My cavalry riding made trails.
Where cities rise I made the hik-
ing to lay the ties and drive the
spikes uniting my country with
rails.
Give me the hardest job. Re-
member I brought America to the
Pacific, punched the railroad tun-
nels through the Rockies. I licked
the Mississippi floods, conquered
the Yellow Jack in Cuba, joined
the oceans at Panama, held like
a rock at the Marne!
I am the American soldier: pio-
neer, Samaritan, vanguard. Wher-
ever I was needed whenever
I was called I stood and de-
livered. I came through. I was
America on the march.
I'm the ring of steel around
democracy. I'm the ramparts that
you sing about. I'm the citizen-
soldier-the nation-in-arms.
I'm snap and precision-West
Point pride. I'm the regular -
strictly G.I. I'm the rookie-made
soldier. I'm up from the ranks,
hell for leather, right on the line,
straight from the eye.
I'm the rifleman, cannoneer,
trooper, skier, engineer, gunner,
scout, marksman, driver, signal-
man, sentry, mechanic flyer.
I'm the eyes of the cannon, the
marching refrain, the brains 'of
the tank, the nerve of the plane.
I'm the heart of the shell,, the
courage of truth. I'm the Liberty
Bell, the song of our youth.
I'm the fighting man at every
outpost.
Remember my yesterday with
Washington, winning this liberty?
Once I was only a thousand. TO-
DAY I am millions, whatever it
takes, whatever the -need-for the
spirit we're living-for the future
we're making. I, the American
soldier, am the SHIELD.

MONEY LOANED
ON ANYTHING OF VALUE
TAMPA LOAN CO.
"TAMPA'S OLDEST AND
MOST LIBERAL"
908 FRANKLIN STREET


A SOLDIER'S DREAM
Where all men at least are non-
coms,
And the officers are nice,
Free beer in every barracks,
And no mosquitoes, ants or lice.
Where breakfast consists of lamb
chops,
Fruit and lots of buttered toast,
While for lunch there's chicken,
turkey,
Desserts 'n everything liked
most.
Where dinners served are a la
carte,
With seconds at every meal,
Dished out and served by wait-
resses
With loads of sex appeal.
Where there, is' no reveille at all,
And one can sleep till noon,
With individual latrines
And one soldier to a room.
With swimming pools on every
post,
Tennis court and links,
With hotels for wives and girl
friends -
Bowling alleys 'n roller rinks.
Air conditioning where it's plenty
hot,
And lots of heat when it's cold.
With free shaves and haircuts 'n
Most things are given away,
not sold.
There would never be any KP,
Or any details tough,
With day rooms like exclusive
clubs,
And no duty that's ever rough.
This could only be a dream,.
And is very nice indeed-
But if true we wouldn't be
an army
To serve our country's need.
-Leonard G. Rubin.


505TH OUTFIT IS
FETED, DINED AT
HILLSBORO HOTEL
As a reward for winning the
.regimental "best" title for inspec-
tions during the past several
weeks, the officers and enlisted
men of the Hq. Co., Reporting of
the 505th Regiment were feted
and dined at the Hillsboro Hotel
on Monday.
They were the guests of Frank
J. Hynes, manager of the hotel.
In addition to a fine supper, they
were entertained by an orchestra
led by Bob Porton and some sing-
ers.
Among the guests were Major
F. G. Ruffner, Chaplain Roy M.
Terry, and Lts. Richard M. Cosel,
Gordon J. Peterson, Amos W. Har-
grave, Howard C Reichert, Charles
A. Ketch and R. C. Boardman.


PALMA CEIA

THEATRE
3icDILL AVE. AT SAN CARLOS
Open 3 P. M. Daily
Program Week of October 4th
Sun., Mon., Tnes., Oct. 4, 5, 6
"HONKY TONK," with Clark
Gable and Lana Turner; also
"SWEETHEART OF THE CAM-
PUS," with Ruby Keeler and
Ozzie Nelson; also News
Wed. and Thurs., Oct. 7 and 8
'THE RICHEST MAN IN TOWN'
with Roger, Pryor and, Eileen
Ohearn. Also "SHE KNEW ALL
THE ANSWERS," with Fianchot
Tone and Joan Bennett
Fri. and Sat., Oct. 9 and 10
"NAZI AGENT," with Conrad
Veldt and Ann Ayars; also "THE
PENALTY," with Edward Arnold
and Lionel Brrymore; also
comedy.
SOLDIERS 1,7c


\ George Brent





Franklin St. Restaurant
HOME OF FINE FOODS
At Reasonable Prices
SPANISH DINNERS
1406 Franklin Street


Hey, There t We're Ready For You!

Soldier OPEN FROM 8 A.M. TO 12:00 P.M.

A Pleasant Place to Spend an Evening ....


[[K


EL


"Drinks You'll Like and Can Afford"
The management cordially invites the personnel of Tampa's Army Posts to spend an
evening in a pleasant place. This will be one of the most exclusive bars in Tampa.

Corner Jackson at Tampa St. Phone M-7097


Int Ut


KJ


MILITARY




CLOTHES

ALL KINDS OF CLOTHES, INSIGNIA,

CHEVRONS, JEWELRY FOR SERVICE MEN

| OPEN TUESDAY AND THURSDAY NIGHTS I


1if 6 RANKLIN ST. i~


Now Playing ... Through October 9th
~rP.....


Original Sc ne Playbyy Arthur Horman Music by Max Steiner


FLO RI


VICTQRY-i-l


- Ilr Esn -rl ~


saaa- --


L~I


-- I nea ~


DRERW FIELD ECHOES


Friday, October 2, 1942


~---~~----~~-


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Friday, October 2, 1942 DREW FIELD ECHOES Page 3


THAT YOU MIGHT FLY
By CARLOS BESTOSO
You blithely call for "Contact," with never a thought or a fear;
With never a qualm of forboding, nor a thought for the Pioneer;
The thought never strikes your conscience that you do not fly alone;
That the spirits of men before you, guard every ship that's flown.
So, consider men who dreamed their dreams, the Unknown to defy;
The men who gave their very lives, just that you might fly.
Think, too, of scoffing blind ones, who greeted their dreams with
jeers.
Who laughed in scorning derision' at their sweat and toil and tears.
Think of the torch (ivitli falling hands), that they have tossed to you;
The right of men to fly like birds, and tame the mystic blue;
Their scroll of fame is long and bright, (their names engraved in
fire);
Each one a daring dreamer, who willed to be\ a flyer.
The things you do so casually, in modern, easy flight,
Are dangers that they conquered-and you don' have to fight;
For theirs was the noble spirit which makes men try and try,
With courage never faltering, though called upon to die.
Though passing from our memories, can you doubt that up on high,
They still are ever watchful o'er you who love to fly?
Can you think that their guiding spirits were snuffed like candle fires
When their last flights were ended? Nay; In spirit they're still flyers.
So remember when you're solo, alone up in the blue,
That shades of greater souls than yours are riding on with you;
Remember, too, when up aloft, a-winging through the sky,
That these courageous, hardy souls gave all-that YOU might fly.


THEATER PROGRAM
FOR WEEK
Oct. 2, Friday BALL OF
FIRE, Gary Cooper, Barbara
Stanwyck; Life With Fido.
Oct. 3, Saturday BERLIN
CORRESPONDENT, Dana An-
drews, Virginia Gilmore; Further
Prophecies of Nostradamus; Jerry
Wald and Orchestra; Woodman,
Spare That Tree.
Oct. 4 and 5, Sunday and Mon-
day-HOLIDAY INN, Bing Cros-
by, Fred Astaire; Donald's Gar-
den; News of the Day No. 205.
Oct. 6, Tuesday-GIVE OUT,
SISTERS, Andrews Sisters, Chas.
Butterworth; Three Smart Saps;
Argentine Horses; Saps in Chaps.
Oct. 7, Wednesday--ACROSS
THE PACIFIC, Humphrey Bo-
gart, Mary Astor; Battle of Mid-
way; News of the Day No. 206.
Oct. 8 and 9, Thursday and
Friday THEY DIED WITH
THEIR BOOTS ON ,Errol Flynn,
Olivia DeHaviland; Alcha Hooey.


Hq. and Hq. Sq. 9th Fighter Wing

The Fighting 9th

By CPL. WALTER WERNER
I'd rather take on.a squad of
Jap flame throwers with bare
fists than try to knock out a col-
umn at a time when news seems
to be as scarce as flyspecks on a
master sergeant's trousers on a
Saturday morning inspection. But
the damn thing has to be done.
So, what ho! "Damn the torpe-
does" "Over the top" .
and stuff.
There are unsung heroes in
every outfit. They are the quiet,
hard-working, men who take every
detail job that, comes along in
their stride. Without any fuss or
flurry they can always be depend-
ed on to perform their work well.
On all the thankless jobs as well
as the jobs that are fun to do,
these men always do everything
well. They are soldiers. One of our
nominations for a "Class A" sol-
dier i Pvt. Earl Whitefoot, from
Bromley, Ky. There are others.
Look around who's your pick?
Further Nominations: Crack
transportation man and all-round
swell guy-Pvt. Bernard Gannon,
who returned Sunday from the
Motor Transport School at Sara-
sota, where he and all the other
boys from "The Fighting Ninth"
made good. When the certificates
were presented, Captain Foss
complimented our men, saying
that they were one of the best
classes ever to attend the school.
Nice going, men.
Swing Around the Squadron:
Sgt. Spector, our old "Massachu-
setts Minute Mein," is now train-
ing to be the outfit's gas non-
com. Looks like he'll be a good
one, too. Hearing of Sgt. Specter's
appointment, some wise guy re-
marked: "Phew, the right guy in
the right job."
Warning to Beverly, Mass.:
Flash: Pfc. Lou "King Kong"
Beaulieu has been let loose! He
got out on furlough Wednesday.
Even now, he is probably beating
his way, swinging through trees,
no doubt, to your peaceful little
village. Better nail the sidewalks
down and put all the "sweet young
things" under lock and key. Be-
lause, according to his own story,
e's one terrible guy, "dat Loqie
Bowloa."
Last Shot: Welcome back, Pvt.
Tom Riley. We missed you. Glad
to hear that you enjoyed your fur-
lough. ,


Rex Billiard Parlor
1012 FRANKLIN
Dan'l S. Bagley


EAT
HENDERSON
BAK I NG C 0 S

BREAD
2702 FLORIDA AVE.


Recent Changes

In Military Law
Section VI, Circular No. 273,
War Department, 1942, is pub-
lished below in order that its con-
tents may be made known to all
members of the Base:
1. Executive Order No. 9048,
dated February 3, 1942 (sec. LV,
Bull. 6, W.D. 1942), suspends the
limitations prescribed by the table
of maximum punishments, para-
graph 104c, Manual for Courts-
Martial, U. S. Army, 1928, on
punishments for convictions un-
der Articles of War 58, 59 and 86,
with the result that violation of
any one of these articles of war
may be punished by death. Con-
viction of desertion committed in
time of war also results in for-
feiture of the rights of citizenship.
22. All unit commanders will
explain carefully to all personnel
of their commands Articles of
War 58, 59 and 86, and the last
provision of Article of War 28,
and emphasize the serious conse-
quences which may result from
their violation.
3. These instructions do not
change or modify the provisions
of Article of War 110, which will
be strictly complied with.
Don't congregate with others in
groups. Dispersion increases your
protection' from observation.


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Page 3


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Fridayl Octobu 2,,~ 1942








Page 4 DREW FIELD ECHOES Friday, october 2, 1942


A. W. T. U. Center's Adjutant Promoted


To SGT. JOHN SUSZYNSKI From
PFC. JOE REGIS


Howdy John:
Although I know you hate the
idea of returning to spend a few
more months with the boys al
Drew Field, I know one lad who
will be happy to have you back;
that is I.
I am enclosing an article that
appeared in. last week's ECHOES
entitled, "Lost, Strayed or Hid-
den Somewhere: One Air Force
Band." You will note that it refers
to your recent comments with the
Base Quartermaster's office, re-
garding arrival of our instruments.
Now that they have arrived, the
question is asked, "What other
alibi, then, can they offer?" Of
course, the question pertains to
our initial public appearance.
You have answered that ques-
tion more than once with the
words, "lack of personnel," but
somehow this needs further ex-
planation. You should have stat-
ed that the band is authorized 28
men for a full band. That is, if the
proper presentation of a music
score is to be given the full quota
of men required. However, IF cer-
train key instruments should be
present, the music could be ren-
dered. Now, here is the answer
,to the'question asked: The band
does not have the musicians at the
present time to fill all these key
positions.
It might also have been a good
idea, John, to add that musicians
to fill some of these positions
happen to be on the field, but,
due to regulations or some other
reason, cannot be transferred
from their outfits to help solve
Warrant Officer Baker's problem
and help out the morale of the
field by rendering concerts for the
personnel.
Wefl, John, I hope that this will
clear up that matter. However, it
looks like an almost impossible
task to secure new men. Here is
hoping we have a couple by the
time you arrive from your fur-
lough.
It might be of interest for you
to know that Sgt. Eaton has taken
over the French horn and is prac-
ticing with us every day. Also that
Sgt. Ferris is now rolling away
mile after' mile toward North
Adams, Mass., and wedding bells.
Are you lucky? Something has
gone wrong with our water sys-
tem and we have to depend on
sodas (and other beverages), and
water from other parts of the
field. It goes kind of tough on the
boys.
When you come back I have a
little personal matter to take up
with you, and it is my hope that
you have a darn good excuse for
an answer.
Too bad we can't take the band
down to the terminal to welcome
you back, but you Know how it is.
I only hope the boys on the field
will bear with us until a few more
men join our organization, then
we will give them music, hot and
heavy.

Pvt. John P. Burke, Keesler
Field, Miss, is a colonel-but not
of the Army variety. Some years
ago he met Governor Ruby Lafoon
at a Kentucky race track and was
made a Kentucky Colonel because
his honor liked the way Burke
picked horses.


Major Leslie C. Follett, Adju-* service of the United States, scal-
tant of the Air Warning Service ing an even five,feet in height. A
Unit, Training Corpt at Drew special waiver was necessary at
Field, may be short in stature, but the time he was commissioned in
he has a mighty big job which he the Texas National Guard in 1927.
performs well. So well, in fact,I Previously he had served as an
that he has just been promoted in enlisted man in the National
rank from captain to major. Guard. He also saw service dur-
Until the outbreak of the pres- ing the first World War.
ent war, Major Follett was theI Major Follett is a native of El
"shortest" officer in the military Paso, Tex.

-..----------.-. -


SPORTS

REVIEW

Obstacle Course Cham-
pionship Meet
A number of outfits are hold-
ing elimination contests in prepa
ration, for the obstacle course
championship meet which is to
be held on October 8 on the obsta-
cle course at headquarters, Third
Air Force.
SThe vinner, through an ar-
rangement with Mr. George H.
Mason, president, and general
manager of Collier Coast Hotels,
Will ibe the week-end guest of
the Tampa Terrace Hotel. Begin-
Wing Friday afternoon, October
9, and lasting through Sunday,
October 11, he will be given
room, meals and trips, as well as
two meals for a guest of the op-
posite sex, one corsage for the
lady guest, and the privilege of
having one couple as his guests
on Sunday.
Second and third place win-
ners will be given appropriate
awards, probably )something in
the nature of athletic equipment.
The meet will involve all or-
ganizgtions in the Tampa area o'f
the Third Air Force.

Volley Ball and Touch.
Football Tournaments
Lt. Arthur Colley, Base Physi-
cal.Training Director, announces
that camp volley ball and touch
football tournaments are in prep-
aration. A meeting will be held
next week-the specific date to be
announced in the bulletin at
which will take place a volley
ball and touch football clinic
sponsored by the Physical Traii-
ing Office.
There will be a demonstration
in technique of both games, as
well as an interpretation of the
rules. Volley ball teams will be
made up of six men. "We will also
distribute pamphlets pertaining to
volley ball and touch football,"
says Lt. Colley.

Basket Ball
Perhaps it is a bit premature
to talk of basket ball, but it is


Sub-Depot Subs


Florence Abraham is one of our
several singers in the Sub-Depot
Headquarters. Sle won first place
in a state music festival. Her fa-
vorife hobby is collecting phono-
graph records-mostly classical.
Helen Kelly would rather work
in her garden than anything. She
has had graduate work in Per-
sonnel at the N. Y. University.
Mrs. Kelly has traveled exten-
sively in Europe and Alaska, tour-
ing with students from many col-
leges of the United States.
Mrs. Myrtle Farn'um, head of
the payroll section, claims she is
above it all. Won't talk, huh?
Mr. H. J. Thomoson was the
first man in Tampa to win a trip
to Chicago for the Uncle Walter's
Doghouse program. He had to live
in a doghouse once, and has pic-
tures, to prove it. He claims his
greatest adventure in life is his
two- children, although he has
had many exciting experience. Get
him to tell you of some.
Mrs. Catherine Wilder is an-
-other of our singers. She also
prefers classical music to jazz or
swing. Her husband works in the
Panama Canal Zone, and Mrs.
Wilder is hoping for a chance
soon to go see him.
Lois McIntyre, that cute little
typist who likes lieutenants, is an
art enthusiast. She loves o draw
pictures.
Lt. Roan is doing a swell job
as Engineering Officer, replacing
Cap. Hudgens.
.We also halve another swell
officer in Supply-Lt. Pleasants,


not so very far, off before the bas-
ket ball season will open. Drew
Field will have a post team, it is
announced. However, until a call
for candidates is issued, the physi-
cal training office advises prospec-
tive applicants for the team to
practice on their own unit courts.
Pamphlets are available at the
physical training office for unit
physical training directors. They
are concerned with calisthenics,
leagues and tournaments, obstacle
courses and group games.


A TOUGH JOB
You think you've a tough job
In Iceland or Nome;
I'll swap you the one that
They've clipped me at home;
I'm drilling the women
The best that I can,
But can't yell the things that
I'd yell at a man.

"Eyes right, ya gorilla!?'
I once. used to shout,
But that and "Hey, Fathead!"
Are both strictly out!
Of jobs in the service
The hardest is mine-
I've .got to discard all
My old Army line.

Did privates toe in?
I could yell, "Lissen, stupe!
You do that again, you'll
Get socked for a loop!"
"Chins up, ya baboons!" was
My cry through the day,
But drill the dames, well,
It ain't the same way!

"Eyes right! Are ya cockeyed?"
I'd yell in loud tones,
But now it's "Please try once
Again, Mrs. Jones!"
"Hey, throw out your chest!
Stow
That barroom effect!"
Are into the discard; they
Ain't quite correct!

"Hey, mug! Wipe that grin off!"
I loved that so much,
But can't use it now for
It lacks the right touch;
"Ya bowlegged scarecrow!"
Is off my routine,
It's now "Watch your form if,
You don't mind Miss Green!"

"C'mon, ya big froop, get
Some snap in them knees!"
Went well with my old squads,
But NEVER with THESE!
Your shirts out, ya dumbbell!"
I cant yell no more-
Forgive me my groans, it's
One 'elluva war.

"That hat is no ale can
To hang on one ear!"
Is now out of order
With "Pull in ya rear!"
But this is what slays me
And makes my head dance:
No more can I bellow,
"Hey, pull 'up them .pants!"
+e,,r,++rrrr^^r^^rr^ ^^ ^


who hails from No'th Ca'lina.
He's a swell guy, even though he
is a 2nd Lt.
Lt. Ford, another new officer,
is in Engineering, but he's so
much in love, we don't know
much' about him but who
wouldn't love that luscious
blonde he's sparking with??
Lt. Birnie had to go to Mo-
bile to attend school for a month.
His sentence is just about up, and
we are anxiously awaiting his re-
turn. That rascal is everybody's
pal.
Lt. Cromartie has' also been
smitten by the love bug-or is it
that he finds the Purchasing &
Conracting Section just interest-
ing work? Could be, but we think
it is somebody with the initials
of L. M. When is the execution
to be, Lieutenant?
The Supply Office hopes to
move into their new quarters
most any day now. If they don't
get morelroom soon, it looks as
though they will be sitting in
each other's laps. This may not be
a bad idea, as there happens to be
plenty of cute things in Supply.
Capt. Williams, Goa bless him,
seems to have his hands full right
now, what with all the new hired
hands and changes going on.
Know it's tough on you, "Captain,
but you will pull through O.K.
We are very proud of our rec-
ord in war bonds and -stamps.
This pay period we hope to go
over the $15,000 mark. What
other organization on the Field
can compete with us?


DceW FICLD





By PVT. ADRIAN GENDOT
Drew Field .dialers should,
without fail, locate that familiar
spot on-the WFLA beam tonight
at 9 p.m. for another varied half-
hour program cast by the Special
Services Office and piloted by Cpl.
0. Z. Whitehead.
Tonight's program will feature
the singing of Cpl. Edward Fer-
guson and the smooth organ styl-
ings of our ole buddy, Cpl. Jack
Hartman. Cpl., Whitehead will
again be that familiar voice from
the Poet's Nook and yours truly
will be on hand-thus advancing
the cause of culture backwards,
I'm sure. For one time (and at
popular prices), this writer will
play "Deep In the Heart of Texas"
on a South African trombooli.
Note: A trombooli is a teakwof"
box two feet wide and 18 fk,
long with a cannon ball inside and
you shake it. Gruesome little
thought, isn't it?
By the way, men, have you ever
wondered what that O. Z. before
the Whitehead stands for? Cor-
nering the elusive corporal for a
brief moment the other day, we
finally pinned him down to the
following: "0. Z. stands for
Othout Zabriski," he said calmly,
flicking a mosquito off his wrist.
"Polish names," he added and
strolled off into the night with
flashlight and net in search of new
talent. Good luck, Othout Zabris-
ki W.
Suppose you know by now that
Cpl. Jack Hartman is back with
us on our early morning "waker-
upper" over WFLA at 7:05 a.m.
Cpl. Jack is running over the pro-
gram on the organ keyboard in
fine style these early mornings
and he'd be most happy to play
.your requests. .So let's have 'em,
fellas.
Say, we'd like to call your at-
tention to another fine program
directed to your earsevery Thurs-
day evening at 8:35 p.m. over
station WDAE. Pvt. Charles Crain
is at the helm each week with a
fine quarter-hour spot of music
and chatter, so be listening,
wontcha?


I'G-NASH ING,
li 'oa '



'88[#flS


Buy your stamps a dime
at a time,
Or a quarter, or even a
dollar,
Whichever you do won't
hurt this ryhme,
Hitler's the one who'll
holler.


Illustration by Gib Crocket.
BUY WAR BONDS
AND STAMPS
U. S. Treasury Department.


Page 4


DREW FIELD> ECHOES


Friday;, October 2, 1942







Friday, October 2, 1942
o
THE PAST, THE
PRESENT AND THE
FUTURE OF DREW
Strolling around the expanding
air base that is Drew Field, one
marvels at t he remarkable
changes which have taken place in
a short period of six months. New
roads and avenues, neatly labeled
and .paved, countless barracks
and hutments where once was
swampland and palmetto scrub
and a city of tents, and new
areas stretching out far beyond
the north and east gates-if one
was Rip Van Winkle, who slept
only six months instead of 20
years, it would be hard to con-
ceive the changes that have trans-
pired in the interim without rub-
bing one's eyes in disbelief.
And while one thinks of the
growth of the air base during war-
time, one goes to the other ex-
treme and thinks of the desola-
ion, the dead bleakness of the
barracks and hutments when six
months have elapsed after the
end of the war. One thinks of go-
ing home and partaking of home's
inimitable culinary art, of rising
at leisure without the sergeant's
whistle sounding in one's ears
like a thicket full of buzzing
crickets during midsummer, of
bathing uhhurriedly, of dressing
in Harris tweeds and a snappy
brim hat.
Think of Base Headquarters and
take a' glimmer of the sergeant
major sitting behind his desk,
one-arm supporting his head, one
hand lazily swatting flies, while
only one letter goes through the
office all day. Picture the thou-
sand-man mess halls swinging
open to only 30 or 40 men.
But I suppose it will never be
like that again. The Army, un-
doubtedly, will still have a large
number of recruits.
Think of the latrines with no-
body in them, of floors covered
with dust, never swept, of no
clothes hanging on either side of
the barracks. But there I go for-
getting that there will still be re-
cruits.
One thing there won't be:. a Hit-
ler Germany.
Another thing there won't be:
'a Hirohito Japan.
And there certainly won't be a
Mussolini Italy.
4C

564th Plotting Co.

Dots and Dashes

By SGT. E. S. PERRY
As week after week rolls by,
the success of our company
mounts higher and higher, till
now we have reached a dizzy pin-
nacle. ,We triumphed again at
softball, touch football, horseshoe
pitching and volley ball, not to
mention marathon walking. We
took some of the best into camp,
thanks to the efforts of such stal-
warts as Knott, Meyers, Noron,
Garrett and O'Neill. But before I
forget, three cheers and welcome
back to the Orlando men. And we
hope they can help us out on that
long-drawn debate on which is the
largest city in the world in area.
I personally will stick to that
California metropolis, Los Ange-
les.
Goodbye and good luck to our
old supply corporal, Herb Solo-
koff, who has been furloughed
into the E.R.C., for he was always
a willing worker. We shall all join
you in rooting during the world
series to beat the team that beat
Brooklyn. And speaking of blues
-the St. Louis type-unless those
checker boards are found, among
those on the mourner's bench will
be Holder, Dempsem, Lampert and
Perry. Well, -we'll all be on the
mou:ner's bench or at the wailing
wall unless this column closes so
we can go get some amber fluid.


Hq. and Hq. Sq. 9th Fighter Cd.

NOTES

By S/SGT. FRANKLIN A.
GODSOE
Recruit's-Eve View of a Sergeant


A sergeant is a large body of
egotism, entirely surrounded by
privates. Comes equipped
with a voice like a bear growling
for a slab of raw meat and a
chronic disposition of irritability.
S. Operates with malice afore-
thought, threatening everything


205 Franklin Street- Phone 4154


DREW FIELD ECHOES Page 5


from mayhem to murder, but
(confidentially) the bark is al-
ways worse than the bie. Is
a past master at making moun-
tains out of molehills .... Consid-
ers everyone but his best friend to
be slap-happy, and rates him on
the peculiar side. .' Is a self-
styled authority on women, yet
gets plucked clean of every dime
he has left from his gambling
losses on payday. Given a
dash of inferiority complex blend-
ed with Dale Carnegie's. recipe
for "Winning Friends and Influ-
encing People," he might be a
pretty good "Joe," but unfortu-
nately those things don't come in
a sergeant's size, so the cause is
hopeless. Sherman was right
. .war is hell!

Proof that marriage is one of
he most contagious maladies is
the case of Pvt. Thomas Taylor
of squadron supply. Exposed to
the disease last week by acting as
best man when Pvt. Joe Newding
and Dorothy Riebe, a little eye-
filler from Texas, wrapped up
their domestic diploma, Taylor is
reported to have a "party of the
second part" heading for Tampa.
K-K-
The boys in the barracks were
talking sports. One decided he
would rather witness a Bowl foot-
ball game than any big event he
could name. Another stamped a.
ticket for the World Series, and
the Louis-Conn fight had a cou-
ple of backers. Then. T/Sgt. Rob-
ert Gabriel stopped them all with
"Just give me a bullfight any-
time, and you take everything
else.". It developed that Gabriel
spent 13 years in Spain, where he
completed his education.,
-K -K +-
New Nicknames: The exact cir-
cumstances 'would probably make
more interesting reading, but a
pair of sergeants in the squadron
have been labeled with new nick-
names. ... The boys are calling
Sgt. James N. Bledsoe "Blonde-
shy," and S/Sgt. J. B. Smith "Ra-
tion Money."

A Sergeant Reflects on Recruits
A recruit is a sad-looking ob-
ject, clothed in G.I. garments of
the most modish shades of khaki
and blue denim and especially tai-
lored too big or too .little.. ..
Wears a look as blank as the man
who has no place to go on Satur-
day night. Has difficulty sa-
luting without hitting an ear.and
doing an about-face without fall-
ing down. Marches with all
the grace of a "Pullman porter
shuffle." .. Can ask more ques-
tions than a district attorney and
understands something less than
.00001 of he answers. Can
usually be found in a horizontal
position, particularly when the
sergeant or C.O. is known to be
down the street. Has an in-
ventive imagination, needs only to
walk into the latrine to dream uo
the future of the squadron for the
next three months, which is then,
of course passed along to every-
one he meets as hot news, straight
from the colonel's lap ... Ser-
geants can't get along with 'em-
God bless 'em-or the Army with-
out 'em.


SUNBURN


a

INSECT BITES-MUSCULAR ACHES




ELKS IN UNIFORM
Reemember Every Saturday,
4 P.M. to 11 P.M. Free Soft
Drinks Food Music
Bring a Buddy,
ELKS LODGE
Florida Ave. & Madison St.

OFFICERS AND MEN!
We Appreciate Your Patronage
-and Thank You.
MacDill Field Post Tailors
V. Ficcio


THE AMAZING B-17
FLYING FORTRESSES
Newly promoted Maj. Gen. Ira
C. Eaker predicted that a round-
the-clock aerial blitzkrieg could
bring Hitler to his knees and Ger-
many to the ground. His forecast
was bulwarked by confidential
British reports on .the perform-
ance of our B717 (Flying For-
tresses) over France and the
Reich.
SThe British express amazement
at the devastating sweep of our
planes and, like the commander of
the U. S. bombing force in Eng-
land, suggest that they may revo-
lutionize warfare. The B-17 type
according to these menios, can
operate from a height of 25,000
feet and drop one of four missiles
exactly on the target, even while
whizzing at a speed of 330 miles
an hour. The intercepted mes-
sages of German pilots reflect the
enemy's fears of engaging these
models. Nazi gunners confess their
dread of taking on an adversary
with so much armor and fire
power.

OUT OF THE DRAFT
Pvt. J. J. O'Gara, of the 314th,
tells this one about a friend of
his from Boston, Mass. This Bos-
tonian's arches had crumbled just
as the Army surgeon was pro-
nouncing him physically fit (that
was the week after Pearl Har
bor). Subsequently he was placed
in 4-F.
Lately, when the selective serv-
ice boards started to reclassify
4-Fs, he showed a little appre-
hension about being taken. When
called to the induction station for
another physical, he asked the
doctor if ]e believed that he could
get by with such bum feet.
To which the medico replied,
"Say, bud, standards have been
lowered so much now that all we
do is feel your body. If it's warm,
we take you."


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WELCOME TO

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TOM BRYSON, Manager
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DREW FIELD ECCHOES


Page 5








Page 6 DREW FIELD ECHOES Friday, October 2, 1942


The Fellow On

The Other Side


Of The Fence

By CPL. TULY UNGER
Have you eyer harbored the
overpowering urge to speak to the
fellow on the other side of the
fence? Well, I have.
Two weeks ago, while passing
through Washington on my way
back to Drew Field from my fur-
lough, I had the opportunity to
satisfy my urge. I met a troop
train on which British M.P.s were
guarding German prisoners cap-
ured in Africa. They were headed
for a Canadian in-ternment camp,
and they thanked their lucky
stars for being captured in one
piece.
The average age of the prison-
- ers was 17 years, and already they
were veterans of some eight
months of service. Before capture
they had been in Italy guarding
an Italian airplane factory, in Sici-
ly awaiting embarkation to Afri-
ca, where they were bombed by a
Malta .bombardier squadron, and
Into,. ;_ AfC__--


h 903 SERVICE G
at Augusta Fiel la.


JLJUI Ull rlllUIUU
By CPL. H. A. HORTON
Fellows, this isn't intended a1
a lecture, but rather as a little
reminder just in case we have
slipped a little since the days of
our civilian life. We were present
the other night at a vaudeville
performance given for the bene-
fit of the men on Drew Field. It
was noticed that there was a great
deal of cat-calling and wise-crack-
ing from he audience. In its place
I guess it would be allright.. But
we don't think that it was very
good manners in this instance.
Those people came here to try and
give us something to think about
besides the war and the parr we
are playing in it. They were try-
ing to give us a little fun. Seems
to me Lmat the least we can do is
show our appreciation of their ef-
forts by a little courteous trea--
ment. We might remember that
we can't all be stars-certainly
that does not give us the right to
ridicule the aspirations of others.
Enough said.
A number of boys are wonder-
ing who that luscious brunette in
red is who was sitting opposite
Sgt. Stringer the other night in
the Tampa Terrace. A mighty nice
addition to your collection, Sarge.
Please refrain from any rough
ailing of Pfc. Anderson, of the
Medics. His back is in a sorry
condition. Try standing on your
feet, Anderson, and those bed
gi soon disappear.
Pfc. Hutson, will you .please
give Cpl. Jarvie whatever it is that
you owe Eim and the corporal will

A dime out of every
S dollar we earn

IS OUR QUOTA
for VICTORY with
U.S. WAR BONDS


later a i n frica.
I got into a conversation with a from the literature of this coun-
group of the prisoners while wait- try. It might not be loaded with
ing for my train. The spokesman classics as in he whole of Euro-
for a group of them, whom I shall pean literature, but it is sound,
refer to as Hans, stated in no un- plentiful and very informative. Al-,
certain terms .that the German most any subject worth knowing
Army as well as the home front, about this country and its people
were disgusted with the horrible is covered by its literature. Much
war situation, of it is exemplified by Lincoln's
The German people, Hans said, Gettysburg address, and I firmly
were at first fascinated by the believe in democracy and) that
Nazi promise of Aryan suprema- "this government of the people,
cy, but never did they dream that by the people and for the people
their Garden of Eden was to blos- shall not perish from the earth."
som into a sordid blood-soaked
continent. Never did they antici- 59h A N
pate that there credo was to be an- 59th A vN. S .
other bloodthirsty proclamation
of the greatest collection of By PVT. JAMES C. GRAY
butchers tile world has ever seen.
The Nazis constituted a party of Here we are, fellows, all ready
Barnums to seTl their gory ideas or' the rounds of the camp--a
to-a peaceful people, and they put beautiful place Is this Camp De-
on not one, but many three-ring Soto Swell officers. So let's
circuses. The people were taken keep 'em swell one bad step
in completely by the ideal of Ar- and it'll certainly be hi ho,
yan supremacy and surrendered here, do I hear a mumbling?
their sanity. Sounds like the earth is quaking.
Now, however, with so many No, there isn't an earthquake-
German corpses piled up all over there are no bad clouds above.
Europe and particularly in Rus- There goes a bit of hee hawing.
sia, the German people are beam-, No, you're wrong, there are no
ing disillusioned and are resigned "animals" in these parts-tip toe,
to the imminence of defeat. Hans hip ho-there you are, Sgt. Les-
himself was convinced that the ter Adams and Pvt. Edward Jack-
two main German armies in Rus- son framing up on some lass in
sia and Egypt would be defeated Bradenton-wish I knew who it
before the year was over. was-no, no, I wouldn't tell.
As my train started to pull out, Congrats to Pfc. Russell Stone
we shook hands. As a parting and Pfcs. Anderson, Bain, Byrd,
gesture he saluted and said, "You Jackson, Mitchell, McMillan, San-
may well thank God that you are cho, Towns, Austin, Baisden,
not only an American, hut an Dougherty, Johnson, Mitchell,
American soldier." Rountree and Thompson. They
4 were selected to attend the UTO
Notes From a Diary of a school at MacDill Field. Good luck
F r E n Nw to you, fellows.
rmer European ow Lt. N. Waitsman has been teach-
Serving in Our ing us how to soldier for the past
Ared Fo s wo weeks. And does he know his
Armed Forces stuff! We hope he'll remain with
As Told to us indefinitely.
Can you imagine a group of
CPL. LEONARD G. RUBIN fellows being so lucky? They com-
pose the 59th Avn. Sq.-all draft-
Yes, I really consider it a great ed in Florida, and all remained'
privilege to become a crizen of in Florida. They say luck is for-
the United States. I am not belit- tune-for how long? Cpl. Ernest
tling my former country, my love Henderson's "Got It Bad and That
for her by saying or feeling so. Ain't Good" since a certain some-
I gave up my native land for good body went away of course he
when I left for this country; I communicates with her through
did not know it at that time, but I allotments other allotments
know it now. not on record. I thought Pfc. Lon-
So many things here, little by nie Bonds had enough of road
little, have become part of my marching. The boys tell me (now,
life that they have become neces- I didn't see you, Lonnie) they saw
sitiel, generally speaking. I know him marching from Clearwater-
that I prefer them to similar whew! It's a pretty long way from
things and conditions at home. At Clearwater to Drew Field-espe-
first I always thoilght the old cially on an early Monday morn-
country had everything in decency ing. What was wrong, Lonnie?
and culture and was far above Oh, well, pay day will solve that
the United States, but at that little problem.
time I knew only the superficial Remedy for high percentage of
life of America as applied to my (duckers) "Sick Call": Eliminate
special experiences. these four:( '1) road marches,
During my work at the World (2) KP, (3) policing, (4) daily
Fair in San Francisco, I know afternoon exercises.
only the international phase or, Pfc., Marion Haynes, think you
shall we say, the cosmopolitan can get two more alibis for com-
side of America. I moved around ing in after "pass hour" as good
mostly among traveling people as the last two? They'll be repeat-
and their likes, and their views ed for the sake of non-repetition
and habits are the same the world by the boys. After all, they are
over. copyrighted:' (1) You were sit-
So, the next few years, when I ting on the bench at the station-
went out on my own among the bus station and being a little
people, especially.in other places sleepy, you went to sleep, over-
in California, I got an insight into slept yourself-naturally the bus
the genuine American way of left you; (2) you and the bus
life. I got to know the average driver had a little misunderstand-
man; behind his desk, in his store,ing; you decided to get off the


Bar and Cocktail Lounge
The TURF EXCHANGE
Package Store
ORCHESTRA EVERY NITE
Phone 2003
202 E. Lafayette St.


UNION BAKERY
"REAL CUBAN BREAD OUR
SPECIALTY"
1506 9th Ave. Phone Y-4399



White Way
LAUNDRY
2800 Armenia Ave., Nenr Michigan
Phone U11-3ts


SWAR

i ... BOND DAY
STOP SPENDING-SAVE DOLLARS


"A GOOD PLACE TO EAT"
POST OFFICE CAFE
C. D. Kavakos, Prop.. Dinners,
Plate Lunches. Beer, Wines &
Cold Drinks. Pies and Pastries.
406 Zack Street Tampa, Fla.


Armenia Floral Gardens
"Really Fresh Flowers"
Corsages 'n Everything
Ph. S 55-341. 4500 Armenia Ave.


GREETINGS
Tropical Paradise
ICE CREAM PARLOR
Hot Dogs Hamburgers
Cubamniix Sandwiches
1809 N. Howard Ave.


Elliston's Drug Store
Phone H-1645
Fountain Service and Lunches
202 W. Lafayette St., TAMPA


If Interested in
IMPORTED FOODS
Call PAUIJ PIZZO, Y 3897
We Have Plenty, and Tasty, Too!
JOE CASTELLANO GROCERY
1724 8th Ave.


CRENSHAW'S
(Wholesale)

Fruits Vegetables
Phone 2623


Service Men Always Welcome
La Gloria Restaurant
Fine Spanish Food and
Sandwiches
3103 Armenia Ave.
Phone H 33-521

Soldiers Welcome To .
MA'S PLACE
Sandwiches Beer Wine
Soft Drinks
N. Boulevard Corner Cass St


U


SERVICE MEN
LA NUEVA ERA
Fancy Groceries Fresh Meats
8018 Armenia Ave
lPh. H 46-174 Free Delivery


in his grove or vineyard, at his bus and walk to the camp. All in turn give you back your soap.
job or in his home with his fam- strings have ends. The boys in the Day Room would
ily. In addition, I saw him in his Get this, fellows: A d-a-s-h like a little quiet while writing
groups and public gatherings, from Retreat to the shower, from their letters.
It was from them I learned that shower to room and with an elec- Now that softball is behind us,
the American citizen is really a tric effect in the putting on of the big question is football and
fortunate person and his society is the dress uniform, a d-a-s-h down that brings to mind this thought.
worth becoming a member of. So the stairs to the C.O. for a pass- How did Cpl. Jarvie get past S/Sgt.
here is my resolution, steady o-u-t to grab a bus-my, my, my, Kiefer to make that run of 90
made: I want to become one of it's full-a mad rush, a dazzling yards for a touchdown???
them! rush, to the street car line-just Cpl. Paterson wants to know
You ask what about my rela- in time- whew! -off to Beulah how he can wake Cpl. Gallatin up
tionship with the old country. I Baptist church. Why the rush, in the morning without having to
felt that if I used my knowledge Pfc. James Johnson? The boys go two or three rounds before be-
anid native characteristics ac- tell me (now, I don't know) that ing recognized as the C.Q.
quired from my previous educa- there is a fair damsel awaiting The boys in T-211 are interest-
tion and upbringing, they would your arrival-ding, dong--"The ed in where Pvt. Toner is taking
certainly be appreciated in this Bells of St. Mary's, I Hear Thee his laundry these nights. Must
country, where so many of my fel- Calling." have an awful lot of clothes judg-
low countrymen had lived and Since the "double time session," ing by the frequency of his trips
'een liked and recognized. I had the chow line seems to be in fine to town.
heard many people say, "It must shape. Now, don't look at me like Sgt. Stevens had a migfity nice
be a great country you come from that, fellows, there's nothing I can dream the other night. Pfc. Brayer
even if it is small, and those of do about your having only one will tell you all about it.
your countrymen I know are all officer to sign your passes.' ... I "Little Caesar" DeRosa looks
fine people and have become some can't sign them-do you wish that much better since he had his hair
of the best citizens of this coun- I direct you to Headquarters? cut. It was a hard fight, 1st Sgt.
try." I imagine Tampa will look like Miller-but you won.
heaven itself (still an imagina- Pv. "Rebel" Cool claims the
Those and similar remarks from tion) when we get a chance to go shortest distance between two
many different people from many there. It's hard, fellows, but it's points is where they serve two
different walks of life for a while fair Another six weeks and we'll steaks for a buck.
had me flattered and I must con- be in a position to really appre- .
fess to the fact that for some time
I though t myself much better than ciate the going. General Custer's "last stand"
Thought myself much better than against the Indians is an epic in
then, y exerieneI have found American history. Today 19-year-
out differently. A great help in old Lawrenoe Ouster, last male
changing my mind concerning my- dese nt to carry on the Cade
self and fellow countrymen came name, is training as an air cadet


CULP LUMBER CO.
'Everything to Build Anything'
Millwork Made To Order


500 Packwood
Ph. H 1862 -:-


MARY ELLEN FLOWER
AND GIFT SHOP
Get That Special Gift Here, for
Sweetheart or Mother.
1311 Grand Central
Next to Big Orange


Special Invitations to All
Service Men
GLEN'S BILLIARDS
Now in its New Location
805 Tampa St.


BILLIARDS
CIGARS CIGARETTES
BEER WINES
SANDWICHES
HARRY WELLECOTT
912 Florida Avenue


TWIN PALMS
Beer Wines Soft Drinks
Sandwiches Our Specialty
CLEAN COOL RESTFUL
Howard Ave. at Columbus Dr.


Phones: 2588--2580

McKay-Clarke Ins. Co.
GENERAL INSURANCE
515 Zack Street Tampa, Fla.


SPECIAL ATTENTION
To Service Men's Families

Peter Grahn & Son
Meats-Produce--Groceries
Phone 3502 910 Florida Ave.


Tampa


Phone M52-073
Manuel Garcia Jr.'s
MADRILLON
Spanish Restaurant
915 Tampa at Tyler
Tampa, Florida


L


I


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Friday, October 2L, 1912


Page 6


GOODY GOODY
For Quality at The
Right Price-"No Tips"
1119 FLORIDA AV&



Adams Kennedy
Whiting and Jefferson
Tampa, Fla.
Groceries, Tobacco, Oandy
Notions



STAR KOSHER
DELICATESSEN
TRY OUR CORN BEEF
SANDWICHES & SALADS
Open till 11 P. M.
805 Gr. Central, Ph. H29-842


Servicemen Are Welcome
Day or Nite at

CHILD CAFE
501 Frankllin St.




DIXIE
Cleaners :: Laundry
Phones: M-1036, 4232



OWNSEND
Sash Door
& Lumber Co.
LUMBER & MILLWORK
ROOFING AND PAINT
-FHA LOANS-
PHONE H 4891
N. Rome & Fuller Street


"WE LIKE TO SERVE"
Service Men and Families

Nebraska Hotel
Moderate Rates
2815 Nebraska Ave.
Ph. M 53-631







Friday. Octoberr 2, 1942


Under the 8th Wing
By CPL. L. E. BLOCH
Last week, in a softball game with
our neighbors, "The Fightin' 9th
Infantry," we had 'em 4-2 in the
first of the fourth when the game
had to be called on account of
condensation on an extremely hu-
mid day. (Never let it be said that
it rains in Florida.) Hostilities
will be resumed at an early date.
Pvt. Donald MacBrian will rep-
resent the 8th in the Obstacle
Course Championship Meet, to be
held on October 8. The winner of-
the event will be the guest of the
Tampa Terrace Hotel for a super
deluxe week-end. Can see Mac
now sitting up in the Palm Room
with all the brass hats..... We
are hapIy to welcome the latest
addition to the Wing's staff,of of-
ficers, Capt. James R. Cox, chap-
lain, who will furnish our spiritual
guidance. Chaplain Cox held his
first services for the organization
out under the trees in the Wing
area last Sunday.
"Who was that lady I saw you
outwit last night?" was a question
asked Herbert Hurwitz, the pres-
idigitating private of the 8th, who
gave a standing room performance
in the phone booth at the main
PX one night last wek.
Pvt. Charles e"Chuck" Berin-
stein, an ex-accountant, spent last
week as "latrine mechanic," look-
ing after the "assets" of the
Wing.... Much to the surprise
of everyone, the Wing's collie
mascot became the mother of
eight pups of unknown lineage a
few days ago.
Have you noticed how Pfe. Carl
Russin has/been following the
straight and narrow lately?
Couldn't be he's expecting the
wife on a visit soon-or could it?
T/Sgt. Donald Gilliland has
gone up to Portsmouth, Ohio, for
a first look at his daughter, who
was born on September 23. And,
come to think of it, we didn't get
a cigar on that deal! Certainly
did hate to see Sgt. Eddie East-
wick leave us last wek. He was
transferred to the 314th Air Base
Squadron to await his call to
OCS.
Pfc. Salph Jones' maps are sad-
ly neglected each time a feminine
footstep is heard on the sidewalk
near the Situations Room. We
fear that one of these days he's
going to snap a vertebra turning
his head so quickly. At ease,
Jones!
Wonder who this "Mary" is up
at Keesler that we are told Pvt.
William Booth misses so? Here's
a little poem we came across re-
cently:
If he parks his little flivver
Down beside the river,
And you feel him all a-quiver,
Baby. he's a wolf.
If he-says you're gorgeous looking'
And your eyes set him a-cookin',
But your eyes ain't where he's
looking ,
Baby, he's a wolf.
When he says that you're an
eyeful,
But his hands begin to trifle,
And his heart pumps like a rifle,
Baby, he's a wolf.
If by chance while you are kissin',
You can feel his heart a-missin',
And you talk, but he won't listen,
Baby, he's a wolf.
If his arms are strong as sinew,
And he stirs the gypsy in you,
And you want him close ag'in you,
Baby, he's a wolf.
--Anonymous.

PHOTOGRAPHS
Roy N. Green Studio

Open Evenings
Opposite USO 505 Morgan St.


THE LENOX
Mrs. Eva Cadden
Chicken, Steaks, Chops, Home
Made Pies, Good Coffee
Regular Dinners
2724 Florida Ave.


Flowers For Mother,
Sweetheart or Friend
POWELL'S INC., FLORIST
412 Tampa St. Ph. 2524
Open 'Til 7 P. M.


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Instrument Pilot's
Ten Commandments
1. Seat thyself well upon
thy fifth vertebra, leaving not
thy fingerprints on the con-
trols, and chewing not on they
fingernails.
2. Kow thy instruments, for
they are the true and appoint-
ed prophets.
3. Follow the indications of
thy instruments; and, verily,
thy airplane will follow along,
even as the tail follows the
sheep.
4. Do not stick out thy neck
a foot; stay within the con-
fines of thy ability, and thou
shalt live to a happy old age.
5. Know the appointed
words and approved methods
so that if thy neck drapeth
out, thou shalt be able even
unto thyself to place same in
its proper place-upon thy
shoulders.
6. Follow thy radio beam;
for its ways are the happy
ways and will lead to the prom-
ised land ing.
7. Listen carefully; yea,
verily, to the signal impinging
on thy eardrum, for sometimes
they seem to have the tongues
of snakes, and will cross up
thy orientation, to the sa.d
state to where thou must ask
Heaven herself for guidance.
8. Assume not, neither shalt
thou guess, that thy Position is
such; but prove to thine own
satisfaction that such is the
case.
9. Boast not, neither brag;
for surely Old Devil Overcast
shalt write such words in his
book, and thou shalt some day
be called for an accounting.
10. Trust not thy seat (of
thy pants) ; but follow thy in-
struments, read and truly in-
terpret the word as given from
Ihine instrument board; know
that the responsibility lies
not with the hand that rocks
the control column, but in and
with the mind that directs the
hand, and thou shalt be blessed
with a long and happy life.

Phone H-3787
McASKILL MUSIC STORES
Radios and Repairing
Sound and Inter Communicating
Systems
Authorized Capehart and Scott
Radio Service
1116 Grand Centrl


OPEN EVENINGS
rTTrTT. .ot


Page '


TRAINED ACTOR, "K *"":":"::*
DANCER, SINGER BOB'S :OPEN EVENINGS
ON DREW SHOW S

Serving as master of ceremonies
at the Thursday show of Drew 51
Field Presents over WDAE, Pvt. .3
Charles W. Crain carries with him Complete Line Military Supplies For The Needs Of
a wealth of experience.
Beginning with his childhood SERVICE MEN
days, Pvt. Crain made public p- EXPERT TAILORING
pearances as a singer and dancer. E TAILORING
In Kalamazoo, Mich., his home 207 E. Lafayette Street Tampa
town, Crain was a boy soprano,
singing and dancing with a vaude- **:->:44:::.;:-':;:" :+:: ::.4.*^
ville unit of children called the
Sunshine Kiddies. L a t e r he ...
studied dancing and dramatics in
Chicago and New York City, after t: A
which he started his career in m ANHATTAN CAFE
vaudeville, fairs, clubs and radio,
playing from coast to coast. 210 E. Lafayette St. Tampa
In 1932 he took over a dancing GOOD FOOD REASONABLE PRICES
school in Battle Creek, Mich., and DINNERS 30c, 40c, 60c
stayed there seven years, also
working as assistant director and Try our Sunday Roast Turkey Dinner with all
stage manager for the Civic .1. Trimmings or Pried Chicken Dinner. Three
Players. Vegetables, Dessert and Drink
Re was the guest star for the Served From 11 A. M. to 9 P.M O C
opening production, in 1938, of OPEN DAY AND NITE
the well known Little Theatre of WE USE STRICTLY WESTERN MEATS
Dallas, Texas. Tired of teaching
little children to "shuffle one,
shuffle two," he returned to
Michigan, closing his school and
appearing in several plays, doing W. C. NICODEMUS
some radio work and then receiv- W. C. NICODEMUS
ing an offer to go to Hollywood.
There he joined a stock com- Most Reasonable Jeweler in Tampa"
appeared, "Maid in theplay in which h Diamonds Watches Wedding Rings Gifts
take off on the Tobacco Road 708 Franklin Street
type of play, was scheduled to
run a week, but it was held over
for a six month run as a result of
popular demand.
Meanwhile, he took part in sev-
eral good movies as an extra. AtE AR A
the 20th Century-Fox studios he-
became a very good friend of Ar-
thur Lake, the Dagwood of the
Blondie series of movies. Lake PHONE ogggedf o
and Mickey Rooney backed a play H-3712 2//S-GRAD CENTRAL AV
starring Lake's wife, Pat Van
Cleve, a starlet at Columbia, and
Crain was given the male lead Madiso Drug Compan
opposite her. Madison Drug Company
He was just getting bigger and aklin and Madison Street
better parts when the little drama Franlin and Madison Street
at Pearl Harbor took place. From Where the Men of the Armed Service Shop and Eat
that point on, heocould see him- A of Se
self engaged in a bigger dramatic Are Anxius to Be Servic
event than any in which he had
ever dre'aned of taking part. In
March he enlisted inthe ArmyL u n ch
at Kalamazoo, Mich. "Only 32
years old now, he hopes to be able the Best 0 Lunch inTampa
to resume his career where he We Serve the Best 30c Lunch ln Tampa
left off, once Hitler's Germany is Only the Finest Quality of Foods Used
no more and Hirohito's Rising A LA CARTE SERVICE
Sun has set. s06 FRANKLIN STREET PHONE M 64-913


LOANS-MONEY TO LEND
Diamonds Watelies Jewelry
4 Silverware
Diamonds at a Blg Saving
A. L. ECKART


409 Tampa Street


FOR PROMPT AND
COURTEOUS SERVICE

Latin-American Laundry
1503 E. Columbus Dr., Ph. Y 1673

*2 *AA3 1--d I


CRANER'S GIFT SHOP GORDON STUDIO
Gifts Packed For Mailing PHOTO GRAPH
210 ass Str Send "Mom" a Precious Gift
SCass Street -Your Photo
Open Wed. & Sat. Till 9 P.M.
616 CITIZENS BLDG.
Post Office Cigar Store i
CIGARS, CIGARETTES,
TOBACCOS "Soldiers Favorite Entig Place"
SMOKERS ARTICLES STEAKS AND CtFOPS
WELCOME SERVICE MEN A SPECIALTY
Florida Av. & Twiggs St. E L IT E
RESTAURANT
TAMPA AND TWRIGGS STS.
TOWNE' S
SERVICE MEN!!
TAMPA STEAM LAUNDRY t Meet Your Friends at....
& DRY CLEANING CO. ; VICTOR CAFE
1105-25 Fifth Ave., Ph. 4663-4664 1324 Franklin Ph. M-7240
Beer Wines Hostesses
SBil Bailey, Prop. Member V.F.W.
Memer and American Legion
Memer We Positively Close atd11:30 P.M.


V. F. W.
Purple Heart Welcome 4
Service Men
E. P. JOHNSON & SON BEER -M
Watchmakers & Jewelers W I N E S
OPEN UNTIL 8:30 P. M. Hostesses

214 E. Lafayette -:- Tamp M. MILLER'S BAR
'Next To Manhattan Cafe 1111 Florida Ave.


SERVICE MEN OFFICERS FAMILIES
FOR REALLY GOOD FOOD AT MODERATE PRICES
PLEASANT ATMOSPHERE-FOLLOW THE CROWD TO


The Colonnade
SBAYSHORE and JULIA

Steak, Sea Food and Chicken Dinners 50c
Delicious Sandwiches



w THE EAGLE PATIO
Has been designed to make your leisure hours
As Pleasant As Possible
Ice Cream, Soft Drinks, Beer, Wine, Fun And Music
1709 North Hoigard Avenue



Park Photo Studio
Open Evenings Till 9
438 W. Lafayette Street Phone H 45-914


BAY VIEW HOTEL
FIREPROOF CONSTRUCTION -:- EVERY ROOM WITH BATH
W. B. SHULER, Manager
208 JACKSON ST. Between FRANKLIN & TAMPA
TAMPA, FLORIDA -!- PHONE M 5537


THE CHATTERBOX
Chicken and Steaks
Real Italian Spaghetti
SANDWICHES DRINKS LIQUORS
Abba Dabba & Band Nightly
707 8. Howard Ave. Phone H-3757


&1
S


THE TERRACE GIFT & FLOWER SHOP
HOTEL TAMPA TERRACE
406 E. Lafayette St.
"Speclallizing In Wedding Flowers"


FLOWERS


GI-TS


rrrfrfrru~r~rru~H~r~rr,~r~w~r~u~r~r~r~u~ ,~r~u:r~u~r~r:r~r~r~r~rrr~r~r~rr~uI~Ir~


I ;








Page 8 DREW FIELD ECHOES Friday, Oc tob~r 2, 1942


Hq. and Hq. Squadron

3rd Fighter Command


Sea Breezes


By PVT. ALVIN M. AMSTER
Who is going to be our here
and eliminate that hydrogen sul
fide taste and smell from the
water?
Flash .flash Meyer Z
Reuben was observed last Sunday
night at a dance playing up tc
what attractive blonde eyeful
n a m e d "Florence?" 'Smatter
'Florence, what happened to thai
major?
Russ Wapensky, the linguist-
he can speak and understand Eng-
lish, Russian, Polish, Slavish,
Ukranian and some German.
Our two pseudo-Hawaiian wood-
nymphs, Louis Navarro and Hor-
ace Gaspard. Recently at Clear-
water they posed for some pic-
tures snapped by Vince Rosche,
wearing GRASS SKIRTS. Even
Major Conklin saw them hula.
Lt. Edmund E. Erickson, our
Statistical Officer, graduated
from Kay Kyser's Kollege- the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill where he partici-
pated in intercollegiate sports and
modestly admits' he played foot-
ball.
Our best KP so far: Chuck Ir-
win, who gave a health talk with
each item of food he dispensed.
Feed us good there, Cook Will
Woods.
What happened to Line Kar-
che's mustache? We hear he's
planning to furlough shortly and
wants to pop the question to a
certain young lady.
It appears that both Mrs.
Walker and Mrs. Huml of Head-
quarters sure like to wear wedgies.
Commercial plug for Hank In-
terdonati. He was an expert
watchmaker before he enlisted.
Now he spends his spare time re-
pairing broken watches for very
reasonable amounts. Is this where
all the hairpins go?
Betsy Wilson recently trans-
ferred from A-3 to A-5. Then she
lost her expensive wristwatch.
Fortunately, some honest individ-
ual found it and turned it in.
NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT
A G.I. HAIRCUT: Better check
with the writer and find out which
barber NOT to go. Otherwise
you'll get a haircut such as we re-
ceived last week.
Bob Oehme, Ted Sotak and Bob
Todd spend their spare time play-
ing football "outside." But they
like retrieving the ball from the
mushy gulley much better.
What sergeant by the name of
Emrick tried to vaccinate the men
with an athletic air pump?
Miss Aida Valenti of Headquar-
ters now has an excellent oppor-
tunity to eye the new officers who
sign in on the Register.
The quietest man in the squad-
ron is Bill Gowan. But does he
make up for it by talking in his
sleep!
WANTED: Someone who will
explain how two identical pack-
ages of laundry can have a 20c
difference in price variance.
We wonder why Joe Jilarus is
counting the days until Oct. 15?
Incidentally, Little Joey almost
didn't hitch a ride back from
Clearwater last Saturday night.
One day last week, after exer-
cise, S/Sgt. Jones accidentally put
on Leverett Duncan's trousers and
wondered why they were so tight
in the waist and so long in the
legs.
Mrs. MacWilliams still thinks
that the WAACS can file. But it's
gotten so that she's flipping her
file boys, Horrigan and Bulger,
each day to see who buys cokes.
Mac continues to lose. Boys, where
is this chivalry?
Sgt. Bob Kollar tried to get a
sun bath last Saturday night at 7
BEAR SYSTEM SERVICE
Central Mechanical
SHOP
B. T. MORRIS
Times Balanced Tire Wear
Corrected. 1010 Central Avenue


SEABREEZE
Italian Spaghetti
SEA FOOD DINNERS
On 22nd St. Causeway
I ;]y*g~4'


The Boner-Bird


fitqth rCh~ttir


SGT.GUSTAV CALIPER "VL" u "IIULLab
>^rc*srcjs*^*sfssr-s-- js- rs-rjss


AIR-MECHANIC EX-
TRAORDINARY, HO
TS'" WEEK BECAME
THE f RST HONOR-
/ / ARY MEMBER OF
TI HE'BONER-BIRDS*
IRATENIT'.
SE ChTAPER
AX/ ENDEARED HWM-
SELF TO TAE FLY-
S- IN6 PERSONNEL OF
"I IHE FIELD eY IIS
MANY UTILE HIMAN
TOL3CES SUC 4ASThOUDHKTLSSLY SIMImtA-
ING TAE IGNITION WIRES OR LOOSENING
ATORNBUCKLE ON A CONTROL CABE


o'clock while sitting in the shade,
and wondered why he didn't tan.
Wonder how A-3 section is do-
ing these days without our swim
hero, the indispensable Durland?
Did you ever see Major Whise-
nand without a cigar? Neither
have we.
Gladhue Guidry uses the same
stroke shooting pool as he does
while wielding a broom and mop
when he cleans up the Orderly
Room.
Belated welcome to Major E. F.
Williams, who nas joined the
squadron after 13 months' flying
service in Iceland.
HOT DOTS. When Tom Wil-
loughby plays volley ball he al-
ways helps the opposing side win.
. .. "Charlie" Taylor has a new
pipe ... Is Mr. B. L. Wolf, of
A-4, really a "wolf," girls? .
How did that red fingernail polish
get on your fingernails, Ray
(KP Kid) Cely? .. .Phil Burke,
how many fish did you actually
catch last week at Clearwater? ...
Shevock found that the best way
to make points in the volley ball
game was to serve the ball to
Small. .. Frank "Buck" Mataya
can sure wiggle a mean conga....
"Blackie" Staiger admits to
blonde trouble. Ray Joffrion
won a Louisiana State singing
championship in 1937. ... Who
the devil swiped the Varga Girl
calendar that was once hanging
in the Upper Bay of B-l?


Your Feel Hurt?
Complete Line of Arch Supports
and 'Foot Remedies, at
BARKER & TULLY
1110 FRANKLIN ST.

HYDE PARK
SPAGHETTI HOUSE'
Frank Rutas Chef of New York
SPAGHETTI AND RAVIOLI
WINE AND BEER
103 HYDE PARK AVE.


HENRY HOWKEE CO.
CHINESE HAND LAUNDRY
Satisfaction Guaranteed
504 Tyler Street


We Extend Greetings and Ap-
preciation of the Patronage
of Service Men
THE 3711
GUEST HOUSE
3711 Bayshore Blvd.
Phone W 2511


KNIGHT BROS.
PAPER CO.
612 B3ell Phones 4205 4204
"A Paper for Every Purpose"


SERVICEMEN
Alfredo Y Familia
Fancy Groceries Free Delivery
1601 N. HOWARD AVE.
DIAL H 25-564


By SGT. MARLIN HILL
S/Sgt. Lloyd has been com-
plaining so much lately about not
receiving any mail, that Cpl.
Chickett, our mail orderly, finally
had to write him a post card o
quiet him. Your reporter sug-
gests, sergeant, that you sign up
with a "Lonesome" or "Sweet-
heart Club." Addresses for same
can be found in he back of almost
any ''Love Story Magazine."
We are glad to see Sgts. Park-
hill and Smith back with the com-
pany. They have been attending
school at Orlando.
Sgt. Harold Silvers, who is
scheduled to leave for OCS, Oct.
8, will be the twentieth fellow to
leave this organization for that
purpose. This represents a good
percentage for a company our
size.
We are getting quite an obsta-
cle course erected in the company
area. To date we have a chinning
bar and two parallel bars. Some
time during that period from 4:15
to 5:15, we all do our best on
those bars. I am convinced if our
C.O., Captain George, can pull his
200 pounds up to chin once, Sgt.
Jacobs could at least make it
twice.


A new volley ball court has
been built in the company area.
It is the scene of very much ac-
tivity every evening. We have a
good team to put up against any
one who cares to challenge us.
Eleven of the fellows completed
the Chemical warfaree School Fri-
day. Lt. Thomas, who has just
completed the same course at
Edgewood. Maryland, will have a
sufficient supply of non-coms to
assist him in sniffing gases.


Always Say...
HOLSUM BREAD
Extra Fresh


All Service Men are Welcome
BARCELONA CAFE
SPANISH RESTAURANT
Wines and Liquors
Phone S2142 Open All Night
4714 Nebraska and Osborne



Max's Liquor Bar
WINES LIQUORS CIGARS
FREE DELIVERY SERVICE
1601 E. COLUMBUS DR.
PHONE Y-1281
-Keep 'Fm Flying--


SELDOMRIDGE
PHOTOGRAPHER
418 TAMPA ST.
Ground Floor'
Hours Special
8 to 6 Appointments


SOLDIERS
ALWAYS WELCOME
EL BOULEVARD
RESTAURANT
Finest Spanish Foods Best
of Liquors 2001 Nebraska

LAFAYETTE HOTEL
E. A. CLAY, Manager
120 West Lafayette Street
East Side of Bridge
Phone M-5588


FERNANDEZ

RESTAURANT
Cuban Sandwiches A Specialty
1216 Franklin St.


Prescriptions, Wines, Liquorx,
Home Made Ice Cream
DIETZ DRUG STORE
FREE DELIVERY
931 S. Howard Ave. Ph. H 4385


Hotel Hillsbor
Frank J. IHynes,
GASPARILLA TAVERN
COLONIAL GRILL


Allan's
1010 Franklin Street
OPEN EVENINGS


Florida Avenue at
'0 Twdggs St. I
Manager

Service Men Welcome


"Largest Supply of Military Souvenir
Jewelry for all, Branches of the Service."
Specializing In
Uniform Alterations


"Service Men Are Always Welcome"

SHEA- PRANGE DRUGS
LUNCHES REFRESHMENTS
702 Grand Central Phone H 4381



FLORIDA SPORTING GOODS COMPANY
The Friendly Store
Complete Line of Fishing Tackle and
Sporting Goods
711 Tanmpa Street Phone M-6770



: RELAX'and ENJOY r
S Listen to the WORLD'S SERIES at .

:. GEORGE'S BILLIARD PARLOR .
Baseball Returns, Boxing Tickets for Sale 0- / '1
2222 E. Broadway Ybor City


S"Flowers Telegraphed Back Home Under Bonded Service" A
NELSON The Florist
514 TAMPA STREET X
Open 9:00 A.M. to 5:30 P.M. Closed Sundays A



Get In the SCRAPE Unle San
Needs Iron


SThe SPOT Where

SERVICE MEN Meet

Special Sunday Matinee Dancing

In the Attractive, Newly Remodeled


SARATOGA BAR
Corner Franklin and Fortune Sts.
BEER' WINES LIQUORS


"DANCING BY OUR POPULAR ORCHESTRA
EVERY NIGHT IN THE BLUE ROOM"


4


I ,-I


- s -II LI
w~rrrr~rr+~,rrr~w~wrH~.~J)


Page 8


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Friday, Octob&eT 2, 19423


PACKAGE GOODS


REASONABLE PRI[CFS







Page. 9


501st Regt. Plant Field



REPORTS
rCEN"C.CCf^^^^^~C^rC*rh^*^**CffErIS^f*ff~ff*^ff^*ft+rfff~^*^Is


By SGT. HARRY J. ZIGUN
Colonel Matheny, the officers
and enlisted men welcome the
new men of Plant Field, and ex-
tend to them every wish for suc-
cess .as American soldiers.
-K-K-K
Last week; Squaaron Leader H.
M. Young of the Royal Air Force
gave a most interesting talk on
"Night Bombing Operations in
Germany, Sicily and Libya" to the
men of Plant Field.
The R.A.F. pilot related some
of his personal experiences in ac-
tual combat, and in concluding
gave us every indication of an op-
timistic outlook of an overwhelm-
ng Allied air supremacy.
-K-K-K
SEWS HERE AND THERE
Plant Field had a father and
son among the new men. Roy S.
Sheetz, age 45, and his son, Roy
G. Sheetz, age 22, were both in-
ducted at Allentown, Pa., on Sep-
tember 3. Good luck to both of
you, father and son.
Hq. Co. is proud to announce
that Sgts. Thomas Kane and Paul
Soulier will be leaving for O.C.S.
very soon. The boys wish you two
good luck.
The .regiment welcomes back
Cpl. Puzak of Hq. Co., who re-
cently recovered from an illness
at the hospital. Cpl. Puzak is par-
ticularly welcome because he is
the all-important person who
makes up the payroll.
-K-K-K
NEWS OF THE 1ST
REPORTING CO.
By CPL. JAMES BROCK
The 1st Reporting Co. takes
pleasure in announcing the fol-
lowing who have been selected for
O.S.C.: T/4 John Umimski, T/5
Joseph P Hoffman, Pvt. Julian 0.
Mason.
This Company boasts of having
\an experienced railroad man who
really did keep them rolling. Pvt.
Yeager, a new secruit, was a rail-
road man for 12 years. He started
S as a helper and worked his way
up to an engineer.
-K -KK
NEWS. OF 2ND
REPORTING CO.
By CPL. PAUL YAKSICK
The 2nd Reporting Co. has two
interesting personalities among
the new men. Pvt. Charles Bry-
an's ambition is to become an
actor. He is particularly interest-
ed in drama, and directed many
plays before his induction into the
Army.
Pvt. John J. Gallin is a' singer
of popular songs. He attended the
St. Joseph College of Acting in
Philadelphia, Pa., for one and a
half years.
Sgt. Mormello Was giving a lec-
ture the other day on military
courtesy and was explaining to the



Sulphur Sprngs

Sundries Tobacco Sodas

Whitehead's Drug Store
Compounding Prescriptions Is
the Most Important Part
'of Our Business
Ph. S 5105 Prompt Delivery


Service Men Always Welcome

Sulphur Spring Cafe
We Specialize in Home Cooked
Food, Chicken, Steak and
Chop Dinners
Surphur Springs, Arcade Bldg.


Sulphur Springs-Liquor
Store
LEOPOLD CHAMBON, Prop.
8113 Nebraska Ave. Ph. S1245
Choice Wines, Liquors & Beer
Sulphur Springs, Fla.
._.^f~f~fff m^^^ m1^^


!new recruis the procedure of em-
barking on. a "banana boat." He
explained that it was proper to
salute the ensign on the ship. Be-
lieve it or not, but one raw recruit
(very raw) said, "You mean, sa-
lute the banana?"
Pvt. Vincent Isenberg, of this
Company, is quite a swimmer. He
has won championships in free-
style swimming, and has well-
rounded experience as a swimming
instructor.
-K -K -K
NEWS OF 3RD
REPORTING CO.
By CPL. FRANK E. NORWICKI
Did you know that Sgt. Todd,
who played for the Drew Field
baseball nine, had a tryout with
the New York Giants during the
1933 season and was with them
for the entire season. He also
played with leading minor league
teams in the South.
Congratulations to Cpl. George
Peterson, who is leaving for
O.C.S. at Ft. Monmouth, N. J.
We were all happy to hear that
Sgt Campbell's wife has arrived to
make her residence here. He is
really happy these days.
The entire personnel of the 3rd
Reporting Co. welcomes the new
bunch of rookies from the Key-
stone State, Pennsylvania. We
know that you will find Army life
a new experience for you. All
that we ask from you is to give
us your cooperation and every-
thing will work out O.K. May your
basic training be your step for
further success and achievement
in the greatest Army in the world.
Pvt. Ben Forrest is collaborat-
ing with well-known orchestra
leader Terry Shand on their new
Army song to be called "G.I. Joe."
Pvt. Forrest is also working on
another song with Jim Blade,
leading song arranger, entitled
"The Colonel's Daughter."
Sgt. Frye ,has returned from
the hospital. We are happy to
hear that he has recovered from
his illness and received a fur-
lough.
Sgt. Rosenthal is waiting to be
called for Flying Cadet school.
-K -K -K.
HQ. CO. REPORTING
BN. NEWS
By T/4 MILGRAM
Ist Sgt. R. D. Wager climbed
the ladder both in civilian and
military life. As a civilian, he
started as a messenger boy with
the Postal Telegraph,- and prior to
his induction ino the Army, was
nigh manager. He has been in the
Army one and a half years and is
now a most capable first sergeant.
At high school he received a
silver cup as recognition of being
the most outstanding man in his
class.
T/5 Albert Jacques was a line-
man for New England Bell Tele-
phone' Co. After induction and
while at Ft. Dix he climbed a 73-
foot pole to remove a flood lamp.
He holds titles for fancy roller
skating competition and competed
in the state championship of
Maine and the All-Eastern States
meet in 1941. His wife is also a
roller skating champion of note
and took part in- a number of
meets in the state of Connecticut.
T/5 Hollis Davison is the "legal
mind" of this company. He re-
ceived his law degree at the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin and prac-
ticed law in Indiana from 1932 to
1942. He was a candidate for
prosecuting attorney of Clinton
County, Indiana. He is quite apt
at horseshoe pitching.
Pvt. William K. Miller halls
from Virginia. He attended Vir-
ginia Polytechnic Institute for
four years and'received a degree
in general agriculture. He worked
for the Department of Agriculture
under the Federal Security Ad-
ministration.
T/4 George J. McCurdy is the
best baker in Florida. Witness:
His pies and cakes.
Pvts. Paul Feinster and Joseph


Pullom are confined at the hos-
pital. The boys wish them a speedy
recovery.
-K-K+-X K
COMMUNICATIONS CO.
By T/4 T. J. SCHOENFELD
The men of the Comm. Co. wel-
come Lt. H. Farmer as their new
C.O. and promise their fullest co-
operation.
Congratulations to the follow-
ing men who were selected for
OCS: S/Sgt. W. Scherer, Cpl. J.
Well, T/5 S. Gale, Cpl. Paul Ze-
nobia.
Pvt. Harry Nelligan is a so-
called new recruit. However, he
has put in 18 years with the Na-
tional Guard, the last 13 years
serving as T/Sgt. Got easy, you
drill sergeants.

The officers of Plant Field have
not practiced softball in vain.
Last. week they defeated a team
of officers from Drew Field.
-K-K-K
Listen in to radio broadcasts
over WFLA on Saturdays, 9:30
a.m., and on Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m.
Chaplain Boren had a record at-
tendance at services last Sunday:
299 men In the afternoon he ren-
dered services for 240 men at
Drew Field.

POST OFFICE
REGULATIONS FOR
CHRISTMAS MAIL
These instructions are based on
latest information available from
the Post Office. Packages for men
in the country are subject only to
ordinary postal regulations. For
men overseas, only one package
from any one person should be
sent in any one week. It is limit-
ed to 11 pounds, and must not ex-
ceed more than 42 inches in com-
bined length and girth.
SHIPPING SPACE IS AT A
PREMIUM.
Send no perishable food unless
hermetically sealed. The Army
and Navy have requested that Oc-
tober 1 to November 1 be consid-
ered the final time for releasing
Christmas mail to men overseas.

SERVICE. MEN

ALBERTUS HOTEL
A Home Away From Home


956 Twiggs


M-1339


CENTRAL OIL
COMPANY, INC.
Tampa, Florida


Service Men

LA LLAVE MARKET
Fancy Groceries, Free Delivery
2415 ,N. Howard. Pr. H 33-024


Air Base Bus

Lines, Inc.

30 Minute Service to Both
Fields At AU Hours



V

15 Minute Service
During Rush Hours






For Further Information


Call 3286


WELCOME SERVICE MEN...


Swim at the SULPHUR SPRINGS POOL
Bus and Street Car to Pool Natural Springs ... Temperature 72o
*.*.. ..*.-.


LOST AND FOUND COLUMN


Miss Dorothy Gilley,


of the


.Post Exchange, has lost a gradu-
ation ring, miniature size. It has
a blue setting in it with a W in
its center. A 1942 ring, It is ini-
tialed D. L. G. The loser believes
that it was lost around the East
Gate.
Mrs. W. B. S. Critchlow, The
Center, Badenton, Fla., has re-
turned to the Service Men's Cen-
ter at Bradenton an O.D. blouse
and belt, wifh the name Moore and
numbers 5347. It was found be-
tween Ruskin and Sun City.

ELITE CIGAR STORES
Football Scores by Direct Wire
WINE BEER CIGARS
400 Zack Phone M 62-072
207 Twiggs Phone M-1236


CHURCH CALL

Catholic
Mass-6:15 a.m., Chapel No. 2
Mass-9:00 a.m., Chapels No. 1
and No. 2.
Protestant
Service-11 a.m., Chapels No. 1
and No. 2.
Service 7:30 p.m., Chapel
No. 1.
Jewish
Service-11 a.m., Theater No. 1.


"The Place to Meet and Eat"
. Matthew's Corner
SFountain and Luncheonetteo
SLiquors Wines Beer
SWe Deliver
Lafayette & Tampa. Ph. M 1242
l^ "m*r*frr*-*-$rf*-**^*'


WELCOME TO ST. PETERSBURG






HOTEL

443 Second Ave. North St. Petersburg
56 Rooms, All With Private Bath

*: "In The Center of All Interest"

$1.00 and $1.50 per Person
***t*1


For Prompt Service

Phone 5909

MASTER CLEANERS
INC.

507 Ninth Street No.
St. Petersburg, Fla.


At St.' Petersburg

Sportsman Billiard Parlor

228 Central Avenue

St. Pete, Fla., Phone 50-612


Mostellar's Sundries
ICE CREAM AND COLD
DRINKS
201 9th St. So.
Opp. Seaboard Station


Colonial Doll Shop
115 9th St. So., Opp. Webbs
FLORIDA SOUVENIRS
UNUSUAL GIFTS
For Wife and Sweetheart

At St. Petersburg

Frank's LIQUOR STORE


147 Central Ave.


Ph. 4342


FREE DELIVERY

Imported Wines And Liquors


PARISIAN CLEANERS
48 HOUR SERVICE
148 Central Ave.
Phone 8631


9th ST. CAFE & BAR
11 9th St. South. Ph. 6339
Steaks Sea Foods Chicken
Dinners
WINES AND LIQUORS
"The Coldest Beer in St. Pete"


Bowling Center, Inc.
Cor. 1st Ave. So. and 2nd St.
12 Brunswick 20th Century
Alleys


St. Petersburg Gift Shop
364 Central Ave.
"DON'T FAIL TO VISIT US"
For Gifts of all kinds for
wives and sweethearts.
Live Baby 'Gators Shipped
SPECIALISTS IN BILLOW TOPS


GEORGES LUNCH
14 2nd St. So.
Specializing in
STEAKS, SEAFOODS,
SANDWICHES



Paramount Bowling
Alleys
You are Invited to visit our
modern and up to date alleys
860 4th Ave. S. Phone 7508


While at St. Pete
Visit

RUDY'S: Hi-Hat
BEER, WINES, SMOKES
848 4th St. So.


NIKKO INN
19 1st St. No. Phone 6720
Air Cinditioned, Private
Dining VBoms, Chinese and
American Meals


DINE AND DANCE
THE COTTAGE
2102 4th Street North
WINE AND BEER
HAROLD BROWN, Mgr.


Northmoor Apts.
Stop in close to headquarters for
the duration. Cool, clean effie-
lency Apts., or Rooms and Bath
By the Week, Month, Season or
Yearly
111 6th Ave. No. Phone 70-781


THE PERRY
125 8th Ave. North
ROOMS, APTS. & COTTAGES
Reasonable Rates, by Week,
Month or Year
ADULTS ONLY NO PETS


Gilbert System Hotel
Betty C. Mitchell, Mgr.
740 Central Ave. St. Petersburg
Phone 7864
"Your Home Away, from Home"
You Are Always Welcome
A phone In Every Room
Hot and Cold Water All Times


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Friday, October 2, 1942




JL


1202 Franklin Street


Saturday Nite, October 3rd, 1942
The Fun Starts at 7 o'Clock


NO
COVER
OR
MINIMUM
CHARGE


9*


ALL
DRINKS
AT
POPULAR
PRICES


Tampa's Most Colorful Nite Spot
The management cordially invites the boys of MacDill, Drew, Benjamin and Plant
Fields to step in any time and enjoy a pleasant drink in a pleasant atmosphere

Music.. Dancing .. Entertainment
MUSIC BY
THE HI-HATTERS ORCHESTRA
FOR YOUR DANCING PLEASURE


Come
As
Close At i


Early
We
Mid-night


Something Doing
All The Time
at the Hi-Hat Club


YOU FLY THEM
WE'LL BUY


THEM


BUY BONDS NOW


Friday, October 2,, 1942


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Pa e 10


Grand Oenin ..
Sof the new




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