Title: Drew Field echoes
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076231/00026
 Material Information
Title: Drew Field echoes
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Post Exchange
Place of Publication: Tampa Fla
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida -- Tampa   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Drew Field Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa -- Drew Army Airfield
Coordinates: 27.975556 x -82.533333 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: "Published each Friday in the interest of the officers and enlisted men of Drew Field."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 39 (Dec. 2, 1943).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076231
Volume ID: VID00026
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24622561
lccn - sn 93063705

Full Text



















VOL. 1, NO. 2~ Published Every Friday Drew Field, Tampa, Florida Friday, September 4, 1942


First Allotment Checks


Are Mailed By


Army


'BARN DANCE' COMING



TO DREW FIELD SEPT. 14


Stars of WLS-NBC Barn Dance Coming


SThe Army is ready to pay the first allotment checks. About
,000 allowance checks were mailed September 1 and 10,000 addi-
rional checks will be mailed on September 5 to relatives and depend-
ents of enlisted men in the Army, covering the first payments under
the recently enacted Servicemen's Dependents Allowance Act, the War
Department announced today. The*
checks will cover all amounts ac-
crued since June 1. Payments, y T
however, are not made for frac- VAr y Of I c I T
tions of a, month.
The Allowance and Allotment
Branch of the Adjutant General's Remove Insignia
Office, with the slogan: "Get 'em
Paid," is now geared up to process Fr1O Sh lde
within 24 hours applications that rrom Sh ulder
are complete. To keep pace with
this, the employees of the Allot- r
ment Division of the Finance De- Loops o hits
apartment of the Army, which is-
sues the checks after claims are
approved, are working in three
shifts, 24 hours a day, including All insignia are to be removed
Sunday. from the shoulder loops of offi-
As against the 30,000 applica- cers' shirts and field jackets, the
tions so far approved, only 157 War Department announces.
have been disallowed, though In o g
many additional ones, found in- Insignia of grade will now be
complete or incorrectly filled out, placed on the collar of the shirt,
have had to be returned for cor- when worn without the service
reaction. coat, appearing where the letters,
Applications filed by the sol- "U S" are now displayed. It will
diers themselves have been found are now displayed. It will


to be accurate and complete in a
much higher percentage of cases
than those filed by dependents.


Mechanics Keep

Combat Craft In

Top Condition

Planes of the Army Air Forces
now on duty in the European
theater are maintained mechani-
cally in the best possible condition,
according to Colonel George H.
Beverly, Air Corps, Director of
Technical Inspection of the Army
Air Forces, who recently, returned
from a European inspection tour.
Col. Beverley's conclusion is
based not only on personal obser-
vation, but on reports from tech-
nical inspectors assigned to all
overseas commands to supervise
the maintenance of combat air-
planes and equipment in the Army
Air Forces.
"In spite of the large number
of 'green' mechanics that have
been taken into the Army Air
Forces during its expansion," said
Col. Beverley, "there has been no
noticeable decrease in the excel-
lence of our mechanical mainte-
'ance. This is of vital importance
Iks the flying safety of a plane in
the air can be no greater than its
mechanical perfection before it
leaves the ground. Any failing of
a military airplane as a machine,
whether in combat, training, or
transport; is a victory for the
enemy.
"To insure as high a degree of
mechanical perfection as is hu-
manly possible, the Army Air
Forces has developed a system of
technical inspection and mainte-
nance supervision that is un-
doubtedly the finest and most
thorough in the world."
The job of repair, overhaul and
maintenance of our planes--espe-
cially in combat zones-is as im-
portant as that of bombardier,
pilot or navigator, he pointed out,
in stressing the urgent need of the
Army Air Forces for thousands of
trained mechanics from all lines
of civilain occupations.
These men do not-have to be
airplane mechanics to be eligible
for enlistment in the Army AMi
Forces, Col. Beverley explained.
For example, automobile, Diesel,
truck, tractor, and farm mechan-
ics can readily adapt their skills
to airplane maintenance and re-
(Continued on Page 10)


also be worn on the garrison cap,
and will continue to -be worn on
the shoulders of the service coat.
The removal of insignia from
the shoulders of shirts and field
jackets was found desirable be-
cause of the interference of such
insignia with the use of gas
masks, carbines, and other mili-
tary equipment.
On the garrison cap, insignia of
grade will be worn on the left
side, centered on the curtain,
with 'center of the insignia 11/2
inches from the front. The bars of
lieutenants and captains will be
worn perpendicular to the bottom
edge of the cap. The leaves of
majors and lieutenant colonels
will be worn with stem down. The
eagle of a colonel will be worn
beak to the front. The star of a
brigadier general will be worn
point upward. Additional stars
will extend to the rear of the
first star, and be placed 5/8 inch
apart. Miniature insignia of grade
is authorized for general officers,
and when this is worn, additional
stars will 'be placed at a relatively
smaller interval.
All officers except general offi-
cers will wear insignia of grade
on the right side of the collar of
the olive drab or khaki shirt
(when worn without the service
coat), and metal insignia indicat-
ing arm, service, bureau, etc., on
the left side, one inch from the
end. The bars of lieutenants and-
captains will be worn parallel
with the front edge of the collar.
Leaves will be worn with the stem
down. The eagle will be worn
,beak to the front.
General officers of the line will
wear insignia of grade on both
sides of the collar, one inch from
the end. Other general officers
will wear insignia of grade on the
right side, and metal insignia in-
dicating arm, service, bureau, etc.,
on the left.
Warrant officers will wear the
insignia of grade on the right side
of the collar, and the insignia, of
warrant officer on the left.
Metal or embroidered insignia
of grade will be worn on each
shoulder loop of the service coat,
the long overcoat, the short over-
coat and the raincoat, and on the
shoulders of work clothing. On
the shoulders of special suits or
jackets of flying personnel, metal,'
embroidered, or leather insignia
of grade will be worn. Except in
the case of the service coat, how-
ever, the removal of this shoul-
der insignia may be ordered by
commanders of divisions of inde-
pendent forces, under conditions
of combat or simulated combat.


Right out of your radio loudspeakers and rigAt into your heart
will be tie goal of tle Cowgirl Swingsters who are featured on the
WLS-National Barn Dance. Stars of America's oldest continuous
conunercial radio program, the five girls shown above are but part of
the WLS-NBC NATIONAL BARN DANCE variety revue being
presented free of charge by USO-Camp Shows. Boasting of a listening
audience running well into the millions, WLS-NBC NATIONAL BARN
DANCE unit is one of the fifteen big USO-Camp Shows summertime
productions which will be presented at Drew Field on Sept. 14.


Soldiers Urged To Aid

Salvage of Vital Scrap


The United States is facing a
crisis in its War Production Pro-
gram. The Nation's scrap and sal-
vageable material are needed .by
war industries to maintain pro-
duction quotas and get necessary
materials to the armed forces-
in time.
Every soldier and officer knows
the importance of this need and
can help materially in meeting it.
We must cooperate constantly and
earnestly with the national effort
to relieve the shortage of critical
materials by supplying a continu-
ous flow of salvageable material
for use in war production.
So let's keep our eyes open in
the barracks and company areas,
on the firing ranges, on the drill
fields and maneuver grounds, at
the post garages and maintenance
installations. There's plenty of
valuable scrap material that can
be converted for industrial use.
For instance, rubber heels, tires
and tubes can be used to produce
rubber shock absorbers,, motor
vehicle and airplane tires, and
many other additional products.
Waste paper and cloth are con-
Vertible to important war prod-
ucts. Remember, the material you
salvage today will help you
and your comrades in battle to-
morrow!
It's our job to find, turn in, or
report any valuable scrap material
that we see to the salvage officer.
Military personnel living off the
post should turn in all materials
available for salvage around their
homes to charitabe organiza-
tions or the local salvage officer.
Scrap metal, discarded tires, or
tubes, lying along the highway,
should be picked up. Old mach-
(Continued on Page 10)


ur (
To Company Reporters

To insure publication in The
Drew Field Echoes, aill copy
must reach the Public Rela-
tions Office, Base Headquar-
ters, by Tuesday night.
Several interesting ne w s
items were omitted this week
due to the fact that they were
received too late for submis-
sion to printers of The Echoes.
Give us your co-operation.
Let us have your news letters
before the Tuesday night dead-
line.
*

Lt. Kelley New Base

Automotive Officer

With the recent transfer of
Captain Thomas Hogan to Stout
Field, Indiana, Lt. Elmcr H.
Kelley has been appointed base
automotive officer.
Captain Hogan was one of the
first arrivals at Drew Field, com-
ing here from MacDill Field May
15, 1941. When he first arrived
he was 'base quartermaster and
was later supplanted by Colonel
Greene.
Lieutenant Kelley received his
commission upon graduation from
Auburn University in 1933. Prior
to his coming to Drew Field two
months ago, he attended the Air
Corps Administration School at
Lowry Field, Denver, Colorado,
and the Quartermaster Motor
Transport School at Atlanta, Ga.


FAVORITE STARS


WILL APPEAR IN


USO-CAMP SHOW

Stellar performers from the old-
est continuous commercial radio
program on the air comprise the
cast of the new "WLS National
Barn Dance" show which appears
at Drew Field Sept. 14, on the
USO-Camp Shows' circuit of free
summertime entertainment for
the armed forces.
For the past 18 years the Na-
tional Barn Dance has been one
of America's favorite radio pro-
grams. It is native entertainment
at its best a mixture of folk
tunes and cowboy ballads inter-
spersed with currently popular
songs, homespun humor and lively
dancing, staged in the setting of
an imaginary hayloft.
The USO-Camp Shows' WLS
National Barn Dance company in-
cludes the Cowgirl Swingsters-
Evelyn, Jeanne, Doris, Ruby and
Irene-who swing out with unique
harmonies of western, hillbilly
and modern tunes. These girls en-
tertained individually at rodeos
and western radio stations before
they merged their talents into
their present act.
'The veteran stage performer,
Jimmy James, has a comedy musi-
cal act which is another highlight
of the show.
Uncle Tom Corwine, the famous
sound effects man, is also in the
cast. A ranking stage trouper,
Corwine can imitate anything
from a steamboat to a peanut
stand.
Polly Jenkins and Her Playboys
have been featured over 150 radio
stations, and have appeared in
theaters from coast to coast. They
offer entrancing music from a
weird collection of instruments, 57
of t h e m, including cowbells,
sleighbells, musical funnels and
coins, in addition to standard in-
struments.
Crystal Cook, the talented nov-
elty dancer, rounds out the show.
The attractive brown-haired, blue-
eyed Crystal has been featured in
night clubs, theaters and hotels
and has proved a sensation at fairs
all over the country.
WLS National Barn Dance is
one of the 15 big-time musical
revues touring on USO-Camp
Shows' summertime circuit of free
entertainment for the armed
forces. It will be staged out of
doors, weather permitting, from
a USO-Camp Shows show bus-a
mobile theater fully equipped with
a stage measuring 30 feet in depth
and 26 feet in width, complete
with lighting and scenery sets and
a public address system. In case
of inclement weather, the troupe
will perform indoors, with time
and place to be announced.

QMC In New Headquarters

Hey, Bub! In case you're
looking for the Quartermas-
ter offices, you're at the
wrong gate!
Colonel Greene and his
Quartermaster crew made one
of the longest non-stop hops
on record at Drew Field.
From their shady haven next
to the East Gate, the office,
officers, and girls (resplen-
dent in their new uniforms)
moved early this week to
"Green Gables," near the
North Gate. Their new office
building was formerly head-
quarters for the 503rd Signal
Battalion.


Drewr Field, Tamnpa, Florida


Friday, September 4., 1942


VOL. 1, NO. 27


Pvblbished Every Fr~idayJ









Tage 2 DREW FIELD ECHOES Friday, September 4, 1942


The Drew Field Echoes
GLENN R. ROSS, Publisher
Tampa Army Newspapers
Business Office:
1115 FLORIDA AVENUE
Tampa, Florida
P. 0. Box 522. Phone 2177
All advertisements contained in
this newspaper are also contained in
the MacDIll Field Fly Leaf. Minimum
ioint circulation: 8,000 copies.
ADVERTISING RATES FURNISHED
ON REQUEST
A newspaper published exclusive-
ly for the personnel of Drew Field
and devoted to military interests
and the United Nations Victory.
Opinions expressed in this news-
paper are those of the individual
writers and under no circumstances
are they to be considered those of
the United States Army. Advertise-
ments in this publication do not
constitute an endorsement by the
War Department or its personnel of
the products advertised.


553rd A.W.Bn. 2nd Rept.

Squads Riot
By S/SGT. ARTHUR BLOOM
This week's item on Levy has
a tragic note-our boy is in the
hospital with a minor kidney ail-
ment, and we are hoping to see his
beaming face soon. Come back to
us soon, Levy, for we loves you
honeychile.
So many transfers are taking
place that the company is dwind-
ling down to almost a shadow of
its former self-but we still have
enough men tried and true to take
on the Medical Detachment, so
anytime you're ready, Sgt. McD--
Pvts. Reirdon, Vannoni and Mc-
Cauley went off to school this
week-end, so we're waiting for
more of our boys to bring those
G.I. diplomas back. When all our
school boys get back, we'll really
have a smart bunch of AW men in
this outfit. Those service schools
can really turn out good men-
witness Pfcs. Lavelle, Ruther,
Gray, Hoole, Knebbe, French and
Pvts. Bentley and Altman who are
already instructors after return-
ing last Sunday.
In closing we'll make a third
attempt to plant Tierney's favorite
piece of blankety-blank verse. Any
similarity between this and Rud-
yards Kipling's "Gungha Din" is
purely coincidental and imper-
ceptible.
The Fighting Irish
Reardon, Radigan, Healy & Jones,
Thomas and Tierney too.
Gave up their jobs and wives and
girls
to go and fight for you.
Now Reardon, Radigan, Healy &
Jones and Thomas and Tierney too
boarded a ship
and took a long trip,
and sailed o'er the ocean blue
Where did they go?
What did they do?
Well, Reardon, Radigan, Healy &
Jones and-Thomas & Tierney too
Threw down their guns
and went in with their mitts
Sure when they were finished
The Axis had fits!
Reardon, Radigan, Healy & Jones
Oh yes-Thomas and Tierney too
What did they do, you ask?
When they got through,
The Axis was blue "
The boys had completed their
task.


7 Photos


$5.95
Including One

8x10
HAND TINTED IN OIL
-(

OPEN UNTIL 8 P. M.
-.




HOWARD

STUDIO

908V Franklin St.
Snite 18
Across Street From Grant's


FEMMES


With today's edition comes the
last day we femmes have as indi-
viduals, for tomorrow the only
way we can be referred to sepa-
rately will be as "just another
uniform" (not "the girl in the
blue suit," (please). If any of you
men find yourselves being whis-
tled at, don't be startled, just keep
on going and try to look coy or
nonchalant-it'll probably be one
of us exercising a privilege of the
uniform. If Alice Phillips
(Base Automotive Office) comes
up very abrutly and asks, "Do I
look 46?" please answer nega-
tively because she's been suffer-
ing from an inferiority complex
ever since the guard at the east
gate (by a mis-lick, she hopes)
put that age down on her finger-
print card. The phrase, "I
beg your pardon, but haven't I
seen you some place before?"
might well be voiced by some of
Yankee-boys to Jane Roth, Jean-
ette Bunch, Mrs. Lucile McElmur-
ray or Mrs. Annie Laurie Sexton
(Engineer stenos), who have ap-
peared many times during the past
few years in New York, Philadel-
phia, Baltimore, Washington and
Chicago newspapers in conjunc-
tion with the Chamber of Com-
merce's program to advertise
Tampa's advantages. The En-
gineer men must be proud of their
beauties, as they're planning a
smoking room and lounge for the
girls, with flowered chintz, vene-
tian blinds, and other swank
touches. "'Tain't fair!" the rest


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Air-Conditioned Cozy
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THOMAS JEFFERSON,
Cor. Franklin & Washington
M-5571


that fit


of us shout, but what we really
mean is, "How'd you work it,
gals?" It seems that Spring is
in the hearts of our Quartermas-
ter personnel, since, added to the
announcement of Lt. May's forth-
coming merge comes the news of
the marriage of Capt. Brazelton's
secretary, Miss Toffaletti (cousin
to Tampa's WAAC-y Toffalettis),
and Lt. Stokes, QM officer. The
happy bridegroom said the mar-
riage was unexpected-we quote:
'"We were sent down to Sarasota
to do some work and when we got
through the first thing we knew
we were married." The Mendels-
sohn-minded pencil-pushers are
expected to take the tip-catch
'em off home base. While
we're on the subject, congratula-
tions are in order to Cpl. and Mrs.
Peter Smiljanich she's Capt.
Bull's secretary, the former Cleo
Warren; he's clerking in Base
Hqs. file section. Several re-
quests to PLEASE not wear frilly
blouses, loud sandals or costume
jewelry with our uniforms have
come from some of the officers
and men-to which we say Amen,
but verily.




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Feature No. 2 -
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Lucille Fairbanks




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Program Week of Sept. 6
SUN., MON., TNES., SEPT. 6-7-8
"ALOMA OF THE SOUTH SEAS"
Dorothy Lamour, Jon Hall
Also
"Phanton Raiders," with
Walter Pedgeon, Florence Rice
also News
WED., THURS., SEPT. 9-10
'ICECAPADES," with Jerry
Colonna, Dorothy Lewis; also
"Whistling in the Dark," with
Red Skelton, Conrad Veldt
FRI., SAT., SEPT. 11-12
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,-"4::4 OR E .M SO M R*


Friday, September 4. 1942


DREW FIELD ECHOES







Friday, September 4, 1942


DREW FIELD ECHOES


564th MEDICOS
V .dP S4P.IN 4P'"" "'


By T/SGT. HENRY J. KATZ
and it came to pass that
the Medical Detachment of the
564th had to move from one row
of hutments to another, and thus
brought with it much grief and
woe to the foreman of supply, one
Cpl. Ayvazian, and to one expert
carpenter, one Pfc. Eichorn, and
causeth them to work as demons
in the preparation of a new build-
ing for the housing of supply. And
it came to pass, that as they fin-
ished their noble task the order
was given, and being good soldiers
they complied, and moved once
again the supply, with more grief
and woe. And it comes to pass that
they here receive three cheers.
S and out of the darkness
came two promotions, and Pfc.
Gabelman became a Technician
Fifth Grade, and Pvt. Simeone be-
came a Private First Class, and
they here receive three cheers.
S. and from a bed in the hos-
pital at MacDill Field returned
Pvt. Vento to his Detachment, and
above his lip was a mustache, and
he here receives three cheers.
and returning from his
home and from a furlough came
Pvt. Pitt, and being a good soldier
Pvt. Pitt was determined to do no
wrong and thus returneth three
days early, and he here receives
three cheers.
S. and also from furlough re-
turned Pvts. McKinley and Mc-
Laughlin, each one day early, and
Pfc. Crabb on the day set, and
each receives herewith three rous-
ing cheers.
--------S------
505th Sig. AW Regiment

2nd Reporting Company
By CPL. S. FS NORRIS
Sgt. Henry G. Hamrick has been
very happy the past few days for
no other reason than that a letter
arrives every day from his one and
only. But just let one day pass
without a letter, and the men sure
catch details, and I do mean de-
tails. In fact the men catch so
many details that only Sgt. Ham-
rick and his company clerk, T/4
Abraham Kreeger, and the Supply
Sergeant, S/Sgt. Luther C. Long.
were available to run the obstacle
course on Friday.
The men of the .Second Report-
ing Company agree that T/4 John
J. Pierson should be a construc-
tion engineer, from the way he
supervised the moving of the com-
pany tents. He sure had the men
on the ball. At least, that is his
story.
Pvt. Harry C. Panazzi is going
to Moonrun, Pa., on his furlough
to find out if it is true about his
home town finally electing a new
president. The latest town paper
headlines proclaim President Lin-
coln.
Pvts. William W. Erwin, James
McCraw and Luke E. Brutvan

I Give Service to the Men in
the Service
SHOE REPAIRING IS
MY BUSINESS
JOE A. RODANTE'
101 W. 7th Ave.

Prescriptions, Wines, Liquors,
Home Made Ice Cream
DIETZ DRUG STORE
FREE DELIVERY
931 S. Howard Ave. Ph. H 4385


WELCOME TO
HOTEL KNOX
TOM BRYSON, Manager
Lafayette & Jefferson


CHARLIE Jr.'s PLACE
BEER & WINE
We Specialize in Mixed Sand-
wiches
"The Best Prices in Town"
Howard Ave. & Walnut St.
West Tampa


have finally made the grade and town at the present, having spent
had themselves transferred to the last two years of civilian life
other companies. So long, fellows, in the resort city. He entered the
we hate to see you go. Army at Allentown, Pa., in 1936.
Pvt. William L. Obenour was The sergeant has been located
married while on furlough, at Drew Field for the past eight
c months, serving in the administra-
564th PLOTT. CO. tion department, wire section and
the supply. Before leaving for
DkTS A D DASHES AOCS, Hoff was supply sergeant
DO AD DAS ES for the Plotting Company. The
sergeant wishes' to thank all his
By CPL. S. O. KATZENELL friends in the 564th for making
Lt. William K. antwell and his his stay at Drew Field a most en-
warriors wish S/Sgts. William joyable one. He says:
Johnson and Maurice Hoff all the "I certainly enjoyed every min-
success in the world. The ser- ute of the eight months at Drew
giants left last week for the Offi- Field. The officers and enlisted
cers' Candidate School. men are regular fellows. I wish
Johnson was born in 1918 at them continued success in their
Philadelphia, Pa. After traveling line of endeavor, and I hope to
through Pennsylvania, Ohio, New see them again when the victory
York and Maryland, Johnson flag is raised. It's not goodbye,
fin.al1, settfloe in Atlantic City. but so long."


N. J., where he graduated with
high honors from the Atlantic
City High School in 1937. During
his high school days, Johnson
played football, basket ball and
baseball. The likable sergeant was
a first-rate gridder. Holding down
fullback position, he was placed
on the New Jersey State High
School All-Star team for two con-
secutive seasons.
Johnson enlisted in the Army
on September 25, 1940, and he
says he intends to stay in the
service the rest of his life.
Johnson speaks:
"I have had several good jobs
in civilian life, but none can com-
pare with the jobs in the army.
"Army life is the best life in
the world."
Sgt. Hoff first saw the light of
day at Easton,' Pa., in the year of
1915. Hoff is also a traveling man.
He spent several eears in the large
state of Pennsylvania, journeying
from one city to another. He
stopped in Newark, N. J., long
enough to graduate from the
South Side High School, where he
participated in baseball and ten-
nis.
Hoff calls Miami, Fla., his home
AUTO-INSURANCE
Army 20% off
BUSSEY
CASUAL Ins. Agency
Phone M-1718
H-29122
109 E. Lafayette St.

SUNBURN


INSECT BITES-MUSCULAR ACHES


Phone Y 1189

BRANT'S BAKERY

2707 E. BROADWAY


Welcome!
Service Men
BEER-
- WINES
Hostesses


M. MILLER'S BAR
1111 Florida Ave.


Elliston's Drug Store
Phone H-1645
202 W. Lafayette St., TAMPA
Fountain Service and Lunches
Tampa and Twiggs St.


Seminole Sandwich Shop
5021 Florida Avenue
CHICKEN AND STEAK
DINNERS
Fountain Service


CRENSHAW'S
(Wholesale)
Fruits-Vegetables
Phone 2623


SELDOMRIDGE
PHOTOGRAPHER
418 TAMPA ST.
Ground Floor
Hours Special
8 to 6 Appointments

SOLDIERS
ALWAYS WELCOME
EL BOULEVARD
RESTAURANT
Finest Spanish Foods Best
of Liquors 2001 Nebraska

LAFAYETTE HOTEL
E. A. CLAY, Manager
120 West Lafayette Street
East Side of Bridge
Phone M-5588


Page 3


I


SERVICE MEN!!

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1302 Franklin St., Comer of Fortune


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COLISEUM

Davis Islands
AFTERNOON
2:30 till 5
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531 CLEVELAND CLEARWATER
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Page 4 DREW FIELD ECHOES Friday, September 4, 1942


-Drew Interceptors


Win One; Lose Om

The Drew Interceptors /spli
two games over the week-end, los
ing 11-0 on ZSaturday to the Belle-
air army nine of Clearwater, anc
downing the Boromei Fishmen
12-0, Sunday in a West Coasi
league game that moved Drew into
second place and the playoff.
Big Carlos Moore limited tht
Fishmen to two hits, both coming
in the eighth' frame with one
away, while his mates were col-
lecting 21 hits off the offering of
three Boromei hurlers. Moore
faced only 29 men over the nine-
inning route, striking out nine
and walking one. The big right-
hander was in perfect form with
his fast sinker ball as he made
his opponents ground out easily.
Moore had five assists to his credit
in pitching superb ball all after-
noon.
Louis Bekeza, captain and
catcher of the team, led the hit-
ting attack against the Fishmen
with one double and three singles
in five chances.
Todd smacked a long home run
for the Interceptors in the second
inning with the bases empty.
Drew sent eight runs streaming
across the platter in the fourth
inning as 13 men marched to the
plate in the wild scoring spree
that sewed the ball game up.
Sunday's game was the 37th
win of the season for the Drew
nine, against 17 setbacks.
Belleair punched Drew for 13
hits and 11 runs on Saturday to
halt the current winning streak at
seven games. A badly patched up
lineup by the Interceptors fell to
pieces in'the early stages of the
game with the victors pushing
across eight runs in the first four
frames.
Three pitchers worked on the
mound for the Interceptors, but
all were ineffective against the
hard-hitting Belleair nine.
Drew will play the third place
winner in the West Coast league
for the right to meet Lakeland,
winner of all four rounds of play.
Lakeland was. declared winner of
the last round when the U.S.P.P.
nine quit the league over a protest
That was overruled by the league
president. U.S.P.P. was due to
play the Lakeland team in the
final game of the season, but their
withdrawal from the league gave
first place to the Food Machinery
team of- Lakeland.
*X

Electric Woman

When a woman is sulky and
will not speak-Exciter.
If she gets too axcited-con-
troller.
If she talks too long-Inter-
rupter.
If her ways of thinking are not
yours-Converter.
If she will come halfway-
Meter.
If she becomes quarrelsome-
Dispatcher.
If she wants to become an an-
gel-Transformer.
If she wants chocolates -
Feeder. I;
If she sings wrong-Tuner.
If ihe is in the country-Tele-
grapher.
If she is a poor cook Dis-
charger.
If her dress unhooks Con-
nector.
If she eats too much-Reducer.
If she is wrong-Rectifier.
If she is cold to you-Heater.
If she gossips too much-Regu-
lator.
If she fumes and sputters-In-
sulator.
If she becomes upset-Reserver.


By CPL. JOHN F. SUSZYNSKI
IT'S HERE, at last-no, not
the load of band instruments we
have been expecting (with the
QUARTERMASTER'S c o m p 1 i-
ments) for so long, but the
day of reckoning. It's altogether
possible that, during Jess Zim-
merman's furlough, this copy will
have to be submitted to Pvt. Bob
Kane for editing. You will re-
member Bob as the lad with the
"whimsical laugh," the prophetic
mind, and a disposition for threat-
ening would-be columnists. He
vowed that when 'his day came,
he would slash this column to
pieces. .. THE DAY IS HERE.
Ah, me! I had so many things to-
tell you this week:
1. That the Sarge is now
STAFF Sergeant Eaton. (I won-
der if we have to salute him?)
2. That Privates Gordon Booth,
Henry J. Costello, Jr., and Wood-
row E. Harwick were all willing
subjects in a "striping" ritual this
week-they have joined our fast-
growing Order of Pfcs.
3. I might have told you how
Cpl. Ferris and the band's other
corporal (see by-line) chose up
sides and played a "close" game
of softball last Sunday. There
being no lightning calculator
available, victory was "graciously"
'conceded 'to the F E R R I S
"WHEELERS" by the score of
1 to 0.
4. I wanted, so much, to tell
you that Miss Page, of the Quar-
termaster's Office, admitted that
the matter of PRIORITIES was
simply an invention of the govern-
ment for the.CONVENIENCE, and
not the HINDRANCE, of military
personnel especially "budding"
organizations such as ours. She
has guaranteed delivery of our in-
struments within a week ....
WE SHALL SEE.
5. And you would have enjoyed
a detailed description of the con-
sternation that accompanied Pvt.
Mike Vitale's FIVE-STAR NIGHT-
MARE. This "production" ended
with Mike, in a -tailspin, on the
floor beside his bunk.
6. And how will you ever find
out that Pfc. Joe Regis' birthday
gift from the mob last Monday
was a shower bath and that
Joe was fully clothed at the time?
7. We might have tried to
psycho-analyze Pfc. Luukkonen
just to find out why he is groom-
ing and slicking his hair down
lately--a comb and hair brush
were always such repulsive items
to "Luke."
8. There is the possibility that
a personally autographed snapshot
of Pvt. Sam Schiavone (with some
of the other Warner Bros. stars


Drew Field Theater


Sept. 5, Sat.-PIERRE OF THE
PLAINS-John Carroll, Ruth
Hussey and Bruce Cabot; A
Pacific Frontier, Hatteras
Honkers, The Wild and
Woosy West.
Sept. 6-7, Sun.-Mon. PARDON
MY SARONG Bud Abbott,
Lou Costello and Virginia
Bruce; The Lady or The Ti-
ger, News of the Day.


Sept. 8, Tues.-ARE HUSBAND
NECESSARY -Ray Milland,
and Betty Field; Loco Boy
Makes Good, Dog Troubles.
Sept. 9-10, Wed.-Thurs.-PRIDE
OF THE YANKEES Gary
Cooper, Teresa Wright and
Walter Brennan.
Sept. 11, Fri. HERE COMES
MR. JORDON-Robert Mont-
gomery and Claude Rains
(revival program); Colorful
North Carolina, The Duck-
tator.
------>(-------
-K
Small Cockpits

The cockpits of Army Air Forces
fighter planes of the "P" group,
which includes the Airacobra,
Kittyhawk, Mustang, Thunderbolt
and others, are built to accom-
modate pilots not more than 5
feet 9 inches tall and not over
170 pounds in weight, the War
Department points out, It is pre-
ferred that they be shorter and
lighter than the maximum.
The cockpit, which is just large
enough for a man of the size indi-
cated to move about, utilizes every
bit of space. It contains the neces-
sary flight instruments, controls,
both for the armament and flight;
has armored walls, and its pro-
tected bucket seat is so designed
that it will hold the pilot, equipped
with his 'chute, comfortably, if
a bit snugly.
Holding down the size of the
cockpit makes for streamlining
which, in turn, makes for greater
speed and maneuverability.

of THE AIR FORCE movie cast)
will be offered as a door prize at
the Band's debut.
.9. And how about the inside
story of Cpl. Zebbie Whitehead's
debut as a singer last Monday
... .from Broadway to Hollywood
-' to' the boxing arena at Drew
Field.
10. And, wouldn't it be a good
idea if the fellows could "let off
steam" (free and open discussion,
criticisms, suggestions, etc., on
any subject) at some quasi-offi-
cial sessions? Warrant Officer
Baker thought so, and he has list-
ed weekly FORUMS, as an experi-
ment, on our current training
schedule.
Too bad I can't tell you readers
about any of these things-lest I
give Bob Kane the satisfaction of
deleting the copy. So no col-
umn this week; we'll try again
next week. So long.


2nd REPORTING COMPANY
564th

"BLITZ"

By S/SGT. TOM CARUSO
The 2nd Reporting Company
has been graced with the addition
of several officers that have been
assigned to this company. The ad-
ditions are: Lts. Erpelding, Graf-
fius, Friedlander, Smelt, Walker
and Wood.
Lt. Mitchell, wto had been act-
ing C. O. until the return of Lt.
Crumplar, has once again resumed
command as acting C.O. Lt. Mitch-
ell did a fine job in his previous
tenure of command and with that
added experience this company
should keep on doing its best as
usual. Do you fellows know that
Lt. Erpelding is a former football
player starring with Detroit Uni-
versity in the past seasons. I am
wondering how many of you fel-
lows witnessed that horseshoe
match that the officers of this
battalion had on our company
street. The air was filled with
horseshoes that at the moment I
thought were P-39s raining in the
air. Wonder who won (none in-
jured in action).
This company regrets the loss
of Pvt. John G. Coulon, one of the
most likeable young fellows lof
this company and the best me-
chanic of the battalion. Sorry to
see you go, Jerry. Wherever you
may go, remember that the fel-
lows are all wishing a grand fella
loads of luck. Hope that your
transfer gains you a promotion,
which you rightfully deserve.
Hot tip to Sgt. Joe Davis: Do
you know who .has Tippy now?
(Tippy, who is our favorite female
pooch and who is no bigger than
a grapefruit, has been lost for the
past two weeks.) The keepers of
this certain organization refuse to
give up the little fireball, claim-
ing that they are now the right-
ful owners of Tippy, because they
have provided a home for her.
What are you going to do? Pag-
ing our lawyer, Cpl. Hall. (Hey,
Joe, why not bring Cpl Hammes
down with you for intercession?
He claims he can handle men just
as well as he can cattle when the
occasion warrants it, especially
Tippy, his little chum.) Sgt. Pom-
peo, Drew Field's most famous
pianist, who once played for King
George, and other famous celebri-
ties of Europe, is still hoping for
that three-day pass. It seems that
there is a certain cute damsel
from Lakeland whom he would
like to visit in Jacksonville. Can't
blame him at that, hear shIe is his
present one and only. Congratu-
lations to Cpl. and Mrs. Smith
upon their marriage in Tampa the
past week. Nope, she is not a
Tampa gal, just his one and only
childhood sweetheart from Texas,
the Lone Star State. Lots of luck,
Smitty. Hear that Cpl. McGee in-
tends getting married while on a
15-day furlough. Lots of luck to
you, Bob. Ditto for 1st Sgt.
Charles Maddox and T/Sgt. Sam
Hines, who intend getting mar-
ried this week-end and plan to


honeymoon at Daytona Beach....


Well, fellows, you got your 15
days (of freedom), make the best
of them, give my regards to the
fairer sex. It seems that the mar-
riage bug must have stung the fel-
lows. Marriage must be a great in-
stitution. Looks like I'll try it
some day. Who'll have me?
I have but one life to give to a
worthy cause this is one of
them.
Cpl. McGee mourns the loss of
his pet, "Garfield." Garfield (no
relation to John Garfield, the
actor who is starring in the pic-
ture "Air Force") is a gar fish
that Cpl. McGee caught in the
waterway that runs near our com-
pany supply hutment. Caught the
"Little General (Cpl. Weir) writ-
ing to a cute number that resides
in Connecticut. I never dreamed
that the little "General" had that
much of a drag with women.
Where can a fellow meet a gal
like that, "General," huh?
Sgt. Hanlin can' most always be
seen at the Post ice cream stand
when off duty. Don't tell me that
you sit there all day and eat ice
cream, Sarge. Hear her name is
Frances, and she has the cutest
smile seen hereabouts. For further
information see Sgt. Hanlin.
Pvt. Martea, now promoted to
the grade of corporal. Lots of luck,
Marty. Let your conscience be
your guide. Pvt. Parella, happy as
a school child, since he has start-
ed school. Never can tell what an
education can do for a fellow. Or,
can it be that promotion which he
has promised him upon comple-
tion of school. Sgt. Celli, the man
who sees to it that we get paid
on Eagle day, is really a charac-
ter. From what he told some of
the boys, he had Cpl. Hammes
beat at this day and' age. Get him
to tell you how great a lover he
was at the age of four. (Story
should prove quite interesting, so
help me, brother.)
This week we are going to have
a company athletic program which
will be a competitive one. You fel-
lows can start to simmer down
and forget the hops. Watch your
waistline, Couvillion!
It's about time that the 501st
Regt'l baseball gave up trying to
beat the 564tli Bn. baseball team.
The 501st went down to their
fourth consecutive defeat in as
many games. Funny, but the same
pitcher, who will remain anony-
mous, beat them in all four games.
It was the 12th win of the season
for the 564th, who now have a
record of 12 wins, four losses and
one tie to their credit. Not a bad
record to date at that. Speaking of
baseball, it is rumored that the
officers of this Battalion can get
up a team to give our Bn. team a
good tussle. Well, whoever started
this rumor cah easily get this
game by getting in touch with this
correspondent. Want to take on
the boys?
Before I close out this column,
a word to the writers of Femmes.
Since you want to cooperate with
the fellows in Drew, how about
getting a petition up trying to get
the Post to hold a dance on the
Post once a week. We can use one
of the larger P.X.s for dancing
which I- believe would have ample
room to hold approximately 200.


Page 4


Friday, September 4, 1942


DREW FIELD ECHOES








Friday, September 4, 1942










ALL



**


DREW FIELD ECHOES


We Are 100 Percent Behind the Boys In Our Armed Forces


S Dr. J. J Guerra


Dr. Julio J. Guerra, lfhysician and
surgeon specializing in genito-uri-
nar y disorders,
with offices in
the First National
Bank building,
was born in Ha-
vana Cuba, o n
April 3, 1900, but
he has lived in
Tampa 41 years.
Too young to en-
list in World War
I, Dr. Guerra was
still 1 1 attending
school when Tam-
pans were cele-
bratinng the Ar-
mistice. A mem-
ber of the Knights of Columbus, Dr.
Guerra married the former Miss
'Helen Mesa. They are making their
home at 2417 Watrous. Avenue.
"Every young man in the armed
services will be so well trained that
they needn't worry about their fu-
ture when it's all over," said Dr.
Guerra. "We, back here in the
home front, will take care of that.
Every one will have a much better
job-and it looks like it won't be
long now. We've started where we
left off during World War I. Our
Rangers, with the help of the Brit-
ish Commandos, will rain bombs
over Tokyo and Berlin. We have
started with the Solomons; now it's
the coast of France, and we can't
forget that Jimmy Doolittle, accord-
ing to the latest uncensored infor-
mation, is still in London. I don't
like to be unduly optimistic, but I
don't believe in the theory that we.
may lose this war. We can't .. ..
for, if we did, so help us God," con-
tinued Dr. Guerra..


Pebley Barrow


Born Feb. 21, 1893, in Milton,
Fla., Pebley Barrow, owner of P.
Barrow Company Shin Chandlers,
has been in Tampa for the past 17
boys of Capt. and Mrs. W. G. Bar-
row, of Pensacola, enlisted in the
other War, along with five other
brothers, in May, 1918, at Fort Sam
Houston, Texas, serving with a spe-
Scial detail of General Headquarters.
He was a Sergeant when he re-
ceived his discharge in March, 1919.
Before enlisting, Mr. Barrow was
connected with the meat packing
concern of Armour & Co., holding
the position of office and credit
manager. He married the former
Thelma M. Mench, of Columbus,
Ga., and they have two children, a
boy and a girl, Pebley, jr., and Bar-
bara Ellen. The Barrows reside at
2618 Watrous Avenue. "We have a
big job on our hands," he tells the
enlisted men of Drew and MacDill
Fields, "but we're a big nation,
with big boys to do the job. When
it's all over the winner's hand will
be raised high, and in its hand will
be the Stars and Stripes flying
high. Give all you've got, boys, and
once more bring home the bacon!"


I Frank A. May

Owner and manager of the May
Well Drilling Company, Frank A.
May, who w a s
born in Tamp& on
Feb. 6, 1904, was
still attending
school at the out-
break of the last
war, but never-
theless, he has a
fine message for
enlisted men of
Drew and Mac-
Dill Fields: "Re-
member, boy, no
one is too big for
the Army. Every
man in it is a
working part of
it, no matter if you're an officer or
a buck private. The uniform you're
wearing today stands for the high
and noble principles upon which
this nation was founded and since
existed-freedom among men and
nations; the right to live and the
will to let live. It stands for hu-
manity and civilization. Wear it
proudly." Married to the former
Miss Bertha Porter, the Mays have
four children, three boys and one
girl, Jack, Robert, Frank and Ber-
tha. They reside at 2717 32nd Street.


M. Austin Davis


M. Austin Davis, vice president
and general manager of Table Sup-
ply Stores, who has been in Tampa
since 1937, also has a message for
the young men of MacDill and
Drew Fields. He says: "The boys
who left their firms to join the
Army will be taken back. There's
no question about that. They will
hold their old positions, with a far
better chance for advancement be-
cause of the experience gained in
the Armd Forcs of Uncle Sam.
There's no question as to who is
going to win this war. No one seems
to know when, but America, once
more, will come out on top. Keep
up the good work."


T. L. Carlton I


"Organized labor was the first to
cry out against the Fascist terror,"
T. L. Carl ton,
business agent of
t United Brother-
hood of Carpen
ters and Joiners
of America, tells
the men of Mac-
SDill aDne d Drew
Fields. "A lot of
our boys are up
there 'somewhere'
4' fighting on every
firing line to pre-
*' serve a free
". & America, a free
world and our
free labor unions.
Right here at home, we're fighting,
too-producing the ships and the
munitions of war day and night,
taking our place in the Civilian De-
fense program. We're so busy, in
our aim to rush the supplies of war
in time, that hardly a city in Ameri-
ca will celebrate Labor Day. We're
doing this because we do not care
to witness what happened in Ger-
many when the Nazis walked in
and shot the union leaders and they
put thousands of working men and
women in concentration camps and
tortured them to death for no other
crime than holding a union card."
Mr. Carlton, who was born January
11, 1911, in DeSoto County, Fla., was
a member of the National Guard,
Battery F, 116th Field Artillery in
1934. In Tampa since 1938, Mr. Carl-
ton married the former Willie Mae
Phillips. They reside at 212 W.
Amelia.


Walter F. Harris


Walter F. Harris, president and
general manager of Anchor Appli-
ances, Inc., dealers in electrical ap-
plances and air conditioning equip-
ment at 1707 Grand Central Avenue.
was born Sept. 28, 1908, in Louis-
ville, Ky. He has been in Tampa
since 1936. He has two brothers
now serving with Uncle Sam's
armed forces. B. C. Harris is a
Sergeant attached to the Quarter-
master post at Camp Forrest, Tenn.,
and B. M. Harris is serving "some-
where" with the Army. His firm
has installed equipment at Drew
and MacDill Fields. In a message
to the boys, Mr. Harris says: "The
greatest morale bolster for the boys
in camps throughout the country
today is to pay strict attention to
orders take your-'medicine' and
show your superior officers that
you like it. You'll never regret
Army life once the war is over and
you return to civilian life. Always
bear in mind one thing-we CAN'T
LOSE. Our victories in the Solo-
mons is the turning point in this
war-a point 'that will make this
world a better place in which to
live."


A. R. Phillips


Four years of rough and tough
Army life taught A. R. Phillips, vice
president of I. W. Phillips and Co.,
dealers in building supplies, that
"the experience gained by many
pays in the long run." Born Dec. 5,
1892, in Boonerville, Miss., Mr. Phil-
lips came to Tampa, enlisting in the
armed forces June, 1915. He served
on the Mexican border and was lat-
er discharged, but re-enlisted and
was sent to the First Officers'
Training Camp at Fort McPherson,
Ga. From buck private he rose to
the rank of Second Lieutenant. Was
overseas, serving with A. E. F.'s
371st Infantry, attached to the 157th
French Division of the Fourth
'French Colonel's Army, receiving
his discharge at Camp Gordon, Ga.,
in 1919. He's now chief observer
with the Third Interceptor's Com-
mand. Before he enlisted he was a
clerk in the company in which he
now holds an executive position.
Married to the former Miss Bertha
Wallays, they reside in Seffner.
"Your chances should be greater
for the future because of the extra
training and experience gained in
thearmed forces," he tells the boys
of Drew and MacDill Fields.


Best Wishes ..







Polar Ice



Cream Co.

939 Fifth Ave.


Larry A. Grayson


Larry A. Grayson, well known at-
torney, a Past Commander of the
American Legion Post No. 5 and for
four years Chairman of the Hills-
borough County Democratic Party,
saw service with the RAF and knows
what the British can do. Born Jan.
30, 1895 in Fairfax County, Va., Mr.
Grayson enlisted in May, 1917, at
Fort Myers, Va., serving with the
RAF in Lincoln, England, after
training in Texas and in Canada.
From an Air Cadet he was promoted
to Second Lieutenant. In the midst
of the fighting, he was injured and
was brought back to Washington,
receiving his discharge from the
Walter Reed Hospital May 26, 1920.
Before enlisting he was attending
the University of Virginia. Dis-
charged because of his disability
after serving three years, Mr. Gray-
son returned to University of Vir-
ginia, made up his mind that school
was no longer a playhouse, but a
place to study and work hard for
advancement. Married to the former
Miss Josephine Cole, the Graysons
reside in Temple Terrace.


Clarence G. Belle


Clarence G. Belle, proprietor of
the Chatterbox Restaurant, 707
South Howard Avenue, where they
dance every nite to the fine music
of Abba Dabba and His Boys, didn't
take a pot shot at the Kaiser dur-
ing the last war, but like many
others, he was in the front lines of
production-making parts for air-
planes and trucks at the Midland
Steel Co. plant in those fateful
days of '17 and '18. Born May 26,
1898, in Cleveland, Ohio, Mr. Belle
married the former Miss Alice
Boyce. They have two boys and
one girl, William, Robert and Jo
Ann, and their residence is at 705
S. Howard Avenue. In a message to
the boys of Drew and MacDill
Fields, Mr. Belle says: "You get
out of the Army just what you put
into it. You won't sell your experi-
ence for a million when it's all over.
Keep up the good work-hit Tokyo
and Berlin 'hard!"


Mario Azpetia


"Some seem to be more concerned
about what is to be done after the
war than they are
.. ... .... about winning'
the war," sa ys
M a r i o Azpetia,
'4,, business re pr e -
sentative, secre-
f.iS ', tary and treasurer
o f Cigarmakers'
International Un-
S b'^6 ion No. 500, who
'. was born Nov. 24,
1899, in Key West,
Fla., and who has
been a resident of
Tampa for the
p as t 15 yoars.
"Let us concen-
trate on winning the war first, and
then take care of the situation that
may confront us when peace has
been established. The Cigarmakers
of Tampa cannot be put in a 'de-
fense worker' classification-but
they are 'Soldiers of Production,'
too, because they're putting 10 per
cent of their pay envelopes into
War Bonds and Savings Stamps.
While we're winning the war, let us
keep our schools, churches, indus-
tries and businesses going: let us
keep the 'home fires burning' and
talk about pease problems when
peace has been won. If we do this,
we will win the war sooner." A
son, Mario Azpetia, jr., is now at
Camp Edwards, Mass. Another one
is scheduled to leave for the Service


S Mrs. Ive Addison


"I'm sure we women are trying to
do our part in this war," says Mrs.
Helen Erwin Ad-
dison, president
and owner of the
Florida Mattress i' :
Factory 1 7 0 1
Chestnut Street,
and widow of the
late Ive Addison,
who was well -
known for his "
civic and welfare
work in Tampa.
Mrs. Addison was '
making mattres-
ses for the Gov-
ernment during
World War I, and
is always ready to do her part at
any time. She also makes uphol-
stered living room furniture, and
since the Government has curtailed
the manufacture of mattresses with
inner-springs and furniture with
springs, Mrs. Addison feels she is
doing her "bit" along with the boys.
"After all, she says, "if it helps win
the war, that's what we want."
Several of the boys from her or-
ganization have entered the Service
and when on furlough they always
drop by to see her. She enjoys
hearing from them and always an-
swers their letters. "My advice to
the boys is for them to go and do
the best they can," she says. Mrs.
Addison has two daughters, Mrs. L.
N. Boyd, of Sacramento, Calif., and
Mrs. F: W. Ray, of Rome, Georgia.
In Tampa for the past 30 years, she
resides at 3301 Memorial Highway.
Arkansas is her home State, Russell-
ville being the city of her birth, and
she never misses a chance to return
and visit among her old friends.


Alfred E. Goding


Too young, too to join the Army
in the last War, Alfred E. Goding,
president and general manager of
the Dixie Rag Co., 2901 12th Street,
has an inspiring message for the
men in uniform. "History will re-
cord the summer of 1942 as the
turning point in civilization. We
do not know how long this war is
going to last, but we do know that
in the 30-odd months that the
Nazis have been parading their
gangsterism throughout Europe,
they have managed to prove there
is nothing in their new order for
non-Germans except the awful
business of hunger, bankruptcy, in-
justice, cruelty, serfdom, silence
and death. I want to tell the boys
in the armed forces today that we
will take care of their interests on
the home front while they are away
doing their big chore." Born in
Tampa, August 28, 1910, Mr. Goding
married the former Miss Ruth Fay
Patke. They have one girl, Janet
Fay, and they reside at 1204 19th
Avenue.


R. T. (Bob) Joughin


"Bob" Joughin, president and gen-
eral manager of R. T. Joughin
& Co., plumbing and heating engi-
neers at 1502 Franklin Street, is a
former Hillsborough County sheriff
and well known in Tampa civic af-
fairs. Born in Terrell, Texas, March
4, 1890, Mr. Jouhgin has been in
Tampa for the past 46 years. He
.served with the Florida National
Guard from 1901 to 1904, and during
the last War served as a member
of the District Draft Board. He
married the former Miss Lulu Mar-
garet Jackson, now deceased, and
had one child, Lula Margaret. A
member of the Masonic Order,
Shriners and Tampa Chamber of
Commerce, Mi. Joughin resides at
321 W. Amelia Avenue. "Your
chances for advancement will be
much better because of the experi-
ences gained in the armed forces,"
he tells the personnel of Drew and
MacDill Fields. "Do what's right
today and you will find your. way
to the top when it's over!"

soon. Married to the former Miss
Eleodora Toledo, they have two
other children. The Azpetias reside
at 1634 Andrade Court.



Keep 'Em Flying




HART


MACHINERY

CO.

2613 4th Ave.


This is one of a series of Feature Pages designed to bolster the morale of the boys
in the Service, by citing the careers of prominent Tampans, whose very success is an
inspiration to younger men and whose words of .courage are convincing proof that
all Americans in all walks of life are 100 peir cent behind the men behind the guns.


S Glen Wellacott

He was born Sept. 13, 1893, in
Key West, Fla., but- Glen Wellacott,
owner of Glen's
Billiards, 805 Tam- ;--
pa Street, h as
been i n Tampa
since 1916. He en- ..
listed in World
War I, April 26,
1918, serving with
Company A, 81st
Division. He saw
action in the bat-
ties of the Vosges
and Meuse Ar-
gonne. He re-
ceived his dis-- '
charge at Camp
Jackson, S o u t h
Carolina, June 27, 1919. Before en-
listing Mr. Wellacott was employed
as a cigarmaker in Key West and.
Tampa factories. Married to the
former Fern Walker, the Wellacotts
have two girls. Glenna and Mar-
garet, and a step-son, Carl Scott,
who is now serving with Uncl"
Sam's Army in Camp Cook, Califol
nia. A brother of Mrs. Wellacott,
Tom Walker, was an ROTC student
but was commissioned a second lieu-
tenant after Pearl Harbor, was lat-
er advanced to Captain and today is
Major Walker, stationed at Ran-
dolph Field, Texas. The Wellacotts
reside at 5114 Wilson Avenue.
"There's no better school than that
of Uncle Sam's Army," he tells the
enlisted men of MacDill and Drew
Fields in his message. "What you
learn there you'll never forget; the
friends you make there are life-
long friends, and with this training
you can't help but make good after
it's all over. The job you're doing
today a civilized world will long
remember. Keep 'em flying!"


Page 5


Dr. A. A. Gonzalez


Born Oct. 17, 1900 in Cierifuegos,
Cuba, Dr. Aurelio Andres Gonzauz,
director and chief
surgeon of "Bien ..
Publ ico Clinic,
Inc.." and Nica-
raguan consul in
Tampa, was at-
tending me dical
college in South
Carolina at the
outbreak of that / '*' I
war that was sup
posed to end all
wars and make
this world safe
for Democracy. In
Tampa for the -..
past 14 years, Dr.
Gonzalez married the former Miss
Lucy Fernandez. The Gonzalez' have
two girls, Lucr and Aurelia. They
reside at 2719 Riverside Drive. In
a message to the personnel of Mac-
Dill and Drew Fields, Dr. Gonzalez
says: "Don't forget President Roose-
velt's words that 'Every man, wom-
an and child is a partner in the
most tremendous undertaking of
our American history.' The Allies,
that is, the United States, China,,
Russia, Canada, Cuba, Nicaragua,
and other South American republics,
are going to win this war, if we"
stand together and we fight to-
gether. We cannot afford to lose.
It is up to all of us to win. If this
war is lost, it will not be the fault
of the brave young men who are
doing,, and will continue to do our
fighting, on land, on the seas and
in the air. They are anxious and
ready to go whenever and wherever
they may be sent to fight the ene-
my."


H. L. Sander


He celebrated his 16th birthday
"somewhere" in France during
World War I, but H. L. Sander,
business agent of Shipyard Workers
and Common Laborers Local 1207
(AFL), from buck private rose to
Master Sergeant. Born July 14, 1901.
in Cairo, Ill., Mr. Sander was a bank,
runner in Sikeston, Mo., when he!
enlisted in June, 1918. He served\
with the Postal Express Service',
France, 1919; in the Army of Occu-'
pation, 8th Infantry: was later at-
tached on special duty at the YMCA,
where he was making. Army motion
pictures. Married to the former
Miss Mary Thomason, the Sanders
live at 407 E. Floribraska Avenue.
In a message to the personnel of
Drew and MacDill Fields, Mr. San-
der says: "You're doing your part--
but 'Free Labor Will Win.' Men in
overalls as well as men in khaki
now fight. Hitler, Hirohito and
Mussolini should sit up and take no-
tice of this. We cannot forget that
the 'Minute Men' of Concord and
Lexington, who gave us liberty,
were workers, too. Just as today,
they fought with guns and tools
alike. There are over 50 million
paid workers in the United States.
Of these, 30 million are potential
purchasers of War Bonds through
the Payroll Savings Plan. We will
continue to build the ships, the
tanks' the guns and the ammuni-
tion. I know you boys can supply
the goods! Let's keep America free!


.


J, ev-







Page6 DRW FELD CHOS Frday Sepembr 4,194


9th FIGHTERS


By CPL. MIKE DODD
A few nights ago, the then Cpl.
Joe Senick and the erstwhile Sgt.
Roscoe Stovall, silently made
their way out to the airplane run-
ways. The moon emitted shafts of
fantastic beams down upon the
two soldiers as they peered sky-
ward hopefully. "She ought to be
coming in anytime," said Joe to
Roscoe in hushed and reverent
tones. "Quiet," chided Roscoe in
a trembling whisper. "She's land-
ing out there at the end of the
runway now. Prepare to give her
a warm welcome and for stripes'
sake, don't pull any boners or do
anything to make her mad."
Presently, down the runway
came rolling gracefully a wee air-
plane which looked more like a
butterfly than a plane. Its wheels
were trimmed with roses. The
propeller was made of laced vines.
The body of the ship was adorned
with flowers of every description.
It was like something out of fairy-
land. When this strange plane
finally came to a noiseless stop,
Senick and Stovall hurried to the
door, stood at attention like two
tombstones. The door opened. A
strangely beautiful lady emerged.
Attired in white, she had the ap-
pearance of an angel. The two
soldiers were awed. They tried to
move, but couldn't budge an inch.
They made an effort to speak, but
their lips remained sealed. The
lady walked up to them, smiled,
and spoke softly: "Don't be
afraid, boys. It is I, Lady Luck.
You were expecting me weren't
ybu? I have come to smile upon
you and your friends. Will you
direct me to your orderly room,
please?"
SJoe and Roscoe began to melt
out of their frozen spell of en-
cbantment. Faint smiles spread
thinly over theri pale faces. She
did come, .after all! How fortu-
nate! How wonderful! The gods
had been good to them; exceed-
ingly good. Trembling with fasci-
nation, the two soldiers escorted
'the .lovely lady to their orderly
room. Inside, seated in a semicir-
cle, were John Mann, William
Hudgins, William Clack, and
Mike O'Hara. Lady Luck surveyed
them kindly. Her radiant beauty
glowed as she stood in the midst
of the soldiers like a flower
dropped down from heaven. As
was her usual procedure in such
,cases, she prepared to radiate her
smile of luck, granting the boys'
wishes. But, as her emerald eyes
traveled from one face to an-
other, a distorted expression of
humor broke out on her face. Her
graceful form began to quiver and
jerk. Her entire personality was
changing from that of a fairy
queen to a hep cat, or something.
At last, Lady Luck could restrain
herself no longer. Hysterical
spurts of laughter jumped from
her mouth. (Come, come, Lady
Luck; you're losing your digni-
ty!) The soldiers' mouths stood
open like bear -traps. Inquisitive
Drew'mosquitoes investigated and,
disgusted, made a hasty exit out
the nearest door. Meanwhile, Lady
Luck was beside herself with fits
of mad laughter. She was almost
ready to pass out. Finally, she
regained control of herself enough
to blurt out incoherently: "Boys,
I can take no more. I've got to
get out of here before I go com-
pletely and totally nuts. Your
wishes are granted. Each one of
will be promoted to the rank you
wanted. And no w, goodbye.
And- But she could continue
no further. She felt herself being
seized by another terrific spasm,
which seemed to be inspired by
the soldiers' mugs. Out she darted,
tripping like the wind, across the
field to her plane. She climbed in
quickly, raced the motor and was
off in a cloud of dust.
Back at the orderly room, the
soldiers had not yet quite compre-
hended what had happened. They
.hadn't regained their presence of
mind. They only hoped that Lady
Luck wasn't kidding. She wasn't.
Next day the following promo-
tions were announced:
Pfc. John Mann was boosted to
corporal. Sgt. William Hudgins
was made staff. S/Sgt. William
Clack is now Tech. Cpl. Mike
O'Hara n o w sports sergeant
stripes. Cpl. Joe Senick was upped
to sergeant. Sgt. Roscoe Stovall
ripped off his sergeant stripes
and replaced them with staff
chevrons.
Congratulations, fellows!


I BOB'S OPEN EVENINGS




| Army Store

A Complete Line Military Supplies For The Needs Of
SERVICE MEN
| EXPERT TAILORING
Ti 207 E. Lafayette Street Tampa
T.. .. .. .. .. ... .. ... ..


'ALWAYS WARM 'ER UP BEFORE TAKING OFF"


Steak, Sea Food and Chicken Dinners
Delicious Sandwiches


SThe Inquiring Line...


Q. What's the best protection
from a tank attack?
A. Your best bet is a well-built
foxhole or slit trench in firm
ground. Tanks will go right over
you without harm. In soft or
sandy soil, it isn't safe to rely on
this as the sides of your trench
are likely to crumble and leave
you vulnerable. You can also get
behind a stout tree. Anything
above a 16-inch diameter is good
protection against most tanks. If
there aren't any trees, keep your
head-stay in one spot and move
only when necessary. The tank
crew is in a noisy, bouncing cell.
They probably can't see you,
couldn't take accurate aim at you
if they did. If you get panicky
and start to run you're as likely
to run into the tank as it is to
iun into you.
Q. My supply sergeant doesn't
have the marksman medal I'm
entitled to wear and doesn't know
when he'll get. any. Is it okay to
buy medals from dealers?
A. Authorized dealers may sell
regulation Army insignia and
buttons. You're supposed to show
them official identification estab-

BUY OR RENT
In Lynwood Subdivision

Richard E. Philpot Co., Inc.
Phones M-8268 W-4141


FOR RENTALS
Of Apts. and Homes
See
WARREN HENDERSON CO.
(Incorporated)
112 E. Lafayette M-8311


SOLDIERS WELCOME TO
THE SHANTY
Every Sunday "Special"
Yellow Rice Chicken Dinner
Cuban Sandwiches- Soft Drinks
117 HYDE PARK AVE;

NEBRASKA
LIQUOR STORE
Cor. Nebraska and 17th Ave.
Complete Line of Whiskeys,
Wines, Liquors. Free Quick
Delivery at All Hours.
Call 7965


TO WNE' S
TAMPA STEAM LAUNDRY
& DRY CLEANING CO.
1105-25 Fifth Ave., Ph. 4663-4664


STAR LIGHT CLUB
Saturday Dancing, 35c, Inc. Tax
THURSDAY NIGHT FREE
Nebraska & Anthony


lishing your right to wear same,
but few dealers.. stand.. on cere-
mony. Just in case you're think-
ing of buying a bucketful of brass
to impress the girl-friend, re-
member-there's fine of $250 and
six months in the stockade for
wearing medals you haven't


earned.
Q. Why do some people call
soldiers doughboys?
A. It all started in the Navy
when a small cake called a
doughboy was issued to sailors,
A button of similar size and shape
was put out on Army uniforms
and the name followed the but-
ton. Then it came to mean the
soldier himself.

SERVICE MEN
LA NUEVA ERA
Fancy Groceries Fresh Meats
3018 Arinenia Ave.
Ph. H 46-174 Free Delivery


LOANS-MONEY TO LEND
Diamonds Watches Jewelry
Silverware
Diamonds at a Big Saving
A. L. ECKART
400 Tampa Street


Member
V. F. W.
Purple Heart


E. P. JOHNSON & SON
Watchmakers & Jewelers
OPEN UNTIL 8:30 P. M.

214 E. Lafayette -:- Tampa
Next To Manhattan Cafe





Air Base Bus

Lines, Inc.

30 Minute Service to Both
Fields At All Hours



V

15 Minute Service
During Rush Hours



V

For Further Information


Call 3286


"Ma" M

NIGHTLY ENTERTAINMENT


0illiams
9000 FLORIDA AVE.


FLORIDA SPORTING GOODS COMPANY
. The Friendly Store i
. Complete Line Of Fishing Tackle And
X Sporting Goods
X 711 Tampa Street Phone M-6770 :
o ; ;*+;><;;; M*++ >* > ;MU.>.>

UNION BAKERY
"REAL CUBAN BREAD OUR
SPECIALTY"
1506 9th Ave. Phone Y-4399


- 50c


SERVICE MEN ARE INVITED

ALMO CAFE
. We Serve the Finest of Spanish Foods and Special Spanish k
x Dishes T
S203 E. Cass Street Tampa, Florida 4
*.- -.. .... K .. -



Park Photo Studio
Open Evenings Till 9
438 W. Lafayette St. Phone 45-914



BAY VIEW HOTEL
FIREPROOF CONSTRUCTION -:- EVERY ROOM WITH BATH
W. B. SHULER, Manager
208 JACKSON ST. Between FRANKLIN & TAMPA
TAMPA, FLORIDA -:- PHONE M 5537


HOTEL HILLSBORO
FLORIDA AVENUE AT TWIGGS STREET
FRANK J. HYNES, Mgr.
GASPARILLA TAVERN -- COLONIAL GRILL
SERVICE MEN WELCOME


THE TERRACE GIFT & FLOWER
HOTEL TAMPA TERRACE
406 E. Lafayette St.
"Specializing In Wedding Flowers"
FLOWERS


SHOP



GIFTS


I
i
.3.
I
3
.3
.3


.3.^


Davis Plate Lunch
We Serve the Best 30c Lunch in Tampa
Only the Finest Quallity of Foods Used
\ A LA CARTE SERVICE
306 FRANKLIN STREET PHONE M64-913

SERVICE MEN OFFICERS FAMILIES
FOR REALLY GOOD FOOD AT MODERATE PRICES
PLEASANT ATMOSPHERE-FOLLOW THE CROWD TO


The Colonnade
BAYSHORE and JULIA


SOLDIERS
THE EAGLE PATIO
Has been designed to make your leisure hours
As Pleasant As Possible
Ice Cream, Soft Drinks, Beer, Wine, Fun And Music
J% 1709 North Howard Avenue



FLAMINGO CONCRETE PIPE CO.
3613 EAST LAKE AVENUE
P. O. BOX 5288 -:- PHONE Y 1289
TAMPA, FLORIDA


SOLDIERS AND SAILORS ARE WELCOME AT


ELITE CIGAR STORES
"The Sport Headquarters
of Tampa
WINE BEER CIGARS
400 Zack Phone M 62-072
207 Twiggs Phone M-1236


'~?~rrwrtt~*?urrUrHt~?rrrHrutur~r


b.*.%


*G VVVVV ** *


-VV ^


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Friday, September 4, 1942


,. Page 6


I


.-~~SZ~.
i







Fridy, eptmbe 4. 942DRE FILD EHOE 1-age'2'


Sub Depot Subs

We see our colored porters
around all day, but I do not think
any of us really know them-and
we should, as they are really be-
hind the office force 100% in
keeping everything so neat and


Plotting Co. 503rd Sig. AW Reg.
PLOTS


1st Rept'g Co. 553rd Sig.

ON THE BALL


By CPL. WALTER E. YOUNG, Jr.
By CPL. JOE GAUDIELLO


Plotting Company reporting.
Yes, reporting that in the past
month many improvements have
been accomplished, and we find


Ernest Welons, ourselves more contented in our
Ernest Wellons, who is the .,
Kingfish of the Porters worked little "tent city."
at the Tampa Y.M.C.A. for 10 In the past week more hew of-
years before coming to us. Tells ficers have been placed here to
me that out of his five heirs he aid us, and we wish them luck in
has two boys who are going into their endeavors at Drew Field or
the Army soon. The most exciting wherever e go
thing that ever happened to him Last Sunday we were favored
was saving a Baptist preacher t a tu y C Evans.
from drowning. Ernest says the appreciate the advice and
most enjoyable part of his life We appreciate the advice and
was the 12 summers he was cook hope we may profit by it and not.
at the amme h w think too lightly of the subject
Johnny ms was truck covered. "Health and good estate
driverJohnand seems to be the "Beau of body are above all gold and
driver and seems to be the "Beau
Brummel" of the porters Says a strong body above infinite
Brummel" of wealth."-Eccl. x1:15.
the most exciting thing that ever Pehaps at a te when one
happened to him-didn't happen. feels low and wonders what he is
One of his girl friends shot at ees o and o s ht he
him five times and, thank the doing at the present and thinks
admissed Thatlong scar on of the things he left behind, the
Lawd, missed. That long scar on allowing les may give him a
his face was made by another girl following lines may give him a
friend who tried to cut his throat reason and purpose. that
Says he's had an exciting life, but show menare." (ectetus).
thoroughly enjoyed it all. Now "Worse than war is fear of
he's ready to help Uncle Sam. war." (Seneca)
John L. Morgan has done noth- war." (Seneca)
n Morgan has done noth- "The nation's honor is dearer
ing but chauffeur every since he than the nation's comfort." (Wil-
has been old enough to work. The son)
most interesting thing he ever saw "The rollof honor consists of
was "Old Faithful" and his trip the names of men who have
to the Grand Canyon. Had three
to the Grand Canyon. Had three squared their conduct by ideals of
uncles killed in the Battle of duty." (W. Wilson)
atau rr duty." (W. Wilson)
Chateau Thierry. "What greedy ears 1 o ose
Henry Douglas used to be a tongues betray; but no one can
plumber's helper. He also studied tongues betray; but no one c
Civil Engineering. Holds a license repeat what you don't say.
as amateur Radio Operator. Noth- himself for not shaving been a
ing exciting has ever happened to soldier." (S. Johnson)
him. Hopes Uncle ,Sam will make "Let it be your pride to show
some provision of taking care ofall men everywhere not only what
his wife, so he can get into this good soldiers you are, but also
ilbur Parks is another fellow what good men you are." (W. Wil-
Wilbur Parks is another fellow son)
taken from the Y.M.C.A. He had torned authority says "Vi
save a swimming instructor from toryA learned autority says: Vic-
drowning. Went rabbit hunting tory will depend upon tlie .proper
drowning. Went rabbit huntingfunctioning of glands, especially
with his cousin once. The cousin tii f glands,nds especially
couldn't tell the difference be- S, men let ia s no s
tenn arabSo, men let us not shirk, but
ten Wilbur and a rabbit, so think of the many opportunities
shot Wilbur instead.
George Harris was driving one our country has given, us in the
day and just as he got on the past and those we shall have in
train track he heard a train com- the years to come. We are now
ing. Says he became so excited, he preparing to keep this country of
ours from the clutch of men who
turned the car towards the train, have no respect for women, chil-
and started down the tracks to dren or even themselves.
meet it. Fortunately he stopped in Let us not forget, we only have
time and all passengers 'had a room in our good old U. S. A. for
chance to escape. He is 2nd tenor but one flag.
in the Allen Temple Choir of "on'sa
"African M.E. Church. Don't spread patriotism too
African ME. Church thin." (T. Roosevelt)
Let our object be to go forward
The Sub-Depot girls wish to ex- pre
press their thanks for the swell pared to whip professionals.
time we had at the party spon- must all work together toward
scored by the Sig. Hq. & Hq. Co. must all work together toward
AWS, 3rd Fighter Command, Aug. victory-teamwork and not bock
90 3hrp d inl ghter Womma nlld, is what we need.
Zn ttn;i itiJtnt V ;IR ~ I.


0U at tL e -aLUI sto tange. VVte really
enjoyed it, boys.


564th 1st Rept. Co. Chats

By PVT. LLOYS E. CRAMER
Sgt. Vacchina, our new duty
sergeant, is kept very busy finding
men for the detail work. Just
the other day he was seen busy at
work in the orderly room before
reveille. Keep up the good work,
Sarge.
The cooks in kitchen No. 7 en-
joyed a wrestling match staged
between Pvt. Jack "Weak Man"
Emerman and Corporal Thomas
"Strong Man" Charkay the other
day. The reports that came to this
reporter of the results were that
Pvt. Emerman put Cpl. Charkay
down, held him .there and did it
with ease. How about that, Cor.
poral?
Pvt. Irving Goldstein, our hand-
some mail clerk, finally is going
to school. I wonder how the Army
expects to teach him.
1/Sgt. G. C. Quinn is now
spending a 15-day furlough at his
home in Austin, Tex. Also on fur-
lough are Staff .Sergeant Green-
berg, of Newark, N. J., and Sgt.
"Sunshine' Worlick, of Dallas,
Texas.
Our new mail clerk, Pvt. Mal-
colm Garrison, hails from Indiana
and we believe he will make a
good clerk.
Anyone interested in the game
of "horseshoe" should get in
touch with Sgt. Nespica. He is an
expert horseshoe tosser and knows
all the fine points of the game.
Sgt. Hansen is our acting 1/Sgt.
now. You have a tough job ahead
of you, .Sarge, 'but we know you
can do it. Not a better man can
be found. Good luck!


FRANK'S CORNER
Sandwiches -:- Cold Drinks
Near Drew Field
Armenia and Tampa Bay Blvd.


For Health

Necessary to Defense

PAPAYA MATE


"Soldiers Favorite Eating Place"
STEAKS AND CHOPS
A SPECIALTY
ELITE
RESTAURANT
TAMPA AND TWIGGS STS.

SERVICE MEN!!
* Meet Your Friends at....
1 VICTOR CAFE
1324 Franklin Ph. M-7240
Beer Wines Hostesses
Bill Bailey, Prop. Member VF.W.
4$ and American Legion


"KEEP'EM FLYING!"
9 -
WE KEEP 'EM EATING
MAC DILL DREW
THE WHITE HOUSE
RESTAURANT
Morgan and Twiggs


It's no use, men, you can't keep
our boys down. Again I take pleas-
ure in announcing some more
candidates for officer material.
Pvt. .Samuel C. Couch has left
for the Signal Corps O.C.S. and
not from any latrine, either. It
was heard that S/Sgt. Royal Fir-
man is preparing for Air Corps
Administration, while Pvt John F.
Mitiguy has received his call to
Medical Adm. Best wishes, men,
let's see those bars glitter on your
shoulders.
The battalion mess has a new
spark of life, in the form of T/4th
Herman (NMI) Ostroff, added to
its surroundings. The ole mess
sergeant seems quite happy. Her-
man decided two could live as
cheaply as one and from his do-
ings he really upheld the old
phrase. Lots of luck, Herman, I
guess this is good for an extra
cup of Java in the mornings.
Belated congratulations to Pvt.
Chamberlain, who also said "yes"
a short time ago. Pardon me, Bill,
I was a little late getting the
news.
Boy! say, aren't those new uni-
formed "skirts" a bit of aureet?
. The two G.I. inseparables,
Pvts Breese and Barredo, when-
ever you see one the other is
bound to show up from some-
where. .. T/4th Robert J. Pratt
and the Mrs. are apartment hunt-
ing. .. The former Atlantic City
sportsman and playboy, Pfc Mur-
ray Sanders is around again and
entertains nightly at the "Tampa
Tarrace" with his many friends.
. Who is the young gal who
sends' Pvt. John W. Hilbert those
unique greeting cards? Word
from Tarpon Springs says I'm still
on the -beam.

4 Can Ride for the Fare of 1

TAMPACABCO.

PHONE M8438


QUICK DELIVERY
ALL BRANDS LIQUORS
WINES CORDIALS
40th St. Liquor Store
JOE VASQUEZ
4014 7th Ave. Y 3815

LABOR DAY GREETINGS
FLORIDA AUTO &
GAS ENGINE CO.
Twiggs at Drew St

SFine Spanish Food
Delicious Cuban Sherbets
-) Cuban SandWiches
SPlenty Parking Space
Los Helados De Ybor
14th St. nnd Sth Avenue
Phone Y 3505

FOR PROMPT AND
COURTEOUS SERVICE

Latin-American Laundry
1505 E. Columbus Dr., Ph. Y 1673


Gordon Studio
PHOTO GRA P'HY H
Send "Mom" a Precious Gift
--Your Photo
Open Wed. & Sat. Till 9 P.M.
616 CITIZENS BLDG.

SERVICE MEN WELCOME


EAGLE BAR
HOSTESSES DANCING
Corner of Tampa & Fortune


U. S. Phosphoric Products


Division Tennessee Corporation



THAT HIKE DAY!
Will be Looked Forward to and Enjoyed
When Spent at


II Egypt Lake Beach

On Sligh Ave., West of Armenia. Spacious *T
7 Playground, Fine Sand Bottom Beach

Free to All Officers and Service Men
Soft Drinks Candies Ice Cream Popular Prices




Benefit U S 0 Tea Dance
From 4 to 8 P. M. Sunday
Music by Don Francisco's Orchestra
Admission: Ladies, 30c; Gentlemen, 55c
All Service Men Are Invited to Attend These Dances

CENTRO ESPANOL
7th Avenue and 16th Street ... Ybor City


SANHATTAN CAFE


210 E. Lafayette St. Tampa
x GOOD FOOD REASONABLE PRICES
DINNERS 30c, 40c, 60c
*Y eTry our Sunday Roast Turkey Dinner with all .
Trimmings or Fried Chicken Dinner. Three
Vegetables, Dessert and Drink
Served From 11 A. M. to 9 P. M 50 T .
t OPEN DAY AND NITE
WE USE STRICTLY WESTERN MEATS


. ATTENTION!! SERVICEMEN!
.. *"KEEP 'EM FLYING"
X Meet Your Buddies at-

I GEORGE'S BILLIARD PARLOR Sale
Baseball Returns Boxing Tickets for Sale
. 2222 E. Broadway Ybor City




A.A
RRAMA
PHONE
H-3712 2// GRA CENTRAL VE.


Madison Drug Company
Franklin and Madison Street
Where the Men of the Armed Service Shop and Eat
We Are Anxious to Be of Service


THE CHATTERBOX
Chicken and Steaks
Real Italian Spaghetti
SANDWICHES DRINKS LIQUORS
Abba Dabba & Band Nightly
707 S. Howard Ave. Phone H-3757



BENNETT'S DRUG STORE
1004 Franklin St.
COMPLETE LUNCHEONETTE
LIQUOR ANNEX IN CONNECTION
pH~fti tt

THE RED MILL
American And Latin Food
ORCHESTRA EVERY NIGHT


LIGHT LUNCH DINNERS
11 A. M. Till 4 P. M. Dally
1715 Platt St. at Pankwood


I 7


Labor Day


Greetings


c


---- -------E~n----------Nln~ZIW+IE~ChEC~CI~


Page Y


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Friday,, September 4,. i942


0







Friday, September 4, 1942


Page 8 DREW FIELD ECHOES


553rd Sig. Bn.


Hq. Co.


Head Cutters

The transfer list .caught up
another good supply of our mei
this week. The 672nd Signal AW
Co. grabbed off Sgt. Vivian O
Chambers, our No. 1 Sluniburne:
together with Privates First Class
Harold E. Epps and Woodrow M
Messick. To the 673rd we los
Privates Charles J. (Snuffy) Gil
bert and Elmer W. Mabe. For
those of you who have wondered
where Gilbert got his nickname
we suggest you catch a glimpse of
him dressed for rainy weather
/That tin skull doily and Missouri
meerschaum really do the trick
Also to the 673rd went Eddie
Klimczak, our ball player. Whal
happened, Eddie, did you strike
out in your last game? Pfc
Wayne L. Craven finally saw the
light of day and transferred from
the Medical Detachment into a
real outfit. We also welcome into
the company Lt. Hoke N. Norris
who joined us from Ft. Monmouth
recently.


HQ and HQ Squadron
By PFC. H. A. HORTON
"Hail the Conquering Heroes
Come." Yes, we did it. Our good
old softball ten took the champs
of Tampa and of the Third Air
Force for that well known sleigh
ride. When the chips were count-
ed we were on the winning end of
a 10-to-8 victory. The first in-
ning looked pretty bad. But from
then on we showed complete mas-
tery. Nice going, fellows-keep up
the good work because the eyes
of the entire field are on you.

Who is Becky??? That's the big
question around these parts to-
day, and why does a former BaTli-
more policeman change the sub-
ject when that question is asked?

Lots of luck to Cpl. Jarvie, who
is taking a course in Radio Me-
chanics. We're sure he will make
the grade in great style as does
also his Nellie.

Pfc. Wolf is back from the hos-
pital completely recovered from
his furlough to Philadelphia.
-X
Signal Hq. and Hq. Co., A. W.S.
3rd Fighter Command
By CPL. LARRY RALSTON
Returning Saturday night at 9,
the SignaJ Hq & Hq. Co., Third
Fighter Command, came back
from a 74-mile hike and a week's
bivouac in the woods. Radio, Plot-
ting and Telephone Sections in-
stalled equipment and several in-
spections took place, by Colonel
Stern, Colonel Tourtellot, and
Captain Parrish, C. 0. of Signal
Hq. The inspections were from
the ground and from the air. The
maneuvers were accompanied by
Lt. Maas, Lt. Nelson and Lt. Beck,
who went along for observation
purposes. Lt. Oglesby was in
charge of the company. Lt. Jo-
seph, medical officer, also accom-
panied the outfit.'
Leaving here at 8:00 Monday
morning with heavy jacks and
rifles, the company proceeded to
a point approximately 24 miles
distant, where they encamped for
the night. Arising before day-
break the next morning, the com-
pany started out again, blisters
and bites and everything included,
and arrived at the camp site, 12
miles further on, in the middle of
the afternoon. The remainder of
the day was spent in putting up
tents, preparing fox holes, setting
up radio, plotting and telephone
equipment.
Camp broke at noon Friday and
the gruelling hike back was be-
gun. The boys arrived 'back at the
point where they stayed the first
night. Saturday morning saw the
company out again hitting the
trail and they arrived at Lake
Carroll about noon, where a six-
hour layover was scheduled. That
water was the best ever and soap
was flying left and right.


Under the 8th Wing
By PFC. L. E. BLOCH
The big news from the 8th this
week is that lst Sergeant W. 'M.
Skinner is now "Daddy" Skinner.
The boy, Timmie Dale Skinner was
born in Harlingen, Texas, on Aug.
25 and tipped the scales at seven
pounds, 13 ounces, the proud
father announced. As if that


wasn't enough, the Sergeant had
another "rocker" added to his
sleeve. That oughta call for TWO
cigars! Mail Orderly Charles
Coco, without doubt the most pop-
I ular man in the outfit, says that
I it's men like Privates John Grant,
Merle Winburn and Walter Gutro
that make his job "heavy." Men in
the Army always think they write
* more letters than they receive. If
That be the case, that trio must
spend all their time writing .
SWe understand Private John ("G.
D.") Vega acquired a new rabbit's
foot shortly before payday Sgt.
SJessie Kagley who is in the hos-
pital with a touch of malaria is
recovering and should be back at
his desk in the A-3 section before
long Satterlee and Meuer of
our medics are the latest "Model
T Corporals." Congratulations!
S. The 8th Wing has challenged
the "Fighting 9th" to a skeet
shoot to be held in the very near
future. Watch for the date! .
Last Wednesday, the officers of
the 8th put in their first day on
the range. Lieutenant Carey was
top man with the pistol and turned
in a score of 130 out of a possi
ble 150. Major Bachelder and
Captain Gough tied for second
place with 124. The real shooting
of the day was done by Captain
Mullins with the "Tommy" gun.
His score was a. mere 193 out o
200. Not bad shooting! Some
fellows get all the breaks. Cor-
poral Theodore Love was seen on
Liggett's corner Monday nite with'
THREE (count 'em) beautiful
dolls. How does he do it? Cor-
poral Robert ("Cannon Ball")
Bhe is a bowling dude. A strike
and the set-up boy all in the same
roll! Wonder why Private
Korah Baker has been going
around grinning like a mule eat-
ing briars lately?

Hd. and Hq. Squadron
3rd Fighter Command

Sea Breezes
By PVT ALVIN M. AMSTER
This column wishes to thank
those who expressed themselves as
being pleased with our initial at-
tempt last week. Our future issues
shall be along the same lines, and
we shall at all times give "un-
biased coverage without orna-
mentation." acts, that's all we
want.
Don't forget, anybody with
some gossip (juicy or otherwise),
please give us the tipoff.
Easy serial number: 0-727374,
which belongs tp Lt. John Pat-
ton, Jr., of the 9th Fighter
Squadron.
D i d you know that Cpl.
"Frenchy" Roberts and Elden J.
Guidry are sitatistictians? Each
day they get out the cubed blocks
and see which one can throw the


Epperson & Co.

Machinery and Supplies

"OUR 11th YEAR"

130-132 S. Franklin Street

Phone 2688 Tampa, Fla.




Rex Billiard Parlor

1012 FRANKLIN
Dan'l S. Bagley


-BUY-

STAMPS & BONDS
Courtesy
TAMPA DENTAL
LABORATORY
442 W. Lafayette Street

BEAR SYSTEM SERVICE

Central Mechanical
SHOP
B. T. MORRIS
Tires Balanced Tire Wear
Corrected. 1010 Central Avenue


SEABREEZE
Italian Spaghetti
SEA FOOD DINNERS
On 22nd St. Causeway
jrrfrfffNfHccm S "000Sr 00SS&s


greatest number of the right com-
binations. And by the way,
Frenchy, your shoes still squeak.
How's about oiling them?
Headquarters, Third Fighter
Command Lothario, pipe and all
is T/Sgt. Bertee E. Brown (on
furlough right now). Right, gals?
T/5th Grade Alvin Glassen's in-
terest is Pass-A-Grille Beach. Or
should be say it's a certain indi-
vidual there; Al? Anyway, the
water is warm there, they say.
In the upper bay of Barracks
B-1 whe'e the writer resides,
there must be at least 10 radios.
No duplication of models, either.
But in all bays, please note: If
you play your radio until the limit
of 11 p.m., how's about a little
consideration for the birds who
want to sleep and turn your radio
down if you listen to it after 10?
And who started this contagious
business of one man calling an-
other "Rock?"
More congratulations. This
time to Majo1 Samuel B. Mitchell,
Jr., of Hq., III F. C., upon his re-
cent promotion.
More middle aisling. S/Sgt.
Cecil E. Cyers took the big step
last Tuesday. And T/Sgt. Charles
B. "Junior" Latshaw will shortly
take unto himself also a wife.
Brave men, these. Good luck, boys.
That new coke machine at
Third Fighter Headquarters really
keeps Pfc. John Hrycewisz busy
filling it up. Good business.
Unsung Heroes Dept.: Sgt. ART
RIDDICK and PFC. FRANK
GUERCIO of the Mimeo shop.


Always Say ...

HOLSUM BREAD

Extra Fresh


DIXIE

Cleaners :: Laundry
Phones: M-1036, 4232


All Service Men are Welcome
BARCELONA CAFE
SPANISH RESTAURANT
Wines and Liquors
Phone S2142 Open All Night
4714 Nebraska and Osborne


SERVICEMEN

Alfredo Y Familia
Fancy Groceries Free Delivery
1601 N. HOWARD AVE.
DIAL H 25-564


Post Office Cigar Store
CIGARS, CIGARETTES,
TOBACCOS
SMOKERS ARTICLES
WELCOME SERVICE MEN
Florida Av. & Twiggs St.


BOB'S PLACE
Beer Wine Mixed Drinks
Dancing Short Orders
1623 4th Ave. -:- Phone Y 1786
CAESAR GARCIA, Mgr


Your Feet Hurt?
Complete Line of Arch Supports
and Foot Remedies, at

BARKER & TULLY
1110 FRANKLIN ST.

HYDE PARK

SPAGHETTI HOUSE
Frank Rutas Chef of New York
SPAGHETTI AND RAVIOLI
WINE AND BEER
103 HYDE PARK AVE.


HENRY HOWKEE CO.
CHINESE HAND LAUNDRY
Matisfaction Guaranteed
504 Tyler Street


Service Men and Families are
Welcome at

Louis Seditta Grocery
Cold Drinks Beer and Wine
Sandwiches and Poultry
2018 Gr. Central Av. Ph. H-3194


They sure turn out good work
quickly. We know.
Aside to HORACE GASPARD
(also on furlough). How come
you adopt the miniker "JOE
ROCK" whenever you go to Clear-
water?
Last Friday JACK AIKEN had
a "V" bowl job. On Saturday
afternoon it was gone. It was a
shortlived bit of tonsorial art.
(Modern design makes the big
difference.)


FERNANDEZ

RESTAURANT
Cuban Sandwiches A Specialty
1216 Franklin St.


BILLIARDS
CIGARS CIGARETTES
BEER WINES
/ SANDWICHES
HARRY WELLECOTT
912 Florida Avenue


Meet Your Friends at ....

ROXY BAR
-Beer -Wine Sandwiches-
203 E. Lafayette St. Ph. 2456
Hostesses-Dancing


Phones: 2588-2589

McKay-Clarke Ins. Co.
GENERAL INSURANCE
515 Zack Street Tampa, Fla.


FISHING TACKLE
Lonnie Strickland
Opposite Post Office
Zack St. & Florida Ave., Tampa
Telephone 3184


LINCOLN BAR
Catering to Colored Service Men
"Nice Place for Nice People"
Main at North Boulevard


SPECIAL ATTENTION
To Service Men's Families

Peter Grahn & Son
Meats-Produce-Groceries
Phone 3502 910 Florida Ave.


Phone M52-073
Manuel Garcia Jr.'s
MADRILLON
Spanish Restaurant
915 Tampa at Tyler
Tampa, Florida


PHOTOGRAPHS
Roy N. Green Studio

Open Evenings
Opposite USO 505 Morgan St.


THE LENOX
Mrs. Eva Cadden'
Chicken, Steaks, Chops, Home
Made Pies, Good Coffee
Regular Dinners
2724 Florida Ave.


Flowers For Mother,
Sweetheart or Friend
POWELL'S INC., FLORIST
412 Tampa St. Ph. 2524
Open 'Til 7 P. M.


Tampa Bay Market
Box Fruit Shipped Anywhere
Beer, Wine, Special Sandwiches
Groceries, Fruits, Magazines,
Ice Cream
204 W. Lafayette Street
A. G. Cleotelis & Son H3143


Max's Liquor Bar
WINES LIQUORS CIGARS
FREE DELIVERY SERVICE
1601 E. COLUMBUS DR.
PHONE Y-1281
-Keep 'Em Flying-


PALM AVENUE
BAPTIST CHURCH
1811 Florida Ave.
WELCOME

Bible School 9:45 A. M.

Worship 11:00 A. M.
Training Union 6:40 P. M.
Worship 8:00 P. M.


Bar and Cocktail Lounge
The TURF EXCHANGE
Package Store
ORCHESTRA EVERY NITE
Phone 2003
202 E. Lafayette St.


RUBIN'S
"THE HOME OF GOOD
SPANISH FOOD"
Best Cocktails
Military Men Most Welcome
Air Conditioned
1403 Tampa St. Phone M-7150


The Tavern Bar and Grill
HOT AND COLD LUNCHES
Spaghetti a Specialty
LIQUORS-BEER-WINES
311 Franklin St. Phone 3940.


VALENCIA GARDEN
Restaurant
WE SERVE THE FINEST OF
SPANISH FOODS
811 Grand Central
Phone H-3773


WHITE ROSE BAR
Paul Webber, Prop.
LIQUORS, WINES, BEER
AND CIGARS
Cor Cass and Marion Sts.
Phone 4502



LIBERTY BAR
Tony Italiano, Prop.
Wines-Beer-Soft Drinks
717 Grand Central Ph. H-3109



Adams Kennedy
Whiting and Jefferson
Tampa, Fla.
Groceries, Tobacco, Candy
Notions



STAR KOSHER
DELICATESSEN
TRY OUR CORN BEEF
SANDWICHES & SALADS
Open till 11 P. M.
805 Gr. Central, Ph. H29-842


Servicemen Are Welcome
Day or Nite at

CHILD CAFE
501 Franklin St.



GILBERT HOTEL
Phone M-1094
811 Tampa Street
George T. Brightwell, Mgr.

T OWNSEND
Sash Door
& Lumber Co.
LUMBER & MILLWORK
ROOFING AND PAINT
-FHA LOANS-
PHONE H- 91
N. Rome & Fuller Street

CULP LUMBER CO.
'Everything to Build Anything'
Millwork Made To Order
500 Packwood
Ph. H 1862 -:- Tampa


GOODY


GOODY


For Quauity at The
Right Price-"No Tips"
1119 FLORIDA AVE.








Friday, Reptemb,~er 4, 1942 DREW FIELD ECHOES Page 9


690th Chatter
By OPL. HAL BRAZEAL
I think we have set some sort
of a record for a company our size.
To date we have lost 15 men to
O.C.S. and it l6oks as the Mon-
mouth is still going to drain us of
officer material .. In spite of the
fact this isn't the FASHIONABLE
season, Sgt. Teed and S/Sgt. Kelly
are going on to Miami for their
officers training .
Lieutenant Thomas is off to
Chemical Warfare School at Edge-
wood Arsenal. The lieutenant has
hardly had time to catch his
breath since just a short while ago
the bars were pinned on the shoul-
ders. Our very best wishes for an
interesting course, lieutenant.
Pay day is an awful day to try
and concentrate on words to hunt
on a typewriter. Everybody is do-
ing the town and yet I don't envy
them a bti. How will they all get
on the bus? I've learned by les-
son. I take a box lunch every time
I wait for it. If it gets any more
-," ested, I'll take my shaving
(i PSand a sleeping bag! It's a bad
gag, but you fellows know I'm
not far wrong.
Well, now we have a volley ball
court. .... Just give us a week or
so of practice and we'll be open
for challengers. I don't think any
of us are exactly experts, but our
spirit can't be questioned. Compe-
tition is very keen. So keen, in
fact, a couple of our boys were
cut to the quick over a minor dis-
cussion of the game. You have
never heard such marvelous vocal
cords as we have in our company.
Any one of ten of them could take
the place of a public address sys-
tem and never strain their oral
cavity. I wouldn't even men-
tion Gebauer's initials!
T/4th Grade Hill is off to
Maryland to take the vows. His
wife-to-be says the ceremony will
take place in a church. Hill is de-
termined it will be for a few
friends at the minister's home.
It will be at the church. It
beats me why a fellow battles a
losing argument.
Captain George has been much
more than our commanding offi-
cer. We have had three fellows in
the hospital going through a stiff
.share of pain. The Captain has
found time off from a very rigor-
ous job to pay them all a visit
and give them a lift. The men are


Sundries Tobacco Sodas
Whitehead's Drug Store
Compounding Prescriptions Is
the Most Important Part
of Our Business
Ph. S 5105 Prompt Delivery


Sulphur Springs Liquor
Store
LEOPOLD CHAMBON, Prop.
3113 Nebraska Ave. Ph. S-1245
Choice Wines, Liquors & Beer
Sulphur Springs, Fla.


Service Men Always Welcome
Sulphur Spring Cafe
We Specialize in Home Cooked
Food, Chicken, Steak and
Chop Dinners
Surphur Springs, Arcade Bldg.


SSulphur Springs Hotel
Special Attention to all
Servicemen
Arcade Building
Adjoining Swimming Pool

Phone S-5073 Prompt Delivery

PARK LIQUOR STORE
"The Home of Good Spirits"
8112 Nebraska Ave.
Sulphur Springs, Florida

SERVICEMEN,
KEEP IN TRIM
CARPET GOLF
-18 HOLES-
15c-First BRound
10c--Additional Rounds
Next to Sulphur Springs Pool


all back with us now and really
appreciate the gesture.
I think it's time to say some-
thing about the food at mess hall
15. Gentlemen, 'tis a gastronomic
delight to eat there. I presume
S/Sgt. Lloyd from the 690th has
a great deal to do with it. Tak-
ing a quick gander at his mid-
section, I would say he eats his
own food and takes great pleasure"
in it. This won't offend the
sergeant. I think he is quite proud
of his embryonic bay window.
~------<------


562nd Sig. Flashes
By CPL. WM. C. SCOTT
Pvt. Anthony Galluccio was pro-
moted to sergeant this last week.
Sgt. Galluccio has been working
very hard since the organization
of the 562nd and we are all glad
to see him receive this much de-
served promotion.
Cpl. Waldor Thalleen was re-
cently accepted for Officers' Can-
didate School and has already re-
ported for duty. This is a big loss
to us but we are sure that 'he will
make a very capable officer for
the United States.
Pvt. Harold Green fell off the
upper bunk of a double decked
bed last week. He received no
serious injury but has received a
lot of kidding. Green will make no
statement as to ?he reason for the
fall.
Pvt. DeSanto has quite a fol-
lowing these days. No one knows
whether he really loves children
or their mothers. If he does half
as well with their mothers as he
does with the boys, he is doing
all the good.
Cpl. Bishop married one of the
girls from his home town last
week. We wish them a long and
happy marriage. When Bishop

TWIN PALMS
Beer Wines Soft Drinks
Sandwiches Our Specialty
CLEAN COOL RESTFUL
Howard Ave. at Columbus Dr.


Service Men Always Welcome
La Gloria Restaurant
Fine Spanish Foods ,and
Sandwiches
3103 Armenia Ave.
Phone H 33-521

Phone H-3787
McASKILL MUSIC STORES
Radios and Repairing
Sound and Inter Communicating
Systems
Authorized Capehart and Scott
Radio Service
1116 Grand Central

Franklin St. Restaurant
HOME OF FINE FOODS
At Reasonable Prices
SPANISH DINNERS
"1406 Franklin Street

MARY ELLEN FLOWER
AND GIFT SHOP
Get That Special Gift Here, for
Sweetheart or Mother.
1311 Grand Central
Next to Big Orange


Special Invitations to All
Service Men
GLEN'S BILLIARDS
Now in its New Location
805 Tampa St.

"A GOOD PLACE TO EAT"
POST OFFICE CAFE
C. D. Kavakos, Prop., Dinners,
Plate Lunches-Beer, Wnies andt
Cold Drinks, Pies and Pastries.
400 ZACK ST. TAMPA, FLA.

WELCOME .
Service Men and Friends to the
SWING CLUB
"A nice place for nice people"
Dancing and Refreshments
5008 Memorial Highway
Phone H-2184


settles down out of the fog we will
be able to give you readers an in-
teresting report, I am sure.
Cpl. Melion has been visiting his
cousin, Miss Lillian Gorden, at St.
Petersburg. These personnel men
really have visiting relatives?
A day off was offered for the
man who had the best and the
man who had the ugliest pass pic-
ture. Sgt. Dann won the day for
the best picture and T/Sgt. Reed
won the day for the ugliest. The
decisions of the judges are final
but we wonder if they weren't re-
versed by mistake.
All officers and non-commis-
sioned officers of this organiza-
tion are studying "Management of
the American Soldier" by Major
General David C. Shanks. After
sufficient time has been given to


study the contents, there will be a
general discussion followed by a
test.
Last week the 555th, 560th,
562nd battalions went on that
weekly road march. After walking
about four miles out and into a
wooded section, the enemy at-
tacked them with gas (smoke).
The poor dogs that were accom-
panying the march are in a critical
condition as they had no gas
masks.
All soldiers are. warned against


A HOME BUY OR RENT
SEE
Jay Hearin, Inc.
REALTORS
Phone M1861, Maas Office Bld.


CENTRAL OIL
COMPANY, INC.
Tampa, Florida


gambling. One soldier, not at Plant
Field, made the boast that he had
won over $14,000.00 with loaded
dice. It may be just a friendly
game but where money is involved
friendship ceases.

White Way
LAUNDRY
2800 Armenia Ave., Near Michigan
Phone H-3898


Holsum Lunch
REASONABLE PRICES
Home Cooked American Meals
Our Specialty: Fried Chicken
and T Bone Steaks
714 Grand Central Ave


Soldiers Welcome To ...
AUNT GUSSIE'S PLACE'
Sandwiches Beer Wine
Soft Drinks
N. Boulevard Corner Cass Street


^7^e~omwe



ST. PETERSBURG
SBAND THE
.ilE

* **= MM_


GORDON HOTEL
520 5th Ave. No. Phone 6507
TRANSIENTS WELCOME'
Rooms with Baths and Showers
Large Veranda and Lobby


Northmoor Apts.
Stop in close to headquarters for
the duration. Cool, clean effic-
iency Apts., or Rooms and Bath
By the Week, Month, Season or'
Yearly
111 Oth Ave. No. Phone 70-781


Gilbert System Hotel
Betty C. Mitchell, Mgr.
740 Central Ave. St. Petersburg
Phone 7864
"Your Home Away from Home",
You Are Always Welcome
A phone In Every Room
Hot and Cold Water All Times

New Paramount

Soda Grille
1131 4th Street North
AIR CONDITIONED ROOMS
DELICIOUS FOODS
SANDWICHES
*FOUNTAIN DRINKS
Music and Dancing
"All At Popular Prices"



For Prompt Service

'Phone 5909

MASTER CLEANERS
INC.

507 Ninth Street No.
St. Petersburg, Fla.


JEWELRY
Watches, Diamonds and
Silverware
GIFTS OF ALL KINDS
At Prices That Cannot Be
Duplicated
EXPERT WATCH AND
JEWELRY REPAIRING
Over 30 years in St. Petersburg
Owen-Cotter Jewelry Co.
273 Central Avenue
Tel. 60514


nnnnnn:*n* n n*nn*un* :+:+:*nn :n*n+*n**:n+++.:.:.:,::..:.:+n.n.+n+n++ .:nn:

WELCOME SERVICE MEN ...


Swim at the SULPHUR SPRINGS POOL


Bus and Street Car to Pool


Natural Springs .. Temperature 720


Mostellar's Sundries
ICE CREAM AND COLD
DRINKS
201 9th St. So.
Opp. Seaboard Station


Colonial Doll Shop
115 9th St. So., Opp. Webbs
FLORIDA SOUVENIRS
UNUSUAL GIFTS
For Wife and Sweetheart


PARISIAN CLEANERS
48 HOUR SERVICE
148 Central Ave.
Phone 8631


VOGUE
Cleaners and Laundry
SHERFY BOURN, Owner
450 4th St. So.
Phone 9518


Wonder Bar And Grill
Headquarters for Service Men
BEER, LIQUOR and WINE
172 Central Ave. Phone 6133

"Dry Cleaning That Is
Unexcelled"
Smith's Cleaning &
Dye Works
1321 Arlington Ave. No.
Phone 4963 St. Petersburg

Service Men's Uniforms
That Will Pass Inspection
Cleaned and Pressed 50c
FLORA-DON
CLEANERS AND DYERS
Phone 4727 1239 Central Av.

OLDEST AND LARGEST
DRY CLEANERS IN ST. PETE
24 Hour Service
PURVIS CLEANERS
619 9th St. No.
Phone 4372


Bowling Center, Inc.
Cor. 1st Ave. So. and 2nd St.
12 Brunswick 20th Century
Alleys




Buy Bonds


THE PERRY
125 8th Ave. Norti
ROOMS, APTS. & COTTAGES
Reasonable Rates, by Week,
Month or Year
ADULTS ONLY NO PETS


SONE

UNUSUAL GIFTS

248 1st Ave. No.

At St. Petersburg

Sportsman Billiard Parlor

228 Central Avenue

St. Pete, Fla., Phone 50-612


At St. Petersburg

Frank's LIQUOR STORE


147 Central Ave.


Ph. 4342


FREE DELIVERY

Imported Wines And Liquors

GEORGES LUNCH
14 2nd St. So.
Specializing in
STAAK, SEAFOODS,
SANDWICHES


Paramount Bowling
Alleys
You are Invited to visit our
modern and up to date alleys
860 4th Ave. S. Phone 7508

While at St. Pete
Visit
RUDY'S Hi-Hat
BEER, WINES, SMOKES
848 4th St. So.


NIKKO INN
19 1st St. No. Phone 6720
Air Cinditioned, Private
Dining Rooms, Chinese and
American Meals

DINE AND DANCE

THE COTTAGE
2102 4th Street North
WINE AND BEER


2~~-~-.-r,-r.-,-..-,-..-;;n;;


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Page 9


Frid y, S8eptemb~er 4, 19422









Page 10 DREW FIELD ECHOES Friday, Sept,~rnber 4, 1942


505th Reg. 1st Rept'g


Company

By "SANDY" SANDIFER
It is with genuine pleasure that
we welcome through The Echoes
our new commanding officer, 2nd
Lt. Emanuel Austern, into the
company, assuring him the com-
plete cooperation and loyalty of
the soldiers of this organization.
To our other new officers, 2nd
Lts. Wesley C. Crawley, Bruce W.
Kinney and Leroy W. Summerhill
we also offer a hearty welcome.
Seeing T/4th John J. Hatala
again was definitely good for all
of us this week, and we want you
to know, Sgt. John, that we ap-
preciate the visit. Lots o' luck to
ya!
Somebody has been snooping
into T/5th Willie J. Cotton's mail,
and-from what we hear about
one epistle in particular-no won-
der Cpl. Cotton looks so lonely
and blue these days. He's singing,
"It's- easy to see what's a-troublin'
me; I'm pinin' for the Carolines."
It's good'to have Pvt. Curtis A.
Wilson back in the company after
a period of advanced training.
Smart boy-this Curtis!
You probably won't see this, but
it's congratulations and good luck
to you, Sgt. Charles E. Strange,
for getting a chance at O.C.S.
We'll miss you most at calis-
thenics.
Pvt. Jim Seybt brings us news
from Greenville, S. C., from our
friends, T/5th Sidney Zang, Pfc.
Walter E. Thatcher and Pvt. Dow
L. Stevens. Jim says that the boys
are well and happy and are ac-
quitting themselves commendably.
He also reports that his trip to
Greenville was sweet but all too
short.
A little detective work revealed
that T/5th Joe Wisniewski is the
melancholy lover about whom
we've heard considerable rumors
lately. However, we can't get the
lowdown, but there's something
about a girl, Two Rivers, Wis.,
and a gift. Come on, Joe, and
confess!
With no exception the entire
company was thrilled to see Capt.
William W. Hamilton again this


ADrew Men Attend
OCS at Monmouth
The following men have been
selected to attend Officers Can-
didate School at Fort Mon-
mouth, N. J., with the class be-
ginning Aug. 31. Th e can-
didates are:
Sgt. Joseph E. Donnelly,
S/Sgt. Don L. Poling, Sgt.
Frank J. Casale, Pvt. Samuel
Mardian, Pvt. Hugh D. Burch,
Pvt. Mark J. Lucas, Pvt. Sam-
uel C. Couch and Pvt. Philip
L. Linebaugh.
*


week. He may not be our company
commander, but-to all the fel-
lows who served under him at Mc-
Chord Field and Florence-he's
forever "our old man."
We congratulate and express
our pride in Cpl. Henry Brooks,
who is a valuable player on the
Drew Interceptors baseball nine.
What shall we tell Lorraine for
you when we see'her, Dudley? It's
too bad that you didn't get that
proposed trip, but-weren't you
taught?-life's like that. The com-
pany wishes you a very successful
military career, Pvt. Hewitt.
These boys are lucky enough to
be furloughing: T/Sgt. Arthur L.
Dysart, Dallas, Texas; T/4th Fla-
vil J. Elrod, Kansas City, Mo.;
T/4th Harry Euler, Chicago, Ill.;
Pvt. Harold M. Gibson, Laurin-
burg, N. C.; Pvt. Julian, C. Mason,
Atlanta, Ga., and Brevard, N.- C.;
Pvt. Heywood N. Thomas, North
Carolina, and Cpl. Joe R. Mont-
gomery, Montezuma, Ind. Inci-
dentally, Sgt. Elrod will see for
the first time the little daughter
about whom we've heard a great
deal.
Beautiful in its simplicity and
impressiveness was the marriage
of Miss Mildred J. Broyles and
S/Sgt. Raymond Brumback, which
was solemnized in Post Chapel No.
1 Saturday morning, August 29,
at 11:30 o'clock, by Chaplain Roy
M. Terry. Both Sgt. and Mrs.
Brumback are natives of Loraine,
Ohio. Congratulations, Ray, for
getting a beautiful and lovely
wife, and the entire company
wishes for the two of you many,
many years of complete and su-
preme happiness.


Soldiers Urged

To Aid Salvage

of Vital Scrap
(Continued from Page 1).
inery, boilers, or other metal ob-
jects which are in disuse, and ap-
pear to be abandoned, should be
reported to the salvage officer,
who will take steps to see that ft
is not overlooked by reporting this
to the Regional Office of the Bu-
reau of Industrial Conservation,
War Production Board, Washing-
ton, D. C.
In your next letter home, tell
the folks about the job the Army
is doing to relieve the national
shortage of raw materials and
urge them to .help in this vital
scrap collection effort. There are
probably quantities of salvagea-
ble material around your friends'
homes and mother's backyard and
cellar, which should be turned
over to a charitable organization
or sold to a licensed junk dealer
The old tire and garden hose in
the garage, that Worn-out lawn-
mower, steel shovel, and ash can,
those obsolete brass faucets and
plumbing fixtures, are all readily
convertible to industrial use.
We, in the Army, must bet be-
hind the national scrap campaign
and wholeheartedly set an example
of cooperative effort to overcome
our Nation's raw material short-
ages in basic industries. Each of
us has a job to do; our salvage
officer has a job to do; our Na-
tion has a job to do. By doing it,
we can make certain that, "For
want of a nail-our Country will
not be lost."

Mechanics Keep
(Continued front Page 1).
pair; gunsmiths, instrument mak-
ers, clockmakers, water meter re-
pair. men are among the skilled
men that can be utliized as air-
craft armorers; men who are
working in radio and communica-
tions can become Army Air Forces
radio operators and mechanics;
all sorts of welders and metal
workers can find opportunities
among Army Air Forces ground
crews.


Buy More Bonds


A L br.... -. .i.







A Labor Day



L upmpi


to all G-E Men



in the Armed


Services


GENERAL ELECTRIC





Believe it or not-Labor Day this year is just another day
here too!
We'll take that back-it's a very special day. It's a day
that gives us the chance to prove what we've been saying
for a long time now. That although there's no comparison
between the hard work and danger and sacrifice of your jobs
and ours-still we're doing what needs to be done to back you
up, and we're giving it all we've got. And we're not taking time
off for holidays either.
So if you think of us today, don't imagine us doing the
usual Labor Day things we used to do together-clambakes
and picnics and swimming parties. We'll be right here in the
shops. We'll be turning out stuff for you to use, and counting
on you to use it where it'll do the most good.
This won't be news to you who've gone into the services
just recently-but if you've been away even six months, you'd
scarcely know the Works. There are a lot of new buildings, and
even new plants-just how many and where we're not allowed
to say.
There are a lot of queer-looking machines going through
the shops-things that you probably know the use of better
than we do, but which none of us ever expected to see being
built in General Electric factories.
Thanks for your letters, and the pictures you've sent:
We'd like more, and the Works News and Monogram editors'
will use as many as they can. Good luck! You'll be hearing from
us again.


.., .


952-841-211


--2


--~hh~


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Friday, September 4,, 1942


Page 10




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