Title: Tyndall target
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076230/00115
 Material Information
Title: Tyndall target
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 27-36 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)
Publisher: Public Relations Office, Air Corps Gunnery School
Place of Publication: Tyndall Field Fla
Publication Date: 1942-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City -- Tyndall Air Force Base
Coordinates: 30.078611 x -85.576389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 16, 1942)-
Issuing Body: Issues for May 9, 1942- published by Office of Public Relations, Army Air Forces Gunnery School.
General Note: Title from caption.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076230
Volume ID: VID00115
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24602432

Full Text





TYNDALL FIELD, FLORIDA


VOL. 3... O. 28... JULY 8, 1944


HONOR SCROLL FOR TYNDALL'S HERO GUNNERS DEDICATED


,GI BILL OF RIGHTS
TO PROVIDE MANY
BENEFITS

Here, in a nutshell, is what
servicemen may derive from the
$6,000,000,000 GI Bill of
Rights, which was enacted into
law last week.
1. A maximum of 52 weeks
unemployment compensation at
the rate of $20 a week.
2. A government guarantee of
50 percent (although not more
than $2,000) on loans for the
purchase of farms, small busi-
nesses and homes. These loans
will bear the low rate of four
percent interest.
3. A maximum of four years'
educational aid for servicemen
who joined the armed forces
before they were 25 years old.
Five hundred dollars yearly
will be provided for tuition,
plus subsistence allowances of
$50 a month f3r single and $75
a month for married veterans.
4. A veterans' placement
service to assist returning
servicemen and women in ob-
taining civilian Jobs through
the U.S. Employment Service.
5. Hospitalization, which Is
obtainable through the Veter-
ans' Administration.

STUDENT SCRIBES VIE
FOR WEEKEND PASSES
VIA TARGET
A recent competition insti-
gated to promote interest and
pride throughout the units of
Section I has been announced
by Capt. Robeson Carter, sec-
tion commander. Weekend pass-
es will be awarded to the unit
reporter and his four assis-
tants who submit the best col-
umn for publication in the
,Tyndall Target. The contest
Will be a weekly affair, under
the supervision of Lt. K.D.
Downer, section Plans and
Training officer, with the
staff of the Target as judges.
This week's contest ended In
a tie, with I-1 and I-7 sub-
mitting copy of equal caliber
and the scribes and assistants
of both units will be awarded
passes.


"...HANY NAMES WILL BE ADDED..."


c -,.vr
. t-. .. .. ".-- .



Future heroes of the air gaze at honor list of those who went before.


LAUNDRY OFFICER EXCHANGES VIEWS WITH
S.S. REPRESENTATIVES AT WEEKLY MEET


Captain J.J. Fornal, post
laundry officer, addressed the
members of the Special Ser-
vices Council last Wednesday,
exchanging views and receiving
suggestions and constructive
criticism from the members on
T/F laundry problems.
Captain Fornal's presence
at the meeting was in keeping
with the recently inaugurated
policy of the Special Services
Office to have at least one
officer of a key department
closely related to the welfare
of the enlisted men address
the weekly council meetings.
In discussing long delays in
returning finished laundry the
captain explained that his
chief problem has been that of
personnel and their transpor-
tation to and from work. How-
ever, he expressed the belief
that for the present the per-


18-YEAR-OLD STUDENT, IN UNIFORM FIVE

MONTHS, CHOSEN GUNNER OF CLASS
One of the youngest Tyndall
gunnery students to be select-
ed as "Gunner of the Class" is
18-year-old Pvt. Ralph 0. Barr,
top man of class. 44-28. Barr
hails from Jamaica, N.Y., and
enlisted in October, 1943.
However, he was permitted to
finish his high school educa-
tion at Forest Hills High be-
fore donning-OD's in March,
1944.
Inducted at Fort Dix, Barr f,
was sent to Greensboro for his
basic training. There he was ',
notified that because of a-
physical defect he was dis-
qualified for flight training
and instead was transferred to 1
Tyndall to take up aerial gun-
nery.
He names his hours in the
air as the most interesting
phase of his training here and PVT. RALPH 0. BAI
wants to go on record as say-
ing that "sleeping" is his fa- Here are his gunnery
vorlte method of relaxation, marks:
When the war is over, Barr Cal. 50....94 Skeet Rang
plans to go to college with a Turrets.... 98 Tower Rang
B.A. degree as his goal. Sighting...97 Moving Tar


sonnel problem has improved
and he promised a maximum of
six-day service under existing
conditions.
The captain concluded his
session with the GI represent-
atives by extending a personal
invitation to them to visit
the laundry and watch the huge
plant in operation.
Other matters up for dis-
cussion at the meeting were
mostly of an athletic nature,
with the water sports carnival
to be held tomorrow heading
the list. The council members
also took up plans for a ten-
nis tournament In the near
future for students and per-
manent party personnel. A beer
hall for students and the com-
ing track meet were also top-
ics of discussion, as was the
War Bond Golf Tournament to be
staged at the Panama Country
Club tomorrow.
Before adjourning, the coun-
cil voted to amend the present
softball rules regarding base-
stealing. The ruling for T/P
softball competition now per-
mits base runners to leave any
base except third as soon as
the.ball leaves the pitcher.
Previously the rules prohibit-
ed a runner from leaving a
base until the ball had reach-
ed the batter.


T/F WAC SOFTBALLERS
FACE WAVE TEAM HERE
THIS AFTERNOON
Tyndall's WAC softball team
this afternoon will have an
opportunity to avenge its 12-2
defeat at the hands of the
WAVES of the Naval Air Sta-
tion administered at Pensacola
two weeks ago. The game will
be played on PT Area 2 and is
scheduled to begin at 2 P.M.
Ensign Marie Oehler, of New
York, is expected to start on
the mound for the visitors
while Team Manager Pvt. Flo-
rence Rice will twirl for the
Tyndall squad.
The WAVES are expected to
arrive here by plane and elab-
orate plans have been made for
their entertainment during
their weekend stay here by the
Wacs, in return for the gener-
ous hospitality displayed by
the WAVES when the Tyndall
team played at Pensacola.
Pvt. Rice announced that her
starting line-up would include
Phyllis Martin at the backstop
position, Wanda Karp on first,
Jeannette Gogan on second,
Rachel Whiting at third, Dot
Smith at short, Marjorie Co-
burn in left, Laura Phlpps In
right, Maro Hessee in center
and Albina Kurlinski In short
field.
The contest will mark the
second of the year for the
WAC team.


TYNDALL "BIG GAME HUNTERS" BAG WILD
HOG, or, NOTHING BOARING ABOUT THIS


RR

school

e...89
e... 83
get15.8


A wild boar weighing nearly
600 pounds, which for the past
two months has been damaging
targets on the small arms
range, was killed-there early
last Sunday morning by three
enlisted men who laid in wait
for the big-tusked animal.
Armed with two submachine
guns and a carbine, the three
men opened fire on three of
of the wild hogs, killing one
ahd wounding one. The other
escaped unscathed.
The hogs apparently have
been attracted to the targets
by the flour and water paste


which is used on them. At-
tempts to lure the hogs into a
pit trap by using the paste as
bait, however, were unsuccess-
ful.
The three hunters were S/Sgt.
Sherwin Morris, Pfc. James
Mulligan and Pvt. 0.G. Morrow.
They laid in wait for the ani-
mals after obtaining permis-
sion to shoot them if possible.

The hogs were among those
which were freed from farms
on the site when the govern-
ment took over the Tyndall
Field reservation.


COL.PERSONS' ADDRESS
HIGHLIGHTS JULY 4TH
CEREMONY
The 4th of July was commem-
orated here by the dedication
of a huge honor scroll, bear-
ing the names of more than 500
graduates of Tyndall Field who
have been decorated for valor
in every theater of war.
Colonel John W. Persons,
post commander, addressing a
crowd of several hundred gun-
nery students and permanent
party personnel, dedicated the
scroll "to the hundreds of
brave American youths who have
gone forth to fight the enemy
with honor and valor."
"It is fitting that we se-
lect 'the celebration of the
Declaration of Independence as
the time to unveil this scroll
of honor," Col. Persons said,
for these men have carried the
attack to a ruthless enemy
to help safeguard the very
principles of American democ-
racy.
"I am confident that this
scroll will serve as a perma-
nent Inspiration to all gun-
ners graduating from Tyndall
Field. There are places re-
served for many names, and
they will be added, for the
history of heroic deeds ac-
complished by aerial gunners
is not yet finished."
The ceremony was brief, but
impressive. As soon as the
dedication had been made, the
gunnery students continued on
their way to their afternoon
classes. The program was held
during the noon hour so that
valuable time would not be
lost from the fast-moving
training program of this sta-
tion.
The 20-foot square scroll
carries the names of Tyndall
graduates who have been dec-
orated with one or more of the
following awards: Silver Star,
Distinguished Flying Cross,
Air Medal, Distinguished Fly-
ing Medal, and the Purple
Heart.
The scroll was prepared and
erected by 2nd Lt. Vincent J.
Murphy, Jr., war room officer,
and his staff. The names of
the decorated alumni of Tyn-
dall were obtained from of-
ficial War Department files.


CAPTAIN McCLELLAN
RETURNS FOR VISIT
Capt. Ammon McClellan, for-
mer public relations officer
here, returned to Tyndall for
a brief visit with old friends
this week.
The captain, who was public
relations officer here during
1942, left for overseas duty
early In 1943 and "sweated
out" three major engagements
or operations of the war: the
defeat of the Axis in North
Africa, the invasion of Italy
and the invasion of France.
For a time Capt. McClellan
was on duty in North Africa,
then Italy and later was gun-
nery officer of a squadron of
A-20 medium bombers of the 9th
Air Force operating from Eng-
land. A graduate of the gun-
nery school here, the captain
is officially credited with 14
missions against the enemy and
wears the Air Medal and one
Oak Leaf Cluster. He Is now
en route to Laredo, Texas, for
further training.


. a.d


\






Page 2 TYN I



I Tyndall<3Ss Target |.^


July 8, 1944




COLUMAfN


PUBLISHED ON SATURDAYS BY THE SPECIAL
SERVICE OFF-ICE FOR PERSONNEL OF THE ARMY
AIR FORCES FLEXIBLE GUNNERY SCHOOL, TYNDALL
FIELD, PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA.
Copy Prepared under Supervision of Public
Relations Officer.
Printing and Photography by Base Photo-
graphic & Reproduction Section.
Art Work by Department of Training Draft-
ing Department.
The Tyndall Target received material sup-
plied by Camp Newspaper Service, War Dept.,
205 E. 42nd St., New York City. Material
credited to CNS may NOT be republished with-
out prior Permission from CNS.

DON'T "TAKE IT EASY"
Now that the invasion of France has
been launched, you have often heard the
warning voiced that we must buckle down
and work all the harder. That word of
advice, we believe, bears repetition.
On the morning of June 6, various re-
marks were heard universally, such as:
"What a relief! "Now we're over the
hump! "
But how about the men who stormed the
beaches and dropped from airplanes in
enemy-guarded territory? Don't you
imagine that one of their first thoughts
was: "Will reinforcements and supplies
reach us in time?"
After the tension of waiting for D-
day, it was only natural for some of us
to relax, breathe a sigh of relief, and
hope for the best. And that inclina-
tion--to "take it easy"-is what we in
this country must now combat.
As Lt. Gen. Somervell, commanding
general of the Army Service Forces,
recently pointed out, the invasion means
that now we shall need increased sup-
plies, larger numbers of replacements,
more of everything.
Then, as Major General Uhl, Fourth
Service Command, declared: "We cannot,
of course, match the sacrifices of our
men in the front lines. But we can--
and we must-make certain that we drive
ahead at full speed to give them all
the supplies, equipment and weapons they
need. Unless we do drive ahead at full
speed, we are not worthy to be classed
as teammates of our fighting men."
So think it over, Mac and Wac, before
you let yourself, intentionally or un-
intentionally, adopt the attitude that
this is the end of the war in Europe.
If you do feel an obligation to those
men who led the assault, who faced the
crossfire of machine guns, who braved
the land and sea mines, who lost their
eyes or arms or legs--or, if you feel
you owe a debt to those who gave their
lives in order to invade Hitler's fort-
ress.... then do not relax, Buddy, and
just watch the fight, and "take it
easy. "


WHAT'S YOUR PROBLEM?
What's your problem, soldier? If
you are puzzled by regulations on
family allotments, GI insurance, fur-
lough time or any other matters of
personal importance to you, look for
the answers in Yank, the Army Weekly.
Yank's 'What's Your Problem' column
gives authoritative answers to every
kind of question asked by servicemen.
Don't miss a single issue of Yank.
It's easy to get--just five cents at
the PX. There's a new issue every
Friday.


FLYING CADETS


We've seen them cove, eager and true,
We've seen them go out into the blue.
Some were friends--and all were men.
fhey went as we, we know not when.
But when we go, as soon we must--
There is a God in whom we trust.
And though we fight and die in a plane
Ye know we have not fought in vain.
For there are those to come behind,
Strong of heart and soul and mind.
They'll take their places and win their
bets-
They are as we were, flying cadets.
--Cpl. George H. Douglas
Class,44-25



KNOW YOUR PLANE


SHORT "STIRLING"


TYPE: four-engined long-range heavy
bomber.
WING: all-metal mid-wing monoplane,
dihedralled and equally swept-back and
tapered, raked wing tips.
FUSELAGE: Rectangular-shaped with
round corners, all-metal construction.
TAIL UNIT: fully cantilever tail as-
sembly, single rudder swept-back and
tapered with round tip, tail plane is
swept-back and slightly tapered, round
tips.
LANDING GEAR: Main wheels retract into
the inner engine nacelles, retractable
double tail wheels, undercarriage can be
retracted by hand operation.
POWER PLANT: four 1,600 hp Bristol
"Hercules" 14-cylinder sleeve-valve or
four 1,00 hp Wright "Cyclone" double-
row radial air-cooled engines, three-
bladed De Haviland hydromatic constant
speed full-feathering propellers, self-
sealing fuel tanks.
SPAN: 99 feet 1 inch.
LENGTH: 87 feet 3 inches.
ARMAMENT: three power-operated gun
turrets, one in the nose, one amidship,
and one in the tail, total of eight cal.
.30 machine guns, maximum bomb load is
18,000 pounds.


BUY MORE THAN BEFORE

SUPPORT THE FIFTH

WAR LOAN DRIVE


YUUR MOTHER'S PRAYING
A priest once met an old Spanish
mother who asked him to pray for her
bullfighter son. And when the priest
met the bullfighter himself, leaning
against a tree, dressed in silver and
black, smoking his cigaret, the priest
wondered and asked him if he were not
excited, were he not afraid about the
morrow and the bull.
"Why, no," said the bullfighter. "Why
should I be afraid?"
"But the bull might gore you. That
should s>are you enough."
"Oh, no!" said the bullfighter. He
stamped out his cigaret and grinned,
"Amigo. Padre, my friend. That bull,
he has no mother to pray for him, yes?"

HORSE SENSE
A horse can't pull while kicking.
This fact I merely mention.
And he can't kick while pulling,
Vhich is my chief contention.

Let's imitate the good old horse
And lead a life that's fitting;
Just Pull an honest load, and then
There'll be no time for kicking.


CHAPEL SERVICES

PROTESTANT
Sunday
Sunday School, Post Chapel........... 9 A.M.
Worship, Colored Rec Hall... ..... 9 A.M.
Worship, Post Chapel .............. 10 A.M.
Worship, Trigger Town. .... ...*.... 10 A.M.
Worship, Post Chapel.............. 7:30 P.M.
Tuesday
Fellowship Meeting....... ....... 7:30 P.M.
Christian Science Service............ 8 P.M.
Wednesday
Choir Rehearsal................... 7:30 P.M.
CATHOLIC
Sunday
Mass, Post Chapel.................... 8 A.M.
Mass, Post Theater................. 10 A.M.
Mass, Post chapel..................11:15 A.M
Mass, Post Chapel................. 6:30 P.1
Daily
Mass .............. ............. 5:30 A.M.
Monday
Novena................. ............. 7 P.M.
Choir Rehearsal...................... 8 P.M.
Saturday
Confessions............................ 7 P.M.
(and any time Chaplain is in his office.)
JEWISH
r iday
worship Service.................... 7:30 P.M.


The best I can make out of it is, "You are now
entering Los Angeles." -American Legion Magazine.








July8, 9144 TE TYDAL TAGETPage 3


VOTING REGULATIONS IN FIVE STATES AND TWO TERRITORIES

E Dt E. adi D SPECIAL TERITOAL


COLORADO Primary, a) In accordance with Colorado law. 21 Aug. 23 Aug. 9 Sept.
12 Sept. or
b) By sending the WD or USWBC
post card to the Secretary of State.
Denver, Colo
LOUISIANA 2 Primaries: a) In accordance with Louisiana law. Any time 13 Aug. 11 Sept. Note that Louisiana holds two primaries. One appl-
12 Sept. or for both (first) firsti cation will sufie for ballots for both elections, but in
first) and b) By sending the WD or USWBC primaries. Oc. 16 Oc case of a change of address, a soldier should make sep-
(second) Baton Rouge, La. It is understood that Louisiana is holding a legislative
One application will suffice for both session, which may change some of the facts as given
primaries, unless the applicant has a
change of address.
MAINE State al In accordance with Maine law. or Any time 15 Aug 11 Sept Note that this is not a primary but an election for
Election, bh By sending the WD or USWBC state and local offices and Representatives of Congress
11 Sept; post card to the Secretary of State. Voting for the offices of President and Vice President
Augusta, Maine. will take place at a general election 7 Nov. 1944.
NEVADA Primary, a) In accordance with Nevada law. 7 June 15 Aug. 5 Sept.
5 Sept. or
b) By sending the WD or USWBC
post card to the Secretary of State,
Carson City, Nev.
SourH 2 Primaries: Soldiers may request ballots if en- 27 May 27 May 25 July Note that South Carolina changed its election laws
CAROLINA 25 July rolled prior to 27 June with a local (first) Ifirst) (first) since YANK announced that soldiers could vote only in
(first) party club. Application for a ballot 24 June 24 June 22 Aug. person.
22 Aug. should be made to the local club or (second) (second) (second) Note 'hat soldiers must have been enrolled prior to
(second) county secretary by the soldier or a 27 June with a local party club in order to request a
relatlv4for friend acting in his behalf, ballot. and that those using WD or USWBC post cards
It can be made with the WD or USWBC should write on both sides of the card the name and
post card, on which he has written on address of the appropriate club or county secretary
both sides the name and address of the
appropriate club or county secretary.
ALASKA Territorial a) In accordance with Alaska law. or 3 Aug. 3 Aug. 9 Sept. Note that this is the Territorial election No further
Election, b) By sending the WD or USWBC election will be held in November
12 Sept. post card to the Secretary of the Ter-
ritory, Juneau, Alaska.
JfAWAi Territorial Hawail does not provide an absentee Soldiers voting in Hawaii can vote only by appearing
Primary ballot for soldiers n the primary IP. person in their home precinct or at a polling place
Election. within the Territory, designated by the Governor
7 Oct.
'Appliatton should reach official. on, r oas a, poidhble fter, the doat the stalt to ltrriory starts ending out te. ballos.S


This table, distributed through Camp Newspaper Service by YANK, the Army Weekly, explains the voting
rules in five states and the territories of Alaska and Hawaii, which are holding primary or.general elections in
July, August, September and October. All these states and Alaska permit servicemen to apply for ballots by
using either the old WD post card (WD AGO Form 560) or the new United States War Ballot Commission card
(US WBC Form No. 7). You may also apply by a letter that contains the text of the USWBC post card but if
you use the letter, or the old AGO Form 560, be sure it is distinctly marked as ballot material and that it
bears the appropriate air-mail markings. In addition to signing'the application, you should print your name
and serial number and if you're applying for a primary ballot be sure to state your party affiliation. To be eligi-
ble to vote in some states and territories, soldiers have to fulfill some other requirements so if you're not sure
about your eligibility, write to the Secretary of State of your home state and get the full particulars from him.


By COE and RUTSTEIN

QUESTION: Do YOU BELIEVE YOUR
ARMY CAREER WILL MAKE YOU A
BETTER CIVILIAN?
PVT. FRED JOHNSON, Hartford,
Conn .:
"yes, I believe
the Army has help-
ed me a lot. It
has taught me
self-discipline
and how to get
along with other men."

PVT. JOHN McCLENTION, Nashville,
Tenn.:


PFC. JACK H.
Ind.:
"So far, no!


"Yes, r think my
Army career will
make me a better
civilian than I
was when I enter-
ed the service
last year."

STIFFLER, Muncie,


TELEVISION FOLDER
AVAILABLE TO GI'S
Anyone who wants to know more
about postwar employment pros-
pects in the television industry
will find helpful information in
a six-page folder on "Occupations
in Television" by John E. Craw-
ford of- the Radio Corporation of
America, just published by Oc-
cupational Index, Inc., New York
University, New York 3, N.Y.
Single copies are 25 cents, cash
with order.
In brief, readable style the
author discusses postwar pros-
pects, training required, methods
of entrance and advancement,
range of salaries, advantages and
disadvantages of television as a
career. For those who want more
detailed data three sources of
further information are listed,
and the five best books are rec-
ommended from a collection of 21
publications examined in pre-
paring the folder.


He may just be curious as to
Where his War Bond money
Goes ---

But, he may be a spy.

Don't drink more than you can
hold In the presence of
Strangers.-

If they ask you suspicious
questions

TELL INTELLIGENCE
Phone Ex. 3104


IteS like this. I don't mind
work--providin' it keeps respec-
table hours. But the first day I
nit Tynlall Field, before I even
got a place to sleep, I found my-
self in the office of the Tyndall
Target. I was needed, it seems,
to fold newspapers. It was a
sort of duty I owed the section,
according to the first sergeant.
no I folded.
cor three hours I folded, until
I got pretty good at it. The
editor even remarked that I'd
make my mark in newspaper fold-
ing. I found out what he meant
very soon. The very next Satur-
day, after having worked on de-
tail for three days in a row on
the range where I am an instruc-
tor, I was given some time off by
the range officer as a reward
for showing initiative on the
paper-picking-up detail.
Well, anyway, I was lying
peacefully on my bunk when a
flunky- announced himself by
knocking on the soles of my feet
and yelling, "Yer wanted, Doug-
las! Then he proceeded to ex-
plain how badly I was needed on a
big production job, and when he
told me how I'd been recommended
because of previous experience,
I began to see the light of day,
as they say.
So, in a little while, I was
not surprised to find myself face
to face with the Target editor.
After favoring him with a sample
of choice. invective which means
that I called him things I can't
repeat here, I asked when I could
get started in order that I might
be able to return to my bunk for
a little sack time before going
back to work.
"Well, he says, "we're not
quite ready yet, you see...,


which is just about as far as he
got, because I was gradually get-
ting madder and madder. "And,
he says, "Come back in about
two hours." So without further
words, for fear of being busted,
or losing my furlough, whibh is
coming up soon, I took off.
Like I said in the beginning,
I don't mind work at all. In
fact, in addition to my regular
army duty at the range, and my
"honor bound duty, as the ser-
geant says it, I .am one of the
favored few who are allowed to
set pins In the evenings at the
field bowling, alley--but that's a
separate story in itself.
I will admit that I wasn't
alone in the paper-folding busi-
ness. With me were three men on
weekend passes, a man on a three-
day pass, a man who had just come
off night K.P., and several
others who were, like myself,
resting after several days of
arduous labor.
What we want to know is, just
when is a man who has been given
time off going to be permitted to
stay in his own barracks without
hiding and trembling in fear of
being considered worthy of fold-
ing newspapers? As for my worth,
you could convince me of it much
easier by putting this in your
paper, than by allowing me the
honor of assisting men on three-
day passes to put the Target to-
gether. --CPL. DOUGLAS.

EDITOR'S NOTE: While far from
sanctioning the practice of
recruiting men who are on pass
to help fold the Target, we hope
you are convinced of your worth.
If there were no Targets to fold,
your letter would never have got-
ten into print.


PFC. V.H. McCANTY, Vinton, Ya.:


"I don't think
Army life has
helped me at all
to become a bet-
ter citizen.'


PYT. MICHAIL TEIPLAK, Long Island
City. N.Y.:
"Yes, I believe
that Army life
has helped me a
lot. Ithas taught
me discipline and
how to get along
with others, so that when I am
returned to civilian life r will
not-have to undergo much adjust-
ing at any job that I may get."

CPL. DONALD W BATES, New Jersey:
w es, it's taught
me discipline and
has made me re-
alize that there
is nothing like
being a civilian."
tg>"


ONE MAN'S OPINION

What's Yours ?


July 8, 1944


Page 3


THE TYNDALL TARGET


k-

"`








Page '~ TYNDALL TARGET


THE C.N.S. PAGE

All Material Supplied By


The Camp Newspaper Serv
USAFI Extends Courses
To Cover U. S. Internees
Washington (CNS)-U. S. mili-
tary and naval personnel who are
prisoners of war or internees in
neutral countries now may use
the educational facilities of the
U. S. Armed Forces Institute, the
War Department has disclosed.
The shipment and distribution
of this material is being handled
by the War Prisoners Aid of the
YMCA, a member agency of the
National War Fund, the WD said.
An Education Center is being
established at Geneva, Switzer-
land, where the program will be
carried out.
Under this plan, thousands of
standard and special textbooks
and courses already are being
shipped abroad. Later they will
be distributed among prisoners of
war and internees and lessons will
be graded and returned and ex-
aminations will be conducted.
The Institute now offers more
than 70 high school, vocational
and college courses, a number that
soon will be increased to 200. All
of these courses will be made
available to prisoners under the
new plan.


ice Clio Sheet
Sept. 15 Oct. 15 Set
as Christmas Mail Month
Washington (CNS)-The Army
Postal Service has issued a call
to GIs overseas, urging them to
tell the folks back home to post
GI Christmas mail from Sept. 15
to Oct. 15.
During this period, which will
be known as "Christmas Mail
Month" for soldiers. Christmas
packages may be mailed overseas
without the presentation of a re-
quest from the soldier. Gift pack-
ages will be accepted for mailing
only within the present limita-
tions of weight and size-five
pounds in weight and 36 inches
in length and girth combined-
and only one such package will
be accepted from the same person
to the same addressee during any
one week.

17 Year-olds Eligible
For AAF Training Again
Washington (CNS) -The AAF
Reserve Corps is accepting enlist-
ments once again, the War De-
partment has disclosed. Eligible
are youths 17 years old who may
volunteer for future training as
combat crew members.


#0


Top Yank Airman

Takes No Chances

With Foe, He Says
When Maj. Richard Bong shot
down his 27th Jap plane, thereby
passing Capt. Eddie Rickenback-
er's World War I total of enemy
aircraft destroyed in the air, Rick-
enbacker announced that he was
sending the new champion a case
of Scotch.
"I'm delighted," the old title-
holder remarked. "I hope he gets
27 more."
Earlier, Rickenbacker had pre-
dicted that his record of 26 planes
downed over Germany would be
trebled by some U. S. flier in this
war.
"Before the war is over, one of
our fliers-if not five or six of them
-will down 50 to 75 planes," he
said.
Although Rickenbacker's 26
was the top score compiled by any
U. S. flier during the last war, his
record wasn't even close to that
of Maj. Edward Mannock, of the
RAF, whose World War I score
was 73, one more than that of
Capt. Billy Bishop, the famed Ca-
nadian ace. Ace of aces in the last
war was Germany's Baron Man-
fred von Richtofen, who downed
81 Allied planes before he was
shot down by a Canadian rookie
flying in his first combat forma-
tion.
In this war, two Jap-killing Ma-
rines, Maj. Joe Foss and Maj.
Greg Boyington, tied Rickenback-
er's American record before Bong
broke it. Top Yank in the ETO is
AAF Capt. Don Gentile, whose
bag totaled 30, including 23 de-
stroyed in the air and seven on
the ground.
The RAF's Wing Cmdr. Paddy
Finucane had 32 enemy planes to
his credit the day he radioed,
"This is it, chaps," as his plane
dived into the English channel and
Russian Maj. Alexander Pokry-
shkin has 59 and is still active.
Nazi propagandists insist that a
Luftwaffe colonel named Wilke
had bagged 151 Allied planes be-
fore he was shot down in a recent -
dog fight. Previous Nazi high
claim was 115 for Col. Werner
Molders, who was killed in 1941.
Some commanders, notably
Maj. Gen. Claire L. Chennault,
chief of the 14th AAF, don't pub-
licize their pilot's combat totals.
Others refuse to count planes de-
stroyed on the ground. Bong's 27
kills, for instance, all were made
in the air.
Bong, who says he takes no un-
necessary chances in the air be-
cause he "wants to get back alive,"
holds 20 decorations topped by the
Distinguished Service Cross.
Incidentally, Bong never did re-
ceive that case of Scotch from
Rickenbacker. Fact is, he doesn't
drink. So Rickenbacker sent him
a case of cokes instead.


Comin' Up!
I


I6 8~~pSW-W


This is Janice Hansen, 17, of
Union City, N. J., who recently won
$1,000 in War Bonds for having the
most beautiful legs in New Jersey.
She's going to show them to sol-
diers in camps all over the U. S.
in a forthcoming coast-to-coast tour.

Yank Marks 2d Birthday,
Still Of, By and For GIs
New York (CNS)-YANK, the
Army Weekly, will mark the com-
pletion of its second year as the
official voice of the enlisted man
in the U. S. armed forces with a
special anniversary issue on June
30, available at domestic PX
newsstands June 23.
Since its inception two years
ago, YANK has expanded from one
edition printed in New York to
14 editions printed in 11 locations,
ten of them overseas, and it has
remained a strictly GI publica-
tion, with all its material pre-
pared and edited by enlisted men.


r, %"Copyrighted Material
ML -u


S' Syndicated Conte nt


Available from Commercial News Providersj


Page 4


TYNDALL TARGET


$L
~J~sj~


'**


-'"ct






July 8, 19114 TYNDALL TARGET Page 5




*NE WE OF


WEEK ENDING JULY 7


It was in Munich at a Nazi party rally
in 1939. Adolf Hitler rose and screamed
to the world, 'On the day the British
declared war, I commanded Goering to
make all preparations for a five-year
war, not because I believe this war will
last five years but because we will
never capitulate in five years.' Today
we lack but a bit over a month to com-
plete the five years Hitler allotted to
his war.
What is the outlook now? The Allies
have broken through the Atlantic Wall,
have captured Cherbourg, the third port
of France, and are turning their strength
inland. In the east the Red Army has
swept across the Berezina and captured
Minsk; like a hungry bear the Russians
pursue their quarry toward Warsaw, driv-
ing ahead at a faster pace and on a wide
er front than the German Army was able
to accomplish in the darkest days of the
early 40s. In the south the Wehrmacht
isinhasty retreat, its forces disorgan-
ized, its equipment scattered, before
the advance of the 5th and 8th Armies
up the Italian peninsula. The under-
ground armies of suppressed countries
are becoming active; scenes such as the
Copenhagen garrison battle, the revolt
at Tours are but weather vanes pointing
toward things to come.


RUSSIAN FRONT
A Symbolical March
Fifteen days ago the Germans were en-
trenched along the "Fatherland Line," a
seemingly formidable chain of bastions
based on the fortresses of Vitebsk,
Orsha, Mogilev, Minsk and Polotsk. To-
day every one of these fortresses has
fallen, the Russians have rolled beyond
Minsk to the broad plains that border
East Prussia. Farthest Russian spear-
head is now 110 miles from the breeding
place of the Junker generals. The Red
Army is pounding along the age-old inva-
sion route used by Ghengis Khan in the
days before Christ. This victorious
march is symbolical, for here the Army
of Napoleon met disastrous defeat,
marking the downfall of the French em-
pire which had set out to conquer the
world.
Other Russian offensives speared tow-
ard Iassi, aimed at splitting Hungary
and Romania. The second is smashing
through Kowol, in an effort to hit War-
saw and split Poland. Another is spear-
ing from the northeast to tear apart
Latvia and Lithuania, and in the far
north another spearhead is developing
which will attempt to cut off Estonia.
A glance at a map of the Russian front
will reveal a most significant develop-
ment to even the untrained eye.
Another thorn in Hitler's side is the
Finnish situation. The Russians have
extended their/ gains beyond Viipuri and
are relentlessly driving toward Hel-
sinki. Prompt action must be expected
from Hitler. Already German troops have
been dispatched to Finland in an effort
to maintain some semblance of Germar
security.


ITALIAN FRONT
The Germans Flee
In Italy, the Germans were withdrawing
as fast as their resources would allow.
Pausing only for limited and sporadic
rearguard actions, they abandoned vast
amounts of irreplaceable materiel in the
path of the victorious Allies, who have
advanced some 300 miles since May 11,
when Cassino fell.
It appears that the German High Com-
mand is still undecided as to whether
it should defend the "Gothic Line,"
based on Pisa, Florence and Rimini, or
whether it should retire to the Po River
or even to the Alps. Observers feel that
'theytime for a decision is running
short, especially if~the High Command
should make its stand on the Gothic
Line. Thus indications point toward a
German retreat beyond the Gothic Line
and a staid in the Po Valley. Such a
retreat would give the Allies a number
of air bases whence British and American
planes can bomb Bavaria, in the heart
of Germany, with ease.

INVASION FRONT
Preparation
The destruction of Cherbourg has been
great but Allied engineers are confident
that operations can be restored in a
matter of days. Even at this reading,
supplies are most probably streaming in
to the marching armies through the third
greatest port of France.
The comparative quiet on the invasion
front is not due to a lack of action;
rather this action has transformed,
momentarily, from one of action to one
of preparation.
Local actions include the capture of
La Haye du Puits on the northern rim of
the shattered German west Normandy de-
fense anchor. Canadian troops who cap-
tured the Capriquet airport have been
driven back from that airport to the
village itself and are standing firm
against vicious counter-attack. British
troops around Caen, on the Canadian
flank, are locked in a deadly battle
with German armor, and the "issue is
still in doubt."

PACIFIC BATTLE
A Vain Gesture
The Japs are backed into a corner for
a Saipan showdown. The Nips, squeezed
into a north end corner of the Island,
are making a final but vain gesture for
their emperor. Loss of Saipan Island
will be a serious blow to the entire
structure of the Japanese military ma-
chine, as Saipan is the door to the
Marianas.
Meanwhile American naval task forces
have been busy hammering Bonin Island,
600 miles from Tokyo. Our airforce has
continued its bombings with unabated
fury, knocking 55 enemy planes from the
sky while attacking Iwo Island in the
Kazan group, 755 miles from Tokyo.
In Burma, Stilwell pressed his cam-
paign in the north, capturing Moguang


and completely surrounding Myitkyina.
However, in China the Japs closed in on
Hengyang and cut the Canton-Hankow rail-
way. The question mark of this week's
war is whether the unaided Chinese
can stop this Japanese drive aimed at
cutting China in two.


| T I INE TREN D S

ONE YEAR AGO
RAF bombs Cologne, Hamburg. Sicilian
bombings continued. On June 30, while
Churchill in London pledged Jap defeat,
U.S. Marines occupied Rendova Island.
TWO YEARS AGO
Gen. "Tooey" Spaatz appointed USAF
European commander. Sevastopol falls
on July I after historic siege. Germans
reach El Alemein on same day. Bremen,
Kiska bombed.
THREE YEARS AGO
Germany attacks Russiawithout warning
(June 21). Lithuania, Poland and most
of Latvia fall. Fighting around Minsk,
Byalistok severe. Italians in Ethiopia
surrender. U.S. occupies Iceland.


Nightmare for Luftwaffe


.... g.,,, .:,. I_-.J=_i _. _
The Army's new "Stratosphere Gun" is
one of the most powerful of American
weapons. This big 120 nm. anti-aircraft
blaster is capable of firing a projectile
20,000 feet higher than any other gun of
its type.







Northern Highwaq t Japan... The Kurile Islands


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be eu mt


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July 8, 1944


WEEK EN DING JULY 7




WEEK ENDING JULY 7


It was in Munich at a Nazi party rally
in 1939. Adolf Hitler rose and screamed
to the world, 'On the day the British
declared war, I commanded Goering to
make all preparations for a five-year
war, not because I believe this war will
last five years but because we will
never capitulate in five years.' Today
we lack but a bit over a month to com-
plete the five years Hitler allotted to
his war.
What is the outlook now? The Allies
have broken through the Atlantic Wall,
have captured Cherbourg, the third port
of France, and are turning their strength
inland. In the east the Red Army has
swept across the Berezina and captured
Minsk; like a hungry bear the Russians
pursue their quarry toward Warsaw, driv-
ing ahead at a faster pace and on a wide
oer front than the German Army was able
to accomplish in the darkest days of the
early 40s. In the south the Wehrmacht
isin hasty retreat, its forces disorgan-
ized, its equipment scattered, before
the advance of the 5th and 8th Armies
up the Italian peninsula. The under-
ground armies of suppressed countries
are becoming active; scenes such as the
Copenhagen garrison battle, the revolt
at Tours are but weather vanes pointing
toward things to come.


RUSSIAN FRONT
A Symbolical March
Fifteen days ago the Germans were en-
trenched along the "Fatherland Line," a
seemingly formidable chain of bastions
based on the fortresses of Vitebsk,
3rsha, Mogilev, Minsk and Polotsk. To-
day every one of these fortresses has
fallen, the Russians have rolled beyond
Minsk to the broad plains that border
East Prussia. Farthest Russian spear-
head is now 110 miles from the breeding
place of the Junker generals. The Red
Army is pounding along the age-old inva-
sion route used by Ghengis Khan in the
days before Christ. This victorious
march is symbolical, for here the Army
of Napoleon met disastrous defeat,
marking the downfall of the French em-
pire which had set out to conquer the
world.
Other Russian offensives speared tow-
ard lassi, aimed at splitting Hungary
and Romania. The second is smashing
through Kowol, in an effort to hit War-
3aw and split Poland. Another is spear-
ing from the northeast to tear apart
Latvia and Lithuania, and in the far
north another spearhead is developing
which will attempt to cut off Estonia.
A glance at a map of the Russian front
will reveal a most significant develop-
ment to even the untrained eye.
Another thorn in Hitler's side is the
Finnish situation. The Russians have
extended their gains beyond Viipuri and
are relentlessly driving toward Hel-
sinki. Prompt action must be expected
from Hitler. Already German troops have
been dispatched to Finland in an effort
to maintain some semblance of German
security.


ITALIAN FRONT
The Germans Flee
In Italy, the Germans were withdrawing
as fast as their resources would allow.
Pausing only for limited and sporadic
rearguard actions, they abandoned vast
amounts of irreplaceable materiel in the
path of the victorious Allies, who have
advanced some 300 miles since May 11,
when Cassino fell.
It appears that the German High Com-
mand is still undecided as to whether
it should defend the "Gothic Line,"
based on Pisa, Florence and Rimini, or
whether it should retire to the po River
or even to the Alps. Observers feel that
'theytime for a decision is running
short, especially if ythe High Command
should make its stand on the Gothic
Line. Thus indications point toward a
German retreat beyond the Gothic Line
and a stand in the Po Valley. Such a
retreat would give the Allies a number
of air bases whence British and American
planes can bomb Bavaria, in the heart
of Germany, with ease.

INVASION FRONT
Preparation
The destruction of Cherbourg has been
great but Allied engineers are confident
that operations can be restored in a
matter of days. Even at this reading,
supplies are most probably streaming in
to the marching armies through the third
greatest port of France.
The comparative quiet on the invasion
front is not due to a lack of action;
rather this action has transformed,
momentarily, from one of action to one
of preparation.
Local actions include the capture of
La Haye du Puits on the northern rim of
the shattered German west Normandy de-
fense anchor. Canadian troops who cap-
tured the Capriquet airport have been
driven back from that airport to the
village itself and are standing firm
against vicious counter-attack. British
troops around Caen, on the Canadian
flank, are locked in a deadly battle
with German armor, and the "issue is
still in doubt."

PACIFIC BATTLE
A Vain Gesture
The Japs are backed into a corner for
a Saipan showdown. The Nips, squeezed
into a north end corner of the Island,
are making a final but vain gesture for
their emperor. Loss of Saipan Island
will be a serious blow to the entire
structure of the Japanese military ma-
chine, as Saipan is the door to the
Marianas.
Meanwhile American naval task forces
have been busy hammering Bonin Island,
600 miles from Tokyo. Our airforce has
continued its bombings with unabated
fury, knocking 55 enemy planes from the
sky ,while attacking Iwo Island in the
Kazan group, 755 miles from Tokyo.
In Burma, Stilwell pressed his cam-
paign in the north, capturing Moguang


and completely surrounding Myitkyina.
However, in China the Japs closed in on
Hengyang and cut the Canton-Hankow rail-
way. The question mark of this week's
war is whether the unaided Chinese
can stop this Japanese drive aimed at
cutting China in two.


S T I H E T R EN D S

ONE YEAR AGO
RAF bombs Cologne, Hamburg. Sicilian
bombings continued. On June 30, while
Churchill in London pledged Jap defeat,
U.S. Marines occupied Rendova Island.
TWO YEARS AGO
Gen. "Tooey" Spaatz appointed USAF
European commander. Sevastopol falls
on July I after historic siege. Germans
reach El Alemein on same day. Bremen,
Kiska bombed.
THREE YEARS AGO
Germany attacksRussiawithout warning
(June 21). Lithuania, Poland and most
of Latvia fall. Fighting around Minsk,
Byalistok severe. Italians in Ethiopia
surrender. U.S. occupies Iceland.


Nightmare for Luftwaffe


The Army's new "Stratosphere Gun" is
one of the most powerful of American
weapons. This big 120 mm. anti-aircraft
blaster is capable of firing a projectile
20,000 feet higher than any other gun of
its type.


L LADNYT T A RG


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TYNDALL TARGET


Northern Highwoq t, Japan... Thw Kurile Islands


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Page 6


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NEWS FROM THE


SECTION 1-8
IMPROVEMENTS UNDER WAY

AT TRIGGER TOWN
Lt. Buford, C.O. of Section I-8,
is endeavoring to make the ship-
ping section of Triggertown a
ore pleasant place for you fu-
ture graduates to come to. He is
having grass sodded around the
orderly room and more and more
tents are being razed. The old
tents are being torn down and
huts are replacing them.
The mall clerks, in both your
old sub-section and in sub-sec-
tion I-8, are working very hard
to get your mail to you as soon
as possible. The usual mixing up
of the mail does not prevail much
anymore.
One of the occupants of Section
1-8, while sweating out a chow
line, was interviewed and asked
what he thought should be the
next improvement in the section.
His answer was very definite:
"; think of my girl with the
longing that is transmitted to
,my fingertips, so I would like
to write a long letter to her,
but I am handicapped through the
lack of electricity."
We, the occupants of Section
1-8, welcome you, our buddies of
Class 44-28, to the shipping
section of Tyndall Field. There
are a lot of morale builders
posted around the section. A
varied assortment of these are in
the mailroom. Be sure to take a
gander at them when you call for
your mall. We hope that you will
enjoy your short stay here.
Welcome back, Sgt. Pollard! How
was the furlough? Did the buggy
manage to make the round trip,
maybe It should be turned In-for
salvage?
I understand that some of the
boys like our new detail.... The
beach is fine this time of the
year.
SECTION I-2
44-34 BOASTS MANY

COMBAT VETERANS
Many of us have come from all
parts of the States; many, too,
have served overseas, some in
combat zones and others in all
theaters on the globe.
Many who make up the newly
formed class have seen a good
number of years go by in the
Army, also some are still very
new to Army life. But after all,
we have all come here for one
purpose: to get this gunnery
course under our belts and then
to be assigned to a combat crew,
where each of us might then give
our all in helping the fellows
who have gone before us.
The great day has arrived now.
that we are here assigned to our
new quarters for the next seven
weeks. We were greeted with a
great let-down, as we were put in
the well known desolated place
(otherwise known as Triggertown)
from which we were all a bunch of
smiles when we packed our bags
and headed toward Section 1-2.
After all the commotion having
been stirred up by our coming
here to start, we have all now
settled back ready to dig in and
prove to Uncle Sam and to Tyndall
Field that all their time with us
has not been spent in vain.
This is Class 44-34 now signing
off for now, but you will hear
from us later.


*Xoq psads o si auold s!qI *jappnJ
puo u'3 alBuis puo sdi papunoj
soa euoldl!oD psadoD aeql sd!i pa
-punoj o, saBpa q4oq uo jado4 puo
uoipes JsuaO )p)!j 0D ADOL SBUIR
aqi -auiBua aqs o04 euoJoaddo
deep o seA6B asou eaq molaq dooos
Jio aBnI yV *aqwuoqeA!p puo jatqBiy
4Das eaBu!s 'Bu!M-MOI o ,,'uooqdAL,,
s,~y~ aq4 s,l g 'ON 41 JON


-sdi4 paAon 'pooJq o4 Jado, slaund
Jaino al4s jo'saBpa aLi al!M JolnB
-uopDJ s! s 6u!i eaLj jo uo!pes ja
-uato e.L 'eziuBo0aj o0 Asoa auold
sil aeyou euoldl!Dot jDL eaql puo
allDou uiqoa eyt q paunDinq aBo6
-asnj jalueau go aJ l -uold iD3o aLu
-wAso Asji oela aq o, paridaj u6isap
IDnsnun jo d!tls-4Ds o04 D 'i tL '"A
uouija~oaqi s,l i '0N JD Gl !


Section I-7
Boys Comb Trigger Town Out Of Their Hair;

Get Set For Nomenclature And Deflections


Greetings from Section 1-7. In
case you don't know just who that
is, we are the GI's most recently
combing Triggertown out of our
hair. In spite of all that has
been drilled into us the past
week on nomenclature, deflections
and the rest of it, most of the
boys have retained their sense
of humor.
For instance, there is the
story that Sgt. Bobby Pope, re-
cently returned veteran of the
South Pacific Theater of Opera-
tions, tells of the Liberator
waist gunner whose gun jammed
while the formation was being
attacked by a flock of Nips. It
seems the gunner, knowing it is
suicide to let a Jap know you're
unarmed, grabbed a flare pistol
and cut loose with it whenever a
Jap made a pass at him. Evi-
dently the Nip pilots thought it
a new "secret weapon" and decided
they had enough flying for one
day. NOW I can't guarantee that
all this really happened. Even
Sgt. Pope can't, but who knows,
stranger things have happened.
They've even developed a nick-*
name for Pvt. Richard C. Hall.
The reason for it is self-explan-
atory. The name? Oh yes, it's
"Sacktime."
Cpl. Kleinfelter is grooming
Sgt. Karsmiszki for Gunner of the
Class. He says the bracelet
would be too heavy to wear but
he'd like to sh4re the three-day
Pass that goes with it.
As far as scholastic achieve-
ments are concerned, most of the
boys are there with the best of
them. For instance, Pfc. Kenneth
Faulkner accomplished field
stripping blindfolded with heavy
gloves on in one and a half min-
utes the first try. And that is
good time for anyone. Pvt. Bob-
bie Freeman did it in two minutes
flat which isn't bad either.
The song bird of the outfit is


Pvt. William Hayes. His voice
can be heard above all of Flight
1, which I think you'll agree is
pretty loud.
I understand M/Sgt. Hall and
S/Sgt. "Red" Gibson give their
lungs a good exercising every
morning around 5 a.m. Doctor's
orders, no doubt.
One thing the fellows are not
happy about though are the lines
around here. Now some lines are
to be expected but when a guy can
read a 300-page book and smoke
three packs of cigarets sweating
out lines in one day....well!
--CPL. JAMES B. LE ROY

Section I-i
Left Over Meatball

Starts Controversy
A shy "hello" from your rookie
reporter of the latest class to
enter this battle of the silver
wings and with an alarmingly loud
gulp, here goes nothing...
In wandering around and stick-
ingmynose where I hadn't ouighta,
yours truly gathered these in-
gredients for his literary stew
which I'll serve to all who like
to read the educational stuff
that makes the Air Forc'e what it
is.
Who ever thought the lowly
meatball could be of such im-
portance as it was in a certain
case this week? It seems Pvt.
Rovinelli had part of one left
over when his hunger was quenched
but the mess sergeant thought he
needed the vitamins left in the
meat. And after a discussion on
nutrition, our own Pvt. Rovinelli
wound up in the kitchen helping--
making more meatballs! No infor-
mation was available as to how
much this improved the dish.
The splendid tenor voice heard
echoing from the barracks 436
shower room belongs to Pvt. H.C.


Wurthman, but don't get him to
singing those Irish ditties or
you'll never love the Irish
again--
Pvt. Earl Jones is taking a
ribbing from his shipmates be-
cause of the way he wears his
earphones during flight. (On his
knee or lap.)
Who said drilling couldn't be
fun? Watch Cpl. Majzels if you
don't believe it. Even a column
left is a show from the specta-
tors' point of view.... ur two
Fuller brothers who got together
here seem headed for different
ways. Wendell got the Emerson
Nose Turret while Nelson took
over the Martin Upper....Of
course all we he-men have tans
but pvt. Vannsicisi almost makes
me self-conscious with the one
the sun painted on him.
And now before my new boss puts
me back to sweeping the floor,
I'll close with this thought:
Every sergeant has his place but
some of them just haven't been
dug yet. I think Confucius said
that but don't quote me.


g40 Jepasa Aq jaeodS yjrnj3jy soqs!lqnd "oD03 pDeW 'ppoo AsaenoD


SECTION I-8
"GUNNER OF THE CLASS'

TITLE SPURS STUDENTS
On Saturday, June 10, in the
year of our Lord Nineteen Hundred
and Forty-Four, 260 brave young
soldiers struggled up the road
from the renowned NTriggertown"
to make themselves a name in Tyn-
dall's Hall of Fame. With each
individual was the small voice
saying, "You, too, may become the
Gunner of the Class.*
Life was pleasant in Trigger-
town for there was no pressure
chamber, first aid lessons, Arti-
cles of War, and other such minor
details. Yes, it seemed that our
life of ease had come to an end
for the time being. During the
pre-school week we didn't have
too much time to "hit the sack'
and lick our wounds. Lt. Bland-
Ing incidentlyy we found him to
be a very efficient as well as
likeable officer) found a way to
keep our days full of classes and
drill. We saw a few of our bud-
dies left by the wayside, victims
of the pressure chamber, etc.,
but as a whole the class did very
well that pre-school week.
Slowly but surely our dreams of
being the "Gunner of the Class"
are fading. our steps are be-
ginning to falter. Between
Sighting and Weapons we are los-
ing our contempt for instructors
and in its place we have acquired
the certain respectful attitude
that they so rightly deserve.
Each day the sick call line grows
in magnitude and the result is
that there are quite a few va-
cancies in the ranks when P.T.
time rolls around In the after-
noon. Yes, the fellows pick up
the little tricks In a hurry.
The second week and the light
is beginning to dawn on some few
of us. This Sighting isn't nearly
as bad as it seemed to be. The
depressing thing is that now we
find the .50 caliber machine gun
(of which we have profound res-
pect) is nothing more than one
big lot of malfunctions. Each
part can have at least one thous-
and things wrong with it at one
time. The result of these mal-
functions were naturally drastic
since each and every one of them
means "the gun won't shoot.


Pa e 7


July 8, 1944


TYNDALL TARGET








Page 8 TYN DALI TARGET


The Girl "Back Home"


r"


Two Meals on Tornado Diet Ruined


by Overdose of "Liquid Sunshine"

Heavy formations of "Florida dew" interrupted the Tornadoes' two
offensive thrusts at highly strategic moments during the past sev-
en days. Last Saturday, at Whiting Field, Pensacola, behind the
spectacular pitching of 'Thunderballn Frank Usonyi, the Tyndall
nine piled up an 8-0 lead in the first inning when buckets full
of dampness caused the game to be halted. Again, on Wednesday, up
at the Marianna Army Air Base, the Tornadoes were trailing 1-0
when they barely made the third out In the top of the fourth to
complete four and a half innings of play and have the game regis-
tered as "official." A sudden outburst of exceedingly heavy mist
sent both teams to the dugout and eventually the players were
forced to wade to a more permanent shelter.
In Saturday's contest against Whiting Field, Uzonyi earned his
newest nickname of "Thunderball, when a resounding clap of thunder
greeted his first pitch.
Up at Marianna or. Wednesday, Dale Livingston was on the mound
for Tyndall and during his four-inning stint on the mound gave up
one hit. The Flyers scoredttheir run in the second inning when
Shortstop Gunkel lifted a fly to right.. Paul Brown got set for
the catch but a burst of wind gave the ball wings and Brown was
barely able to touch the ball when it finally descended and Gun-
kel was safe on third. Centerfielder Dawkins then drove Gunkel
home with a single to center for the only score of the day. Tyn-
dall's two hits were accounted for by Patterson, who singled in
the first, and George Mitro, new T/F third baseman, who doubled
to center in the fourth.
This afternoon on the Post Diamond, the Tornadoes will meet the
Moody Field nine from Valdosta, Ga. The game will start at 4
P.M. In their only previous meeting, the Tornadoes clubbed out a
15-9 win over the Georgia team. The Tornadoes are scheduled to
meet the Moody baseballers again in a night game at Valdosta on
Tuesday.


"THE PAUSE THAT REFRESHES"


7


Nine out of ten GIs have one--and for the tenth lonely GI who
doesn't have a girl back home, we recommend Twentieth Century Fox's
Jeanne Crain in "Home in Indiana. A comparative newcomer to the
screen, Jeanne turns in a top-notch performance in this homey film
story which is scheduled for the Post Theaters tomorrow and Monday.
You probably won't recognize Jeanne in "Home in Indiana" as being
the same girl in the above photo, but regardless of the role she
plays, she can be the leading lady In our photo album on Sunday,
Monday and always.

SECTION I-3
YOU SHOULD HEAR JONES' STORIES ABOUT


HAWAII; LANDOLINA WAS
Did you know that S/Sgt. Jones
spent eight hears in Hawaii? (you
ought to hear some of his stor-
ies!).... ne of our boys, Pvt.
Landolina, was a professional
boxer and really was heading
toward the big time before he got
his greetings....We are consid-
ered the best sub-section on the
field for policing the airdrome.
All they have to do now is ask us
once more and the boys will be
asking for a phase check on po-
licing the area with blindfold
and gloves...

Thought: Wonder when PPappy"
will count the same cadence that
he starts out with? The boys are
such a fine crew that they change
step without being told. But,
that's all right, 'Pappy," we
love you just the same.... Room 7
was so glad to get back from Apa-
lachicola that they all threw a
big 'blast" Saturday night...on
milk and crackers. P.S. They had
to fly the next morning.


PRO BOXER
Incidentally the last group of
cadets that we sang our special
song to, "Junior Birdmen,* ap-
preciated it so much that they
started to throw coins at us,
which we so easily appropriated.
(What ever did happen to that
sum of 8 cents?)
Weapons, sighting, turrets,
drill, moving base range, moving
target range and all the others-
just think how much we are going
to miss all these formations....
It certainly showed on every-
body's face when the different
flights began to fly. Of course
there were the few that liked it
so much that they stayed for
more. We'll be waiting for you
fellows, catch up! Will ya',
huh?...
Of course the most prominent
part of the sub-section, Ist/Sgt.
Nelson, will be missed when we
leave. You did a fine Job with
us boys, Sgt. So don't mind the
little griping (?) that we did.
--CPL. LOUIS GOLDBERG


The members of the Tyndall Field skeet team pause for a moment
of refreshment between events at the AAF gunnery competition staged
at Las Vegas, Nevada, June 24-25. Also entered in the meet was a
team of Tyndall gunnery students which placed second in the student
competitions.
The Tyndall Field instructors who comprised the skeet team pic-
tured above are, left to right, T/Sgt. R.G. Henderson, Sgt. E.J.
D'Ambrosio, Pfc. E.A. Cusick, T/Sgt. Paul A. Brown and Sgt. E.H.
Miller. Henderson smashed 50 straight pigeons for a perfect score
in the first event of the meet.


I INTERSECTION SPORTS RESULTS AND STANDINGS


Team
B2.........
El.........
E2.........
C ..........
C5.........
A .........
B4 .........
Al.........
photo ....


SUr-TBALL
W L Team W
7 1 B6 ... ... .4
6 1 Finance.... 3
6 1 A2 ..... ....3
5 3 C6 ........ 2
5 3 C2.......... 2
3 2 C9 ..........2
5 4 C4......... .2
4 3 B3..... ....1
4 3 BI....... ..1
C7 ......... 1


RESULTS
C8 8, C3 2; B6 5, C6 5; C7 10, B4
3; B2 9, El 0 (forfeit); B6 9, C4
O (forfeit) B4 2, C5 1.
OUTSTANDING GAME OF THE WEEK:
B4's 2-1 victory over C5 behind
the 2-hit hurling of Wagner. San
Knepper, the losing twirler, was
nicked for four hits. Neither
team committed any errors. CS
scored its lone run in the fourth
inning, while s4 pushed across
one run In the second and an-


other in the seventh.
BASEBALL
Team W L Team WW I
C ......... 4 0 C .........2
E1......... 3 0 Al ......... 1 3
E2.........2 1 B5...... ... 1 4
A2......... 2 C7......... 1 4
RESULTS
A2 12, C7 3; E2 5, El 5 (game
called on account of darkness.)
VOLLEYBALL
Team W L Team W L
BI ......... 4 0 B6.........2 2
photo.... 3 1 B2 .........2 2
Al......... 2 1 Finance....1 3
ce......... 2 1 E2.........0 3
E1..........0 3
RESULTS
B6 15-15, El 0-0 (forfeit); B2
15-15, E2 0-0 (forfeit) ; Fi-
nance 15-13-0, Photo 6-15-1; B
15-15, Al LP2 10.


Page 8


TYNDALL TARGET


-1^ ', .

i- ,







T


BOATI COMPANY--
NEW T/F 'DRY DOCK'

READY FOR USE BY

CRASH BOATS
The dock space around here is
fairly cluttered with tired
looking patrol boats. These
shabby ladies have come from all
over the east Gulf area to have
their faces lifted on the new
marine railway. Capt. F.V. Thoma-
son of the Fourth Service Command
under Col. Bozardt supervised the
completion of this dock and re-
cently hauled the first boat out
'high and dry. In case you are
wondering what a marine railway
is, it is not a branch of the
great Bay Line, but an inclined
railway that carries a platform
down into the water. Any boat
to be hauled is maneuvered over
this platform and secured and,
presto, the cradle is pulled pp
the rails and the boat is ready
to be overhauled. The prime pur-
pose is to service and repair Air
Force Rescue Boats in the Gulf
area.
It is a known fact that the
little mess hall is witness to
some of the best meals laid out
on the field. "Just like up-
town! the boys say.
Pride of the Boat Dock baseball
team is Cpl. Joseph Forbes who,
,in his own quiet way, fanned 18
out of 21 in a 7-inning game and
the next day dropped 13 more into
the bag. Forbes played semi-pro
once, but has logged a lot of
desk time since, which ain't so
good for a barefooted Mississippi
lad.
SAILJER OF THE WEEK: Our man on
the dock interview this week
caught T/Sgt. Thoe S. Shaw of
someplace close to Akron, Ohio.
"S" stands for "Smokey," who is
Regular Army and at this writing
aboard the P-253. His Army car-
eer is unique in that he has
spent al four years on crash


boats and has a Master rating.
Four years ago the Air Force res-
cue boats were in their infancy,
but Shaw says they put him in a
Quartermaster Corps boat "that
was old enough to vote." He is


PHASE CHECK--
"Checkers'" Softbal lers
Arouse Enthusiasm

Fnthus!asm in the Phase Check-
ing Departrient Is running h i~h
over the classy softball team,
which, despite the fact it has
lost three out of six games,
looks like one of the best tears
in the league. Playing Manager
John Baker, after juggling the
lineup for the last few games,
has a combination which re main-
tains will tlay winning ball the
remainder of the season.
In a closely played game Monday
night the Phase Check Regulars
defeated an all-star team of mar-
ried men from the department by
a 5-3 score. Sgt. James Hayes
turned in a creditable mound per-
formance for the married men by
holding the hard-hitting regulars
to seven hits.
The Phase Check volleyball team
paced by Sgt. Lee Alterderfer has
two wins in four matches, but is
practicing nightly and expects to
show a big improvement in the
near future.
We welcome to our fold Sgt.
Dale Livingston and Cpl. James
Wilson.
We notice increased enthusiasm
on the part of our Sgts. Finley,
Eelton and Radio S. Edwards who
recently acquired what is known
as "A Better Half." Congratula-
tions, fellas!
Pfc. Roberts, a newcomer to the
department, hasn't wasted any
time getting acquainted with our
charming Wac, Cpl. Hilton. It is
said they're making good use of
the Florida moon. "Just talking
things over," says Roberts.


WACTIVITIES--
Rhowdi Takes Over Where
Sad Sack Left Off

Since ye olde Sad Sac left. cn
detached service there has been
no Wactivitles but now Rowdhi is
taking over and all shall be re-
ported.
We often wonder why Dicky sings
such sad songs while she is ron-
ing. We have a hunch thai. gig
she got in basic is still haunt-
ingherand her listeners.....Looks
as if Diers, Beeney and McGee
have all landed a man apiece.
Wonder if Beeney is selling her
man bonds? And speaking of sell-
ing war bonds, Cagel seemed to be
making every effort to build up a
sales talk in her sleep the other
night.
The Wacs like to play softball
with B-1 as everyone flatters
them except that Goodman fellow
is a fly-hawk as well as being a
very fancy pen pusher. Any sec-
tion wishing to play our softball
team, just call 3254 for an ap-
pointment. (adv.)
Welcome home, Gershon, we miss-
ed your humor (????) around the
company area. We trust you had
a delightful furlough. Schiele,
too, is back and her inimitable
(is that the right word) style of
making the piano keys talk is
again floating from the dayroom.
Never too much music, Schiele.
Virginia Duncan is doing a fine
job in the mess hall. We are all
pulling for you, so don't let us
down.
Mail clerk, beauty operator,
messenger, PX operator, un-doer
of all odd jobs, for crying out
loud Dively what IS your MOS?


a long, easy-going GI, got a wife Emerson S. Harlow back after a
and a little baby, and has been long stretch of D.S. He's one of
heard to say, with a far away the pioneers of this place, and
look in his eyes, that being a 30 ace draftsman, carpenter and
year man would not be so bad... sailor. --SAILJER JACK
All hands are glad to see Cpl.


CAMERA STOPS BALL AS FORMER A.L. BATTING CHAMP GETS SET FOR SWING


- p .


-~ -, -


K: ~j


Ted Williams, "Mr. Boston" himself, is caught by the cameraman as get a better view of the horsehide and call the pitch.
he prepares to pounce on one of Dale Livingston's pitches in the The former American League batting champ caught the ball inside
fourth inning of the T/F Bronson Field game here two weeks ago. In and slammed it through First Baseman Bob Patterson (waiting in the
this unusual shot, the ball has been stopped in mid-air, half-way background) for a single. Bronson won the game 2-0, thereby halting
between the pitcher's box and home plate. Livingston has completed the Tornadoes' winning streak at 7 straight. Cpl. Bill James of the
his follow through, Williams is set for a slam, and Catcher Busby Post Photo Section was the boy with the quick finger on the shutter
crouches low and waits, while Umpire Russ Cannon also bends low to in this case .


WHAT'S DOING NEXT WEEK

SUNDAY
7 P.M.--Bingo at Triggertown
MONDAY
7 F.M.--Movies, Hospital
8:30 P.M.--Movies, Receiving
Section
TUESDAY
7 P.M..-Entertainment in
Hospital Wards
8 P.M.--Dance, USO
8 P.M.--Bingo, Rec Hall
8 P.M.--Movies, Colored Rec
Hall

WEDNESDAY
12:30 P.M.--Special Service
Non-Com Meeting, Library
7 P.M.--Weekly Variety Shqw
at Receiving Section
8 P.M.--GI Dance, Rec Hall,
Permanent party only

THURSDAY
7 P.M.--Movies, Hospital
8 P.M.--GI Dance, Rec Hall,
Students only
8 P.M.--Dance, Colored Rec
Hall
8:30 P.M.--Movies, Receving
Section

FRIDAY
7 P.M.--Triggertown Talent
Review
8 P.M.--Movies, Colored Rec
Hall

SATURDAY
7 P.M.--Movies, Hospital
8:30 P.M.--Movies, Trigger-
Town

BOXING
Tuesday, 8 P.M.-Weekly bouts
at Post Gym Area


Pane Q


L LADNYT T A R G E T








July 8, I94~ TYNOALL TARGET Page 10


MOVIE FARE FOR THE WEEK

POST
Saturday, 'ROGER TOUHY, GANGS-
TER,' P. Foster, V. McLaglen.
Sun.-Mon., 'HOME IN INDIANA,'
Walter Brennan, Jeanne Crain.
Tuesday, 'SECRETS OF SCOTLAND
YARD, Lionel Atwill, C.
Aubrey Smith; Also, 'SOUTH OF
DIXIE,' Anne Gwynne, David
B ruce.
Wed.-Thurs., 'MARINE RAIDERS,'
Pat O'Brien, Ruth Hussey.
Friday, 'TAKE IT BIG,' Jack
Haley, Arline Judge.
RITZ
Sun.-Mon., 'TENDER COMRADE,'
Ginger Rogers.
Tues. thru Fri.'PIN-UP GIRL,'
Betty Grable.
Saturday, 'BENEATH WESTERN
SKIES.'
PANAMA
Sun.-Mon., 'BEST FOOT FOR-
WARD,' Lucille Ball.
Tuesday, 'FIVE GRAVES TO
CAIRO,' Von Stroheim, F. Tone.
Wednesday, 'DR. GILLESPIE'S
NEW ASSISTANT,' L. Barrymore.
Thursday, 'THREE HEARTS FOR
SYLVIA. '
Fri.-Sat.'ARIZONA WHIRLWIND.'
BAY
Sunday, 'NINE GIRLS,' Harding,
Keyes.
Mon.-Tues., 'CRIME SCHOOL,'
Humphrey Bogart.
Wednesday, 'TOP MAN,' R. O'-
Connor.
Thursday, 'WINTER CARNIVAL,'
Anne Sheridan.
Fri.-Sat., 'GUN SMOKE MESA.' &
'CITY THAT STOPPED HITLER.'

f-


SPORTS BULLETIN I
This afternoon, on the Post
Diamond, the Tornadoes face
the Moody Field Flyers; the
game is scheduled to start at
4 p.m. On Tuesday the T/F
nine will travel to Valdosta
to play the Moody team in a
game under the arc lights.
Next weekend the Tyndall squad
will play at Pensacola with
Bronson Field as the opposition
on Saturday and Fort Barrancas
on Sunday.
Tomorrow afternoon on the
enlisted men's beach the rain-
delayed water sports carnival
will be held with the final
heats in all events expected
to begin at 2 p.m.
The War Bond Golf Tourna-
ment, to which all T/F golfers
are invited, will be staged at
the Panama Country Club in
Lynn Haven tomorrow with the
first flight tee-off set for
8: 30 a.m.
Also on tomorrow's b'sy
schedule is the former Ins-
tructors' Club beach party and
dinner. GI transportation for
all guests will leave from
Section B headquarters and
from the Department of Train-
ing headquarters at 10 a.m.

Capt; 0.0. Freeman, Special
Services Officer, announced at
noon today that through the
cooperation of the local U.SO,
50 cadets will be selected each
week as guests on a Sunday
fishing trip, an invitation
similar to that now offered to
50 enlisted men who are third
week students.
The first group of cadets to
enjoy the invitation will
leave from the USO pier to-
morrow morning.


ORIENTATION LECTURE











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4~~_ --E r
\P lo






















' -^ON
44Y


July 8, 1944


TYNDALL TARGET


Page 10




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