Title: Drew Field echoes
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076231/00029
 Material Information
Title: Drew Field echoes
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Post Exchange
Place of Publication: Tampa Fla
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida -- Tampa   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Drew Field Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa -- Drew Army Airfield
Coordinates: 27.975556 x -82.533333 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: "Published each Friday in the interest of the officers and enlisted men of Drew Field."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 39 (Dec. 2, 1943).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076231
Volume ID: VID00029
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24622561
lccn - sn 93063705

Full Text




















VOL. 1, No. 30 Pnblished Every Friday I)rew Field, Tampa, Florida Friday, September ~5, 1942


Lost, Strayed Or

Hidden Somewhere:

One Air Force Band

It seems that the controversy
,roused in the columns of the
echoes some weeks ago between
he Air Fo Band and the Base
quartermaster personnel has not
yet abated. Obviously, only the
public appearance of the band will
end the good-natured debate once
and for all.
I Call it "The Mystery of the
Drew Field Air' Force Band," if
you will. Or title it, "Lost,
Strayed or Hidden: One Air Force
Band." It does seem strange,
nonetheless, to find buried in ob-
scurity a military band that has
so many fine .potentialities-with
accomplished bandleader Warrant
Officer Lester Baker at the head
of a capable aggregation of musi-
cions which includes Bud Estes,
Leo Luukkonen, Mojmir Sedlac,
John Suszhinski arid others.
The Band complained that de-
lay in the G.I. instruments
reaching them was holding up
their emergence into the open.
The Base Quartermaster's office
defended itself by inquiring of\
Sgt. John F. Suszhinski, the
band's publicity man, if he hadn't
heard about that nasty word, "pri-
orities." Itswas that, they averred,
which was putting a sour note in
many would-be army bands.
A few days later the Public Re-
lations Office was notified to for-
ward a message to the band that,
the instruments were on the way.
More than a week ago they ar-
rived.
And still no peep out of the
band. The people in the QM office
wonder what's holding up the
band's debut now. After all, they
insist, the instruments are here.
The band can no longer blame the
delay of holding up the band's
public appearance on the QM any
more. What other alibi, then, can
they offer?
In all justice to the hard-work-
ing band leader and the men, the
answer to the mystery lies in the
lack of'enough manpower to tote
and toot the instruments.
There. are capable musicians at
Drew whom the bandsmen believe
would fit in very neatly with their
organization, but the band cannot
obtain them. Any musician inter-
ested in becoming a member of
the band is invited to.call on War-
rant Officer Baker at the Band's
orderly room, upper bay, barracks
T-272, or phone 388-F1.

THEY ARE NOT
BUGLERS NOW,
BUT TRUMPETERS

In the Army two very impres-
sive ceremonies are reveille and
retreat, and no soldier plays a
more important role in either, of
them than the trumpeter, the
much-maligned bugler of the old
Army.
Two trumpeters, both members
of the Air Force Band, share the
task at Drew Field-Sgt. Harry
T. Ferris and Cpl. Russell C.
Hoier.
Before entering the Army on
October 10, 1941, Sgt. Ferris, aged
24, played with bands around his
home town, North Adams, Mass.
He also played with the Junior
Symphony Orchestra of Pittsfield,
Mass., and with Pete. D'Amico's
orchestra which toured New Eng-
land.
Cpl. Hoier, aged 24, a native of
New London, Wis., played the
trumpet with Jack Crawford's na-
tionally known band before enter-
ing the Army in November, 1941,
at San Antonio, Tex. Five months
ago he came to Drew Field from
Fort Dix, N. J., and three months
ago he joined the Air Force
Band.


New Telephone System

Improves Service at Drew


In the above picture, telephone operators employed by the Penin-
sular Telephone Company are busy plugging lines into the new
P-AX switchboard which has replaced the old P-BX at Drew Field.


In the new location


Sunday*


morning 'several young women
with earphones were busy plug-
ging lines into the P-AX switch-
board, a part of the new dial tele-
phone system inaugurated recent-
ly as part of the Drew Field com-
munication services.
"What do you think of the new
telephone system in comparison
to the old?" Mrs. Venie Miller,
chief operator, was asked by the
Echoes reporter.
The pretty operator smiled hap-
pily at her questioner.
"Comparison?" she ejaculated.
"There is no comparison. The
P-AX has lots of advantages over
the old P-BX switchboard. On
the P-BX we tried,to serve every-
body at one time. We couldn't.
We simply couldn't. There were
crossed wires. Often a delay in
service. Now the switchroom
downstairs handles much of our
work automatically. It's going to
take quite a bit of pressure off
us."
The switchroom, supervised by
Mr. L. R. Wheeler, is quite an
impressive maze of batteries, ca-
bles and wires. An automatic elec-
tric step--by-step common battery
system, it has facilitated services
rendered by the once-over-bur-
dened operators who could not
handle efficiently the traffic load
in and out of Drew Field on the
P-BX call system. The dial system
is speedier; interpost communica-
tion is not transmitted through
the operators, and city calls are
dialed direct by the subscriber,
providing the calls are not re-
stricted.
Users of the telephone are ad-
vised to refer to the new Base
telephone directory for general in-
structions concerning its use.
Among other warnings, it cautions
the user never to jiggle the receiv-
er or interfere in any way with
normal operation of the dial. Such
a procedure will bring about the
reaching of a wrong number.
------^-------
The tall thin shavetail asked
his colonel to make the platoon
stop calling him "Legs."
"Gadly," responded the colonel,
"if you'll make the regiment stop
calling me 'Baldy.' "


LOST
Ladies' Waltham watch.
Solid yellow gold case, with
four diamonds, two on each
side. Brown leather strap.
Finder please return to Betsy
Wilson, Headquarters, Third
Fighter Command, Drew Field.


Tent City Gives

Way to Hutments

As Drew Grows

Ten City is about to breathe its
last, and few will mourn its pass-
ing. Phrases such as "Boom
Town" and "Tent City," which re-
ferred to the expansive area once
covered with numerous tents,
will soon be obsolete.
When Drew Field became a
school center for the Air Warn-
ing Service during the early part
of this year, Tent City sprang up
like a mushroom almost over-
night on endless swampy terrain
sparsely fringed with palmetto
scrub. It spread and spread, grow-
ing to gigantic strength.
And then, in keeping .with
Army progress, it slowly gave way
to hutments and *barracks, fur-
nishing improved living 'quarters
for the soldiers. Only a few days
ago the 503rd A. W. Signal Regi-
ment moved the last of its person-
nel into hutments, and now only
one regiment remains. Soon it,
too, will move into hutments.
Already building contractors
are laying down foundations for
wooden warehouses on soil where
once the tents stood. Now, about
nine months after its hurried
birth, its last tents are about to
be torn down and Tent City will
be just a memory.
------(-------

The Army Times

Given Out Through

Message Center

The Air 'Force edition of the
Army Times, a weekly tabloid
newspaper which is published in
Washington, D. C., is to be dis-
tributed to the various Drew Field
units through the Message Cen-
ter.
The W.E.M.A., dipping into a
fund set aside for the purchase of
reading material for soldiers, has
bought enough subscriptions to
The Army Times for a five per
cent coverage of the Base person-
nel.
Each issue of The Army Times
deals with the Army everywhere,
and the Air Force edition is espe-
cially packed full of stories and
features that every air force sol-
dier would want to read. Be sure
and look for a copy.


PROMOTION BLITZ
HITS OFFICERS

A promotion blitz hit Drew
Field recently when a number
of officers received notice of-
their elevation to higher
grades.
Those promoted were: Cap-
tains Walter F. Joyce, Harvey
G. Turner and John T. Gibney
to major; and'Lts. Robt. Flour-
noy and R. R; Rice to captain.



Doubles Officer

Candidate Class

In its program to relieve medi-
cal, dental and veterinary corps
officers from administrative, work
for professional duties, the War
Department. announced today that
it will double the capacity of the
Medical Administrative Corps Of-
ficer Candidate School at Camp
'Barkeley, Texas. As a result the
class of officer candidates en-
rolled for the training course on
September, 26, 1942, will be twice
the size of previous classes, which
were also increased in May and
again in August of this year.
Medical Administrative Corps
officer candidates are chosen
from among applicants of the en-
listed ranks of the Medical De-
partment or other branches of the
Army who have demonstrated
qualities of leadership during
their basic training.
The officer candidates are
trained in the duties of maintain-
ing hospital records, supply ac-
counts, mess management and
numerous other administrative
tasks to serve as adjutants, in-
spectors, mess officers, etc., in the
Medical Administration Qorps.
Upon completion of the course,
candidates are commissioned as
second lieutenants in the Army of
the United States.
A Medical Administration Corps
Officer Candidate School is also
operated at Carlisle Barracks,
Carlisle, Pa.


Promoted


The Base Plans and Train-
ing Officer is no longer Cap-
tain Walter F. Joyce, but
Major Joyce. He was promot-
ed on Sept. 20.
Before assuming his pres-
ent duties, the handsome ma-
jor was the Base Consolidat-
ed Mess Officer. Major Joyce
began his present tour of duty
in October, 19.40, at Camp
Shelby, Miss., but army life
was nothing new to him even
then. Although in his early
forties, he is a veteran of
World War I, having served
overseas with the 112th En-
gineers.
In civilian life the major was
a businessman in his home
town, Lakewood, Ohio. His
son, Walter F. Joyce, Jr., is
an aviation cadet at Kelly
Field, Tex.


THREE PRIZES


GIVEN IN USO

GRID CONTEST

Those professors of gridology
at Drew Field, who in the past
have bragged about their foot-
ball prognostications, will have-
without any cost or obligation-
a chance to cash in on some of
the prizes that will be given win-
ners of a Football Contest, which
the USO Club at 214 N. Boule-
vard, starts sponsoring this week.
The task is easy and the rules
governing the contest are simple,
says Leslie Mann, director of the
club.
Former gridsters who have de-
veloped into smart prognosticators
will have to do but one thing:
stick your schnozzola up against
your crystal ball and come up
with some rather startling pre-
dictions.
First prize will be donated by
the Tampa Army Newspapers;
second prize by Sears, Roebuck &
Co., and third by Bryn-Alan Stu-
dios.
Visit the USO Club at 214 N.
Boulevard, pick up your blank,
fill it in and sign your name to
it. All blanks must be in not later
than 11 p.m. the day before the
contest.
Rules and explanations follow:
1. This contest is open without
cost or obligation to all Service
personnel.
2. Each week's winners will be
picked on the contestants' total
selection of winning teams, as
well as on the number of final
scores guessed correctly. (Five
points for each winning team se-
lected and five points for each
correctly guessed game score -
possible maximum total score is
100.)
3. Example: If the contestant
guessed South. Calif (19) Ore-
gon State (7))-and the actual
score turned out to be the same,
the contestant would get five
points for picking the winning
team and five more points for
guessing the correct score.
4. Three prizes for the three
contestants with the highest
scores will be awarded each week
5. Results will be published in
local newspapers on Monday as
well as appearing on the back of
next week's football guessing con-
test blank.
6. Contest blanks must be
turned in to the USO Club, 214 N.
Blvd., where they will be auto-
matically stamped as to the time
they are turned in.


All Army Sales To

Personnel In U. S. To

Be For Cash Soon

All military personnel, officers
as well as enlisted men, will be
on a pay-as-you-go basis for per-
sonal purchases at Army posts,
camps and stations throughout the
continental United States, begin-
ning November .1, the War De-
partment announced today.
At commissaries, p o s t ex-
changes and theaters, tailor shops,
etc., all purchases will be for
cash, .or for coupons bought and
paid for in advance. Company col-
lection sheets, which have im-
posed complicated administrative
burdens upon officers whose time
was needed for military duties,
will be discontinued.
In addition to the military ad-
vantages derived from the pay-as-
you-go plan, it is designed to fur-
ther the President's program for
reduction of credit buying. It is
believed also that the pay-as-you-
go policy will inculcate the habits
of thrift in the soldier.


VTOL. 1, No. 30


Publi~shed Every 2ili-iday


Drew Field, Tampa, Florida


Friday, September '25, 1942








Page .2 DREW FIELD ECHOES Friday, Sept~nber 25, 1942


The Drew Field Echoes


GLENN R. ROSS, Publisher
Tampa Army Newspapers


Business Office:
1115 FLORIDA AVENUE
Tampa, Florida
P. O. Box 522 Phone 2177


All advertisements contained in i
this newspaper are also contained in
the MacDill Field Fly Leaf. Minimum m
joint circulation: 8,000 copies.

ADVERTISING RATES FURNISHED t
ON REQUEST I

A newspaper published exclusive-
ly for the personnel of Drew Field
and devoted to military interests
and the United Nations Victory.
Opinions expressed in this news-
paper are those of the individual
writers and under no circumstances
are they to be considered those of
the United States Army. Advertise-
ments in this publication do not
constitute an endorsement by the
War Department or its personnel of
the products advertised.


Hd.and Hq.Squadron
3rd Fighter Command

Sea Breezes


By PVT ALVIN M. AMSTER
Furloughs are in the air. Some
gone, others going, others return-
ing. First thing T/Sgt. Bertee
Brown did upon his return was
to get a G.I. haircut. Frank
Shields received a week's guard
duty as his return gift. Berny
Grossman spent his furlough in
the Big City with his wife and
folks.
How come Miss Smoke is the
only Signal steno who insists upon
wearing her name tag? Are they
too heavy, Mrs. Gum and Miss
Forsythe? Anyway, Miss S., toy
snakes don't bite.
Manassa (who'll loan him two
bucks?) says his first name is
"Frank," and not "Mario."
Good luck on your furlough
next month, Sgt. John Hill. We
hope you convince her to 'become
the Mrs.
Winning that Third Air Force'
swimming meet last week for the
3rd FC sure pleased Major Conk-
lin. Nice going, True, Verchuck,
Durland, Palmer, Vivona and
Gosselin. G. Durland sure takes a
wonderful picture, no?
Recently Norman. (Two Beer
Zinzin) Zinser mailed an ex-flame
a beautiful birthday card. Several
weeks pass. Finally a letter came,
thanking him, also informing him
she was married several months
ago to another guy. Poor Norm.
R e c e n t promotions: Pete
Washe, Tom Clayton and Pierce
Butler, from sergeants to staff U
sergeants; Ed Knippers and Rad
Williams from corporals to ser-
geants. Nice going men.
Sgt. Al Magnum will hire out
as a pool instructor. Business ad-
dress: Supply Room or Dayroom.
Ray Janus meanwhile ob-
sorbed all the knowledge of the
File Section while on loan there
and is back in A-1. Didja
know that S/Sgt. Howy White, of
Ord., 'is a doodlerr?" Accord-
ing to Hq. drivers' call board, one
day last week, Claade Johnson
had Tokyo as his destination.
We always knew S/Sgt. Cecil
Myers was a popular guy with the
girls. Since he has his cute little
collie pup walking around the car-


l

S
i


center shop the girls certainly go
for him. We mean the pup. Re-
member the little wifey, Sarge.
Sgt. Lee returned from his fur-
ough last week and informed the
girls at Hq., Third Fighter, he was
still single. Were they glad! .
Married men living off the Base
highly approve that 7:30 a.m.
check in. .... T/Sgt. Don Hanson
has flown the coop for OCS at
Miami.
Recent appointment as Bar-
racks Leader for B-1 is T/Sgt.
Artice Adams. But Adams has al-
ready found out that getting guys
out of bed for 6:15 roll call isn't
the easiest thing in the world.
We wonder what the purpose of
John Horrigan's and Tom Bul-


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'Dorothy Lamour,
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Feature No. 2
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William Lundigan






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ger's running down to the PX each
evening after work is for?
Note to Dottie of the Hyde
Park section. Have you decided
whether you like the Drew boys
or the MacDill pickles better?
More "Did you know": Col.
Tourtellot, Col. Stern and Col.
Kyster are all West Point gradu-
ates. Capt. Alexander C. Strecker
is an author and has several books
and many magazine articles to his
credit.
HOT DOTS Lucky "Char-
lie" Taylor received two nev.
pairs of GI shoes from Salvag'-
replacement. J im Robiii
knows where the water shutoff
valve for the showers is located
. Orval Staiger looks at the keyz


too much when he types ...
Odell Alcorn claims he washes his
fatigues better than the laundry.
. What happened to what cer-
tain non-com's wedding ring?
Tough luck? Mutt & Jeff of the
outfit: Joyner and Caldwell ..
Bob True transferred to Base
Medical Nice mustache George
Chase will have in about a week.
. It looks like the boys so far
like that 4-5 P.M. exercise.



Right Spot
S Of Tampa
Niahf Life
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'Ibllll~ ----ra~- --as~p~r. --


Page.2


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Friday, Septotier 25, 1942


Air-Conditioned Ph. M 1878
39c Matinee 44c Night
TODAY THROUGH WED.

RECKLESS!
Ji. / DARING!'
ROMANTIC!
Uncle San's Boys in the


~lnDDT:







Friday. September 25, 1942


Hq. and Hq. Sq. 9th Fighter Wing

The Fighting 9th

By CPL. WALTER WERNER
The 01' 1st Sgt. is puffing his
big Havana and wearing a big
smile today. Yes, suh, he's just put
another one of his boys on the
right track. Sgt. Stephens is a very
happy married man. Nothing
pleases him more than a chance to
arrange a smart military wedding
for .a good buddy.
The lucky soldier is S/Sgt.
Clyde Quesnel, our 3-A man, from
Duluth, Minn. The pretty bride-to-
be is Miss Elaine Liberty, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. B. Liberty,
also of Duluth.
The date: October 5. The place:
The Post Chapel. Time: To be
announced. Class A's will be worn
-and don't forget. your rifles,
fellows!
SQUADRON NOTES: Congratu-
lations to Pvts. William Hunter
and' (Hey, here's that man again!)
udolph Palomaki for passing the
aviation Cadet Board examina-
tion. "Chief" Hunter is a Piute
Indian from California and a swell
fellow to boot. Palomaki is an
old-timer in this column. May ac-
tion and adventures be yours,
men-lots of good luck to you
both.
Welcome back to the squadron,
Pvt. "Chris" Hilt, and Pfcs.
"Wally" Haskell an.d Frank
Blackard. Glad to hear you en-
joyed your furloughs. We thought
sure that "Little Chum" Haskell
would be coming back with a
"better half." But if she really is
here-so far, he's managed to
keep it deep secret.
Congratulations are also in or-
der for Cpls. Ervin Smith, who
hails from Embarrass, Wis., and
Charles Thompson, from Atlanta,
Ga. Both men are slated for OCS.
Smith, who has some reputation
as a singer and as a pretty smooth
operator around local YWCAs, is
going to Ordnance School. Thomp-
son left Tuesday for Anti-Aircraft
Artillery School.
Sgt. John Olson has been ap-
pointed instructor of aircraft iden-
tification. In a recent test, in
which model planes were used,
Sgt. Olson knocked out a perfect
score, giving the correct nationali-
ty and make of all 30 of the planes
on hand.
We intended to shoot in a para-
graph about all of the non-coms
whose wives are living in town.
As we get it, soldiers' wives must
be as charming as they are brave
and gallant, because all the boys
are mighty proud of them. We're
sorry that the list, much to our
surprise, is too long to work in
all the introductions at this time.
But we'll go into this again.





A ACE
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564th PLOTT. CO.

DOTS AND DASHES


1

t
I


By SGT. E. S. PERRY s
e
Another week has rolled by, t
and here we are again. But, as 0
this company well knows, we are t
here but in a different place--
Plant Field. The squirrels wel- ,
comed us with a suspicious gleam t
in their eyes, and Pvt. Garrett i
stared right back at them-the T
Kentuckian's. mouh watering in
anticipation of more baked squir-
rel pies. On the other hand, Pvt.
Strammiello, the Brooklyn can- i
nonball, thinks they're brown rab- v
bits with big tails. a
And no sooner than we got here,
we took the volley ball champion-
ship into our hands by nosing out
Hq. & Hq. Sq., Plot. Bn., 501st,
in a scorcher, 22-20. The visitors
were stubborn before going down,
being ably led by Wisbar and
Tramar, while we Plotters, under
the fiery leadership of Sgt. Jim
O'Neall, lay our success to strict
teamwork.
"Major" Griffin is proudly
flashing a pic of his intended-a
beautiful gal-all of which ex-
plains that ear-to-ear smile he's
had lately. Dempsey is a champ;
that's old stuff. But here it's
Felix Dempsey who's the checker
champ, while the ping-pong hon-
ors go to Tom Mager until and
unless the tournament proves
otherwise. Watch out for a dark
horse in that tournament, a tall
lieutenant with sandy hair.
Claude Baseler, if you need any
strings, picks, or anything, let us
know. We want lots and lots more


DREW FIELD ECHOES

of your strumming and singing.
Scouts report that Pfc. Dickerson
has been outflanked in a certain
party's estimation-don't retreat,
there's time and room for some
nore maneuvering.
Sgt. Pool takes an extra lick in
shining his shoes and stops at
every mirror to fix his tie, so
here must be something coming
iff somewhere. But nobody can
alk Squires or Pupo-the com-
pany 'Romeos-into a share-the-
wealth club. It took a rumor that
hey were serving chicken gumbo
n Tampa to get "King Carl'
lubbell to leave the post.
Those Hengle boys! Which is
'om and which is Mat? And to
nake matters worse, they are al-
ways so busy it seems as if there
are six of them.


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Expert Alterations
CHEVRONS CAPS BELTS, ETC.
OPEN EVENINGS


COLLEGE SHOP
MEN'S WEAR


567 Central Ave.
St. Petersburg


wI


3-5x7 Easel Mounted Portraits $3.50
3-8x10 Folder Portraits 5.00
Portrait Post Cards 6 for 1.50
EVERY PICTURE GUARANTEED TO PLEASE YOU
VICTORY PHOTOS
509 TWIGGS ST. OPPOSITE BUS STATION
OPEN EVERY DAY UNTIL 11:30 P. M.





ROLLER SKATING


COLISEUM

Davis Islands
AFTERNOON
2:30 till 5
NIGHT 8 till 11
Except Monday

5c FARE ON DAVIS

ISLAND BUSES

Leaving Grant's Corner
Franklin and Cass Streets

7:15 -- 7:45 -- 8:15

Diamond Cabs 10c

THE SOUTH'S FINEST


q 06 SKATING RINK



Hotel Hillsboro Twiggs St.
Frank J. Hynes, Manager
GASPARILLA TAVERN Service n Welcome
COLONIAL GRILL



BENNETT'S DRUG STORE,
1004 Franklin St.
COMPLETE LUNCHEONETTE
LIQUOR ANNEX IN CONNECTION


ALL ONE SHOES
PRICE MILITARY
$4.99 e E B GUARDSMAN
SHOES FOR MEN
508 FRANKLIN STREET TAMPA, FLORIDA

THE RED MILL LIGHT LUNCH DINNERS
K> AJ n. ^^ i', 4 p. M. Daly
American And Latin Food
ORCHESTRA EVERY NIGHT 1715 Platt St. at Packwood


301 Twiggs
Tampa


0 0N EVENING&
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MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT THE
SARATOGA BAR
Cprner Fiortune and Franklin
Dancing Every Night in the Blue Room
... o-w BEER WINES LIQUORS
Orchestra Music Nightly Phone 7988


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'TRADE-MARK
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~- ~,~4
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4:3








Page 4 DREW FIELD ECHOES Friday, September 25, 1942


To SGT. JOHN F. SUSZYNSKI
from Chief Assistant PFC. JOE
REGIS
H'YA BUDDY:
This is the Chief Assistant to
the Fourth Assistant writing to
let you know how the band anc
the boys have carried on since
your departure for a furlough
with the folks in McKees Rocks
Pa.
Warrant Officer Baker is still
sending out his S O S call for men.
His pleading seems to go unheed-
ed, as no new men have joined
the band since you left our domi-
cile. Meanwhile, he is carrying on
with the troupe of 17 men ra-
tioned -to him thus far.
The sounds from that French
horn you were hearing before you
left are now rounding out and
soon will be holding down the
first horn part of the rhythm sec-
tion.
Sgt. Bitner did his bit for Cpl.
O. Z. Whitehead's radio show last
Friday night by rendering two
numbers on that program. Did a
good job, too.
From all indications, Sgt. Fer-
ris isn't fooling about those fed-
ding bells; he is continuing to
make plans for the great event.
His actions hint that he is a
goner. Too bad; he is a regular
feller.
The dance group again pounded
out some of Estes' arrangements;
also a couple by Hoier. The trick
of the trumpet section elevating
themselves above the sax section
has not dented the smooth music
by Estes, Luukkonen, Costello
and Sedlak. Wait until the danc-
ing herd hear them.
Cpl. Luukkonen has pulled up
stakes' and now resides in Tampa.
The Mrs. arrived last week from
Quincy, Mass. Hope he is enjoying
the new cooking.
Oh, yes! The same train
brought back the Brooklyn kid,
Pvt. Schiavone, in person. Sam
reports a good furlough spent
with the folks and friends.
By the way, John; your pal,
Pvt. Kowlalski, is beginning to
think that Hyde Park is his new
home (and I am not referring to
Hyde Park, N. Y.). Another
thing, never allow "Lucky" to
talk you into going fishing. The
Only poor fish around the 'water
will be yourself.
Our tuba man, Pvt. Woodke,
now has the idea that he can move
the moon. Be sure and have him
tell you about it when you get
back.
Pvt. DeRidder's frequent visits
to a certain cafeteria indicate
that the food is not the only at-
traction. Speaking of food, have
Pv. Vitale tell you about the
handouts everyone wants to give
him due to that hungry look he
has about him. Mike is behaving
himself like he promised you he
would.
Instructions will 'e issued to
Pfc. Harwick to throw all your
mail away that is, all but the
good telephone numbers.
Trying my best to carry on for
you until you get back. Give my
regards to the people of the Key-
stone state. Almost forgot, have
you started that mustache again?

NEW BASE PHOTO
OFFICER ASSUMES
PHOTO DUTIES
Relieving Major Jerome A.
Waterman, Second Lieutenant
Robert E. Price is now the Base
Photographic Officer. He started
on his new duty on Sept. 18.
After graduating with high
honors from Mississippi State
College in 1938, Lt. Price studied
photography at Tasope, a pho-
tographic school in Aurora, Mo.
For the ensuing two years he was
photographic director for the
Dixie Advertisers. Later he func-
tioned as service consultant for
the Mississippi Power and Light
Company.
Commissioned as a second lieu-
tenant in the Army Reserve Offi-
cers Corps in 1938, Lt. Price start-
ed his present tour on Sept. 15,
1942.


S IRCW FICL




By PVT. ADRIAN GENDOT
Music and comedy take to the
air as Cpl. O. Z. Whitehead pilots
another variety show on the
WFLA beam tonight at 9 p.m.
The program will feature Pvt.
Robert "Red" Wells with another
fine group of impersonations;
Pvt. Charles Crain and Cpl. Thom-
as Kneeshaw working out on the
black and whites (piano to you,
Mac) and Sgt. Menenshousen in
a dramatic sketch. Cpl. Whitehead
and yours truly will play a ques-
tion and answer game, with this
writer on the answering end of
the interview. I guarantee to make
my past an open book. West Coast
papers, please do not copy.
A tip to tuners: Dial our way
Monday evening at 6:30 o'clock
for a new swing tried, led by that
well-known "skin slapper," Sgt.
Armstrong. The lads have prom-
ised a rugged version of "Idaho"
and a solid beat on the "Jersey
Bounce," plus a selection or two
on the sentimental side. The sta-
tion-WTSP, so be listening,
wontcha?
By the way, Cpl. Jack Hartman
is expected back soon, so be look-
ing for those fine organ'numbers
on our regular Drew Field Pre-
sents program every morning in
the dawning over WFLA.

"How come you didn't turn out?
Didn't you hear the bugler blow
reveille?"
"Honest, Sarge, I'm afraid I'm
going to be a flop as a soldier. I
don't know one tune from an-
other."



The Boner-Bird


DAMON WOQLLCOTT 1.

POSTIUlMOUSN ELECTED
TO MEMBERSHIP IN TM
I ~~BONER-B1RDSI.
IA AVIATI0N4 fIFf14S
LITERARY WOQLD, CADET
W.VOOLlOTT WAS A SN -
SITIVE SOUL WAO OMEN
CREATED AIS MOST BEAU-
lIFIL POETRY IGH IN
19CIEQUIET AEAVENS'
WidtE INAN ART-
IStIC MOO) LA9f WEEK.
WOOLLCOTT COMPLEMELY IfRCOT A5091
AIS ShFETY BCrT.


Theater Program

For Week
Sept. 25, Friday--BABES ON
BROADWAY (Revival Program),
Mickey Rooney, Judy Garland;
The Blitz Wolf.
Sept. 26, Saturday WINGS
AND THE WOMAN, Anna Neagle,
Robert Newton, Byron Nelson;
Juke Box Jamboree.
Sept. 27-28, Sunday and Mon-
day-THE TALK OF THE TOWN
Cary Grant, Jnan Arthur, Ronald
Colman; News of the Day No. 203.
Sept. 29, Tuesday THE
LOVES OF EDGAR ALLAN POE,
John Sheppard, Linda Darnell,
La Cucaracha; Men of West
Point; Kickin' the Conga Round.
Sept. 30-Oct. 1, Wednesday and
Thursday-ORCHESTRA WIVES,
Glenn Miller and Orchestra,
George Montgomery; News of the
Day No. 204; The March of Time
No. 1

Stranger Than Words
A Lieutenant is an Officer. An
Officer issues out passes. Passes
permit soldiers to go to tpwn.
When soldiers go to town, some
of them head for the nearest sa-
loons. Saloons have bars in them.
Most bars are long. Anything long
has length. A length is a mile. A
mile is one' helluva distance to
travel. Anything that's a helluva
distance to travel is far away.
And that's where the Lieutenant
is when you want him to sign
your pass.
Colonels have eagles on their
shoulders. Eagles are birds. Birds
fly in the air. You oughta see
some Colonels when things go
wrong.
Generals have stars on their
shoulders. Stars gleam in the sky.
The sky is above us. So are the
Generals.
Military Police carry clubs.
Clubs are places where people
congregate. So do Military Police
if you start something.
SK.P.s work in a Mess Hall. A
Mess Hall employs cooks. Cooks
prepare the food. When food is
prepared you can eat it. After
you eat so much of it, you are
fed up. So are the K.P.s.


Diamonds and All Jewelry






605 Franklin St.


Expert Watch Repairs


REMEMBER. CORREGIDOR

17th St. News Stand
Curb Service
When in Ybor City Shop at the
Corner 17th and Broadway
All the Latest Magazines


TAKE A CHORUS;
PVT. "LAZYBONES"
SAYS IT WITH MUSIC
A private decided to "Say it
With Music" to the folks back
home:
"Dear Mom":
"My Gal Sal" is "Angry" "Be-
cause" I sent "One Dozen Roses"
to "Three Little Sisters"-"Sweet
Eloise," "Marie" and "Jeanne
With the Light Brown Hair."
Now she's given" me the "Jersey
Bounce" for "Jim." "He Wears
a Pair of Silver Wings," but his
nerves "Jingle, Jangle, Jingle."
"Do I Worry?" "Because" "Some-
body Else Is Taking My Place."
"Should I." "I Said No."
So now "I'm Stepping Out
With a Dream," a, "Sleepy Time
Gal" Five Feet Two," who can
eat like my "Sister Kate." But
when she sings "Cuddle Up a Lit-
tle Closer," "My Heart Belongs
to Daddy," I say "Happy Days
Are Here Again." "Yes, Indeed."
"Bye, Bye Blues,"

CATCH
"In which branch of the Army
would you like to serve?" ques-
tioned the recruiting officer.
"Are you kiddin'?" inquired
the youth. "You mean,I can take
my pick?"
"Yep! Anything but the Wom-
en's Auxiliary Army Corps."
"Aaaaaah! I knew there was a
catch in it."

The Supply Sergeant handed
the recruit a pair of pants and
the recruit put them on. They fit
perfectly. So did the blouse and
the cap.
"Gad, man!" exclaimed the
Sarge. "You must be deformed!"
With everybody wondering
when the second front will open,
a proper title for this phase of
the war might be:
"Allies In Wonderland."

"WE LIKE TO SERVE"
Service Men and Families

Nebraska Hotel
Moderate Rates
2815 Nebraska Ave.
Ph. M 53-631


BECKWITH-RANGE JEWELRY CO.


DIAMOND WEDDING RINGS


410 FRANKLIN STREET


OPPOSITE COURT


HOUSE


Complete Printing Service


S.0



The



Commercial



Printers


1115 Florida Avenue


Phone 2126





Printers of...



The MacDill Fly Leaf


Drew Field Echoes


"I HAD A BRILLIANT FUTURE WITH THIS OUTFIT
UNTIL THE 'FLIGHT SAFETY' PROGRAM
CAME ALONG."


New Base

QM Officer


Succeeding Lt. Col. J. F. Greene
as Base Quartermaster of Drew
Field, is Major Hamry T. Reynolds
Before his appointment to th(
Drew post, Major Reynolds was
supply officer at Third Air Force
headquarters, Benjamin Field.
A graduate of De Pauw and
Northwestern Universities, Major
Reynolds was called to the service
in March, 1941, at Selfridge Field,
Michigan.
Prior to military service, the
new Quartermaster was a chain
store manager and schoolteacher
in Racine, Wisconsin.
When taking cover in a shell
hole or ditch, keep in the shadow.
You can ibe seen from above if
you are on the sunny side.

WHITE ROSE BAR
Paul Webber, Prop.
LIQUORS, WINES, BEER
AND CIGARS
Cor Cass and Marion Sts.
Phone 4502

Bar and Cocktail Lounge
The TURF EXCHANGE
Package Store
ORCHESTRA EVERY NITE
Phone 2003
202 E. Lafayette St.


Page 4


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Friday, September 25, 19/1-2







Friday, September 25, 1942


DREW FIELD ECHOES


327 Service Squadron
By PVT. LOUIS O'MALLEY
We want to extend to our Com-
manding Officer our best wishes
on his promotion from'first lieu-
tenant to captain. Captain Flour-
noy, may you soon exchange
those bars for an oak leaf.
Pfc. Trice says they are going
to fight the Battle of Bunker
Hill over again, as it was not
fought on the level. Cpl. Skeen
thinks that at 40, a woman stops
patting herself on the, back and
begins under the chin. Pvt. Riggs
says his girl is only the postmas-
ter's daughter, but she sure knows
how to handle the mails. Is it
rue that Pvt. McAndrews took a
ozen clams into a Turkish bath
with him so he could get them
steamed for nothing?
That recent order, transferring
officers' insignia of rank from
shoulders to collars, leaves the
shoulders clear for parachute
straps, gas mask, camera or field
glass straps, or other equipment,
to avoid entangling. It also clears
the landing field for a girl's head.
An officer and a gentleman with
a blonde or other equipment (such
as a brunette dr a redhead) used
to find the metal bars, leaves, etc.,
pinned on shoulders, acting like
barbed wire entanglement, trap-
ping a permanent wave tempo-
rarily on said shoulder. Scientific.
tests prove that it is still possible
for her hair to get caught in or-
naments on collars, but this is not
a serious handicap.
Things are really getting des-
perate when the guards at the
Base Hanger stop and question
Cpl. McGuire as a suspicious char-
acter. It takes a lullaby to put me
to sleep, but Sgt. Kent's girl
friend sings nursery rhymes to
him and puts. im gently to sleep.
Pvt. Kinser says a cross-eyed
girl may be virtuous, but she does
not look straight. Pvt. Patton re-
marks that some girls keep their
love letters, others let their love
letters keep them. Is "Honey" giv-
ing Pvt. Carlisle typewriting les-
sons, or is it vice versa? Pvt.
Klong says the reason you see
George Washington standing up
in the boat crossing the Delaware
in all those pictures is that his
pants were' too tight for him to
sit down.
: Pvt. Cummings thinks a time
table is something upon which you
set a clock. Cpl. Epstein, our
baker, wrote the following to his
girl friend: "Sweet Tart, You're
roll the world to' me. I am a well-
bread man and that is a good rea-
Son you should marry me. Be my
batter half and everything will
pan out all right. Icing your
praises night and day because I
loaf you. Doughnut refuse me,
sugar, or you are cruller than I
think you are."
Pvt. Meyers knows a man who
spent 20 years writing one novel.
That's nothing. I know a guy who
is spending his life finishing one
sentence.
Our swimming team made an
excellent showing in the Third Air
Force Swim Meet. Our hats off to
Pfc. Meo for his swell perform-
ance- in the disrobing contest
which he won. It seems that the
talent which performs in the
shows here on the field don't


HQ and HQ Squadron
By CPL. H. A. HORTON
Congratulations from the Squad-
ron to Captain Turner, who is
now a major, and to Lieutenant
Rice, who is now a captain. The
boys wish you all the luck possi-
ble.
Since the addition of a Day
Room to the Squadron's recrea-
tional facilities, there has been a
marked increase in the number of
men staying on the Post after Re-
treat. Even Pfc. Collison, also
known as the Ybor City Kid, has
been taking advantage of the nice,
soft seats.
The other night, through the
good offices of Pfc. (Clipper)
Kasprzak, we were entertained
with a couple of reels of good old-
fashioned cowboy pictures. The
Day Room was packed, and Pfc.
"Reds" Trott was hard put'to find
space to twirl his lariat.
While on the subject of the
Day Room, it's fitting that we
take time out to thank Pfc. Mal-
lick and Pvt. Brayer for their con-
tinued interest in keeping it in
fine order.
Pfc. Blanchard has found a
new form of entertainment. He
gets on the bus that passes the
!,'loridan Hotel and rides back and
forth to Sulphur Springs. Don't
ask him why.
Have you noticed the lost ex-
pression on the faces of DeSanto's
Commandos???? All because their
boss is on a special guard detail
and they are denied the use of
their picks and shovels in the fur-
therance of the athletic field.
No, Cpl. Morris is not over the
hill. Mrs. Morris is visiting with
him in Tampa.
Too bad that some of'you boys
missed the deluge that struck
Barracks T-236 the other night.
Somebody leaned on the basin and
the pipe broke. If the wind had
been in the right direction, the
boys would have had smooth sail-,
ing. After a little time Chief
Plumber's Mate Stevens came
"through with a. solution to the
problem. He turned off the water.
Mighty fast thinking, Steve.
Fellows, we have a real hero in
our midst. Pvt. Olson, of the Medic
Section, was commended a couple
of days back by Col. Gamel, Base
Surgeon, for the prompt manner
in which he acted when an emer-
gency arose out on a runway. As
we understand it, one plane was
coming in to land as another was
about to take off. In some way,
the two planes crashed, one break-
ing out in flames. The pilot of
the burning plane was injured
badly in the crash and was un-
able to get out of his ship. Olson,
rising to the occasion, dashed into
the flaming plane and dragged

know if the audience is clapping
or killing mosquitoes.
Pvt. Bischak tells us of the
cannibal's daughter who liked the
boys best when they were stewed.
Pfc. Joe Haber's favorite song is
"She is only a gardener's daugh-
ter, but you don't have to tell her
where to plant her tulips." Pfc.
Speakman says if sending threat-
ening letters thi'ough the mail is
a criminal offense, he is going to
bring charges against that jewelry
store that sold him a diamond
ring on credit.


IN F O
309th SERVICE Group


EAGLE BAR
HOSTESSES DANCING
Corner of Tamnpa & Fortune


ATTENTION!! SERVICEMEN!
"KEEP 'EM PLYING"
Meet' Your Buddies at- X
GEORGE'S BILLIARD PARLOR O
SBaseball Returns, Boxing Tickets for Sale*
S2222 E. Broadway Ybor City


"Flowers Telegraphed Back Home Under Bonded Service"

NELSON The Florist
514 TAMPA STREET
Open 9:00 A.M. to 5:30 P.M. Closed Sundays
S.*~ .to-ou -Mt4't.ro.


STOVALL OFFICE BLDG., SECOND FLOOR


the man to safety. The pilot, we
are sorry to report, died as a re-
sult of the accident. But that in
no means lessens the splendid ex-
ample of self-sacrifice shown by
Olson. in the face of grave per-
sonal danger. A fine job, Olson,
and the Squadron acclaims you
for it.
First Sergeant Miller seems a
lot happier since receiving a let-
ter and a package from a certain
person. Understand the box con-
tained a lot of C.S. (Chewy
Stuff).
Will someone do something
about that daily feud between
Cpl. Lankford and Pfc. Paster-
nak at the Group Motor Pool.
S/Sgt. Parker expects to see blood
shed at any time now.
The other night Cpl. Lawrence
had a little adventure that he is
trying hard to forget. He had oc-
casion to enter the Supply Room
after dark and, knowing just
where the article was that he
wanted, he didn't bother turning
on the light, but proceeded right
to the rear of he building. As he
was stooping over, the night was
split by the piercing shriek of a
woman in mortal terror. Rising
to the occasion, after the bones in
his legs had rehardened, he niade
a headlong dash for the door and
across the street to Sgt. Stevens'
quarters. There he related his
story. After hearing the tale, the
sergeant took the corporal by the
hand and began to retrace his
'steps to the Supply Room in an
effort to show that what he
claimed just couldn't be. There
they found that someone had for-
gotten to turn off the radio
when locking up for the ntht,
and the Green Scorpion or, some-
thing was holding his weekly ren-
dezvous. Enough said, and is your
face red, Corporal?
Pfc. Pasternak says: "Like the
proverbial nine lives of a cat, an
aerial gunner has two: one for
himself and one for the pilot.


FRANK'S CORNER
Sandwiches -:- Cold Drinks
Near Drew Field
Armenia and Tampa Bay Blvd.


SERVICE MEN WELCOME


Page 5


NOW IN PROGRESS....


Sears 56th Anniversary

15 DAYS OF GREAT SAVINGS


Sears Greatest Event of the Year.



Sears, Roebuck & Co.

801 FLORIDA AVE. TAMPA


Service Men's Portraits

Beautiful 8 x 10



Oil-Colored Portrait

In DeLuxe Tapestry Finish

for the folks at home (With Coupon Only)

STUDIO OPEN
STUDIOEN OBTAIN COUPONS
MONDAY, WEDNESDAY, From our Representative at
FRIDAY POST EXCHANGE
TO 6:00 P. M.
for men in the service (Cannot Be Purchased in
fStudio)
TUESDAY, THURSDAY, i
SATURDAY
TO 9:00 P.M.
TO 9:00 P. O.D. Cap and Blouse Furnished

Without Charge



BRYN- ALAN STUDIOS


917 Franklin St., Tampa
872 Central-St. Petersburg 531 Cleveland-Cleorwater


I


416 TAMIPA ST.







aj D FO


Limited Servicemen to Be

Given Preference For

Administration 0. C. S.

The War Department announces
that the Army Administration Of-
ficer Candidate School, to open
soon under the supervision of the
Adjutant General's Department,
will be unique in that enlisted
men who have been accepted for
limited service will not only be
eligible for appointment, but, if
they have equal qualifications,
will have preference over .men
eligible for combat duty. This will
apply also to the enlisted men be-
tween the ages of 45 and 50. This
is the first time that the oppor-
tunity to enter an Officer Candi-
date School has been presented to
these groups.
Qualifications held particularly
desirable for the Administration
Officer Candidate School are col-
lege or equivalent academic train-
ing, preferably in business admin-
istration, transportation, or per-
sonnel management; or evidence
of successful business or profes-
sional experience in transporta-
tion, industrial engineering, pub-
lic utilities, personnel manage-
ment or any of the administrative
fields. The soundness of this
background or experience, it is
emphasized, must Be validated by
the outstanding quality of the
man's service as a soldier.
Applications for the Adminis-
tration Officer Candidate School,
as for other Officer Candidate
Schools, must be made by the en-
I sted man to his commanding of-
fcer.
Tentative opening dates for the
Various classes of the Administra-
tion Officer Candidates School are
as follows:
North Dakota Agricultural Col-
lge, Fargo, N. D., September 21.
SUniversity of Florida,. Gaines-
ille, Fla., September 28.
i Grinnell Co 11 e ge, Grinnel,
Irwa, October 5.
Mississippi State Colege, Stark-
yille, Miss., October 19.
i-^,^, ^^^m ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^J^^^^^


Signal Hq. and Hq. Co.

9th FIGHTERS

By GPL. MIKE DODD
Several months ago it was my
pleasure and good fortune to meet,
along with some other fine fel-
lows, the then Pvt. Brooks. As a
result of his excellent soldiering
and leadership, Bill was soon
made private first class. Not long
after that, he was promoted to
corporal. He performed his duties
so well that he was soon made a
sergeant. His congenial nature, his
friendliness and genuine interest
in his fellow soldiers, whether
private or non-com, made him one
of the best liked and most popu-
lar soldiers of this organization.
His rapid promotions never went
to his head. He remained the same-
oJd Bill, always smiling, always
eager to lend a helping hand, and
make the going easier for those
about him.
Well, several weeks ago, Bill
was transferred out of this com-
pany, and was soon on his way
over there. For obvious reasons,
nio information as to where he is,
what he's doing and the like can
be divulged. But one thing is cer-
tain. I-e is quite capable of taking
care of himself wherever he may
be, whatever he may be doing. He
will be equal to any situation that
may arise. His friends, and he has
them by the score, miss him
keenly, but find solace in the well-
founded belief that eventually he
will come marching triumphantly
home, intact and with an enviable
record of outstanding service that
will never be forgotten by the
folks of Brooklyn and his friends
elsewhere. All his buddies here
and elsewhere join in wishing him
Godspeed and a safe and quick
return home. Good luck, Bill.
It's up the ladder for these
fellows to whom promotions were
meted out recently: Ollie Futral,
from sergeant to staff sergeant;
Earle Whinna, from private first
class to corporal; ditto for Bill
Holle; Lou Toller, from staff ser-
geant to tech sergeant, and John
Rock, from private first class to
ro-p-ral. Congratulations, fellows,
and may you keep right on step-
ping up.


LKnow America's Planes,
DOUGLAS TBD-1 TORPEDO BOMBER


Iff





Shown here by the Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce of America
are silhouette views of a formidable air weapon-the Douglas TBD-1 tor-
pedo plane, known to the U. S. Navy as the "Devastator." Heavily armed,
this low.wing monoplane is carrier-based. The leading edge has a scarcely
noticeable taper, though a pronounced taper is noted on the trailing edge.
The tail plane is tapered sharply on leading edge and the trailing edge of
the rudder is curved. The three-place "Devastator" is powered by an air-
cooled Wright Cyclone engine.


The Creed of An American ..
"I HAD rather be the humblest citizen in a land of
freedom than to be the absolute ruler of a land of
slavery.
"I had rather be a free American than possess all the
world's wealth and have my hands stained by the blood
of the innocent.
"I had rather be the "Unknown Soldier" than to rule a
world with hate, slavery and human misery as the only
monuments to my greed and power.
'"HEREFORE, I will be loyal to my country and the
democratic .principles for which it stands.
"I will respect the rights of my fellow man and accord
to him the same privileges I ask for myself.
"I will at all times support and contribute whatever I
possess to the triumphant completion of this war against
the enemies of liberty and justice.
"I will extend the hand of brotherhood to the people of
every nation who support the principles of liberty, equal-
ity and fraternity.
"I will surrender my life before surrendering my freedom.
"I will remember Pearl Harbor!"


10% of Gross Receipts of Opening

Day Will Go To USO




Opening..




Palm Cafeteria



Saturday, 11 A. M., Sept. 26th


4 Fine Foods..

SModerate Prices


R. 0. SVIEN, Local Manager



510 Tampa Street



LESLIE H. BLANK
REALTOR
407 Tampa St. Telephone 3222
"DEFENSE RENTAL HOMES"



"Largest Supplier of Military Souvenir
SA lla Jewelry for all Branches of the Services."
S110 Franklin Street SPECIALIZING IN
OPEN EVENINGS SPECI
ALTERATIONS UNIFORMS
i .* *


VALENCIA GARDEN
Restaurant
WE SERVE THE FINEST OF
SPANISH FOODS
811 Grand Central
Phone H-3773

SPECIAL STORAGE RATES
for
SERVICE MEN'S CARS
JACK SHEPPARD
1407 S. Howard Ave.


UNION BAKERY
"REAL CUBAN BREAD OUR
SPECIALTY"
1506 9th Ave. Phone Y-4399


White Way
LAUNDRY
2800 Armenia Ave., Near Michigan
Phone H-S808


SEMINOLE WANT CAR!
Souvenir & Jewelry Co. SOLDIER wishes to take car off
hands of soldier pulling out of
Live and Stuffed Alligators MacDill or Drew Field. '36 or '37
Florida Souvenirs-Curios Ford, Chevrolet, or Plymouth.
10WILL PAY CASH. Contact, P. O.
107 E. Lafayette St. Box 522, Tampa, Fla.


m BAKE EV AY
lPAY tAY
WAR
\ -..ABOND DAY
STOP SPENDING-SAVE DOLLARS

GOODY GOODY
For Quality at The
Right Price-"No Tips"
1119 FLORIDA AVE.


OFFICERS AND MEN!

We Alter Uniforms &- Shirts

For Quick Service & Good Work

FLORENCE GREEN
SPORTSWEAR, INC.
711 Marion St. DeSoto Hotel Bldg.


Armory Service Station
P. D. Fox, Prop.
607 N. Howard Ph. H 34-053
Soft Drinks Beer Wines
Cigars and Cigarettes


QUICK DELIVERY
ALL BRANDS LIQUORS
WINES CORDIALS
40th St. Liquor Store
JOE VASQtUEZ
4014 7th Ave. Y 3815

WELCOME TO
HOTEL KNOX
TOM BRYSON, Manager
Lafayette & Jefferson


The Tavern Bar and Grill
HOT AND COLD LUNCHES
Spaghetti a Specialty
LIQUORS--BEER-WINES
311 Franklin St. Phone 3940


Buy More Victory Bonds


Page 6


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Friday, Septemljer 25, 1942






Page 7


r e 1


What's In A Name?

Drew Field Roster
Answers Questions
By CPL. LEONARD G. RUBIN.
It is obvious, after scanning the
rosters of officers and enlisted
men at Drew Field, that this is a
war of all peoples, races and reli-
gions against barbaric enemies.
Though most of the following per-
sons are, of course, not related to
the famous men whose names they
bear, it is an indication of the
peoples, races and religions repre-
sented by the men on this post.
Below are a few of the many in-
terestiig names which appear on
the rolls of Drew Field:
For Presidents there are Wash-
ington, Lincoln, Adams, Monroe,
Madison, Jackson, Harrison, Polk,
Taylor, Johnson, Arthur, Buchan-
an, Cleveland, Taft, Harding and
Hoover.
In addition to these are the fol-
Jowing famous public figures:
inklin, Hamilton, Hull, Han-
!k, Hughes, Byrne, Black,
Stone, Reid, Murphy, Knox, Per-
kins and Donald Nelson.
Being in the Army may interest
you in Generals: we have Robert
E. Lee, Pershing, Grant, Sheridan,
Sherman, Houston, MacArthur,
Doolittle, Marshall and Billy
Mitchell.
For inventors and industriaists
our roster discloses the following:
Henry Ford for autos, McCormick
for harvesters, DeForest for ra-
dio, Fulton for the steafnboat,
Wright for the airplane, Sperry
for the bombsight, and DuPont for
chemicals. For contrast we have
a Crosby for "Bing" and a Dean
for "Dizzy."
Other famous names include
authors and statesmen, Cicero,
Chamberlain, Churchill, Eugene
O'Neill, Conrad, Locke, Ludwig,
Scott, Paine, Dumas, Stephenson,
Newton and Robert Owen.
Here are some "Believe It or
Nots": We have an East, West.
South and North! We have a
Metro, a Gould, a Wynn, a Mayer,
making Metro Goldwyn-Mayer!
We have 132 Smiths and a Doe!
Appropriate for the Air Forces,
we find a Props!
Finally, with no offense meant,
we ask if you would like to be a
first sergeant calling THIS roll
on a dismal, dark morning:
Przyrylowski, Stratigopolos, Czar-
obski, Czuprynski, Worontoff, Ig-
nacio Chavarria, Alphonse Dlugo-
sielski, Dombrowiak, Dominguez,
Vanlandingham, Zitzelberger, Zu-
bizareta, Cosme Espanoza, Pat-
rzyk, Olesiewicz, Nosuchinsky and
Novakovitch!!!
(K
HABIT
On to the grinder marched the
B.C. He gave a look at the men,
rubbed his glasses and had an-
other look.
"Hang it all!" he barked to the
lieutenant. "What's the idea of
parading all the big men in front
of the little men?"
"It's the sergeant's fault," said
the Loot (and would' you know
it?).. "He used to run a fruit
store."



I&I
6-NASHIN G



AXby A


Buy your stamps a dime
at a time,
Or a quarter, or even a
dollar,
Whichever you do won't
hurt this ryhme,
Hitler's the one who'll
holler.


Illustration by Gib Crocket.
BUY WAR BONDS
AND STAMPS
U. S. Treasury Department.


U. S. Treasury Department.

"Wait! On second thought you ought to make a sood
son-in-law!"


SOMETHING ABOUT
DROOPY, THE DREW
FIELD MOSQUITO
By PVT. J. J. O'GARA
From scores of secret bases
scattered throughout Drew Field
(memo to Intelligence Dept.),
each evening myriad winged
squadrons 'of Anoplielini- or
country mosquitos if you didn't
get your degree-take off and
wing their way to the' various
hutments and barracks. There
they resume the everlasting strug-
gle of man 'against mosquito.
* You fellows with grape-sizpd
lumps on your anatomies might
be interested to know that the
female of the species, not the
male, is tearing slabs out of your
hide, for her diet consists princi-
pally of blood which is required
for the development of her eggs..
The male mosquito isn't quite so
fussy'; he satisfies his gastronomic
desires around garbage cans and
K.P. fatigues.
During these nocturnal sieges
one has no choice but to cover
himself with some vile-smelling
five-and-ten-cent store prepara-
tion, which, although repugnant
to the none-too-refined tastes of
Miss Mosquito, is infinitely more
so to the guy that's trying to
knock off a little shuteye after a
hard day's work dodging details.
The alternative is mosquito net-
ting, under which you experience
all the discomforts of asphyxia-
tion. Regardless of how much ef-
fort you put into securing your


Buy Bonds


ELITE CIGAR STORES
"The Sport Headquarters
of Tampa
WINE BEER CIGARS
400 Zack Phone M 62-072
207 Twiggs Phohe M-1236


TOWNE'S
TAMPA 'TEAM LAUNDRY .
& DRY CLEANING CO.
1105-25 Fifth Ave., Ph. 4663-4664


Member
V. F. W.
Purple Heart

E. P. JOHNSON & SON
Watchmakers & Jewelers
OPEN UNTIL 8:30 P. M.

214 E. Lafayette -:- Tampa
Next To Manhattan Cafe


bunks against the onslaughts of
the pests, you always wake up'
with a face that feels like a relief
map of the Himalayas, and sitting
in the corner of the bunk are two
or three blood-gorged mosquitos
that have succeeded in kicking a
hole through the netting.
Back in Boston the skeeters
there used to come at you with
their motors wide open, but down
here there seems to be more of
the noiseless type that land and
take off before you can slap them
down. Mosquitos don't like the
hot sun and hide out in houses
during the daytime.
I guess I'll have to work nights
and sleep days.

LOANS-MONEY TO LEND
Diamonds Watches Jewelry
Silverware
Diamonds at a Big Saving
A. L. ECKART
409 Tampa Street


FOR PROMPT AND
COURTEOUS SERVICE

Latin-American Laundry
1505 E. Columbus Dr., Ph. Y 1673


IGORDON STUDIO
PHOTOGRAPHY
Send "Mom" a Precious Gift
-Your Photo
Open Wed. & Sat. Till 9 P.M.
616 CITIZENS BLDG.


For Health

Necessary to Defense

PAPAYA MATE


"Soldiers Favorite Eating Place"
STEAKS AND CHOPS
A SPECIALTY

ELITE
RESTAURANT
TAMPA AND TWIGGS STS.

SERVICE MEN!!
Meet Your Friends at....
VICTOR CAFE
1324 Franklin Ph. M-7240
Beer Wines Hostesses
Bill Bailey, Prop. Member VF.W.
and American Legion
We Positively Close at 11:30 P.M.

Welcome! >
Service Men
BEER-
WINE S
Hostesses

M. MILLER'S BAR
1111 Florida Ave.


SBOBCS OPEN EVENINGS I



: Army Store

SComplete Line Military Supplies For The Needs Of f
SERVICE MEN
EXPERT TAILORING
I207 E. Lafayette Street Tampa .




SANHATTAN CAFE
210 E. Lafayette St. Tampa
GOOD FOOD REASONABLE PRICES
I DINNERS 30c, 40c, 60c
Try our Sunday Roast Turkey Dinner with all
Trimmings or Fried Chicken Dinner. Three
Vegetables, Dessert and Drink 5Q
Served From 11 A. M. to 9 P. M 50 "
OPEN DAY AND NITE
SWE USE STRICTLY WESTERN MEATS



W. C. NICODEMUS
"Most Reasonable Jeweler in Tampa"
Diamonds Watches Wedding Rings Gifts
708 Franklin Street


Madison Drug Company
Franklin and Madison Street
Where the Men of the Armed Service Shop and Eat
We Are Anxious to Be of Service


306 FRAN


avis Plate Lunch
We Serve the Best 30c Lunch in Tampa
Only the Finest Quallity of Foods Used
A LA CARTE SERVICE
NKLIN STREET PHONE M 64-913


SERVICE MEN OFFICERS FAMILIES
FOR REALLY GOOD FOOD AT MODERATE PRICES
PLEASANT ATMOSPHERE-FOLLOW THE CROWD TO

The Colonnade
BAYSHORE and JULIA

Steak, Sea Food and Chicken Dinners 50c
Delicious Sandwiches


SOLDIERS
iTHE EAGLE PATIO
Has been. designed to make your leisure hours
SAs Pleasant As Possible
Ice Cream, Soft Drinks, Beer, Wine, Fun And Music
S. 1709 North Howard Avenue



Park Photo Studio
Open Evenings Till 9
438 W. Lafayette Street Phone H 45-914


BAY VIEW HOTEL
FIREPROOF CONSTRUCTION -:- EVERY ROOM WITH BATH
W. B. SHULER, Manager
208 JACKSON ST. Between FRANKLIN & TAMPA
TAMPA, FLORIDA -:- PHONE M 5537


THE CHATTERBOX
Chicken and Steaks
Real Italian Spaghetti
SANDWICHES DRINKS LIQUORS
S Abba Dabba & Band Nightly
707 8. Howard Ave. Phone H-3757


* THE TERRACE GIFT & FLOWER SHOP
HOTEL TAMPA TERRACE
406 E. Lafayette St.
"Speclagizing In Wedding Flowers"
FLOWERS GIFTS
^K":~.~u:^:~K"K^ U:^K^~K"K~:~~ 4".4,~KK:K


L


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Fr~idaY-. ---etember 25, 1942


I







DREW FIELD ECHOES Frida9~ Scptcmbcr 25, 1912


Pae. 8


Under the 8th Wing


By PFO. L. E. BLOCH
Under the management of Lt.
Nichols, assisted by S/Sgt. Pen-
niston, the 8th Wing has worked
up a snappy softball team. Twice
they met and defeated the 303rd
Signal Company by scores of 6-1
and 9-3. Last Friday, however,
they lost a heart-breaker to the
Base Medicos, 3 to 2. The lineup
for the game was: S/Sgt. Pennis-
ton, Ib; Cpl. Haddox, cf; Cpl.
Mountjoy, c; Pvt. Collings, 3b;
Pvt. Grant, ss; Cpl. Love, rf; Pvt.
Carroll, If; T/5 Meuer, sf; Cpl.
Shupe, p, and Pfc. Testa, 22b.
Subs included Pfc.- LeVan, 2b;
Pfc. Luca, p; Pvt. McBrian, If;
Cpl. Hegwood, Ib, and Cpl. Gunck-
el, 2b. The team is ready to chal-
lenge all comers and anyone de-
siring a game with the 8th can
contact S/Sgt. Penniston at phone
No. 227. Better think it over
twice before you pick up the
phone, though, 'cause you'll have
a tough team to try and lick.
One of the happiest days in a
soldier's life-at least for those
concerned-is the day on which
ratings come out. Last week saw
such a day in the 8th Wing with
the following men made happy by
an additional stripe: Staff Ser-
geants Clarence, McLennan and
Fred Razook, Privates First
Class Korah Baker, Edwin Belota,
Fergus Casey, Charles Coco, Ed-
ward Gelb, Clyde Hall, Arthur Le-
Van, Cecil Mason, Ben Persons,
Ray Schwarzman, Joe Vasko and
Harry West, Jr. Congratulations!
Lt. Carey drew an excellent
cartoon of newly made Corporal
Bill Mountjoy floating into the
A-3 office on a cloud with his new
neori stripes aglow, the day after
ratings were announced.
Here's the mailman's answer to
that oft repeated question:
"Where's my mail?" Lt. Fontaine,
the squadron CO, received the fol-
lowing letter a few days ago:
"Dear Lieutenant:
"'Why am I not receiving any
mail?' is the common wail that
arises from all and various
sources. Your cry, Lieutenant, has
in the past few days risen far'
above the rest. Now let's take the
situation and attempt a fair analy-
sis. If one expects to reach a com-
fortable solution to the problem
as regards the receiving of no
mail, one must ask oneself if one
always remembers to give one's
address to others. Has one done
this? On the other hand, I can
see where purposely avoiding the
divulging of your address to peo-
ple is a tactic of no little impor-
tance. You might be searched out
and' arrested for looking like a
movie star and be taken to Holly-
wood to be shot. Or you might be
arrested for looking like a college
student and maybe thrown into
Yale.
S"Take a woman. Why doesn't
she write to you? The explanation
may well be that while out with
you she is so completely charmed
that her eyes have said really all
that there is to say. She has noth-
ing else to say and, therefore,
nothing whatsoever to write.
"Maybe people who would like
to write to you can't because they
are allergic to licking postage
stamps, which is a strong argu-
ment in flavoring them (the post-
age stamps). In this case, I think
the government ought to see the
Jello (6 delicious flavors) com-
pany for advice. Since I am under
your bars (come to think of it,
I'd rather be under bars than
have them in front of me), I really
must give a short answer to why
you don't get mail. I really haven't
the foggiest notion, Suh.
Yours truly,
The Mail Orderly,
Pfc. Charles Coco."

BROTHER, THOSE ARE
JAPS UP THERE IN ALASKA.
THAT'S NO OPTICAL ALEU-
TIAN!

KNIGHT BROS.
PAPER CO.
612 Bell Phones 4205 4204
"A Paper for Every Purpose"


SERVICEMEN

Alfredo Y Familia
Fancy Groceries Free Delivery
1601 N. HOWARD AVE.
DIAL H 25-564


By PFC. JOHN E. LEE
Enwrapped in the peaceful
charm of luxurious living, the
Medics have finally felt the full
effects of the war they have
been double-decked. The crowded
barracks present many, many dif-
ficulties. When reprimanded by
S/Sgt. Senecal for not shaving,
Pfc. Manuel Enriquez claimed,
"There were seven of us around
the mirror, and I must have
shaved someone else."
Three rahs and hey nonny for
Jimmy Crulckshank on his shiny
new sergeant's rating. Jimmie's
wife is faring splendidly after an
appendectomy, giving him a dou-
ble occasion to celebrate.
The Base Medics took the first
contest of the Drew Field "little
world series" from the 309th obn
Monday. Coming from behind, the
final score was 6-3 after a very
erratic ball game. Congratulations
to Cpl. Robert True, of the 3rd
F. C. swim team, for paddling his
way to three medals in the recent
meet at Cuscaden park. Looks like
Bob is the "Base Sturgeon."
As per our predictions of two
weeks ago, Sgt. Thurman R. Re-
pass has taken unto himself one
Sarah Hart. She is a Georgia
peach and mighty sweet.
How does Cpl. Jerry Kovler, of
Chicago's north shore and Miami
Beach manage to hobnob with the
aristocracy on a T/5 salary?
Questions of the week: Was
Pfc. Frank Rocco the stage door
Johnnie who escorted her home
from the Gay 90s review? Are
Pfc. Joe Filas and Pvt. Arnold
Pellucci taking swimming les-
sons?
Our own inadequate felicita-
tions to Capt. W. M. Steele of the
Optical Department. He's working
overtime to whip the office into
shape.
'Pfc. Frank Focht, former news-
hound, says he'd like to go to
Alaska. The first thing he'd do is
get an overnight pass. The nights
are six months long.


553rd Sig. Bn.


Hq. Co.


Head Cutters


By S/Sgt. WILLIAM H. WALKER
Sgt. Thomas G. Sluttei returned
from furlough in time to pack his
bags for ,OCS. at Miami Beach
last week. Slut almost had to in-
troduce himself around the com-


Rex Billiard Parlor

1012 FRANKLIN
Dan'l S. Bagley

BEAR SYSTEM SERVICE

Central Mechanical
SHOP
B. T. MORRIS
Tires Balanced Tire Wear
Corrected. 1010 Central Avenue


!---------------

SEABREEZE
Italian Spaghetti
SEA FOOD DINNERS
On 22nd St. Causeway


HYDE PARK

SPAGHETTI HOUSE
Frank Rutas Chef of New York
SPAGHETTI AND RAVIOLI
WINE AND BEER
103 HYDE PARK AVE.

HENRY HOWKEE CO.
CHINESE HAND LAUNDRY
Satisfaction Guaranteep
504 Tyler Street


,Service Men and Families are
Welcome at

Louis Seditla Grocery
Cold Drinks Beer and Wine
Sandwiches and Poultry
2018 Gr. Central Av. Ph. H-3194


pany atfer he had his locks shorn
a la G.I. and got those pince-nez
hooked on.
Cpl. Max Sadlak has been re-
leased from MacDill Hospital
after an operation and is now re-
cuperating at his home in Con-
necticut. By way of transfer, we
have lost S/Sgt. Frank H. Orr to
the 2nd Reporting Co. of the Bat-
talion.
The following promotions have
been made in the company: Sgt.
William H. Walker to staff ser-
geant; Sgt. Jack Farash to staff
sergeant; Pfc. Robert H. Eanes
to Technician 5th Grade; Pvt.
John Boguslawski to sergeant,
and Pvt. Harry D. Johnson to
Technician 4th Grade.
We welcome into the company
Lt. Eugene Barbaras; who comes
to us from Camp Murphy, and
Lt. William M. Miller, chaplain.
Chaplain Miller's office is in the
first hutment of Row 5.
UP'N DOWN THE STREET:
No, Lt. Kinder, you'll find no
demonstrable pathology for Lt.
Heib's apparent neurosis. The
findings are all subjective. Only a
week to go to Oct. 1. We com-
mend to the C of E'the referee's
chair erected for Lt. Haugland's
use in calling the shots in the of-
ficer's volley ball games.
And now that our pooch has a
boy friend, hadn't someone better
take her aside and "talk" to her?
Or does she want to grow up and
be like "Lady," who makes her
home down around the battalion
kitchen?


Post Office Cigar Store
CIGARS, CIGARETTES,
TOBACCOS
SMOKERS ARTICLES
WELCOME SERVICE MEN
Florida Av. & Twiggs St.


Your Feet Hurt?
Complete Line of Arch Supports
and Foot Remedies, at

BARKER & TULLY
1110 FRANKLIN ST.


Always Say...

HOLSUM BREAD

Extra Fresh


All Service Men are Welcome
BARCELONA CAFE
SPANISH RESTAURANT
Wine~ and Liquors
Phone S2142 Open All Night
4714 Nebraska and Osborne



Max'S Liquor Bar
WINES LIQUORS CIGARS
FREE DELIVERYi SERVICE
1601 E. COLUVMBUS DR.
PHONE Y-1281
-Keep 'Fpm Flying-


SELDOMRIDGE
PHOTOGRAPH R
418 TAMPA ST.
Ground Floor
Hours Special
8 to 6 Appointments


SOLDIERS
ALWAYS WELCOME

EL BOULEVARD
RESTAURANT
Finest Spanish Foods Best
of Liquors 2001 Nebraska

LAFAYETTE HOTEL
E. A. CLAY, Manager
120 West Lafayette Street
East Side of Bridge
Phone M-5588


FERNANDEZ

RESTAURANT
Cuban Sandwiches A Specialty
1216 Franklin St.


Prescriptions, Wines, Liquors,
IHome Made Ice Cream

DIETZ DRUG STORE
FREE DELIVERY
931 S. Howard Ave. Ph. H 4385.


[LARRIE'S

506 Franklin St., Next to Madison


HEADQUARTERS
FOR THE WELL DRESSED ARMY MAN


COMPLETE LINE OF MILITARY CLOTHES
SUPPLIES AND INSIGNIA
Also Military Tailoring All Kinds of Chevrons
Smmm- m a


BILLIARDS
CIGARS CIGARETTES
BEER WINES
SANDWICHES
HARRY WELLECOTT
912 Florida Avenue



TWIN PALMS
Beer Wines Soft Drinks
Sandwiches Our Specialty
CLEAN -, COOL RESTFUL
Howard Ave. at Columbus Dr.


Phones: 2588-2589

McKay-Clarke Ins. Co.
GENERAL INSURANCE
515 Zack Street Tampa, Fla.


SPECIAL ATTENTION
To Service Men's Families

Peter Grahn & Son
Meats-Produce-Groceries
Phone 3502 910 Florida Ave.

Phone M52-073
Manuel Garcia Jr.'s
MADRILLON
Spanish Restaurant
915 Tampa at Tyler
Tampa, Florida


PHOTOGRAPHS
Roy N. Green Studio

Open Evenings
Opposite USO 505 Morgan t.


THE LENOX
Mrs. Eva Cadden
Chicken, Steaks, Chops, Home
Made Pies, Good C6ffee
Regular Dinners
2724 Florida Ave.


Flowers For Mother,
Sweetheart or Friend
POWELL'S INC., FLORIST
412 Tampa St. Ph. 2524
Open 'Til 7 P. M.


Tampa Bay Market
Box Fruit Shipped Anywhere
Beer, Wine, Special Sandwiches
Groceries, Fruits, Magazines,
Ice Cream
204 W. Lafayette Street
A. G. Cleotelis & Son H3143


LIBERTY BAR
Tony Italiano, Prop.
Wines--Beer-Soft Drinks
717 Grand Central Ph. H-3109



Adams Kennedy
Whiting and Jefferson
Tampa, Fla.
Groceries, Tobacco, Oandy
Notions


STAR KOSHER
DELICATESSEN
TRY OUR CORN BEEF
SANDWICHES & SALADS
Open till 11 P. M.
805 Gr. Central, Ph. H29-842


SServicemen Are Welcome
Day or Nite at

CHILD CAFE
501 Franklin St.


DIXIE
Cleaners :: Laundry
Phones: M-1036, 4232


T OWNSEND
Sash Door
& Lumber Co. ^L-"
LUMBER & MILLWORK
ROOFING AND PAINT
-FHA LOANS-
PHONE H 4891
N. Rom & Fuller Street

CULP LUMBER CO.
'Everything to Build Anything'
Millwork Made To Order
500 Packwood
Ph. H 1862 -:- Tampa


MARY ELLEN FLOWER
AND GIFT SHOP
Get 'That Special Gift Here, for
Sweetheart or Mother.
1311 Grand Central
Next to llg Orange


Special Invitations to All
Service Men
GLEN'S BILLIARDS
Now in its New Location
805 Tampa St.


~""~""""""""""CNC~Nm"


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Friday* SeplembeT 25, 1912


- e 8







Page 9


Friday, Septen~er 25, 1942 DREW FIELD ECHOES


Hq. and Hq. Sq. 9th Fighter Cd.

NOTES


By S/SGT. FRANKLIN A.
GODSOE
Any number of non-coms at
:-Trew Field may be able to better
T/Sgt. Francis Bongartz' record
of 17 years' service, but few can
touch his background as to va-
riety.
The burly sergeant major of
Command Headquarters has been
through everything foreign gerv-
ice can offer a peace-time soldier,
including duty in China, the Phil-
ippines, Panama, and Hawaii. He
has split his time between three
potent arms-the Air Corps, In-
fantry and Tank Corps.

One soldier who has been able
to apply his civilian talents to the
Army's benefit is Cpl. William
Maxwell, for five years an actor
with the Paramount Studios in
Hollywood.
Since Maxwell bade the dizzy
merry go round of Movieland
goodbye, he has, in addition to his
duties as clerk, found time to
produce three all-soldier shows,
one of which swelled the coffers
of Army Emergency Relief by
$3,000.
During his picture career, Cpl.
Maxwell appeared in 35 feature
productions, including "I Wanted
Wings," "Sullivan's Travels" and
"Virginia." Before coming to
Drew Field, he was a member of
the Recreation Staff at Will Rog-
ers Field, Oklahoma, where such
friends as Bing Crosby, Bop Hope,
Sally Rand and Jeannette Mac-
Donald dropped in to say "hello"
and entertain his buddies.

If Sgt. James N. Hawley, trim
little North Carolina soldier, had
his pick of the places to take a
crack at the Axis, it would be in
a much cooler place than Florida,
and with good reason. Hawley's
father, Major M. E. Hawley, is
With the U. S. forces in Iceland.

If indifference to risking a neck
is one of the primary requisites of
a good soldier, Sgt. Matthew Ro-
galski should be one of the fight-
ingest customers in the Command.
Rogalski used to earn the gro-
ceries in civilian life driving rac-
ing automobiles on the eastern
tracks.
Rogalski, piloted his racing jobs
in competition with such stand-
outs as Will Bill Cummings, Doc
MacKenzie and Johnny Peterson,
Lnd had more than one close brush
vith death. At the Yellowjacket
speedway in Philadelphia, he sur-
lived three crashes through the
rail, which puts him in competi-
tion with the "cat with nine
lives."


CENTRAL OIL
COMPANY, INC.
Tampa, Florida



OPEN EVENINGS
UNTIL 8:30
CRANER'S GIFT SHOP
Gifts Packed For Mailing
210 Cass Street


Phone H-3787
McASKILL MUSIC STORES
Radios and Repairing
Sound and Inter Communicating
Systems
Authorized Capehart and Scott
Radio Service
1116 Grand Central


2nd REPORTING COMPANY
564th

"BLITZ"

By S/SGT. TOM CARUSO
There comes a time in every re-
porter's life when he has to for-
sake the better things in life and
get accustomed to the shady side
of it. So today, being my birthday,
finds me pounding away on a GI
typewriter and trying to scrape up
enough of the chatter around this
area to keep all the fellows in on
the know. About the only satisfac-
tion one can get these days is to
sit back and try to reminisce of
the old days. Sometimes when I
set my thoughts back to my ear-
lier life, I really have to laugh at
the various things we thought
constituted our whole existence.
Today those "important" things
amount to just a few trivial inci-
dents now a thing of the past.
For instance, who would have
thought we would spend a part
of our lives in a poultry house
and call that home or that we
would eat our three squares a
day neathh the grandstand of the
ball park of the Cincinnati Reds
. or that we have to go to a
cigar factory in order to see Joe
Berry, our supply sergeant, for
some needed item or that
we'd wind up visiting a barn in
order to see our personnel clerk?
However, there are such days
that some of us will never want
to look forward to. There has yet
to be a day that Uhcle Sammy
and the boys couldn't knock the
ears off Hirohito and his clammy
mob. Whether it be your com-
pany, my company or anyone's
company, we all can remember
that this is war and that we're all
in on the big show. This may not
be a war to end all wars, but this
being our generation, it is up to,
us to finish it off in a hurry. To
those of you who feel very incon-
venienced at times because of cer-
tain changes that cause you to
move to another street or another
hutment, I'd like to have you re-
member the tough overhauling
that some of our buddies are go-
ing through in places other than
Drew Field. I, for one, would like
to salute those men who, in spite
of their isolation, are still carry-
ing on in true American fashion
S. .all saying We'll keep fighting.
I hear that T/Sgt. Pompeo is
being snowed under with work.
Can that be possible? I thought it
was always the other way around.
The next time that a certain ser-
geant takes a shower, will be
please remember to take his shoes
off before he comes in contact
with H20?
Orchids to Martin Wolf, our ad-
ministration instructor at Drew
Field. For the short time that he
has instructed he has done a swell
job. Keep it up, Marty, it's fellows
like you who make things much
more enjoyable to the students in
class.
Really would like to see some
of those cute Drew Field gals sta-
tioned here at Plant. We certainly
can use some of that radiant
charm the gals give out. We
herewith extend an invitation to
all you 'gals come one, come
all open every night.
Hear tell that S/Sgt. Hallett,
stationed at Drew in charge of all
our men left 'behind to complete
their schooling, is certainly having
his fill. ... Not only is he an act-
ing first sergeant, but he also has
taken over the duties of a father,
mother, porter and at times he
serves as a chaplain to the boys
with his fatherly advice. Congrats
to S/Sgts. Primavera- and Schub-
ring, who are now Tech/Sgts .
Sgt. James Thomson, who was
promoted to Staff/St .Cpl.
Falcon, now Sgt. Falcon, and to
Cpl. Podstawski, now Sgt .
Won't the Mrs. be happy, Pottsy.
S.. Don't want to forget Cpl. Hol-


ton, who finally got the promotion
that he deserved. Would also like
to put in a plug for Kinlein, our
mailman Here's a fellow who
certainly has kept the mail com-
ing, no matter what the circum-
stances were. You're doing a
swell job, Herby; keep it up,
you'll get there soon. Memo
to Sgt. Krause: Hey, Jack, will
you take it easy in the morning?
I hear tell that the battalion can
use you just to wake up all the
men each morning. Things
are getting so that I can hear your
voice way out here and it does
carry, too.
SWonder why those new recruits
who are coming .here from all
points north cofisfder themselves
privates second class.
Also wonder who that dumb
cluck was who told the lieutenant
that he was out of step .... As if
that weren't enough, how about
the -time that a certain sergeant
caught a private writing 'to him-
self and, upon query, answered
that it was about time that he re-
ceived some mail and since no one
wrote to him he delegated the,
task to himself. Whereupon
the sergeant asked the private,
"What does the letter say?"
Whereupon the private replied,
"How the hell do I know? I won't
get it until tomorrow." Well,
that's the Army for you.

SERVICE MEN

ALBERTUS HOTEL
A Home Away From Home


956 Twiggs


M-1339


Air Base Bus

Lines, Inc.

30 Minute Service to Both
Fields At All Hours


.V



15 Minute Service
During Rush Hours






For Further Information


Call 3286



Sulphur Springs

Service Men Always Welcome
Sulphur Spring Cafe
We Specialize in Home Cooked
Food, Chicken, Steak and
Chop Dinners
Surphur Springs, Arcade Bldg.

SERVICEMEN
KEEP IN TRIM
CARPET GOLF
-18 HOLES-
15c-First Round
10c-Additional Rounds
Next to Sulphur Springs Pool


WELCOME TO ST. PETERSBURG




PENNFLORA
HOTEL

443 Second Ave. North St. Petersburg
56 Rooms, All With Private Bath
"In The Center of All Interest"
$1.00 and $1.50 per Person


Gilbert System Hotel
Betty C. Mitchell, Mgr.
746 Central Ave. St. Petersburg
Phone 7864
"Your Home Away from Home"
You Are Always Welcome
A phone In Every Room
Hot and Cold Water All Times


For Prompt Service

Phone 5909

MASTER CLEANERS
INC.

507 Ninth Street No.
St. Petersburg, Fla.


Mostellar's Sundries
ICE CREAM AND COLD
DRINKS
201 9th St. So.
Opp. Seaboard Station


Colonial Doll Shop
115 9th St. So., Opp. Webbs
FLORIDA SOUVENIRS
UNUSUAL GIFTS
For Wife and Sweetheart


PARISIAN CLEANERS
48 HOUR SERVICE
148 Central Ave.
Phone 8631


VOGUE
Cleaners and'Laundry
SHERFY BOURN, Owner
450 4th St. So.
Phone 9518


Wonder Bar And Grill
Headquarters for Service Men
BEER, LIQUOR and WINE
172 Central Ave. Phone 6133



Service Men's Uniforms
That Will Pass Inspection
Cleaned and Pressed 50c
FLORA-DON
CLEANER AND DYERS
Phone 4727 1239 Central Av.

Bowling Center, Inc.
Cor. 1st Ave. So. and 2nd St.
12 Brunswick 20th Century
Alleys


A dime out of every
.dollar we earn

SIS OUR QUOTA
for VICTORY with
U.S. WAR BONDS


Northmoor Apts.
Stop In close to headquarters for
the duration. Cool, clean ettfe-
lency Apts., or Rooms and lnath
By the Week. Month, Season or
Yearly
111 6th Ave. No. Phone 70-781


THE PERRY
125 8th Ave. North
ROOMS, APTS. & COTTAGES
Reasonable Rates, by Week,
Month or Year
ADULTS ONLY NO PETS



SONE

UNUSUAL GIFTS

248 1st Ave. No.


At St. Petersburg
Sportsman Billiard Parlor
228 Central Avenue

St..Pete, Fla., Phone 50-612

St. Petersburg Gift Shop
364 Central Ave.
"DON'T FAIL TO VISIT US"
For Gifts of all kinds for
wives and sweethearts.
Live Baby 'Gators Shipped
SPECIALISTS IN PILLOW TOPS

At St. Petersburg

Frank's LIQUOR STORE


147 Central Ave.


Ph. 4342


FREE DELIVERY

Imported Wines And Liquors


GEORGES LUNCH
14 2nd St. So.
Specializing in
STEAKS, SEAFOODS,
SANDWICHES



Paramount Bowling
Alleys
You are invited to visit o ~
modern and up to date alleys
860 4th Av% S. Phone 7508


While at St. Pete
Visit

RUDY'S Hi-Hat
BEER, WINES, SMOKES
848 4th St. So.


NIKKO INN
19 1st St. No. Phone 67e0
Air Cinditioned, Private
Dining Rooms, Chinese and
American Meals


DINE AND DANCE

THE COTTAGE
2102 4th Street North
WINE AND BEER


SWE CME SERVICE MEN ...
WELCOME SERVICE MEN ...


Swim at the SULPHUR SPRINGS POOL
Bus and Street Car to Pool Natural Springs ... Temperature 72o
^A.W.:..:,g....g.g.g*..g.,g..:...:..g ..g4..:..:....t..4:*+^*- .4 :+M :+ + +*+ +: :Q


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Friday, Septen'b~er 25, 1942







1F


CHURCH CALL

Protestant
Service- 11:00 A.M., Chapels
No. 1 and No. 2.
Service 7:30 P.M., Chapel
No. 1.
Jewish
Service 11:00 A.M., Theater


No. 1.


Third Fighter Command Wins Swim Title


Catholic


Mass-6:15 A.M., Chapel No. 2.
Mass-9:00 A.M., Chapels No.
1 and No. 2.



SPORTS

REVIEW ,

Free Golf for Drew Men
Drew Field soldiers have been
invited by the Airport Golf Club
to use its course gratis. The course
is located one-half mile west of
the North Gate. All divot diggers
who take advantage -of this invi-
tation will be furnished golf clubs,
Tees and balls, however, must be
brought by the individual players.
Obstacle Course
Championship Meet
The Base Physical Training Di-
rector, Lt. Arthur Colley, an-
nounces that the winner of the
Obstacle Course Championship
Meet, to be held on the obstacle
course at Headquarters, Third Air
Force, on October 8, will be given
a luxurious week-end at the
Tampa Terrace Hotel gratis.
The winner's week-end, through
arrangement with the president
and general manager of Collier
Coast Hotels, Mr. George H. Ma-
son, will begin Friday afternoon,
October 9, and last through Sun-
day evening, October 11. It in-
cludes room, meals, and trips for
the champion, two meals for a
guest of the opposite sex, one cor-
sage for the lady guest, and the
privilege of having one couple as
his guests on Sunday.
Second and third' place winners
will be given appropriate awards,
probably something in the nature
of athletic equipment.
By contacting the Physical
Training Office, the obstacle
course can be scheduled for use.
Watch the bulletin board. It will
contain information concerning
the meet which will involve all
organizations in the Tampa area
of the Third Air Force.
A Fable About G.I. Stew
A keen sense of humor is al-
ways a token of good morale, and
soldiers at Drew Field have more
than their share of it. The fol-
lowing humorous story is told by
Pvt. J. J. O'Gara, of the 314th
Air Base Squadron:
One day, during the height of
the rush hour in the mess hall,
from which issued savory odors of
a G.I. stew in the making, a prac-
tical joker stepped up to the
counter and dumped a large sack
on the counter. He extracted from
it four dogs of dubious ancestry,
three cats and a qhuirrel.
He addressed the mess sergeant.
"Sorry, Sarge," he apologized.
"That's all I could get hliis time."
This statement was enoughh to
arouse much consternation among
the chow hounds, and when he de-
parted he left them wondering as
to the source of their chow.
ic


ELKS IN UNIFORM
Remember Every Saturday,
4 P.M. to 11 P.M. Free Soft
Drinks Food Music
Bring a Buddy'
ELKS LODGE
Florida Ave. & Madison St.


OFFICERS AND MEN!
We Appreciate Your Patronage
-and Thank You.
MacDill Field Post Tailors
V. Ficcio


Above are pictured the winners of the Third Air Force swim title at Cuscaden park, held on Sept. 16
and 17. Top row (left to right), Pvt. Walter Verchuck; Pvt. Walter L. Welsh, Sgt. Seab Reeves, Pvt.
Cecil Amick, Sgt. Samuel Palmer, S/Sgt. John P. Vivona and Sgt. Gordon Durland. Bottom row: Opl.
Robert T. True, Miss Lynette Peralta and Sgt. John B. Gosselin.


For the second successive year,
a Drew Field organization won
the swimming and diving cham-
pionship of the Third Air Force
units stationed in the Tampa area
when the girl-coached, eight-man
team of the Headquarters and
Headquarters Squadron, Third
Fighter Command, came out on
top in competition against 22
teams, 12 from Drew and 10 from
MacDill.
'With more than 200 officers
and enlisted men cutting the
water of the Cuscaden pool in the
two-day meet held on Sept. 16 and
17, the Third Fighter Command
men rolled up 43 points, to lead
their nearest rivals by 15 mark-
ers. The winners were coached by
Miss Lynette Peralta, of Cuscaden
pool.
The winning team consisted of
S/Sgt. John P. Vivona, Sgts. Seab
Reeves, Samuel Palmer and Gor-
don Durland; Cpl. Robert E. True,
Pfc. Walter Verchuck and Pvts.
Cecil Amick and Walter L. Welsh.
It was managed by Sgt. John B.
Gosselin.
On behalf of the winning team,
a trophy was accepted by Maj.
Roscoe G. Conklin, commanding
officer of the Headquarters and
Headquarters Squadron, Third
Fighter Command, from Col.
Thomas S. Voss, commanding offi-
cer of MacDill Field.
Lt. Fred Prestin, of Drew Field,
won easily in the diving compe-
tition, scoring 254.3 points. Sgt.
Durland, also of Drew, finished
second with 172.8. Among the
judges for the diving events was


Margaret 'Reinhold, of Lakeland,
holder of the women's national
diving championship.
Other results:
50-Rard Free Style
Lt. Fred Prestin, Lt. R. C. An-
derson and Pvt. Cecil Amick.
100-Yard Breaststroke
Sgt. K. L. Hawk, Sgt. Louis
Trenner and S/Sgt. Jasper Bash-
am.
160-Rard Free Style
Pvt. Henry Lillerman, Pvt. F.
L. Kruger and Cpl. Crosby.
Plunge for Break
Pvt. Foster Griffith, Lt. Saul
Reuben and John Collins.
Cross-Chest Carry
Won by Pvt. Charles Little and
Pvt. Abe Mish.
f00-Yard Free Style
Cpl. Robert True, Lt. R. C. An-
derson and Cpl. W. C. Triol
100-Yard Medley Relay
Won by 4th Weather Squadron
team of Moran, Newmyer and
Crosby.



HEAT RASHES
CAUSED BY HOT SUN(
When your body breaks out with red, itchy,
prickly heat, you want relief and you want it
fast-for neglect causes great discomfort. Get
overnight relief from the burning, itching
torture, with pleasant, cooling, quick-acting
Poslam Ointment. Over 16,000,000 tins sold
-it must be good-all drug stores-only 500.

E m- IL


166-Yard Free Style Relay
Won by Headqaurters and
Headquarters Squadron, Third
Fighter Command.


Watch This Page Next Week


For Our Grand Opening ...
I----- -


-=MAAS

BROT-IERS

*,


Complete ...

convenient


MILITARY Y


DEPT.

JUST INSIDE OUR
FRANKLIN ST.
ENTRANCE




MEN'S SHOP
MAIN FLOOR


SUNBURN


INSECT BITES- MUSCULAR ACHES
V& 4voee PvtSt


More Convenient



Telephone Service



Now Available



"Attended public telephone service," a group

of conveniently located telephone facilities

operated by trained attendants, is now availa-

ble to make your telephone service more con-

venient, especially on long distance calls.



The pay stations are at 517 Zack Street,

on the ground floor of the telephone

building. (The 12-story building in the


Open


every evening in the week between 6 and

12 p.m.



You will find it especially helpful to place calls

here because,the attendants are on duty to

provide rate quotations you cannot obtain from

telephone directories, to make change, and to

assist you otherwise in obtaining the most

convenient service possible.




PENINSULAR TELEPHONE COMPANY


same block as the bus terminal.)


Friday, Septeiiiber 25, 1949


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Page 10


-O-




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