Title: Drew Field echoes
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076231/00018
 Material Information
Title: Drew Field echoes
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Post Exchange
Place of Publication: Tampa Fla
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida -- Tampa   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Drew Field Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa -- Drew Army Airfield
Coordinates: 27.975556 x -82.533333 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: "Published each Friday in the interest of the officers and enlisted men of Drew Field."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 39 (Dec. 2, 1943).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076231
Volume ID: VID00018
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24622561
lccn - sn 93063705

Full Text


















VOL. 1. NO. 19


Ex German Exile

Proud To Become

American Citizen


An exile from Naziism, Cpl.
Walter J. Nagel, of the Second
Reporting Company, 501st Signal
Regiment, is now a full-fledged
American citizen.
Over a week ago he was one of
eight soldiers from Drew Field,
including four Germans and a
Hungarian nobleman, who went
before Federal Judge Baron and
became a United States citizen.
When the Judge told them that
they had made an admirable start
in becoming citizens of the United
States, Cpl. Nagel glowed with
pride and happiness. For he was
well aware of what citizenship
represented.
The new citizen was born and
raised in Germany, and attended
grammar and high school as well
as college there. During the years
of the rise of Hitler, Walter wit-
nessed with accumulative despair
the closing up of his father's busi-
ness, the sending-off of his
friends and relatives to concen-
tration camps, and other atroci-
ties too awful to relate.
One day in 1936 Walter found


It won't surprise any of the sol-
diers in the 501st School Comp-
any if the great war song of the
World War II is written in their
orderly room. The fellows are
sure that before the war is over
their acting company clerk, Priv-
ate Ben Forrest, will turn out a
song to equal the "Over There"
and "Hinky Dinkey Parley Voo"
of the first World War.
Forrest is no amateur song
writer. Already to his credit are
such songs as "Bugles in the Sky",
"All I Need," "Love Can Do The
Darndest Things," and "You are
the Lyric," all published and re-
corded, not to mention the fact
that the 35-year-old native of
Chicago collaborated on the
words and ideas to "Alexander Is
a Swoose," one of the hit songs of
1941 which introduced a new
word to the American language.
Right now Forrest is interested
in war songs as the title of some
of his latest compositions indi-
cate. "Tattoo" and "Soldier, Hold
Your Girl" will soon be on the
market, and he has great expec-
tations for a marching song which
he is writing to the cadence of
"Hep, Two, Three Four."
Writing songs is a funny busi-
ness, Forrest admits frankly.
"Sometimes the melody comes
to my mind first, and sometimes
the words," he says. "When you
get an idea, you work around
with it for awhile. Sometimes you
can write a song in three hours;
sometimes it takes three months;
sometimes you can work hard
with an idea for five years and
never have a song."
"There aren't any set rules for
song writing," he continued, "ex-
cept that the melody and words
must be simple enough to catch
the fancy of the public. The ap-
peal of sophisticated songs is very
limited because there are few so-
phisticates. The man in the street,


Published Every Friday Drew Field, Tampa, Florida Friday, July 10th, 1942


Church Services


In New Chapels


Beginning on Sunday, July
12, 1942, church services will
be held in the two new chapels,
according to Chaplain William
*L. Clark, Base Chaplain. Dedi-
cation services will be held at
a later date.

that the American liner, Manhat-
tan, was to leave Hamburg for
America. The liner was to leave
at midnight and, at 8 p. m. he was
called before the police authori-
ties and subjected to certain in-
quiries. Luckily he managed to
board the Manhattan that evening
and came to America. Shortly
after his departure his father
died, and it has been more than a
year since he last heard from his
mother.
"The privilege of citizenship is
the most valuable and precious of
my possessions and something I
shall always cherish," he said. "I
know what democracy is because
I have lived under the yoke of
Naziism."


WTSP Song Contest

Open To Soldier

How'd you like to take your
favorite girl friend out to dinner
at the Mayfair and then to a show
at the Florida Theater-and all
on the house!
Amazing-it can't be- But it
is! The Girl You Left Behind of
WTSP's Bugle Call program,
heard each' week-day morning at
7:15, is starting a musical quiz
contest this week, and that's the
prize. The lucky winner takes his
girl friend out and enjoys a pleas-
ant evening, and it doesn't cost a
cent.
Here are the details:
Each morning for one week
Continued on page 5


Moved
The Public Relations Office,
has moved to a new location in
the Base headquarters build-
ing. Reporters for the Drew
Field Echoes in the various
companies and squadrons
should have their news at the
Public Relations office no
later than 8 a. in. Wednesday.


First Medal Presentation In



July 4th Celebration at Drew


Gen. Wash Pins Medal on Sgt. Wisdom


In a ceremony at Drew Field
on July 4, Sgt. Ray E. Wisdom,
20, Cleveland, Tex., was decorated
for heroism by Brig. Gen. Carlyle
H. Wash, commander of the Third
Air Force. It was his reward for
risking his life to save a buddy
from drowning and was the first
presentation of its kind at Drew
Field.
Before the assembled men of
his regiment, Sergeant Wisdom
received a soldier's medal award-
ed by the War Department.
On Dec. 12, 1941, while sta-
tioned at Seattle, Sgt. Wisdom-
at that time a private-was in
company formation, with his out-
fit in full dress an.d full packs.
Master Sergeant Fred Carey, now
stationed at Orlando, missed his


footing on a pier and fell 40 feet
into the waters of Puget Sdund.
Pausing only to lay aside his rifle
and pack, Wisdom-still fully
clothed-dove into the water and
kept Sgt. Carey afloat for 30
minutes until both were rescued.
Carey's leg was broken in the fall.
Wisdom's outfit was aboard a
transport just a few miles off the
American coast enroute to the
Philippines when the Japanese at-
tacked Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7.
Their ship, traveling without es-
cort, turned back and put in at
port.
On June 26 Sgt. Wisdom was
transferred to Drew Field.
Sergeant Wisdom enlisted in
December, 1940. He is the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wisdom, of
Cleveland, Texas.


Drew Drubs MacDill, 2-1,

For 11th Straight Win


the child in school, and the sol-
diers like a repeated phrase in a
song. It really doesn't matter
whether the music or the words
are conceived first. Either way
will make a good song if the lyric
and melody are that happy com-
bination which strikes the pub-
lic's fancy."
Forrest worked in Chicago and
Hollywood and had an office in
New York before joining the
Army. He entered the service at


Camp Grant, Ill., three months
ago and attended the Message
center school at Drew Field. His
time for song writing has been
rather limited since joining the
Army, but he hopes to find a few
more minutes now that he is act-
ing company clerk.
"Maybe I'll have a little more
time to work on two or three
songs that have been popping into
my head every five minutes," he
said.


Two fine pitchers, Sgt. Fred
Swindells, of Drew, and Russ
Crider, of MacDill, hooked up in
a beautiful pitching duel on the
Plant Field diamond Wednesday.
The Drew Interceptors squeezed
out a 2-1 win over their arch
rivals, the MacDill Fliers.
The win was the Interceptors
llth straight win.under Captain
Earle DeForest.
Drew sent tallies across in the
third and fourth innings to take
an early 2-0 lead. Howell tripled
and McNulty singled him home in
the third for the first run of the
game. Singles in the fourth by
Bekeza, Grabosky and Meyer pro-
duced the second and final run of
the day for the Interceptors.
The Fliers started a rally in the
eighth inning that fell shy by one
run of tying up the game. Shgles


by Minsky, Dixon and O'Brien put
the Fliers back in the ball game.
At this point Swindells bore down,
to retire the next three batters in
order.
Jim Minsky led the Fliers with
the willow in pounding two for
three and scoring their only run.
Klimczak led the swatting par-
ade for the Interceptors with a
triple and double along with his
teammate Bekeza who garnered
two singles in four tries.
The game Wednesday was the
seventh meeting of the two serv-
ice hines with Drew holding the
advantage in games won, five to
two.
Score by innings:
MacDill ......000 000 010-1 7 0
Drew ..........001 100 000-2 8 4
Batteries: Crider and O'Brien;
Swindells and Bekeza.


Song Hit Writer Now Writes


War Songs At Drew Field








aFSj 1 1 4


The Drew Field Echoes


JIMMY JACKSON, Publisher
Tampa Army Newspapers

Business Office:
1113 FLORIDA AVENUE
Tampa, Florida
P. 0. Box 2555 Phone 2177

All advertisements contained in
this newspaper are also contained in
the MaeDill Field Fly Leaf. Mlnianum
joint lcrculation: 8,000 copies.
ADVERTISING RATES FURNISHED
ON REQUEST

A newspaper published exclusive-
ly for the personnel of Drew Field
and devoted to military interests
and the United Nations Victory.
Opinions expressed in this news-
paper are those of the individual
writers and under no circumstances
are they to be considered those of
the United States Army. Advertise-
ments in this publication do not
constitute an endorsement by the
War Department or its personnel of
the products advertised.



MRABAE1 S
FLOMIWPRlfs ASSOCIATION1
NnONALsDITORALASSOCIAION U.
1942 O



"Boy, those calisthenics! My
charlie horses are driving me
wild."
"My charlie horses are so wild,
they're 'saddling' me with dis-
comfiture and trying to pass the
'buck' to other muscles."

AT THE THEATRES


Drew Man Serves "

In Mexican 553rd Aw Bn 2nd Rept.

Revolution Squads Riot


By Pvt. S. Katzenell

Army life is nothing new to
Acting Corporal William Marshall
Tucker of the 564th. From 1926
to 1927, Corporal Tucker served
as a Captain in the Procurement
division of the Mexican army, see-
ing active service under General
Francisco Cos during the De La
Huerta revolution.
Tucker was born in El Paso,
Tex., but spent ten years in Mexico
where he received a thorough
Spanish education. He reads and
writes Spanish like a native, for
while his father is an American,
his mother is Spanish.
Although Tucker thinks Mexico
is a fine country, he prefers the
United States. He returned to this
country in 1932 and worked for
several years at various jobs in
and around El Paso. Then the for-
mer Mexican officer took Horace
Greeley's advice and journeyed to
the Pacific coast in 1934. He
landed' in Hollywood where he
worked as a carpenter for the
RKO, MGM and Universal studios.
At the time he was called into the
army, Tucker was holding down a
handy man's job at the Universal
studios.
Tucker's greatest ambition is
to serve with an American force in
Mexico where he thinks his
knowledge of Spanish will be a
valuable contribution.


Med. Det. 309th Service Group



Prescriptions

By CPL. ARTHUR GISMONDI

Our detachment is now sta-
tioned at the old Dispensary
where we take care of sick call
for the 69th Fighter Sq., 9th
Fighter Sq. and, our own group,
the 309th Service Group. Don't
hesitate to come on sick call, sol-
diers, as you won't have to wait
all day to see the Medical Officer.
Sick call starts at 7:45 a. m.
Wonder when they are going to
get lights and hot water in the
new barracks. It's not so hot,
trying to shave in the dark, as
yours truly can attest. Of course
one thing that we are certain of
and that is that "lights out" is
complied with.
We are also awaiting patiently
the opening of the new Mess Hall
since "sweating the chow-line,"
as the boys call it, is no pleasure.
Those Signal Corps men are too
fast for us and we always get the
leavings. It won't be long, men,
until we are over in our own
kitchen.
Now that Drew Field and Mac-
Dill Field have been enlarged, and.
what with the Army practically
taking over St. Petersburg and
Clearwater, I wonder where the
soldiers who used to go there to
get away from the Army atmos-
phere on their day off will do.
Florida has changed from the
"Tourist State" to the "Soldier
State." On "the other hand it
would be nice if the government
took over the two possible roads
over to those towns and opened
them to the public.
Pvt. Goins and Anderson, back
from their furloughs, said it was
swell being home but that it was
very hard breaking away again.
All the rest of us are anxiously
waiting our chance to visit the
folks at home. Anything to get

away from this sweltering heat.

"Umm, take a, look at the
calves on that babe."
"Listen, pardner, when calves
git that old we call 'em beef on
the hoof."


By GPL. K. K. McKAY

We were confined again. Of
course the boys felt bad about
it for a while, but after a few
hours decided it wouldn't be so
bad as they could save a lot of
money for their coming-out party.
Then again who knows what will
happen tomorrow, so why plan
ahead? Sgt. Luther and Cpl. Mc-
Kay opened a P. X. right in the
company street and with the help
of a group of fine workers, Pvts.
Limoges, Resnick, Bumpus, Ad-
ams, Fluharty and Lipsconib,
served the boys with refresh-
ments, cigarettes, candy and such,
making life more enjoyable. What
will yours be, Cpl. Grim, a beer?
Pvt. Ramey says: M.P. don't
stand for My Pal.
Sgt. Bloom is still blowing his
top by saying so what is it, so
what is it.
Pvt. Bumpus had a talk with
his wife the other day and she
said if they send her little man
back to her she promised not to
beat him anymore.
Pvt. Pixley says any fool can
plainly see he's decent. But hold
everything. Just a minute later
Mike Cristani asked Max if he
wanted a beer and Max said you
done talked me into it. Ha, Ha,
as any fool can plainly see.
Sgt. Kautz can get more men
in a Ford coupe than there are
sardines in a can. His wife said
it got so that the only thing he
says. in his sleep now is, are you
going my way, Sarge? Pvt. S. J.
Adams is expecting an addition
to his family and hopes the baby
has its mother's features and its
father's fixtures.
Did you ever hear the love-life
of Sgt. Bedell as told by Sgt. Be-
dell? If you didn't, you don't
know what you're missing.
Buck McKeeby: "Who is Miss
Jones?"



Big Time Band

Drummer Now a

Soldier At Drew

Drop in on one of the Thursday
night dances at the North Boule-
vard USO club and you're likely
to find Sergeant Robert G. Selleck
sitting in with the band at the
drums. The acting first sergeant
of the 501st School company feels
right at home in such a musical
atmosphere, as he is a professio-
nal musician who has made his
living at the drums and vibra-
phones since the age of 15.
Before he entered the army at
Ft. Niagara, N. Y., a year and a
half ago, Sergeant Selleck played
with some of the big name bands
in the country, among them
Isham Jones, Jan Savitt and Jan
Campbell. He is a graduate of the
Cincinnatti Conservatory of
Music, and besides the drums and
vibraphones, plays the bass horn
and slaps a mean bass fiddle.
With such a musical back-
ground, it is natural that the
Sergeant takes a big interest in
army music. While at Ft. Niagara,
he organized a military 'band and
traveled with it all over the sec-
ond corps area with a USO Mobile
Unit show. He is looking forward
to the time when Drew Field will
have more facilities for entertain-
ment in which the enlisted men
can take part in themselves. And
when that happens, the Sergeant
undoubtedly will be sitting in with
the band in the Krupa role, show-
ing Drew Field men a thing or
two about drum playing.

BUY MORE BONDS


564th Medicos


By PVT. DAN E. MOTLOW

The 564th Dispensary has been
remodeled by Pfc. Eichorn and
Pvt. Clymer. A marquee' has been
added and the tree on the com-
pany street removed, helping the
appearance very much. Note the
green light on the Dispensary that
signifies the Prophylactic Station
which is open 20 hours a day.
Anyone wishing recommenda-
tions on a good laundry, see
S/Sgt. Simcox. Be sure and wear
your asbestos ear muffs.
Pvt. Kelly was an interested
spectator at the training film on
Booby Traps. He has plans for
putting one on the company
litters.
During a sand blow Pvt. Vento
(spelled with a B) obsoived that
sand was blowing into an open
pot. "Say, cook," he said, "If
you kept a lid on that pot, you
wouldn't get sand in it."
"Your business," replied the
cook, "is to serve your country."
"Soive it, yes," replied the
Brooklyn boy, "But not to eat it."
"Jim Brady" Simeone is wear-
ing his hardware low and look-
ing for the snake eating varmint
who turned out the light while he
was looking for the butt of a 50-
cent cigar stogie. No 3 man Rider
is a suspect.
Have you heard what Chester-
field said to Phillip Morris. "I
believe I will get lit tonight and
make an ash of myself."
Main topic of conversation on
the 4th of July: "Where were we
a year ago today?"


LAFAYETTE HOTEL
E. A. CLAY, Manager
120 West Lafayette Street
East Side of 'Bridge
Phone M-5586


Tampa Bay Market
Box Fruit Shipped Anywhere
Beer, Wine, Special Sandwiches
Groceries, Fruits, Magazines,
Ice Cream
204 W. Lafayette Street
A. G. Cleotelis & Son H3143


SERVE


VICE MEN


ALBERTUS HOTEL
A Home Away From Home
956 Twiggs M1339


Post Office Cigar Store
CIGARS, CIGARETTES,
TOBACCOS
SMOKERS ARTICLES
WELCOME SERVICE MEN
Florida Av. & Twiggs St.


Flying Accidents Now

Under Close Scrutiny

Landing is the greatest cause
of flying accidents which are at-
tributable to pilot error, accord-
ing to Colonel Samuel R. Harris,
Director of Flying Safety for the
Army Air Forces.
"According to our studies,
56% of all pilot-error accidents
occur during the landing opera-
tion," Colonel Harris reported.
"Together with taxiing accidents
and take-off accidents, this trio
comprises a total of 70%. Only
30% of pilot-error accidents oc-
cur in full flight."
As a result, the newly inaugu-
rated Army Air Forces Accident
Prevention program is giving par-
ticular attention to the causes of
"landing" accidents, and wide-
spread educational activity in
this direction will start shortly.
Such obvious mistakes as be-
ing unfamiliar with field traffic
rules, undershooting, overshoot-
ing, obstructions and improper
use of brakes will all come in for
close scrutiny.

The Guidepost To .
EVERYTHING A
SOLDIER NEEDS
Services Merchandise -. Sundries

FERLITA
SHELL STATION
4th Ave and 22nd Street
MR. S. A. FERLITA


Armenia Floral Gardens
"Really Fresh Flowers"
Corsages 'N Everything
7500 Armenia
Phone S-55341



Adams Kennedy
Whiting and Jefferson
Tampa, Fla.
Groceries, Tobacco, Candy
Notions

FOR RENT

703 BAY ST.
*: 3 Room Apartment Furnished
S$35.00
717 So. Orleans
S4 Room Apartment Furnished
S:!: $55.00
833 So. Dakota
: Room House Unfurnished
$60.00

I WARREN HENDERSON CO.
(Incorporated)
S112 E. Lafayette M-8311

SPECIAL ATTENTION
To Service Men's Families

Peter Grahn & Son
Meats-Produce---Grocries
Phone 3502 910 Florida Ave.


ELITE CIGAR STORES
"The Sport Headquarters
of Tampa
WINE BEER CIGARS
400 Zack Phone M 62-072
207 Twiggs Phone M-1236


:: FLORIDA SPORTING GOODS COMPANY
The Friendly Store
Complete Line Of Fishing Tackle And

.. 711 Tampa Street Phone M-6770 *.


FLAMINGO CONCRETE PIPE CO.
3613 EAST LAKE AVENUE
P. O. BOX 5288 -:- PHONE Y 1289
TAMPA, FLORIDA


CULP LUMBER CO. Sash Dor
'Everything to Build Anything' & Lumber Co
Millwork Made To Order Lumber Co. W
LUMBER & MILLWORK
500 Packwood ROOFING AND PAINT
-FHA LOANS-
Ph. H 1862 -:- Tapa HONE HLOAN-91
N. Ronre & Fuller Street

BAY VIEW HOTEL
I'IFEPROOF CONSTRUCTION -:- EVERY ROOM WITH BATH
W. B. SHULER, Manager
208 JACKSON ST. Between FRANKLIN & TAMPA
TAMPA, FLORIDA -:- PHONE M 5537


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Page 2


Friday, July 10., 1942


C








Friday. .Jnlv 10. 1942


DREW FIELD ECHOES


SMOOTH SAILING'S
Musical Stairatone


0, The Musical Stairatone, the most sensational novelty ot modern;
stagecraft, highlights the USO-Camp Shows production, SMOOTH,
SAILING. Saul Grauman, famous Broadway showman, brings to the'
USO-Camp Show circuit his unique musical staircase and the four
lovely dancing girls whose agile heel and toe routines tap out melody
and rhythm on the specially designed stairway of music. This is only,
one of the all-star features of this streamlined musical revue.
Admission is free. SMOOTH SAILING is coming to
the Drew Field Outdoor Arena, Tuesday, July 14, at 8:00 P. M.


350 th Service


NEWS

By CPL. C. BEHM
Another swell time was had by
all last Saturday night at the
First Presbyterian Church in
Tampa.. The delicious watermelon
surely hit the spot. And the lovely
lassies didn't exactly displease
anyone. The evening turned out
to be a big success. But what
really stopped the show was the
unforgettable singing of Pfc Fee-
man-even the seeds in the mel-
ons curdled.
The grass around the targets
may have been thinned quite a.
bit, but there were still many hits
recorded last Sunday at the police
pistol range by the group of 350th
men that were holding practice
there. Major Kaeppel and Sgt.
Box walked off with the top
honors. But of the beginners that
were shooting many showed
promise of being future sharp-
shooters.
Pvts. Fillipone and Hudson,
on the guitar and harmonica re-
spectively, furnish the boys in
barracks one with some very de-
lightful melodies in the evenings.
It's too bad we don't have a few
more instruments in the group.
Music always does furnish the
best of entertainment and re-
laxation.
Of, all Lt. M. L. McBride's
athletic schedules, his obstacle
course should prove the best. It
is our opinion that this course
will meet the approval of every-
one. And it should prove benefi-
cial in a large way in the develop-
ment of our muscular system and
in developing quick thinking and
co-ordination.


Our hopes for a quick recovery
for the three men we now have in
the hospital. There must be some-
thing going on in that place. We
no sooner take one out only to
put a couple more in. There's no
double but what we'll have to
visit Cpl. Shawley, Pfc. Samko,
and Pvt. E. L. Wolfe and look
this situation over. It must be the
nurses.
Delightful confusion now reigns
in our transportation group. It
was a long wait, Joe, but we fin-
ally got them.
Benny. says: "These close
friends that insist on cutting in
on the romance will learn. Won't
they? Crime does not pay."

The Guidepost To ...
EVERYTHING A
SOLDIER NEEDS
Services Merchandise Sundries

ATTENTION OFFICERS'
WIVES
Am starting a sewing class im-
mediately, Embroidery work and
applique. Will cut and fit your
dress for $.150.
Suits, Coats, Dresses, Alterations
ELSIE V. BAILEY
Formerly with Singer Sewing
Machine Company
Specializing in evening gowns
for Officers' Wives
Hutton holes and covered but-
tons. Speeializing in children's
dresses and coats
3214 Bay-to-Bay Boulevardl
Phone H 46-783

FISHING TACKLE
Lonnie Strickland
Opposite Post Office
Zack St. & Florida Ave., Tampa
Telephone 3184

SERVICEMEN
Alfredo Y Familia
Fancy Groceries Free Delivery
1601 N. HOWARD AVE.
DIAL H 25-564


PlottingCo. 564th AWSig. Bn.Sep.

Dots and Dashes

By CPL. S. C. KATZENELL
What's the toughest job in
the Army? Well, the answer to
that question is open to debate.
However, many experienced Army
men will tell you a Mess Ser-
geant's position is no bed of roses.
So when a Mess Sergeant smiles
he has a darn good reason for be-
ing happy. Today Staff Sergeant
M. D. McLaughlin, big boss of the
564th kitchen, is all smiles.
The 564th Battallion has only
been quartered at Drew Field,
Tent City, for a short time and
McLaughlin's kitchen has been
awarded the "Best Kitchen" /flag
seven times. A record anyone can
be proud of.

Cpl. Randt Frederick is resting
quietly in his native Chicago. The
lanky corporal left Wednesday for
the Windy City where he will
spend eight days. Frederick was
so excited about his trip that he
reminded us of an absent-minded
professor. A day before his jour-
ney to Chicago he was going to
Tampa with his good friend, Pvt.
The Guidepost To .
EVERYTHING A
SOLDIER NEEDS
Services Merchandise Sundries

The


Jewel Box
1512 7th Avenue

Phone Y-3741

Genuine

5 DIAMOND

WEDDING BAND

$12.50

Watch Repairing
20 Per Cent off to all Service
Men


L' Guns and
Locks
FLORIDA ^ Repaired
GUN & LOCK SERVICE
705-A FLORIDA AVE. PH. M51-251

A HOME BUY OR RENT
SEE

Jay Hearin, Inc.
REALTORS
Phone M1861, Maas Office Bld.


h(; i.~


Member:
V. F. W.
Purple Heart


E. P. JOHNSON & SON
Watchmakers & Jewelers
OPEN UNTIL 8:30 P. M.

214 E. Lafayette -:- Tampa
Next To Manhattan Cafe

REMEMBER CORREGIDOR
17th St. News Stand
CURB SERVICE
When in Ybor City Shop at the
Corner 17th and Broadway
All the Latest Magazines

CAMPBELL
BARBER and BEAUTY SHOP
308 Twiggs St. Ph. M 54-572
Marion & Ahna, Betty & Deedie
Open evenings by appointment


Walter Henson. Henson said:
"Randt meet me in front of the
Bond Tent at 6 p. m."
Frederick answered: "Okay
I'll be there with bells on."
And Cpl. Frederick showed up
promptly at 6 p. m. He was
neatly dressed with one exception.
His trousers were missing.

Sgt. Russell Williams is down
in the dumps these days. Hailing
from the nation's Capital, Wil-
liams ha's been one of the Wash-
ington Senators' staunchest root-
ers since he was knee high to a
duck. Today the Senators are
The Guidepost To .
EVERYTHING A
SOLDIER NEEDS
Services Merchandise Sundries

GILBERT HOTEL
Phone M-1094
811 Tampa Street
George T. Brightwell, Mgr.

Phone H-3787
McASKILL MUSIC STORES
Radios and Repairing
Sound and Inter Communlcating
Systems
Authorized Capehart and Scott
Radio Service
1116 Grand Central


holding undisputed possession of
the cellar position in the Ameri-
can League.

The men of 564th are wishing
Capt. Reuben D. Caudle, com-
manding officer of the Plotting
Company a.nd personnel adjutant,
a speedy recovery. Capt. Caudle
is recuperating from a very bad
cold at the MacDill Hospital.
The Guidepost To .
EVERYTHING A
SOLDIER NEEDS
Services Merchandise Sundries
Keep 'Em Repaired

Needlecraft Service Shop
Reweaving & Alterations
Mending & Repairs
201 CITIZENS BLDG.

Flowers For Mother,
Sweetheart or Friend
POWELL'S INC., FLORIST
412 Tampa St. Ph. 2524
Open 'Til 7 P. M.

Yes, if its what you don't need
See Us
WE BUY AND SELL
CLOTHING
Shoes, Luggage, Jewelry, Etc.
NOAH'S ARK
960 Twiggs Street


FLOWERS .. Dependable Photo Finishing
Telegraphed Everywhere Service
TINMAN'S FLOWERS
316 Madison FLORIDA PHOTO
In Hotel Hillsboro Bldg. SERVICE
PHONE 2059 604 Madison Street


+ THE TERRACE GIFT & FLOWER SHOP
e. HOTEL TAMPA TERRACE
406 E. Lafayette St.
S FLOWERS GIFTS
$ :{:




SBOB'S


Army Store

t Complete Line Military Supplies For The Needs Of
SERVICE MEN
:t OPEN EVENINGS
S207 E. Lafayette Street Tampa
., CO


.. ... .... ....- .


Athlete's Foot


6 -DEX


FOR SALE AT ALL POST EXCHANGES
Drew, MacDill and Benjamin Fields-Satisfaction Guaranteed



United Optical Dispensary

Manufacturing Opticians
205 Zack St. Discount to All In Uniform Phone M.5783





KAt You rService! .


917 FRANKLIN ST. -


TAMPA


OPEN EVENINGS UNTIL 8 P. M. O'CLOCK


Page 3


-------.~ ---~ ---~


=








Page 4


nlilll Elilllmll E lllNImllmi lilUiriE iI



9th Fighters
Illi lliME l lllnillnilllllin ii llni illliii llll i IE
By CPL. MIKE DODD

If you ha-ppen to notice a wig-
wam in one of our tent rows,
think nothing of it. It's the abode
of Sgt. Harry "Chief" DeMarr, of
the Red race, and a more efficient
short sheeter never walked the
face of the earth. Sometime ago,
1st Sgt. Bob Dubberly had fore-
sight enough to keep all axes out
of the Indian's reach, for occa-
sionally he emits a blood-curdling
whoop, and bingo! he's on the
war path again. Sgt. Dubberly
doesn't want any of his men to
get scalped, hence all axes, knives,
and other weapons a-re kept out of
the Chief's sight. About the first
of each month, Sgt. DeMarr sheds
his civilized nature, takes on his
native personality, and .concocts
heap bad medicine. Then it's time
to look out.

The old timers here at Drew
Field were chagrined to learn that
Sgt. Ollie L. Futral has returned.
A few months ago he left for New
Orleans and the boys heaved a
sigh of relief because now they
would have a chance with the
Tampa gals. They were also hop-
ing he wouldn't tarry long there,
but would be sent farther away
to Alaska or Iceland or some re-
mote place. The boys didn't greet
the sergeant with a brass band;
in fact, they didn't even know he
was coming, but when some of the
gals, started breaking dates with
them, they knew he must be back.
Oh, unhappy day!

To me, the city of Pittsburgh
was the Smoky City, city of
rugged industry, and when I
thought of love and romance, I
visualized Hollywood with its
glamorous girls and romantic
movies. Recently, the city of
smoke made a contribution to our
company in the person of Joe
Teresak, who admitted he was
the best cook west of Hoboken.
But our story doesn't concern
such a material thing as cooking,


but rather love. When this com-
pany was stationed at New Or-
leans, Joe met the most beautiful
French lass he had ever lost a
night's sleep over. It was love
at first sight. The two lovers
would bill and coo on the beaches
and in the park, and we knew
they were meant for each other
and that a romance had blos-
somed that would last forever.
This story reads like fiction. Alas,
the two birds, love birds, were
parted, for it seems that the
Army had other plans for Joe.
So, off to Tampa he came, leav-
ing his weeping flower in New
Orleans to cry her little heart out.
But, happy to say, their little
story isn't over. This week the
swain and his lass will be re-
united. If you see two lovers in
the park, all cuddled up cheek to
cheek, he whispering sweet noth-
ings in her ear, just remember
this story. Let's hope it has a
beautiful ending.


Meet Pet Squirrel, B-17, Jr.


Three period jabs: 1st Sgt. Bob
Dubberly had his picture snapped .
recently with an el ropo stinko f
hanging from his jaw. "You can
even smell the thing in the pic-
ture," remarked one of his non- ....
comes. Sgt. Tom Izzo asked me .
to give him a plug in this get off,
so for the benefit of the gal he
left behind him, here 'tis .
Pvt. Charlie Drusky announcedgt. William La
he was going on the network on
a coast to coast .hook-up last Fri- The nine-week-old, diminutive
day night as a radio announcer, gray squirrel pictured above with
Charlie doesn't exactly stutter, his owner, Sgt. William Lape, has
but once in a while his tongue been named B-17, Jr.-Jerk, for
gets out of harmony with his short-and adopted as the mascot
brain and his words do sound a of the sergeant's outfit, the 690th
little on the stuttering s-s-side Frontier.
Sgt. Baily (Gunga Din) Lee, who The sergeant acquired him only
cuts quite a fancy figure with the i several weeks ago while on a fur-
femmes, is hearing regularly from lough at his home in Columbus,
Miss Somebody back in New Or- j Ohio. Lape asserts that wherever
leans Notice where soldiers he goes he is overshadowed by
can escort their dates out to the tiny squirrel who attracts con-
Honeymoon Island. Fine idea siderable attention because of his
Another fine idea: Dodd is fur- beauty and antics. Women, espe-
loughing home this week-end, cially, are attracted to the little
animal.
The woman autoist posed for a a .
The woman autoist posed for a B-17, Jr., was a very active ro-
snapshot in front of the fallen
dent while the above picture was
pillars of an ancient temple. being snapped by the photogra-
"Don't get the car in the pic- pher. He raced up and down and
ture," she said, "or my husband around the sergeant's person. Ac-
will think I ran into the place."


pe and B-17, Jr.


UHIII lIIf l lllglll lllltlWIII l i lll uli llU I lnN II li gI Il lll g i lultm m u

690th Maneuvers
Illll~i lliillu lll l lll Ml ii rillllllllMW IIglIllM
By. S/SGT. JIM KELLEY
Capt. Russell M. George an-
nounces that at this Sunday's
inspection the following men will
be awarded diplomas for success-
ful completion of school. In the
Radar Department: Pvt. Steve
Zimnewicz, Pfc. Robert C. Mayew,
Pvt. Joseph M. Osborne, Pvt. Rus-
sell H. Brazeal, Pvt. Charles W.
Thompson; in the Administration
Department: Pfc. Thaddeus F.
Fiut; in Motor Transport, Cpl.
William Eagle.
The 690th is quite proud of its
school records. Almost every man
in the company has received a
diploma for successful completion
in more than one school: A few
of our men have completed all of
the schools here at Drew Field. It
might be well to add that the
majority of the grades are
superior, excellent and very satis-
factory.
Sgt. Michael Hallahan and Cpl.
ConIrad Erickson have just re-
ceived orders to report at Ft.
Monmouth to start training in 0.
C. S.
*S/Sgt. Jim Kelley and Sgt.
Charles Teed are impatiently wait-
ing orders to proceed to the O. C.
S. in the air corps at Miami, Flor-
ida.


cording to Lape, the squirrel is We are all quite satisfied with
a good soldier, his favorite detail our new home here at the base.
being that of bunk fatigue. The Most of us have put in over five
squirrel divides his sleeping time months in Tent City, and have
between his owner's shirt pocket looked upon the base with envious
and a slit in the tent. Occasionally eyes for so long that we now feel
B-17, Jr., runs away, butl he al- that we are really in the class. We
ways returns, hope our part in the Drew Field
The tiny creature's eating maneuvers is over for quite a
The tiny creature's eating
habits are strictly G. I. He eats while.
At present we have four men.
everything that a soldier eats. He At present we have four men
likes baked beans and potatoes, attending O. C. S. in the signal
but prefers walnuts. And he corps at Ft. Monmouth. They are
drinks Coca-Cola. Cpls. William Folkman, Thomas
Phillips, Carl Walter, John Lin-
genfelter. We also have Pvts.
Pvt. One: "When I get out of Don Marinov ich and Charles
the Army, I'm going to marry Thompson attending the radio
some nice poor girl and settle
some nice poor girl and settle electricians' course at the Univers-
down."
down" ity of Florida.
Pvt. Two: "When I get out, ity of Florida.
Pvt. Two: n Ii get Pvt. Nicholas D'Ecsery is one of
I'm going to marry a rich girl and the boys who have just received
settle up.the boys who have just received
settle up." citizenship papers.


St. Petersburg and the Gulf Beaches.

Offer Service Men, their Families and their Friends Unlimited Recreation in the Waters of Tampa Bay, Boca Ciega
Bay, Gulf of Mexico. BATHING BOATING FISHING
Delightful Places in which to Spend an Hour, a Day, a Week or More.
The friendly beaches at St. Petersburg, Pass-A-Grille, St. Petersburg Beach, Treasure Island, Madeira Beach and
Redington Beach offer the utmost in recreation to be found on the West Coast of Florida. The clear sparkling waters
of the Bay and the Gulf provide unlimited bathing. Boats, both large and small, are always available for pleasure
trips. From fishing piers and from fishing boats, the followers of Isaac Walton can enjoy their sport. The many miles
of Sandy Beaches offer freedom from the cities' heat and permit privacy for groups both large and small. The fine
: hotels, cabins and apartments offer the best of services at reasonable cost. The cafes and restaurants are known for
fine foods. The nite clubs offer unlimited entertainment. The progressive merchants of the area are well-known for
their fine merchandise and services. Collectively, these many attractions make St. Petersburg and the Gulf Beaches a
most ideal place in which to enjoy life in a care-free way.
EASILY REACHED WITHIN LESS THAN AN HOUR BY CAR OR BUS FROM TAMPA
These Friendly Merchants Invite You 'lo St. Petersburg And The Gulf Beaches


HOTELS

ROOMS


CABINS CLUBS BARS GARAGES SERVICE STATIONS DRUGS SUNDRIES
LODGINGS ENTERTAINMENT SERVICES MERCHANDISE
APARTMENTS THEATRES RESORTS BARBERS UTILITIES GIFTS SUPPLIES


At St. Petersburg

Furnished Moder Rooms

75c SINGLE $1.25 DOUBLE

Also Housekeeping Rooms

913 7th Avenue North

Tel. Easy Washer 68-034

CLUBS BARS
ENTERTAINMENT
THEATRES RESORTS


At St. Petersburg


Beer Mixed Drinks


Wine


Liquor
BAR PACKAGE
Lowest Prices

HORSE SHOE BAR
37 9th Street North
Free Delivery Phone


6370


At St. Petersburg

-Wonder Bar And Grill
Headquarters for Service Men
BEER, LIQUOR and WINE
172 Central Ave. Phone 6133

At St. Petersburg

Sportsman Billiard Parlor
228 Central Avenue

St. Pete, Fla., Phone 50-612

At St. Petersburg
Big Crab Tavern
Beer, Wine, Coffee, Tea, Sand-
wiches, Sea Food, Chowders
A friendly place welcomes you
MIXED DRINKS
760 Central Ave.

At St. Petersburg

VARSITY GRILL
HOME COOKED MEALS
961 Central Avenue


At St. Petersburg

Coker's Beauty Shop
866 1st Ave. N. Phone 7373


At St. Petersburg
Welcome to soldiers and their
Families

Carbone Beauty Shop


722 Central Ave.


Phone 7529


At St. Petersburg
WELCOME TO U. S. ARMY

-from--

Wholesale Distributors of

HAV-A-TAMPA

CIGARS


At St. Petersburg


HEADQUARTERS-
Fishing Tackle


CENTRAL HDW., Inc.


662 Central Avenue



At St. Petersburg

Welcome Army Boys
To the Best Tourist City
and to


CANNING

618 Central Avenue
Draperies, Upholstering, Awnings


St. Petersburg, Florida


DRUGS SUNDRIES
MERCHANDISE
GIFTS SUPPLIES

At St. Petersburg

Frank's LIQUOR STORE
147 Central Ave. Ph. 4342
FREE DELIVERY
Imported Wines And Liquors


At St. Petersburg

Greetings From-


MANGELS

449 Central Avenue


Ladies Ready-To-Wear


At St. Petersburg
Welcome to the U. S. Army

Duval Jewelry Company
343 Central Avenue


i=1111


Friday, July 10, 1.942,


DREFW F`TELD) ECHOES


- A_








Friday .Tilv 10 1494


DREW FIELD ECHOES


] cheese, crackers, pickles and a
3rd Rent. Co. 503rd Regt. Variety of candy. It's no wonder
he is able to maintain his rotund
N O T figure and we may as well help
him dispose of his store of food.
After all, we wouldn't want it to
spoil. And you can thank the
Iy THIOMAS W. DUGAN little woman for all of it.


Imagine finding the three great
lovers of all time-Romeo, Casa-
nova. and Anthony (of Cleopatra
fame)-all in one company or-
derly room. But believe it or not
they actually exist in this com-
pany. Romeo Stanley, Casanova
Dray and Anthony Ness. We have
heard the many exciting episodes
of Romeo and Casanova, but what
of Anthony? Where, oh' where, is
his Cleopatra? And we wonder if
Romeo's Juliet is only 16?

Who ever heard of a fellow who
likes KP so well that he asks to
be made permanent on that duty?
Pvt. Phelps, who did, just that,
seems to fare well at it. You can
see it keeps him well-fed and it
is showing up just about one fin-
ger south of his chin. Who ever
said the Army wouldn't build
you up?

The fellows here are thinking


501 st. Regt.
Plant Field



REPORTS

By PFC. HARRY J. ZIGUN

The men of the 501st don't
agree with Shakespeare's philos-


pany is going over the top in the burg," and that's all there is to
War Bond Drive. ft. Answers must be sent in all
THINGS WE DIDN'T KNOW at once, and must be in the mail.
TILL NOW: Cpl. Frank Richard- not later than midnight Monday.
son, of Signal HQS. Co., was the The winner will be announced
first commercial artist in the Thursday morning, and the lucky
U.S. to volunteer for military boy may name the day he wishes
service. He enlisted Sept. 18, to dine and go to the show.
1940. Richardson was an artist The contest started Monday
of note in New York City and for morning, July 6, and ends Satur-
many years had lettered the cov- day morning, July 11. But
ers of such magazines as Harper's there'll be a new contest each
Bazaar, Vogue, Vanity Fair, week until further notice, so if
House Beautiful and Cosmopoli- you don't win the first time. don't
tan. along with illustrations and give up.
designs for many national adver-
tisers. He is a descendant of Rob-
ert Burns, the poet, and of Ad-
miral Ludlow of the U.S. Navy.


BUY MORE BONDS


PALM AVENUE
BAPTIST CHURCH

WELCOME

Bible School 9:45 A. M.
Worship 11:00 A. M.
Training Union 6:40 P. M.
Worship 8:00 P. M.


ophy that "hanging and wiving Song Contest
go by destiny." If the rate of s


marriages increases, we'll need a
separate column for announce-
ments.
Sgt. Chapter, Tech Sgt. .\.
Donelly, both of HQ. Plotting Bn,
and Staff Sgt. Alfred B. Hilton of
Communications Co., have an-
nounced their forthcoming mar-
riages. We wish you luck, fellows.
After an announcement of mar-
riages, what is the most natural
news? You're right. Babies. The


of starting a boating club. That regiment extends congratulations
new canal just behind our last to Capt. and Mrs. Frank'J. Con-
tent row is an excellent spot for ley, who were blessed with a baby
such activity. Of course, with all boy. Baby's name-Frank J. Con-
the rain we have been having, we ley, Jr. PFC Jack Henock, of
could just as well use the com-" Signal HQS. Co., and wife have
pany streets. Last week a couple announced the birth of a baby
of the tents were veritable house- boy who weighs 91/2 pounds. Pvt.
boats. John A. Peterson of the same
Co. is the proud father of a baby


As usual, there is a lot of
stringing along when it comes to
advising a younger fellow soldier.
Pvt. Harvey McLane, age 19, is
planning on a furlough and your
editor hopes he gets it. But his
high hopes went smashing to the
around when one of the fellows
told him that soldiers under 21
must be accompanied by a chape-
ron when traveling.

We all like an occasional snack
just before hitting the hay in the
evening and so, fellows, I'll let
you in on a little secret. Pfc.
Louie Roeller, has plenty of pro-
visions. In the barracks bag in
the corner you can find salami,


girl.
NEWS HERE AND THERE:
Maj. Henry R. Chamberlin has
good reason to be proud. His son
recently graduated from VMI and
is a now a. Second Lieut. with the
242nd Coast Arill Artillery at Ft.
Michie, N. Y. Sgt. Bob Par-
tride, company clerk of Signal
HQS. Co., is a patient at the hos-
pital. We all miss you, Egghead,
especially acting 1st Sgt. Leroy
Fox Pvt. Aronivici, of the
HQ. Plotting Co., who was con-
fined to the hospital, is well again
and back with his company. His
buddies say he is the best cook
in the Army 1st Sgt. Pratt of
HQ. Plotting Bn. says his com-


(Continued from Page 1)

Esther Howarth on WTSP will
play one record without an-
nouncing the name of the num-
ber nor the band which plays it.
All you have to do is identify
both correctly for six days. Then
send in your six answers together
with not more than 50 words
stating "Why I Like St. Peters-





Air Base Bus


Lines, Inc.

30 Minute Service to Both
Fields At Al Hours




V


15 Minute Service
During Rush Hours







For Further Information


Call 3286


LAWRENCE HERNANDEZ
CHARLEY'S PLACE, BEER
GARDEN

To the New Service Men in the Tampa Area. We are MARLBORO HOTEL
pleased to have you with us, and hope your stay will be ARLINGTON HOTEL
a ple t o. SMITH'S BICYCLE SHOP
a pleasant one. LINEN'S INC.
LINEN'S INC.
GURSTIE'S BEER PARLOR MARCUS GROCERY CRENSHAW PRODUCE CO.
GARCIA'S CAFE McEWEN LUMBER CO. COATES STANDARD SPRINK-
J. C. HARTNESS LASTINGER & GRAY FURN. CO. LER CO.
GENERAL LUMBER CO. FLAMINGO CAFE LELAND B. CHAPMAN
FRITZ & HUGO AUTO PAINT ROXY BAR MARGARET E. BOSFIELD
SHOP HAYMAN JEWELRY CO. J. CARL BELLAMY
FLORIDA AUTO & GAS ENGINE KNOX HOTEL HELEN ADDISON
CO. MELBIN M. EUDY FRANCIS ALESSI
ESTUARY BAR LOPEZ FEED DISTRIBUTORS CLYDE PERRY
PAT BALDWIN, INC. SERVICE WAREHOUSE CO. REV. JOHN W. BRANSCOMB
TAMPA SHEET METAL WORKS J. M. RAMSEY INS. CO. De SOTO AUTO PARKING
GROCER & BUTCHER MACH- SOUTHERN GOLF CO., SPORT- LAWRENCE LACAN
INE EXCHANGE ING GOODS R. C. HUFFMAN CONSTR. CO.
FRANKS DRY CLEANERS A FRIEND OF FLA.
LINCOLN SUNDRY STORE SHAW ELECTRIC AVON PRODUCTS, INC.
PEARSON TERMITE TREAT- O. L. SCHULSTAD REAL ALLGOOD & RYE GROCERS
MENT ESTATE CACCIATORE BROS. MEATS
ROY HUNTER, LUNCH OTTO P. STALLINGS & SON, BRANTS BAKERY
A FRIEND INSURANCE PIONEER TIRE CO.
GRECO FLORAL SHOP SMITH & PORTION, INC. ROYAL GROCERY & MARKET
HUTTO'S CAFE CENTRAL OIL CO. INC. JENKINS GROCERY
HILLSBORO HOTEL BARBER DR. B. M. MOODIE NASH HIGGINS
SHOP GANDY BLVD. SERVICE STA. CROWN DISTRIBUTORS
DR. WHITE SIMMONS MRS. ISAAC'S CAMEO TEA CASCADE CIGAR STORE
MR. JOE LANGHOFF ROOM AIRPORT GOLF CLUB
HOME RESTAURANT BOYD'S SERVICE STATION CHICK'S LOUNGE & BEER
EMERICK LUMBER CO. CLEAN PRODUCTS CO. GARDEN
ARMANDO BEAUTY SHOP FONTE CHICKEN MARKET CENTRAL RADIO & NEWS
H. W. HILGEMANN CONSTR. BELL BAKERIES, INC. CUBA CAFE
PALLADY WATROUS, R. E. SEMINOLE FURNITURE CO. CIRCULO CUBANO CLUB
A FRIEND MORNINGSIDE APTS. COLUMBIA VENDING CO.
FRANK E. JAMES SERV. STA. F. C. MORRIS, R. E. CITRO DRY, INC.
CAMP COMFORT MOTOR MOORHOUSE REALTY CO. VICTORIA'S SANDWICHES
COURT PROFESSIONAL INS. CORP. WARING'S FISHING CAMP
LA NORMA COFFEE MILLS E. P. ABBOTT FLORIDA MOTOR LINES
KINCHAFOONEE MILLING CO. ABE HYMAN GROCERY ADAMS PRESCRIPTION SHOP
FRANK'S BAKERY DR. R. E. MYERS FRANK C. FASSETT
LA NUOVA VITA, INC. GRO. DR. HERMAN 0. ULRICH HORNER PHARMACY
TAMPA SIGNAL CO. BURGLAR IDEAL COTTAGES TOURIST DAVIS SERVICE STATION
ALARM I COURT DEMMII'S MARKET & GROCERY


HERCHEL C. ANDERSON
HI HAT CAFE
N. J. DRIVERS
W. B. GRAY, R.E.
P. BARROW CO.
A FRIEND
FORD PLUMBING CO.
BOBS CORNER GROCERY
FLORIDA CABS, INC.
ARMORY SERVICE STATION
CELESTE'S GIFT SHOP
CLARK'S AUTO PARTS (USED)
AURORA'S BEAUTY SALON
APTE BROS. CANNERIES
BROADWAY ICE CO., INC.
CREIGHTON BROS. AWNING
CO.
FLORIDA MOTOR & ARMA-
TURE WORKS
ROBERT M. BROWN DREDG-
ING CO.
MYERS DENTAL LABORATORY
AMUSEMENT CORP. OF AMER.
I. W. PHILLIPS & CO.
EL PARAISO CAFE
EDDIE'S FLA. AVE. LIQUOR
STORE
EL ENCANTO CLEANERS &
TAILORS
JOE & !SON GROCERY
EDGEWATER HOTEL
M. & B. AUTO PARTS
WILLIE'S SERVICE STATION
DR. ROBT. G. NELSON
A FRIEND
GLEN'S PLACE
JACK'S AUTO SUPPLY CO.
DR. H. MASON SMITH
ANNA'S BEAUTY SHOP
PLATT STREET FLORIST
DR. HARPER E. WHITAKER
DR. D. D. MARTIN
GRAHAMS SANITARY SUP-
PLIES
DR. E. B. WOODS
DR. ROSS ARMOUR
FRANK M. HENDERSON


FLORIDA SEA FOOD MARKET
DR. JULIO GAVILLA
A FRIEND
CORY'S GROCERY
GULF BAG & BURLAP CO.
DR. A. A. GONZALEZ
HELEN & WANDA'S BEAUTY
SHOP
PERRY PAINT, & GLASS 0O.
BOARD OF UNDERWRITERS
OF N. Y.
LAYCOCK ARMATURE WORKS
JOHN M. ALLISON, ATTY.
BURNS FLORIDA CORP.
LERNER SHOPS OF FLORIDA
FLORIDAN HOTEL
HUMPHREY & McGREGOR,
BROKERS
EDWIN THOMAS
FISK CLOTHING & JEWELRY
CO.
ANCHOR APPLIANCE 0O.
ED. F. McNENNY
PETE'S PLACE
Y. M. H. A.
DR. MIGUEL F. DIAZ
E. B. GREGORY, INS.
WEST COAST ROOFING WKS.
AMERICUS RESTAURANT
LERA GROCERY
KIECKHEFER CONTAINER 00.
LaMAR GROCERY & MARKET
LA NUEVA ERA GRO. CO.
MRS. ROBERT P. KOCKER
LA REGULADORA COFFEE CO.
FLORIDA FYR-FYTER SALES
& SERVICE
C. A. FIELLAND, CONSTR.
LA EPOCA GROCERY
JOHN McQUADE PAINT 00.
FERNANDEZ & GARCIA MEN'S
SHOP
GREEN'S RESTAURANT
FLORIDA MACHINE & ENGI-
NEERING CO.
GOURLIE MUSIC 0O.
GOFF JEWELRY CO.


Page 5


0 LV V -O-/








Fair (3 DRWFEDEHE rdy uy1.14


Where To Go! What To Do: Promising Young.

DURING OFF-DUTY Tenor Now Sings
HOURS In Drew Shows
.L~1~h~p,.- t..,ar a ,i 1 fhI


Dininlg Etrtl~~anmentell Dancing




rr..~ Il


couovert loe
Noimum tO6
Minimum O jP


HOTL

T TI ''i
AMIPATHERRACiEWJ^B


LUj


ROLLER SKATING


'I,

Ii


COLISEUM

Davis Islands
AFTERNOON
2:30 till 5

NIGHT 8 till 11
Except Monday

5c FARE ON DAVIS

ISLAND BUSES

Leaving Grant's Comer
Franklin and Cass Streets

7:15 -- 7:45 -- 8:15

Diamond Cabs 10c

THE SOUTH'S FINEST


't- SKATING RINK


At Drew Field Mess Sgt. Cesar
Longo is just another non-com-
missioned officer. But in Balti-
more, Md., a city which has con-
tributed numerous stars to the
Metropolitan Opera Company, he
was a, student singer of much
promise.
About 17 years ago, when only
six, Sgt. Longo early displayed
his vocal talents when he sang be-
fore members of the Metropolitan
Opera chorus while the New York
troupe stopped off on tour in
Baltimore.
At the age of 19 he impressed
members of the Metropolitan
Opera so favorably that they ad-
vised him to develop his voice
under a good vocal teacher. He
followed their advice and for
three years prior to entering the
Army he studied under the tute-
lage of the late celebrated church


Where To Go! What To Do!
DURING OFF-DUTY
HOURS
Dining Entertaimnent Dancing


musician, Monsignor Leo P. Man-
zetti.
Sgt. Longo, who bears a strik-
ing resemblance to the famous
tenor, Enrico Caruso, both in ap-
pearance and voice, possesses a
rare vocal equipment, that of a
dramatic tenor. Edward Johnson,
-general manager of the Metropoli-
tan Opera Co., once said that dra-
matic tenors are as rare as hen's
teeth.
Acquainted with some of the
nation's outstanding musicians
and symphonic orchestra leaders,
Sgt. Longo includes among his
patrons such celebrities as Arturo
Toscanini, former conductor for
the N.B.C. Symphony Orchestra,
and Pietro Yon, organist and
choirmaster of the famed St.
Patrick's Cathedral, New York
City.
Of Italian origin, Longo's fam-
ily is nevertheless 100% against
Mussolini. Their patriotism is un-
questionable, both being citizens
of the United States, and both of
their sons are serving as non-
commissioned officers in the
Army of the United States. Six
Where To Go! What To Do!
DURING OFF-DUTY
HOURS
Dining Entertainment Dancing


Elliston's Drug Store
Phone H 1645
202 \V. Lafayette St., TAMPA
Fountain Service and Lunches


All Service Men are Welcome
BARCELONA CAFE
SPANISH RESTAURANT
Wines and Liquors
Phone S2142 Open All Night
4714 Nebraska and Osborne


By OPL. JOHN F. SUSZYNSKI
Last week's BAND NOTES
gave you a bit of an introduction
to some of our personnel; this
week we hope to get past the
verse (nope-I didn't say "worse"
... OUC H!).
Prospective bandsmen will be
seeing Sergeant, instead of Cor-
poral, Eaton these days-Con-
gratuations, Sarge. If anyone
doubts that the Band is a Morale
Unit, just see Russ Hoier (last
week's low caste Bugler); he's
sporting a Pfc. in front of his
name now-and he's got brand

months after entering the army,
Sgt. Longo was promoted to Mess
Sergeant.
The youthful sergeant has con-
tinued to indulge his talents in
his spare time from his soldierly
studies. In a Tampa church he re-
cently sang a few solos from the
Requiem Mass for the late Gen-
eral Tinker, the Air Corps officer
lost in the Pacific while on duty,
and he acquitted himself well.
Sgt. Longo expects to con-
tinue his operatic aspirations
after the war is over. He hopes
to emulate his fellow Baltimore-
ans, John Charles Thomas, Robert
Weede, Hilda Burke, Lansing
Hatfield and Ellwood Gary, all of
whom are stars of the Metropoli-
tan Opera, by following them to
this top-ranking organization of
American opera.

"How are you on punctuation,
soldier?"
"Just great, sarge. Me, I ain't
been late a minute in me life."
Where To Go! What To Do:
DURING OFF-DUTY
HOURS
Dining Entertainment Dancing


Davis Plate Lunch,
We Serve the Best 25c Plate Lunch in Tampa
Only the Finest Quality of Foods Used
A LA CARTE SERVICE
306 FRANKLIN STREET PHONE M 64-913

SOLDIERS
THE EAGLE PATIO
Has been designed to make your leisure hours
As Pleasant -As Possible
Ice Cream, Soft Drinks, Beer, Wine, Fun And Music
1709 North Howard Avenue


new Pfc's. Austin Plante, and
Joseph Regis Jr. to keep him
company. Pfc. Plante, saxist
from Oshkosh, Wis., is the vet-
eran soldier of our gang and he
is reading up on the LONGEVITY
BULLETINS the War Department
is issuing lately. Pfc. Regis,
horn-player, has been on Uncle
Sam's payroll for the past six or
seven years-as postmaster of
Rimersburg, Penna.-he is still
working for the same boss, but
with a change in scenery and a
"slight" change in salary.,
The past week brought us two
newcomers: Pvts. Gordon 0.
Booth, Trumpeter of St. Peters-
burg (right out of our own back-
yard); and Henry J. Costello Jr.,
Philadelphia reed-man. Both
these men have established repu-
tations as musicians, and enlisted
in the Army with the express pur-
pose of joining our Band-we are
flattered, and glad to have you-
WELCOME.
Pvts. Bernard S. Kowalski,
drummer, and Sam J. Schiavone,
sax man, ought to be getting their
heads together the latter part of
this week to talk over the Brook-
lyn situation (or something)-
that's their hometown. Kowalski
will be back crowing about his
furlough-but Schiavone can off-
set that by serenading Barney
with his off-pitch, three-for-a-
dime fife.
Pvt. Will Krewson of Phila-
delphia, the mighty mite of our
gang, plays drums and wants to
be a glider. He's a popular fellow
too .but, maybe Elaine's
(that's the gal friend) cookies
and candies, which we all sample,
have something to do with his so-
cial prestige here.
That leaves only your scribe to
complete the Band's personnel to
date. It seems that he is just a
guy who started out to be a musi-
cian in McKees Rocks, suburban
Pittsburg, Penna., and then "re-
formed" by going to work for a
living. He's back now to his
"first-love" .. or, can it be,
"Second Childhood?"
iSo long, now-we'll give you
the chorus next week.

The fat man and his wife were
returning to their seats in the
theater after the intermission.
"Did I tread on your toes as I
went out?" he asked a man at the
end of the row.
"You did," replied the other
grimly, expecting an apology at
least.
The fat man turned to his wife,
"All right, Mary," he said "this
is our row."
Where To Go! What To Do!
DURING OFF-DUTY
HOURS
Dining Entertainment Dancing


Sulphur


Springs


TAMPA'S PLAYGROUNDS 7;%

Invites All Service Men to Enjoy Its Recreation Facilities '

The famous Sulphur Springs are well known thruout all America. Their clear sparkling
waters provide unlimited swimming. About these springs has been built an unexcelled recreation
park, offering many forms of recreation and entertainment. And adjacent to the Park, the
friendly business people offer every service obtainable anywhere. Easily reached from downtown
Tampa, a visit to Sulphur Springs will prove most enjoyable. These friendly merchants invite
all service men to enjoy the facilities of Sulphur Springs during their off-duty hours.


Phone S-5073 Prompt Delivery
PARK LIQUOR STORE
"The Home of Good Spirits"
8112 Nebraska Ave.
Sulphur Springs, Florida


SERVICEMEN
KEEP IN TRIM
CARPET GOLF
-18 HOLES-
15c- First Round
lOc-Additional Rounds


WELCOME SERVICE MEN :

Swim at the SULPHUR SPRINGS POOL L
: BUS AND STREET CAR TO POOL Natural Springs-Temperature 72


Sulphur Springs Hotel
and Cafe
Special Attention to all
Servicemen
Arcade Building


Madison Drug Company
Franklin and Madison Street
Where the Men of the Armed Service Shop and Eat
We Are Anxious to Be of Service


SANDERS DRUG

COMPANY



8124 Nebraska Ave.


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Frid~iay, July 16,, 1942


Page 6








rluy, JUly l 1LV DIOg


NI

309th SERVICE


HQ and HQ Squadron
By CPL. ANDREW PATERSON
We welcome back to the fold,
Pvt. Raymond Weld, who has just
returned from home after a 15
day furlough. Pvt. Weld had been
sick for about two months at Mac-
Dill, and it is certainly nice seeing
him back on the job.

We are about to face the su-
preme test, the obstacle course,
but we are looking forward to it
with keen anticipation. From
what we have seen, it really is
a honey and will be a real test
for all of us. This will give us
an opportunity to see if our morn-
ing exercises have done much to
help our stamina and staying
power. Personally I think most of
us have noticed a change in the
short time we have been exercis-
ing, but we will have to report on
the outcome in the column next
week. Just let's say "Let No One
Fall 'by the Wayside."

Last nite the heat had your
scribe down, and he found it dif-
ficult to enjoy the arms of Mor-
pheus, but did not mind it as the
strange noises emanating from his
more fortunate sleeping mates af-
forded him an opportunity for a
quiz program by himself, trying
to distinguish from whence the
particular sounds came from and
what the men could possibly be
dreaming. Of course it was easy
to identify "Jockey" Wright.
"Jockey" had been on guard duty
on the trash truck and must have
thought he was. still on duty, be-
cause he was certainly telling the
detail where to put this and that.
I will say one thing for "Jockey,"
he did not seem to have any trou-
ble finding words and expressions,
for he talked clearly all nite long.
I wonder how he was making out
in the card game? All he would


say on that was "Play the Aces"
(not a bad idea at that). Strange
as it seems, the majority of men
talk in their sleep, and when they
all sound off together, the
Chicago Round Table has nothing


69th Fighter Squadron chow line. It must stretch all the te
F Hangar Line Chatter way to MaDill.P
tu
E Group By T/SGT. A.STYRSKY The Soldier Who Had a
If you've had the pleasure to al
327 Service Squadron witness those sweet landings No Oki Winfe
these P-39D's were making on in
By PFC. T. G. MEO Monday and Tuesday of this week, w
Now that the 327th Materiel you've probably remarked "Boy, Field slier frm ichita, Kan- D
Squadron has changed its name to there's a pilot." And pilot it was, b
S quadron has changedron, its certainly rather two of them. Those fea- sas, was sitting on his bed after st
Sservince squadron, it'si certainly rthr-like landings wf them e bfe reveille the other morning, listen-
living up to its name. In the pat ther-like landings were made by ing to the radio. Suddenly hearing b
week we went after three crack- 1st Lt. S. J. Fuller, and st Lt. his name called, he jumped to at-
ups. One of these crack-ups was H. J. Whiteman of 3rd Fighter
assigned to our squadron for re- Comm. They were at one time test W
pairs, under the guiding hand and pilots for the Bell Aircraft Co. Where To Go! What To Do
watchful eye of Mr. Roan, our Have you seen our line chief, DURING OFF-DUTY
Engineering Officer, and his able Master Sergeant Fritz? If you HOURS
staff. It won't be long now till have, you've probably noticed he Dining Entertainment Dancing I
this airplane will be flying mer- doesn't say much. But I warn you,
rily along once again in the sky. when he does speak you'd better : GLEN'S BILLARDS C
Years ago Benjamin Franklin hustle about your work.* "Where Service Men Meet"
said, "Early to bed and early to The 69th doesn't understand .
rise makes a boy healthy, wealthy the purpose of the armed guard
and wise." No wonder all the boys by the hangar coke machine. B I L L I A R D S
are losing no time getting up for Must be an anti-aircraft gun CIGARS CIGARETTES
early morning exercise. Keepp camouflaged, for we are otal- BEER WINES
the good work, boys, and you may lowed to approach it. And heaven SANDWICHES
be able to give Charles Atlas a help any of us who tries to put a 912 Florida Avenue
few lessons in your spare time on nickel in it.
how to build muscles. One fellow I admire is T-Sgt.
No wonder Pvt. Jones and Pvt. Williams of the 69th. He is as MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT
Bittner are happy. Not because of industrious as a bee, and it is GEORGE'S BILL
the raise in pay, but because their common knowledge that he has BASEBALL SO
wives are now visiting Tampa. We never lost his temper, no matter
hope they are enjoying their stay how rough the going. 2222 E. BROADWAY
as much as you boys are enjoying The tall, powerful figure of
their being with you. Captain Call 'back one the flying WELCOME .
One of our T/Sgts. is having his line was a welcome sight for us. Service Men and Friends to the
hands full trying to keep his girl He's a hurricane when it comes SWING CLUB
from falling in love with a Signal to getting a job done and he's a "A nice place for nice people"
Corps private. Don't worry, Ser- man we don't mind working for. Dancing and Refreshments
geant, just because he can play If you seek action in the form 5008Memorial Highway
the piano, it must be infatuation of rollicking .dominoes, see Cpl. Phone H-2184
on her part, but with your looks Peterson of our Armament crew. Fine Spanish Food
it must be love. Better bring 50 or a 100 dollars Delicious Cuban Sherbets
We wonder why all the belles with you however if you intend to urban Sandwiches
Plenty Parking Space
from Tampa were following compete with him. It is rumored Lo Helados De Ybor
S/Sgt. Qualey last pay day? One that he was born with a pair of Los Helados De Ybo
wouldn't think that he was the dice in his mouth. 14th St.ne Y-3505h Avenue
Barrymore type to look at him. Well, about time for chow.-
We later found out that he was Holy Mackerel-Look at that ior a I
unpaid for (6) months, and at MaX S Liquor Bar
last his ship came home bringing Where To Go! What To Do! WINES LIQUORS CIGARS
his pay in a lump sum of $50,0.46. DURING OFF-DUTY FREE DELIVERY SERVICE
We wonder how much he has left HOURS 1601 E. COLUMBUS DR.
after his merrymaking? Dining Entertainment Dancing PHONE Y-1281
What S/Sgt. has to thumb a VALENCIA GARDEN -Keep 'Em Flying-
ride home from Clearwater while VALE A A
his fellow companion slumbers in Restaurant Rubin's Restaurant
a nearby lawn? WE SERVE THE FINEST OF
SPANISH FOODS FINEST SPANISH FOOD
1st Cannibal: "Am I late for 811 Grand Central IN TAMPA
dinner?" Phone H-3773 1403 Tampa Street
2nd Cannibal: "Yeah, every- ARe CONDITIONED
S..+. Phone M52-073


entio and said "Yes, sir."
No officer was in sight, and
private Hayenga's face suddenly
Lrned red as he heard the radio
announcer describe Hayenga's
ixiety about a younger brother
I the army who had no wife work-
Lg at home to whom he could
rite for money.
Hayenga later discovered his
buddies in the tent had spilled the
;ory to the radio announcer who
broadcasts the morning "Drew
field Presents" program each
ay.

Where To Go! What To Do!
DURING OFF-DUTY
HOURS
)ining Entertainment Dancing

cigars, Cigarettes, Soft Drinks,
Beer and Sandwiches
204 South Polk St.

Welcome To
Italian Foods Liquor-Beer
El Trocadero
-DANCING-
C. K. Hebble, Mgr.
1701 E. Brodway Ph Y 1i391



IARD PARLOR
RES RETURNS
YBOR CITY


TheI CATTERBOX
Chicken and Steaks
Real Italian Spaghetti
Sandwiches Drinks Liquors
Abba Dabba & Band Nightly
707 S. Howard Ave., Ph. H3757

BEER AND WINE
You May Go Far-
But you must spend an evening
-at-
M. MILLER'S BAR
1111 FLORIDA




KEEP'EM FLYING!'

WE KEEP 'EM EATING
MAC DILL DREW

THE WHITE HOUSE
RESTAURANT
Morgan and Twiggs


on barracks 'T-214. ouuy s eaten.
Where To Go! What To Do!
Once again we offer the De- DURING OFF-DUTY
tached Medical soft-ball team the
opportunity of wiping out their HOURS
two defeats at our hands. Thurs- Dining Entertainment Dancing
day nite we travel to Plant- Park
to try and even our score with the Welcome S
564th Signal Co., who hold one THE MARJA
defeat over our heads. You may THE MARJAI
be sure the team will be in the IN SULPHUR
pink and give the Signaleers a Good Food-Cocktails and Liq
run for their money.


GOING UP ...


564th Plotting Co.
The following men of the Plot-
ting Company received promo-
tions on June 30, 1942:
To be Sergeant (temporary)-
Cpl. J. C. Booth, Cpl. Harold C.
Donald, Cpl. Floyd I. Edmond-
son.


To be Corporal (temporary)-
Pvt. Leland Jarrett, Pvt. Frank
L. Martin, Pvt. William G.
O'Brien, Pvt. Coy L. Pool, Pvt.
Frank A. Serito, Pvt. William M.
Tucker.
To be Technician 5tlA Grade
(temporary)-Pvt. James E. Bos-
tain, Pvt. Arthur E. Brown, Pvt.
Herman A. Deutsch, Pvt. Carlton
C. Dunn, Pvt. Randt W. Fred-
erick, Pvt. Lovelz R. Green, Pvt.
Sidney C. Katzenell, Pvt. Edward
Lerner, Pvt. Robert W. Ludwig,
Pvt. Edward G. McIntyre, Pvt.
Edward S. Perry, Pvt. Agustin
Saenz, Jr., Pvt. Frank Slota, Pvt.
Herbert W. Solkoff, Pvt. Paul A.
Zarcone.


THE RED MILL
American And nLtin Food
ORCHESTRA EVERY NIGHT


BOB'S PLACE
Beer Wine Mixed Drinks
Dancing Short Orders
1623 4th Ave. -:- Phone Y1786
CAESAR GAROIA, Mgr


FERNANDEZ

RESTAURANT
Cuban Sandwiches A Specialty
1216 Franklin St.


SARATO
MEET YOUR FR
Corner Fortune
Dancing Every Night
BEER WIN
ORCHESTRA MUSIC NIGHT


THE SILVER MOON
LITTLE SAVOY
Bar Rooms Colored Soldiers
1102 Central 1340 Central
Chas. Vanderhorst, Prop


Manuel Garcia Jr.'s
MADRILLON
Spanish Restaurant
915 Tampa at Tyler
Tampa, Florida


soldiers to

CK TAVERN
SPRINGS
uors All at Moderate Prices


LIGHT LUNCH DINNERS
11 A. M. Till 4 P. M. Dally
1715 Platt St: at Paekwood


SERVICE MEN!!
Meet Your Friends at....
VICTOR CAFE
. 1324 Franklin Ph. M-7240
X Beer Wines Hostesses
Bill Bailey, Prop. Member V.F.W.
and American Legion


Meet Your Friends at .... I
ROXY BAR
-Beer --Wine- Sandwiches-
203 E. Lafayette St. Ph. 2456
Hostesses-Dancing


GA BAR t
ENDSS AT THE
and Franklin
in the Blue Room
ES LIQUORS
PY PHONE 7988


TWIN PALMS
Beer Wines Soft Drinks A
Sandwiches Our Specialty
CLEAN COOL RESTFUL A
Howard Ave. at Columbus Dr. **


Rex Billiard Parlor
1012 FRANKLIN
Dan'l S. Bagley


i Visit


WMtAUSANT
W// "INTu Vo"
0,7-Fr


HOTEL HILLSBORO
FLORIDA AVENUE AT TWIGGS STREET
FRANK J. HYNES, Mgr.
GASPARILLA TAVERN COLONIAL GRILL
SERVICE MEN WELCOME


SERVICE MEN OFFICERS FAMILIES
FOR REALLY GOOD FOOD AT MODERATE PRICES
PLEASANT ATMOSPHERE-VISIT


The Colonnade
BAYSHORE and JULIA

Steak and Chicken Dinners 45c
Delicious Sandwiches



SilverSprings

Invites You To Enjoy A I



FREE CONCERT i
By The

"RAMBLING MOUNTAINEERS"

From MacDill Field at Tampa
THE ARMY'S GREATEST HILL-BILLY BAND

Sunday, July 12 at 3 P. M.
RIDE THE BUSES FROM OCALA HOURLY
...*. ......^M ........... .,l. fl.-l.fl.-. .-


I


i


.9-W


DREW FIELD ECHOES


Page 7


Frida Jul 10 1942


i








Page~~~~~~~~~ 8 RWFEDEHE FiaJW1,14


VIEW FiCtD




By CORP. H. L. T. FROST
Radio Log
Red, White and Blue, WFLA,
7:05 a. m. daily thru Saturday.
Monday Review, WTSP, 6:30
p. m. Monday. t
Specialties, WDAE, 8:15 p. m.
Thursday.
The All-Star Parade, WFLA,
9:00 p. m. Friday.

Hiya, fellows! Here we are
again hoping that you-all "out
there" are healthy and happy.
We're awful happy. Why, you
ask?
We found a new listener!
Yessiree, we got us another
listener to help our Aunt Emma
and the maid keep from going
nuts as we prattle on over the
ether. She is Miss Mary Rose Gal-
lagher, one of the sub-depot debs.
We haven't met her yet but we
know who she is and-Aw, gee!

Chaplain Boren and Pvt. Harry
Zigun have been welcome addi-
tions to our early morning ses-
sions this week. Chaplain Boren
delivers a fine devotional and Pvt.
Zigun plays a -beautiful violin.
Cpl. Jack Hartman and Harry
have been giving it the duet time
this past week and have worked
extremely well together.

We got ourselves all up in a
lather the fore part of this week
about a proposed show, a dra-
matic offering featuring a refu-
gee from a Nazi invaded country.
But misfortune in writing the
script and some well placed shots
in our direction by our august
dramatic critics, J.R.T. and
O.Z.W. put us back in our moth-
eaten trundle bed for wound-
licking purposes. But someday
soon we're gonna putout with it
and then they'll be sorry. Espe-
cially when we flash the Metro-
Goldwyn-Mayer contract in front
of them. What contract? Well .
we can dream, can't we?

Lt. Matt McBride gave us a
little fight talk this week which
we appreciated very much. The
Lieutenant is, as the expression
goes, "really on their ball." And
his 'boxing program sounds like
a.natural. Ketchel, a name synon-
omous with boxing for years, is
the moniker one of the civilian
coaches boasts. So with Lt. Mc-
Bride, Ketchel and the rest we
urge you to come out for the
boxing squad and trade punches
for paunches.

Well, gang, that's all there is.
There ain't no more. What a re-
lief, huh? We'll see _you next
week, maybe, but in the mean-
time keep listening wontcha?


505th Sig. Bn.



NEWS

By PVT. RAYMOND HOULE

Sunburns and tans remind us
that our own Porky Pasquino has
a real recipe for taking sunbaths
without the burn; (Medics-please
note)-Porky says a bottle of
olive oil-a sunny day, and, most
essential, a few hours of leisure
results in a beautiful tan with no
burn guaranteed.
Sergeant Al Ashcraft and assist-
ants are receiving much praise
from Major F. G. Ruffner and all
members of the Plotting company
for the fine piece of engineering
in the construction of four bridges
over the northern end of Drew
Brook. The bridges tend to save
many steps for the weary drillers
of the Plotting company and in


We present Cpl. H. J. Friedman
of Drew Field, our oneman art
department. Anything goes with
Friedman. He's game for any
muss. If you want the Lord's
Prayer on a pinhead, an original
Rembrandt or Whistler, just call
on Hy Friedman of Hq. and Hq.
Co. of the 503rd, give him fifteen
minutes and you'll get it .. at a
price. That's if you aren't a mem-
ber of some G. I. department. Of
course, if you are, that's different.
Cpl. Friedman is the man re-
sponsible for the more than three
hundred and fifty identification
badges adorning officers' chests
at Drew. He has designed a dis-
tinctive service badge for the
Third Fighter Command which
will be worn by all members of
that command when it is accepted
by the Adjutant General in Wash-
ington, D. C.
His talent, born of years of
practical experience, is unlimited,
we would conclude, when con-
fronted with. some of the things
he has done here at Drew. Besides
the officers' tags he has designed
and built a portable I.C. for use
'by his regiment, designed and
rendered many different diplomas
including those given Chinese
flyers graduating from U.S. Army
flying courses. And if there is
anything our man Hy can't do in
the way of art, we don't think it
has been done before.


addition add to the scenic beauty
of the camp. Corporals Ev Tip-
pets and Walt Wrona, the 'swamp
foxes,' earned their pseudonyms
and increased their daily pay as
chief assistants of-the engineering
crew. Privates Rahar, Morris,
Ferraro, and Pfc's. Sikorsky,
Lyon, Zippo, and McAloose are a
few who come in for much de-
served praise. The entire bridge
building was completed in two
days, which is a far cry from 'gold-
bricking', we would say. Nice
job and well done, soldiers; take
a bow!

Lieutenants J. W. Godfry and
W. H. Kelly should have no diffi-
culty in enticing the boys to the
swimming pool if the actions of
the Plotting company is any indi-
cation. The Fourth of July was
observed in a wet manner. After
a tough all-afternoon session on
the drill field, many of the pri-
vates and' non-coms had a much
cherished (????) dip in the 'rain
pool' out in the center of the field.


Before coming into the Army in
September of 1940, Hy owned
and operated his own commercial
art studio. He had a corner on the
automotive art and advertising in
Detroit and executed all the ad-
vertising art for the Federal
Truck Company and had a share
in the contracts let out by Ford
and 'General Motors.
Hy was in the "heavy sugar"
at the time he was inducted and
his weekly "take" was generally
written in five figures checks.
When asked how he felt about
being drafted for a $21 per job
Hy, with .characteristic noncha-
lance, replied, "What the heck!
I can always go back after the
war." He further explained that
there were very good possibilities
to keep on in his work right here
in the Army. And this work he is
doing at Drew is what he hopes
is a stepping stone to higher re-
sponsibilities in the Intelligence
Department in Washington, D. C.
The art section of the Intelli-
gence Department is a wonderful
opportunity for any artist and it
is essential to the well balanced
program conducted by that de-
partment. "Someday I hope to
get into that sort of work, be-
cause I know I could be effective
there," Hy said with a hopeful
light in his eye.
We wish him luck in the ma-
terialization of his dreams.


The idea was swell, the water
was fresh rain water, but the bot-
tom-not a thought was given to
the mud-laden bottom. It was
swing and sway and splash. We'll
see what can be done, boys, to get
rid of that 'black bottom'.
'Sergeant Al F a r m e r, so
the s t o r y has been going
around, returned from his fur-
lough a little bit blue. Shall we
say, 'little boy blue'? He claims
that the Long Beach, Calif., resi-
dents are holding up well under
nightly blackouts.
Staff .Sergeant George Sedita
pens from New York "don't let
the heat get the best of you boys,
and above all things, don't get
'palm daffy," an expression
which George claims to be his
own. Right now the days are
very warm in New York also, but
the nights are very cool, with few
of the dive-bombing mosquitoes
to harass the sleeper. Ah, Man-
hattan in July-long, tall, cool
ones.


Talented Young Soldier


Drew Nine Has


Winning Week


Drew 7-Baromei 0
Behind the two-hit pitching of
Freddie Swindells, the Drew In-
terceptors bounced the Baromei
Fishmen, 7 to 0, for their seventh
straight win Tuesday on Regan
diamond.
Swindells struck out nine Fish-
men and clouted a double in the
seven inning affair. The young
pitcher was the leading hurler in
the Florida state league last year
and was slated for Uncle Clark
Griffith's Washington Senators
before the emergency arose and
he volunteered his services to the
government.
The Interceptors started early,
pushing over four runs in the
first frame, one in the fifth and
two in the seventh.
Catcher (Schnozzole) Bekeza
hit a mighty home run for the
Drew nine in the first inning.
Todd managed two for three for
the Interceptors, one being good
for a three bagger.
-Drew ......... 400 010 2-7 8 0
Baromei ...... 000 000 0-0 2 1
Score:
RHE

Drew 7-MacDill 3
Private Peyton Epps pitched
and batted the Drew field Inter-
ceptors to a 7-3 victory over their
bitterest baseball rivals, the Mac-
Dill Fliers last Saturday. The win
gave the Interceptors a lead of
four games to two in the summer
series with the Fliers.
The win Saturday was the In-
terceptors eighth straight victory.
Epps slugged out three hits in
four times at bat and knocked
in one of the Drew runs. He
struck out five men and allowed
but seven well scattered hits.
Louis Bekeza, big Drew catch-
er, rapped out two doubles and
scored twice himself. In addition,
he played brilliant ball behind the
bat.
Minsky gave up 11 hits in go-
ing the route for MacDill but he
was given very poor support.
None of the MacDill hitters
secured more than one blow off
Epps.
MacDill took the lead when
their star slugger, Stanley singled
and Gros doubled him home.
In the second inning, Drew
took the lead for good, scoring
three runs on Bekeza's double,
singles by Cochrane and Epps and
two infield errors.
Thereafter t he Interceptors
were never in trouble. They added
a single run in the third and
three more in the ninth. Doubles
by Bekeza and Todd along with
a single by Brown and infield
error produced the final tallies.
MacDill counted single runs in
the sixth and seventh innings.

Drew 7-Ocala 0
Ooala, Fla.-Sgt. Fred Swin-
dells pitched the Drew Intercep-
tors to a stirring 7-0, one-hitter
over the Ocala All Stars in the
Central Florida city as a part of
a big July 4th celebration.
The win gave Swindells his
second straight shutout of the
week and ran his scoreless inn-
ings .to 20 straight. He has
allowed only one run in the last
40 innings and this was of the
unearned variety.
Drew shoved t h r e e tallies
across in the fifth on hits by
Howell and Firkser along with
two errors to take the lead.
Mehaffey touched Swindells
for the only hit of the day for
the home nine. A clean single in
the sixth.
The Interceptors increased
their lead in the sixth by scoring
a single run on a hit by Todd,
base on balls and two Infield
outs.
In the seventh, Drew added
their final three markers on a


CHURCH CALL


PROTESTANT
Chaplain William L. Clark
Base Chaplain
11:00 a. m. service-In new
Chapel nearest Base Headquar-
ters.
Chaplain Carl W. Hewlett
553rd S. A. W. Bn.
11:00 a. m. service-In new
Chapel nearest Tent City.
Chaplain Amos L. Boren
501st S. A. W. R.
11:00 a. m. service-In the
Chapel at Plant Field.
Chaplain W. A. Thompson who
recently Ireported for duty with
the 50,5th Regiment will hold aE
joint service with Chaplain Clark
as per schedule above. The men of
the 505th are invited to join in
this service until other arrange-
ments are made.
ROMAN CATHOLIC
Chaplain F. J. O'Brien
503rd S. A. W. R.
Early Mass 6:15 a. m.-Base
Library Building, in Chapel near-
est 'Tent -City.
Mass at 9:00 a. m.*-Base Li-
brary building in Chapel nearest
Tent City.
JEWISH
Rabbi Isenberg
11:00 a. m.-Base Library
Building.

*Catholic services have been
changed from 11 a. m. to 9 a. m.

towering home run by Howell
with two men on the paths, the
ball traveling out to the 490 foot
mark in deep centerfield for the
round-tripper.
Howell and Meyer led the
Interceptors at bat with two hits
apiece. Howell went far to his
left from his second base position
on several occasions to make one
hand stops and get his man at
first by a step.
Score: R H E
Drew ....... 000 031 30-7 6 1
Ocala ........ 000 000 00-0 1 2
Swindells and Bekeza; Mehaf-
fey and Silas.



Sub Depot Subs
New faces behind old desks:
Capt. Oliver Williams taking over
where Capt. C. C. Harris left off
Lt. Alfred Cromartie now
sitting where his keen eye sees
all the sub debutants come and
go. Formerly Capt. Williams'

post Our feelings have been
unhurt now as we are again being
recognized by the Drew Field
Waker-Uppers Wish all
"bosses" had Mr. Hancock's work
together-itis Miss Bernice
Dormany of last week is today
Mrs. "Sgt." James C. Cooper of
the 314 Transport Group Hq. and
Hq. Sg.
One of "Supplies" best book-
keepers has been snatched by
Base Tech. Supply. Our loss is
Techs' ga.in. Good luck on the
new job, "Sue" (Mrs. Mary
Logan).
Sub-Depot is very proud of its
efficiency. Seems as if whenever
anything needs straightening out
folks come to us. Mrs. Louise
Guy was transferred to Marianna
July 1. Mable Bell is leaving
July 15 and August 1 we are
bidding farewell to that sweet
little Gertie Ray. They, too, are
going to Marianna.
"Kingfish" Mattenlee seems to
be doing a swell job of engineer-
ing. He took Mr. Baker's place
who was transferred to Morrison
Field.
What would Supply be without
our Abigail Hatcher? She's our
regular little "Ray of Sunshine"
-at least Mr. Hancock seems to
think so.
Sam Esco has another job-
airplane and engine inspector.
How that guy gets around. Mrs.
Helen Dorman has taken over his
job and is doing O. K. as head
of the Planning section.


Self-Portrait of Opl. Hy Friedman


Page 8


Friday, July 10., 1942Z


DREW FIELD> ECHOES




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