Title: Tyndall target
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076230/00114
 Material Information
Title: Tyndall target
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 27-36 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)
Publisher: Public Relations Office, Air Corps Gunnery School
Place of Publication: Tyndall Field Fla
Publication Date: 1942-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City -- Tyndall Air Force Base
Coordinates: 30.078611 x -85.576389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 16, 1942)-
Issuing Body: Issues for May 9, 1942- published by Office of Public Relations, Army Air Forces Gunnery School.
General Note: Title from caption.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076230
Volume ID: VID00114
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24602432

Full Text





TYNDALL FIELD, FLORIDA


VOL. 3. ..) 2....JUI,Y 1, 194
J


WATER SPORTS CARNIVAL SET FOR G I BEACH TOMORROW


RECRUITINGG DRIVE FOR
CIVILIAN EMPLOYEES
GETS RESULTS
An all-out recruiting drive
to obtain civilian employees
for vital jobs at Tyndall
Field ended today; with Major
Ray L. McCullough, civilian
personnel officer, announcing
that a large percentage of the
workers needed were signed up
during the five-day campaign.
The appeal for storekeepers,
mechanic learners, typists
carpenters and skilled mech-
anics of all types was carried
to the people of Panama City
and vicinity by press and
radio, and also by personal re-
cruitment by Tyndall Field em-
ployees.
The entire program was di-
rected in conjunction with
'rank B. Ungar, director of
civiliann personnel procurement
for the Eastern Flying Train-
ing Command, who was assisted
by Major McCullough, Lt. Al-
bertT. Radka, public relations
officer, and officials of the
Civil Service and U.S. Employ-
ment Offices in Panama City.
Colonel John W. Persons,
post commander, expressed his
appreciation to the Panama
City News-Herald and Radio
Station WDLP, .for their Lx-
cellent.cooperition in help-
ing the drive, and extended a
warm welcome to all the new
employees recruited.

PENNSYLVANIA STUDENT
CHOSEN 'GUNNER OF
THE CLASS'
Sgt. Alexander. Chaychls,
of Mocanaqua, Pa., was select-
ed as the leading gunner of
Class 44-27. The sergeant is
22 years old and a graduate of
"hickshinny High School, Pa.
has had 23 months of ser-
-ice in the AAF and came here;
from Bartow Army Air Base,
Fla. He also attended the
A.M. school at Lincoln Army
Air Base and is classified as
an instrument specialist.
Chaychis was employed as an
electric arc welder in civil-
ian life. He lists photography
as his chief hobby, and names
his work with turrets as the
most interesting phase of the
gunnery course. When the war
is over, he hopes to go back
to school and take up civil
engineering.
Here are his gunnery school
grades:
Cal. S0..... 90 Moving Base.91
1urreta......96 Tower Range.92
Sighting.....92 Jeep Range..18
Skeet........89 Final.Exam.131

MOTIONS ANNOUNCED
_..romotion of Major James W.
Clark, Deputy for Administra-
tion and Services here, to the
rank of lieutenant colonel was
announced on Thursday.
Lt. Col. Clark has been on
duty at Tyndall for several
months, reporting from the
27th Flying Wing at Cochrane
Field, Ga., where he served as
Administrative executive.
Also announced this week was
the promotion of Lt. John F.
Lyle, of the field's rationing
office, to the rank of cap-
tain.


HONOR SCROLL FOR T/F
GUNNERY GRADUATES
TO BE DEDICATED
A large honor scroll, bear-
ing the names of some 500 Tyn-
dall gunnery school graduates
who have been decorated for
their achievements in combat,
will be dedicated at a cere-
mony at 1 o'clock Tuesday af-
ternoon.
The scroll will be erected
diagonally opposite the De-
partment of Training head-
quarters at the intersection
of Illinois Avenue and Suwan-
nee Road.
Colonel John W. Persons,
commanding officer, will speak
at the ceremony, and the Tyn-
dall Field band will play.
Students will participate.
The honor scroll stands
eight feet high and Is sixteen
feet long. It will be painted
in AAF colors of blue and
gold. The War Room Officer,
Lt. Vincent J. Murphy, is in
charge of its erection.
The names of the decorated
gunners to be placed on the
scroll have been obtained from
A-2.in Washington. A revised
list will be posted quarterly
to keep pace with the increas-
ing number of gunners who re-
ceive medals from the War De-
partment.
Only the names of decorated'
enlisted men will be placed on
the scroll. Officers from Tyn-
dall Field who receive awards
will have their names posted
on a board to be erected later
in the vicinity of Post Head-
quarters.

IN 13 INNING DEADLOCK


mt


Sgt. Dale Livingston, ace
right-hander of the Tornado
pitching staff, who hurled
nine innings of the 13-inning
deadlock between Tyndall and
Eglin last Wednesday. The
game was called on account of
darkness with the score at
4-4.
This afternoon the Tornadoes
are playing Whiting Field at
Pensacola. Their next home
game will be against Moody
Field on Saturday.


"AU REVOIR. MON GENERAL"


General Charles Luguet, commanding general of the French
Air Forces in the U.S. bids farewell to Cpl. George Lemleux,
T/F French interpreter. The scene took place last week as
General Luguet prepared to board his plane and continue his
tour of EFTC stations. Standing by to escort the general
to his plane are, left to right, Lt. Jean Chambon, Col. John
W. Persons, post commander, and Col. William H. Hanson, deputy
for operations and training.


"GI BONDS" EXPECTED
TO SHARPLY BOOST
TYNDALL SALES
One of the greatest boosts
to bond buying by servicemen
is the $10 "GI Bond" which the
government will issue shortly.
The sale of the new bonds Is
authorized only to commission-
ed and enlisted personnel.
They may be purchased for
$7.50 in cash or by monthly
Class B allotments.
The old $6.75 monthly al-
lotment plan will be discon-
tinued in favor of the new
$7.50. However, Class B al-
lotments will still be per-
mitted for $18.75, $37.50,
$75 bonds and up.
According to the post fi-
nance officer, the new bonds
are expected to arrive here
in August. Until then the
purchase of the "GI Bonds"
will have to be made through
payroll allotments.
Capt. R.S. Salley, post War
Bonds officer, announced today
that the personnel of Tyndall
Field have purchased $75,00C
worth of bonds in the present
campaign and he is confident
that the goal of $100,000 will
be reached before the close
of the drive on July 15. He
also reported that Apalachi-
cola has gone over the top of
its $10,000 quota.

SPECIAL EVENTS
THISSU-DAY- Water Sports com-
petition at 0G beach.
TUESDAY, July 4- Boxing 8 P.M.
T/F vs. Apalachicola Base.
WEDNESDAY, July 5. USO Camp
Show, 'Helgh Ho At Trigger.
town 7 P.M.; at Rec Hall No. 2
8:30 P.M.


BUY MORE THAN BEFORE


SUPPORT THE FIFTH

WAR LOAN DRIVEl


BOMBARDIER SON OF T/F
POSTMASTER REPORTED
KILLED IN ENGLAND
It was with deep regret that
lhe men and women of Tyndall
Field learned of the death of
Lt. Derrel J. Jones, bombard-
ier in the AAF and son of D.D.
Jones, veteran Tyndell post-
master. Lt. Jones was killed
in Englano June 14, according
to a telegram received this
week by his parents, who re-
side in St. Andrews. The of-
flcer entered the service two
years ago and left for England
early in May. He was employed
at the Southern Kraft Corp.
prior to his enlistment and
attended Bay High School.
NOTICE
On Sunday, July 2, at the
6th Street USO Club, between
6:30 and 7:30 p.m., there will
be a conference on the rela-
tionship between the service-
man and the community. Par-
ticipating will be five ser-
vicemen and five members of
the faculty of the Florida
A & M College.


Here's the Navy's New 'Flying Catfish'


(Mat 92-553) Official U. S. Navy Photo
This bulbous-nosed, big-bellied "Flying Catfish" is the United States
Navy's newest and biggest cargo carrying plane. Built .of stainless steel,
it has a 100-foot wingspread, two 1,000 horse power air-cooled motors,
and cruises at 165 miles an hour. It can carry 10,000 pounds of freight
600 miles and has a maximum range, with a smaller load and auxiliary
gas tank, of 2,500 miles.


SWIMMING, DIVING
ROWING EVENTS ON

BEACH PROGRAM
Final plans and arrangements
have been completed for Tyn-
dall's first water sports car-
nival to be staged at the en-
listed men's beach tomorrow
afternoon. Although elimina-
tion heats in many of the
events will have been complet-
ed by noon, final competition
in all events is expected to
get under way at 2 p.m.
The Special Service Office,
under whose supervision the
carnival is being staged, an-
nounced that a great many en-
tries have already been re-
ceived. Individuals and teams
who have not as yet turned In
entry blanks may do so tomor-
row afternoon at the beach.
Lt. J.H. Riley will be in
charge of the competitions.
Enlisted men who have not
entered for fear of not being
equal to the competition are
advised by the Special Service
Office that the carnival is
being staged strictly for ama-
teurs and that Tyndall men
with professional experience
will serve as judges for the
various events.
Fun for all will be the key-
note of the gala water fest,
a,: all who can wade beyond
their ankles will be missing
tle chance of a lifetime if
they don't sign up for one or
more of the events, which in-
clude swimming, rowing and
paddle races. Also on the
schedule of events Is a life
raft demonstration and several
other water safety exhibits.

SUNDAY CONCERTS
Tomorrow evening at 8:30 the
Tyndall Field Band will pre-
sent its second Sunday concert.
Until further notice, these
Sunday evening concerts will
be held at the boxing ring
area adjacent to the Post Gym.
All are invited to attend.
CWO Joshua Missal, band di-
rector, announced that the
featured selections for to-
morrow's musical session will
include "The Flight of the
Bumblebee" and several numbers
from George Gershwin's "Porgy
land Bess.,











- TyniaaIAr~ar~ete


PUBLISHED ON SATURDAYS BY THE SPECIAL
SERVICE OFFICE FOR PERSONNEL OF THE ARMY
AIR FORCES FLEXIBLE GUNNERY SCHOOL, TYNDALL
FIELD, PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA.
Copy Prepared Under Supervision of Public
Relations Officer.
Printing and Photography by Base Fnoto-
graphic & Reproduction Section.
Art Work by Department of Training Draft-
ing Department.
The Tyndall Target receives material sup-
plied by Camp Newspaper Service, War Dept.,
205 E. 42nd St., New York City. Material
credited to CNS ay NOT be republished with-
out prior permission from CNS.


THE B-29 AND A PLAN

"The use of the B-29 Super-Fortress in
combat brings actualityto an Air Forces'
plan made years in advance for truly
global aerial warfare. It proves that
our planners and engineers, coupled with
the capacity of American industry, are
an unbeatable combination. The result
is here,a highly complicated and most
deadly airplane, capable of delivering
the heaviest blows yet known through
air power.
"I assume the heavy responsibility for
its employment under the Joint Chiefs
of Staff with full confidence in its
potential use.
"This employment of the B-29 makes
possible the softening up attack on
Japan very much earlier than would be
possible with aircraft hitherto known
to combat. This mighty weapon ad-
vances the bomber line a long way.
"The Super-Fortress is not going to
win the war by itself, nor has anyone
thought it will do so. It will, how-
ever, like its predecessors the B-17
and B-24, strike at the sources of enemy
strength, and prepare the way for ulti-
mate decision by our well-established
team of land, sea and air forces. In
our new strategic thinking, the B-17
and B-24 will now become medium instead
of long-range bombers, and our B-25 and
B-26 aircraft will become short-range
bombers. These smaller planes will
travel no less distances than they do
now, but the B-29 will attack from much
greater distance, and with much more
power.
"The employment of the B-29 is just
beginning. It goes directly into bat-
tle from the production lines, and we
have a lot to learn before its full
power may be developed. Consequently,
the frequency of its use will be care-
fully determined for some time. From
this circumstance, let our enemies take
what comfort they can while they can."
GENERAL H.H. ARNOLD
Commanding General, AAF


NIGHT SOFTBALL
One of the most recent innovations in
the way of recreational facilities at
Tyndall Field has been the installation
of lights on the diamond at P.T. Area 2,
permitting inter-sectional softball
after dark.
Until now, the only real obstacle
standing in the path of strong league
competition by GI teams has been the
lack of time in which to play the games.
However, through Special Service funds,
this handicap has been overcome.
The spectators and the players are
apt to forget their surroundings at
these games and believe themselves


T -)4/ ,h/ / fi i o


WE BO U G H T A B OND
Dedicated to the Minutemen and
Women of Tyndall Field
We bought a Bond for Freedom-
We invested in the U.S.A.
We insured ourselves for the future
In the good old American way.

We bought a Bond for Johnny,
The kid across the street,
And to help bring that day nearer
When as free men we shall meet.

We bought a Bond to buy a tank
To knock at Hitler's door.
It will sound like a "Fourth" celebra-
tion
When our dollars start to roar.

We bought the Bonds because we have
faith
And the boys who man the tanks,
The planes, the guns and ships, know
That by our buying we are bayihg "Thanks."

And there's little doubt that now
The job for me and you is to
Buy more than before and let our boys
Know that we're in this fight too.
Sgt. Jimmie Hammonds
Section A-i


KNOW YOUR PLANE


SUPERMARINE "SPITFIRE V"

h


TYPE: Single-seat fighter monoplane.
WING: Low-wing monoplane, perfectly
elliptical wings, dihedralled.
FtUSELAGE: All-metal monocoque cons-
truction, long tapered nose, enclosed
cockpit, vertical fin integral with
fuselage.
TAIL UNIT: Fully cantilever tail as-
sembly, oval-shaped tail plane which is
detachable.
POWER PLANT: A late model of the Rolls
Royce "Merlin" engine is installed.
Three-bladed D.H. hydromatic constant-
speed propeller. Prominent air-scoop is.
situated below starboard wing. Two fuel
tanks in fuselage with direct feed to
engine pumps.
SPAN: 36 feet 10 inches.
LENGTH: 29 feet 11 inches.
ARMAMENT: Two British Oerlikon 20 mm.
shell-firing aerial cannon.and four
Browning machine guns mounted in wings.
MAXIMUM SPEED: 387 mph at 18,400 feet.
CEILING: 36,000 feet.

to be back in their home town, watching
the Mudcats maul the Tigers. There is
little formality at the contests, with
most of the spectators wearing fatigues
and the players attired in their favor-
ite P.T. outfits, and everyone enjoying
the atmosphere of the "good old days."
These night softball games are de-
creasing the bus passenger loads into
town, and that's one of the best ways
to judge the popularity of an on-the--
field activil.y.


Next week we will observe Independence
Day, the birthday of our nation--a na-
tion "conceived in liberty and dedi-
cated to the proposition that all men
are created equal." Our forefathers
recognized that there are inequalities
among men, social, intellectual and
physical inequalities, but beneath all
these they wisely saw a common bond oI
equality in that we are all creatures of
the same creation and Creator. In that
they gave recognition to an ideal that
is as old as the first human family-the
ideal of human brotherhood. The world
since that day has had many Cains: men
who have achieved a false glory for
themselves by betraying a sacred trust
to keep their brother.
This ideal of human brotherhood is not
entirely a Christian concept; it reaches
way beyond that, but it has received its
strongest impetus through Christianity.
Paul in his glorious oration on Mars
Hill at Athens said: "God who created
the world and all that is in it...giveg
all men life and breath and everything.
For from one forefather he has created
every nation of mankind...so that theq
might search for God...and find him. For
it is through union with him that we
live and move and exist, as some of your
poets have said, 'For we are also his
offspring.'" (Acts 17:24-29.) Brothers
together of one Father!
Jesus reminded us often of this common
brotherhood. "When ye pray, say, Our
Father." We are at war today because
men have refused to recognize this
brotherhood or conform to its implica-
tions. As the men of our armed forces
have gone into all parts of the world
to fight the battles of the war, they
have become affiliated with many people
whom we had not hitherto regarded as
brothers. And as side by side they have
battled a common enemy, Chinese, Rus-
sians and Australians seem nearer to
them.
We who are Christians know that this
ideal of human brotherhood is not e
thing to be hung on the walls of ou,
minds like a pious motto which we can
forget at will. We have a duty to God
and men to live in the light of it, rec-
ognizing its imperative value for us at
every turn. It would save much of our
tears and sweat and blood. It would
forever banish war. Indeed the only way
we can "insure the blessings of liberty
to ourselves and our posterity" is by
the whole-hearted recognition of this
ideal and the application of all of its
principles to life, individual, national
and international. And if we are truly
Christian that is our duty. He who
"hath made of one blood all nations of
men" must wince when he sees how slow
is the resurgence of the spirit of
divinity he brought to birth in each of
us. But we are learners, though our
,progress is slow and fitful. Some day
we will yet be able to pray, our rever-
ent voices colored with understanding
and our brave spirits shining with the
realization of what it means: "Our
Father."
--Chaplain W.F. Fulmer


BUY MORE THAN BEFORE

SUPPORT THE FIFTH

WAR LOAN DRIVE


TYNDALL TARGET


Pace 2







JyTHE TYNDALL TAREI
Paae 3


RUSSIANS SMASH NAZI DEFENSES
the Goal Is Minsk

Cherbourg is in our hands, and is be-
ing put into condition for use by the
ships which will carry mountains of
equipment and millions of men into
France. The British are pushing forward
around Caen, slowly encircling that'
city, France's seventh largest port. It
is possible that there will be a com-
parative breathing spell in the French
fighting around the Normandy peninsula
area while the Allies complete the job
of moving troops and their arms across
the Channel.
Now the attention has shifted to an-
other of Germany's fronts-in Russia.
Nazi defense lines in the east have
sen smashed by the great offensive
which the Soviet forces began a little
nore than a week ago.
Vitebsk, vital fortified rail city
which long has been the Germans' closest
outpost to Moscow, has fallen into the
hands of the Russians, and the next main
goal seems to be the White Russian capi-
tal of Minsk.
Along a 250-mile zone of fighting,
more than a thousand "populated places"
have been liberated by tht Red Army, as
Soviet troops swept through what were
reputed to be the Nazis' strongest de-
fenses on the Russian front.
The fortified cities of Mogilev, Lep-
el and Osipovichi all were captured in
one day, and Brobruisk was completely
encircled and then captured by the Red
Army.
Minsk is less than 50 miles away from
e Russian forces, and it seemed easily
possible that the city might be reached


in a few days. And Berlin is 580 miles
beyond Minsk.
The advance of the Red Army was being
aided by what observers said was the
most terrific aerial cover yet seen on
the eastern front.
In the north, the drive ,into Finland
went forward with little interruption.
Nazi troops marched through the streets
of Helsinki toward the front as grim-
faced civilians, many of whom apparently
did not care for Nazi aid, looked cm.
*


CHERBOURG FALLS TO ALLIES
British Tanks Rout Nazis


American infantrymen, slugging their
way yard by yard, finally conquered the
German defenders of Cherbourg on Sun-
day.
The closing hours of their attack were
marked by a gigantic naval bombardment
by American and British battleships,
cruisers and destroyers, which steamed
to within 15,000 yards of the Nazi-held
shore defenses to blast the last defend-
ers into submission.
American engineers consider that Cher-
bourg harbor is so constructed that it
would be extremely difficult for the
Germans to render it totally useless.
British tanks Wednesday defeated the
main German armored force in western
France in a daylight battle below Caen.
The battle came after the British had
taken up positions almost encircling
Caen. The bulk of four German panzer
divisions was reported defeated with
heavy losses.


SAIPAN CASUALTIES HEAVY
I,474 Yanks Die There

The battle for Saipan is costing the
American invaders the heaviest casual-
ties of any ground action in the war
against Japan.
With approximately half the island
in our hands, there have been 1,474
Americans killed and 7,400 wounded,
878 are missing.
There are no official figures on Jap
total losses, but American troops have
buried nearly 5,000 enemy bodies.
Naval guns and planes have been blast-
ing away at other Jap islands near
Saipan to prevent reinforcements froi:
being sent to the beleaguered Nips
there.
The Japanese island with the odd
name of Yap, in the Carolines 700 miles
southwest of Saipan, has been bombed
for the sixth time since June 22. Eight
Japanese planes were shot down as Lib-
erators unloaded 63 tons of bombs on
Yap. Palau, also in the western Caro-
lines, also was attacked.
In ground fighting in China, the
Americans have lost their air base
at Hengyang, the last major Chinese
position on the Canton-Hankow rail-
road.
Hengyang still is not in Japanese
hands, but it is encircled by three
Japanese divisions, which have been
accucSd by the Chinese of using poison
gas to g&in their advantage.
In Burma, Chinese forces have started
driving south from captured Mogaung
down the main railway leading to Manda-
lay, and other advances have been
made in the northern Burma area.


A Bomber's Eye View Of Europe's Invasion Coast


PLYMOUTH


ENGLAND
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11. PPOCI


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NANLE MANS CHATRES PAR VIERAT. RLEETIMM G


THE TYNTI~T.T. TIROBT


Paae 3


July 1, 1944




TYNDALL TARGET


SQUEEZE


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Page 4







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"Truly Yours"


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Say Any Hore?


Section I-5
STUDENTS OF 44-30 VOW TO BE "BEST YET;"

A/C DAVEY KAYOED BY SOLAR BLOW


44-30 started school June 10.
The class, composed of GI's and
Cadets, Is a pretty good bunch,
and when they have the attitude
that they're going to be "the
best damn gunners" ever turned
'out, that's even better. The
attitude of the majority of the
men is: "Since we are going to
be gunners we're going to learn
all we can because we may be
needing it some day. What we
learn here may, in the near--very
near--future be saving our lives
Numbering more than half of the
total class are the Aviati n
Cadets, more popularly known as
"Gadgets" and "junior Birdmen,"
who share the squadron dayroom,
war-room, game room and...de-
tails.
Much to the surprise of those
who read this, the truth is that
the Cadets of 44-30 are largely
former enlisted men assigned to
the ground crew of the air corps,
the infantry, the cavalry and the
armored forces. Service time
'for each man runs from 11 months
to three years, with rank from
staff sergeant on down. Several
already have seen combat before
transferring to cadets.
In contrast to this we have the
enlisted men, with a majority of
them having the average "veteran
service" of about three and a
half months. Length of service
Is not hindering these EM in
their learning and enthusiasm for
gunnery training and military
discipline.
The entire class is placed on a
cadet set-up, with a little modi-
fication for the enlisted men.
Each academic flight is consid-
ered a squadron, with its own


CO flight Lts. and non-coms. Lt.
Tom V. McClusky is tactical of-
ficer of the aviation cadets and
Lt. Leonard Zuckerman runs the
two EM squadrons. Aviation Cadet
Alexander B. Dahlem heads the
group staff Of cadets, with A.B.
Stein and O.H. Herrig assisting
as group adjutant and group sup-
ply, respectively. For the en-
listed men we have Sgt. J.R.
Baker, ably assisted by Sgts.
A.F. Gesmandi and M.F. Russell.
Perhaps the best known student
in the class is A/C Davey, who
has been seen in action in the
local boxing ring. On two occa-
sions he has shown his talent as
an intercollegiate boxer by win-
ning his first fight and drawing
a tie in the second attempt. His
third try will be postponed for a
short time while he recovers from
a knockout blow by "01' Man Sol"
who blistered his nose pretty
badly.
Like any other group of ser-
vicemen, the class hails from
nearly every state in the Union,
and are eager to get back to the
home town as soon as possible
after victory is won.


INSTRUCTORS PLAN BEACH
PARTY, DINNER WITH
DEFUNCT CLUB FUNDS
The former members of the now
defunct Instructors' Club are
planning a beach party and dinner
on Sunday, July 9, with the re-
maining funds of the club treas-
ury. The beach party will be
followed by a dinner at Mattle's
Tavern.


-', ."


ISECTION-NOTES

Section 1-7
FULLERS FIND NEW WAY
TO GET RID OF FLIES

The class of 44-32 has started
out, as our CO said, to be a very
superior group. Your reporter
doubts it when Pfc. Nelson Fuller
and his brother Wendell open the
screens to let the flies out.
Wendell said that he is now try-
ing to induce our nightly four-
motored mosquitoes to leave via
the same exit. (Barracks 446 re-
grets their sudden transfer to
I-A.
Pvt. Joe Campagna Is going to
"break his back" for the title
of "Gunner of the class." We
hope he will recover enough to
enjoy his expense-paid weekend if
he is chosen for the honor. In-
cidentally, Joe, you have compe-
tition and may the best man win.

Section A-1.
IN WHICH SMOKEY SHOOS
US WITH A SHOE TALE
I cum back from furlough t'oth-
er day. Had a powerful good time
up in th' Hills whar I cud go
barefoot but when I cum back here
they said I had ter wear these
size 11-B's (3 sizes too big) now
er else. I'm wearing' Em.
Speaking' of shoes reminds me
of a time when Pa had bought a
new pair of them store shoes and
was a-tryin' to get some of us
younguns ter sorta break 'em in
for him....well we had a coup'la
houn dogs an a old razorback sow
that had jist brought pigs off
down th' trail aways that could-
n't see jist eye-t'eye on who wuz
a goln' ter be King-fish in th'
cove. One cold night, Pa set
them shoes of his up on the
hearth ter keep warm and went ter
bed and soon dozed off ter sleep.
Long 'bout time the fust rooster
crowed down the valley, I thought
I heard a pig squeal and in about
13 seconds that old sow had chaw-
ed the ears off'n the whole lot
of them houns and they cun
aboundin' up through the bresh
to'ards the cabin like a scairt
colt. Well Pa didn't quite wake
plumb up but the noise excited
1im some. Pa wuzn't as young as
he usta be so he grabs his squir-
rel gun and sez "grab the shoot-
in' Irons 'n' 'rifle balls an
skeet fer th' bresh younguns, its
them Satterfields -a-comin'." Pa
didn't want ter leave his shoes
behind so he makes a dash fer the
hearth where he had 'em a-warmin'
and rams a foot In one an lets
out ahowl yuh could heered
clean ter th' Grist Mill an back
an sez "law me, boys I'm a goner
now...I been snake bit." Well by
then we had all lit a shuck fer
the bushes and so Pa cum whizzin'
down the trail like a man pos-
sessed.
They wuzn't nuthin happunt and
when th' noise died out we slippt
on back ter th' cabin an looked
fer Pa's shoes....theone he'd
tried ter put on was still a-
layin' on the hearth with a pe-
culiar whimperin' noise a-comin
frum it so I steppt close 'nuff
ter have a look-see and one of
th' pups had been takin' a snooze
In Pa's shoe whar it'uz warm. Pa
swore he'd quit th' jug after
that....said his pizen warn't
suitin' him now we'd gone ter
sweetenin' hit with 'lasses.
Thats his block'n'tackle likker..
..take a snort, walk uh block and
ye'll tackle anything.
Your'n...
SMOKEY


nThe day I thought
I was rejected by
the draft board.


V (


tiL. GB)RGE W. BISE, JR., Wilbur,
Washington:
"The most fright-
ening moment of .. -
my life was today
when I thought I
missed the ship-
ment the rest of
my buddies are on.


PFC. AUGUST W.
N.J.


YECK, Keansburg,


q* "oThe most fright-
ening moment of
. ;-> my life was the
day I caught my
c2'. first glimpse of
Florida. However,
I feel much better now.,



PVT. FRED WAUSCHET, Youngstown,
Ohio:
"The most fright-
ening moment I
ever experienced
was when I re- gm
ceived notice that
I was coming back
to Florida for a second summer
after spending a winter at Syra-
cuse, N.Y."



PFC. ELMO BROWN, St. Louis, Mo.:
M first picture
of myself in my
GI clothing, whici
consisted of gar-
ments In the two
well known sizes,
too big and too
: small.


By COE and BARDI


DOTTIE LAHOUR--Need We


Jul y 1, 1944


TYNDALL TARGET


Djna


QUESTION: "WHAT WAS THE MOST
FRIGHTENING MOMENT YOU HAVE
EVER EXPERIENCED?"


PFC. MELVIN E. BERKEY, Johns.
town, Pa.:
"The day I heard n
a rumor to the
effect that the <
graduates of Tyn-
dall's gunnery
school would be
shipped without detouring through
Triggertown.




PFC. SAM W. HINSHAW, Scottsboro,
ALA.:







Page 6 TYNDALL TARGET


.-... .......
-:<::::::::r' ;;:;;::: ..:.:.: ;;;;:::::::~::~::
::1.:.:.:<-::: .;i:::;::
:':':'1<') ::::;;:::::::~~iij~i~i~~i~:I:~l~
..............
....... .........
::::::::::.:-:<-::j::::i
.... .
.............
:i: i: i
<.:. X.v.


Story by.S/S.1. A.H..Mil.:t

Story by S/Sgt. A.H. Milgat


pv q.


"The Articles of War"


Contrary to the general opinion held
by GIs that they will forget.their Army
careers as soon as "the duration and
six" have gone by the boards, I for one
hold that there will be much that will
linger on.



The majority of us will have had at
least four years of service come the
day, and I'm ready to debate with one
and all that after four years of Army
indoctrination, it will be a long time
before you stop looking down at your
shoes to see if they're well-dubbed.


Speculating on the peaceful days to
come, a GI can have a whale of a time
transposing his Army details and forma-
tions into corresponding niches in his
civilian timetable. Before projecting
ourselves into the future, we must first
plan on the basic fundamentals-an Army
and a commanding officer. I have given
some thought to the problem and have
come to the only logical solution, my
progeny will form the nucleus for my
Army. The commanding officer, of course,
will be me. My wife, naturally, will be
either the executive officer or the ad-
jutant, and possibly both, in the inter-
ests of efficiency, economy and social
dictates. However, in order to avoid
any usurpation, there will always be a
sharp line of demarcation between her
duties and mine. It is possible, how-
ever, that in some Army households a
weak CO may find himself replaced by a
more willful Wac CO.
So, with the barest essentials of our
Army organized, we are ready to proceed


further along this road of fantasy
Probably the first function we will b
concerned with is the matter of a C.9
In view of the fact that our Army ma
be a bit on the youthful side, it i
more than likely that the CO and th
executive officer will alternate onpull
ing charge of quarters. This arrange
ment is particularly imperative if th
soldiers of your army are still in th
bottle stage. The numerous incident
that may occur in the dead of the nigh
will call for experienced hands.


Basic training will be gi -n at perij-
ic intervals, in keeping 1i uhe si
ier's length of time in service. A
soon as one of my soldiers approach
the two-hitch mark, I shall -begin read
ing to him or her, as the case may be
the Artibles of War, which in my arm
will consist of Mother Goose Rhymes, th
Bobbsy Twins, and Hansel and Gretel, th
latter to make lip for the "heavy" stuf
contained in the famed Articles.



I am determined that K.P., or kitchen
police, shall not be the sword of Da
modes hanging over the heads of my sol
diers, nor shall it ever be used as
threatening agent. On the contrary,
intend to use the full limit of n
authority as CO to see to 'it that K.P
is to be one of the pleasanter detail
in my camp. This will b )ne in (
eral ways. First of all, very mem
of my command who expects to eat in n
mess hall will aid uhe mess officer (wl
doubles in brass as the executive ar
adjutant) in preparing each meal and i





'V q ) \

















J<~


"K.P. will be pleasant"


"...cash disbursements will be made at strategic
moments...


Page 6


TYNDALL TARGET












,.........................o.OOo.`

...............
::::: ::: :.: :.; : .:.:.::.'::;Nii ::.::.;:: ii:::.:::...::::



il2 ~ ~ jijj~iYY:~iiliii.:~i::~:: ~ ".".."~..'.' ..............
:: :::f~: :~:~::~5:;;:;::; ::::::: ::i~ 8~::::::8 ;'; :::i::i:::;;:;:::ii:: :::::i



Illustrations bX .. ... Goodman
:::.::::::: ... ...........:;:
-:::N. .......~
:" .:" .....'' Illustrations by Sgt. Marshall Goodman ~:: :"I-:::.2.;;:::: :


i of fantasy.
Lon we will be
bter of a C.Q.
o ur Army may
1 side, it is
he CO and the
,ernatc on pull-
This arrange-
erative if the
s still in the
'ous incidents
d of the night
hands.



-n at perj i-
u bhe si
service. As
irs approaches
11 -begin read-
a case may be,
.ch in my army
)se Rhymes, the
md Gretel, th
"heavy" stuff
;icles.



P., or kitchen
sword of Da-
sads of my sol-
be used as a
he contrary, I
L limit of my
o 'it that K.P.
santer details
,ne in (
.very mera
s to eat in my
3s officer (who
executive and
bch meal and in














(


cleaning up afterwards. The chores will
be divided equally. There will be ade-
quate room in which to work, and there
will at all times be sufficient equi.--
ment with which to do the job.

The telling of the best jokes of the
day and the singing of the leading tunes
of the week will be encouraged during
this period. Under such circumstances
the morale of my men will not deviate
from its upward curve, particularly in
view of the fact that the K.P. pusher
will be conspicuous by his absence. And,
there will be no mess counter. If guests
want to share our meals with us, they
are welcome.



During the first six years of service,
my men will undergo rigid supervision
in personal habits. In order to avoid
pick-up details after their second hitch
the men will be taught to field strip
all butts simply by placing them in the
nearest receptacle. Out on the lawn,
there will be daily sprinkling and
raking sessions, for I shall impress
upon my soldiers the necessity of trim,
neat lawns, in their future lives. In-
spections will be daily affairs, with
all discrepancies noted and memoranda of
same forwarded to the supply and salvage
officer (also the mess officer and ex-
exutive and adjutant). There will be a
quota of shoe inspections, but I don't
believe I shall insist on "dubbin," on
work and play shoes.
There will be orientation lectures.
If there is anything my army career has
sold me on, it's orientation lectures,
But, those lectures will be of an ori-


entation nature in every sense of the
word. They shall be free front announce-
ments by the first sergeant (the oldest
soldier in the unit) and if the mess
and supply officer and the executive and
adjutant want to speak at those lectures
she'll have to confine herself to
strictly orientation subjects. At these
lectures I will listen to all arguments,
provoke some myself and answer all
queries. If a question is popped which
I cannot answer, I shall have a diction-
ary, a .complete Encyclopedia Britannica,
and a direct telephone line to John
Kieran handy, so that I can get the
answer within a very short time.


Sex lectures will be scheduled for all
personnel entering their fifth hitch in
the army. The discussioits will be
forthright and pointed and I shall have
the family physician as guest speaker
on several occasions. I will not show
any films on the subject. If necessary
I shall have Marshall Goodman draw il-
lustrations, but films shall be out.
The only films shown to the personnel of
my unit will be homemade movies and
will come under the heading of "Why We
Fought."


PT will occupy a regular period each
day in the life of my soldiers. Those
periods will be confined to games of all
sorts and possibly 10 minutes of calis-
thenics three times per week. There
will not be any obstacle course, since
I believe the funds necessary to run my
army will take up every cent'I have to
spare, leaving little left for doctor
bills accrued to setting broken bones.


All men with less than 15 years of
service will be paid by cash without a
voucher from a sinking fund. These dis-
bursements will be made at strategic
moments fro!i the left hand troiier
pocket cash drawer. Men with 15.years
or more of service will be permitted to
draw from a monthly expense account. In
order to eliminate a lot of extra paper
work, there will be no such thing as a
"red lining."
Soldiers beginning their third hitch
will be sent off on part time D.S. to
schools. No one will be sent to a tech-
nical school who has not completed five
hitches. They will be quartered and
rationed by their permanent unit.
From my office in headquarters I shall
issue a daily bulletin, listing the
special events for the day, and the
time the GI truck will leave for the
Saturday afternoon game at Yankee Stad-
ium.

All details will be suspended on Sat-
urday at 1200 through 2100 Sunday. Men
who are resting in their barracks during
time off will not be recruited for sud-
den details. Two men each year will be
given intensive training in the care and
operation of coke machines.
The high point in the careers of my
soldiers shall be the day I approve
their request for separate rations so
that they may begin an army of their
own. The executive officer and myself
will look forward to the day when we
will have discharged our entire army and
have retired on pensions. Our greatest
joy will come from visiting the stations
which our soldiers have activated, and
witnessing a review of new troops.


C5;
IWO


"...Intensive training in the care and operation
of coke machines."


"...a review of new troops."


Page 7


Jul y 1, 1944








Paae TYNALL ARGE


THE TYNDALL CIVILIAN
Editor's note: We introduce a new feature this week, dedicated to
the civilian employees of Tyndall Field, which offers a standing in.
citation to every employee on the field to submit items of news
concerning themselves and their fellow employees. Submit all copy
to the Public Relations Office in Post Headquarters, either through
messa-e center, or by delivering it in person. This is YOUR column
....and its future depends on YOUR support.
NEWS AND VILWS: The office personnel of Post Engineers recently
entertained at an informal reception at the Lynn Haven country Club,
honoring Mrs. Thomas H. McKey, whose" marriage was a recent event.
Major and Mrs. ThomnI. H. McKey are at home to their friends on El
Prado Avenue, Panama City.
Mrm. Annette Wheeler has returned from a vacation spent in Sharon,
Pa.
Friends of Miss Caroline Crawford sympathize with her in the loss
of her father, whose death occurred on Monday, June 26, at his
rt:.'dence in Tyndall Homes.
Richard L. Newsham has returned from a two weeks' vacation In
St. petersburg, Fla.
Mrs. C.F. Koon, Miss Betty Koon and Sanford Koon have returned to
the:.' home in Columbia,. S.C., after having been the guests of Claude
D. Koon at his cottage on Beacon Hill.
Sgt. and Mrs. Nils S. Larsen announce the birth of a baby son.
Mrs. Larsen will be remembered as our "Marvelaos Marvil.
WAR BOND BREVITIES: "The Spirit of '42" now prevails, inasmuch
as many of the old 1942 War Bonds have begun to arrive, and the
genuine rejoicing accorded this happening serves good notice that
civilian war bond payroll deduc'lons will increase.
The Fifth War Loan Drive, however, is lagging, and every civilian
employee will have to dig down deep to buy that extra bond, or Tyn-
dall will not reach its goal for the drive. Remember the slogan...
"Buy MORE Than BEFORE"...and buy your extra bond today.
And now, to quote correspcndert Eunice Rhyne of Post Engineers:
"As the little dog said Nhen he sat on the cake of Ice, 'My tale
1 s told.'

HER SON IN ON THE INVASION


"One of the happiest letters I've ever received," is the des-
cription Mrs. Flora Belle Day gave a recent message received from
her son, pvt. John S. Day, now stationed in England. ie was in
on the invasion, but he's safe and sound," she said, "and that's
the most wonderful news I could receive. Mrs. Day works in the
Tyndall fabric control section.

BACKING UP HER SOLDIER-HUSBAND


TYNDALL AND EGLIN HOOK UP IN 13 INNING

DEADLOCK AS DARKNESS HALTS 31 HOUR

GAME WITH SCORE AT )4-4

The only team in T/F baseball history' to tangle with the Tornadoes
in extra innings has been its traditional rival and neighbor, the
Eglin Field nine. Last year it was a 12-inning affair which saw
Tyndall finally win out. Last Wednesday, playing at Eglin, the two
teams again locked horns, this time for 13 innings in a game which
was three and a half hours in duration and was called on account of
darkness with the score at 4-4.
Holding a 3-0 lead going into Hub Freeman made a beautiful stop
the eighth inning, Tyndall's Dale and attempted to tag out the run-
Livingston weakened and Eglin ner from first; he missed his man
pushed across three runs on three and threw to first attempting to
hits to tie the score. Neither catch Joachim, but the batter was
team was able to tally again un- .safe. Meanwhile two runs had
til the 13th, when both scored a scored and the game was tied at
run. The tie game knocks out any 3-3.
chance for Tyndall to square its Tyndall had a chance to win the
series with Eglin, as the men game in the tenth when Patterson
from the Proving Grounds hold a and Freeman singled after Living-
2-0 edge with but one more game ston struck out. With Patterson
on the schedule. on third, Hines hit into a field-
Merritt Lancaster hurled the er's choice, Freeman going out
entire game for Eglin, giving up 6 to 4. Orange, the next batter,
11 hits while walking none. Lef- was hit by a pitched ball, load-
ty Southard started on the mound ing the bases. But Hockenberry,
for Tyndall and during his four who followed Orange, forced him
innings on the mound gave up two at second to end the inning.
hits, striking out five and is- In the 13th, the Tornadoes fi-
suing three free passes. Living- nally pushed a run across when
ston took over in the fifth and Orange singled, stole second and
for the next nine innings gave up scored on Paul Brown's bingle to
six hits, struck out 10 Eglin right. The Eagles countered with
batters and walked three, the tying rally in their half of
Third Baseman Joachim was the the inning on a triple by Charley
big gun for Eglin, collecting Kress, who scored on Joachim's
three hits in six trips to the grounder to short.
plate. Hub Freeman did likewise The only honor garnered by Tyn-
for Tyndall, with Patterson, dall in the game was the fact
Orange, Brown and Southard each that for the first time this year
getting a pair of hits apiece to they played errorless ball, and
account for T/F-s 11 hits off through 13 innings at that!
Lancaster. TORNADOES AB R HI E
Tyndall scored its first two Patterson, lb...... 6 0 2 0
runs In the third inning on three Freeman, 2b........ 6 o 3 o
hits and added another tally in Hines, ss.......... 6 O 0 0
the fifth. Orange, If......... 5 1 2 0
Hockenberry, rf .... 6 0 0 0
In the hectic eighth, Lancas- Tarr, f ........... 3 0 0 0
ter, the first Eglin batter, Brown, cf.......... a o 2 o
flied out to short. Leftfielder Mitro, 3b.......... 3 o o o
Carlglla then singled to left. Polcynski-x........ 1 0 0 0
Allen, c........... 4 1 0 0
Bob Kind, playingat shortstop Southard, p.;...... 2 1 2 O
for Eglin, struck out for the Suchenskioe......... 0 1 0 0
second out of the Inning. But Livingston, p...... 3 0 0 0
Mike Draemel, second baseman and Fenton, 3b......... 1 0 0 O
fourth batter, caught one of Totals 49 4 11 0
e.-batted for Mitro in 9th
Livingston's pitches for a drive *o.Ran for Southard in 5th
into left good for three bases, EGLIN
scoring the first Eglin run. Cariglia, if........ 1 1 o
WIl Cearley, the next batter, Kind, s......... 4 0 O 0
Draemel, 2b........ 6 1 1 0
drew a walk, putting the tying Cearly, rf......... 4 1 1 o
run on base. Charley Kress, who Kress, lb.......... 5 1 i
followed, also walked, loading Joachim, 3b........ 6 0 3 1
the bases. Jo- Joachim, veteran Archambeault c.....5 o o o
Eagle third baseman, then hit a Lancaster, p....... 5 o 0 0
sharp ground ball towards second. Totals. 46 4 8 2


INTERSECTION SPORTS RESULTS AND STANDINGS


Team


J 79 j -1- -L- -13

Typical of the many soldiers' wives, who help "keep 'em flyin'" at
Tyndall Field, is Mrs. Albert R. Dahlstrom (first name: Christine),
wife of Cpl. Dahlstrom of this station. Christine works in base
shops, handling a man's job on a lathe machine.


E1......... 6
E2........ .6
B2..........5
C3......... 4
C ......... 4
A3......... 3
B4..........3
A1.......... 4
Photo ......4
A2......... 3


80FTBALL
W L Team


W


O Finance.... 3
1 B6......... 3
1 C2.... .....2
2 C6......... .2
2 C9......... 2
2 C4..........2
2 B3.........1
3 B1......... 1
3 C7..........0
3


L
3
4
4
4
5
5
4
5
5


RESULTS
E2 8, B6 3; A2 2, B4 0; B2 6,
Finance 1; photo 8, B1 2; Al 3,
C4 0; C2 2, C6 1: C9 9, B6 0
(forfeit);E2 9, B3 1; A2 1, B2 0;
B1 7, AS 0; Fin. 3, photo 2.
OUTSTANDING GAME OF THE WEEK
Wednesday's contest between B2
and A2 in which the boys from the
boys from the MP section scored
one run in the fifth inning to
win out, 1-0. George Moser pitch-
ed a 2-hit game for 18, while
Martin of B2 was nicked for six
hits and the one run. perrotta
and Lake got two safeties apiece
for the Guardians, with Richards
and Spencer accounting for the
other A2 bingles. Weiner and
Howell were the only two B2 bat-
ters to get a hit off Moser.
Parsih did the catching for the
winners, while Ritter was Mar-


tin's battery mate. The win gave
A2 an even count in the league.
Also outstanding was the game
between AS, the cook-, and B1,
Department of Training Flashes.
The contest was on Wednesday and
the stars from the Department of
Training chalked up their first
win of the season, 7-0, behind
the two-hit pitching of newcomer
'Gentleman Jim* Corbett. Cor-
bett's receiver was Oral Ledbet-
ter. The losing hurler was Fred
Russell, with quattlebaum behind
the plate. The D. of T. sluggers
pounded out nine hits, with Short-
stop VanCott accounting for two
of them. Each team committed
one error.
BASEBALL
Team W L Team W L
E1......... 3 0 C .........2 3
C 5......... 4 0 A ........ i 3
2......... 2 C7 ........ 1 3
Weapons....2 2 B, ........ 1 4
Tie game: CS, E2.
RESULTS
El 4, B5 3; Weapons 2, E2 1; C5
7, A1 5; C6 3, B5 1.
OUTSTANDING GAME OF THE WEEK
Weapons' 2-1 triumph over E2
behind the three-hit pitching of
Italiano. Hesse, the losing
pitcher, gave up one hit, but
four errors by his mates in the
field led to the defeat.


TYNDALL TARGET


Page 8








yTYNDALL TARGET Pane 9


T F BLANKS BARRANCAS 13-0, BOWS TO BRONSON 2-0


TORNADOES STOPPED BY BRONSON AFTER WINNING COCIO'S K.O. WIN, RANIERI'S DECISION OVER


7Hl STRAIGHT; PETRICH HANDS T/F FIRST

SHUTOUT; SOUTHARD BLANKS BARRANCAS


Bunt in Fourth Inning
Spoils Lefty's Bid
For Perfect Game
Norman Southard, Tyndall's ace
southpaw, came within one hit, a
bunt in the fourth inning, of
hurling a perfect game against
the Fort Barrancas nine here last
Saturday. Lefty, pitching one of
the greatest games of his career,
faced 31 batters, four above the
minimum, striking out 16 and
walking one.
In chalking up Tyndall's sev-
enth straight win, Lefty allowed
four runners to reach first, but
only one got as far as second. On
the other hand a trio of Bar-
rancas hurleis failed to halt the
Tornado rampage as' the home team
pounded out 16 hits which were
converted into 13 .runs. Featur-
ing the hit barrage were a pair
of homers accounted for by Third
Baseman Joe Fenton and Right-
Fielder Les Tarr. Billy Hines,
hard-playing shortstop, pounded
out two triples and a single in
five trips to the plate, while
Pat Patterson also rang up a 3
for 5 count for the day. Hub
Freeman, leading T/F extra base
hitter, blasted out a double in
the third.
Tyndall got off to a flying
start, scoring six runs in the
first inning and added four more
in the second. The last three
runs were scored in the eighth.
Schultz was the starting and
losing pitcher for Barrancas. He
was relieved in the third by
Smith, who gave way in the eighth
to Bartlmol.
The only hit off Southard came
in the fourth, with two away.
Davis, the Barrancas third base-
man, bunted a slow roller in
front of the plate. Southard
rushed in to make the play, but
was slow in picking up the ball
nd Davis reached first safely.
The 16 strikeouts boosted South-
ard'r; record to 86 in eight games
and the win gave him a count of
five victories against three de-
feats.
The box score:
BARRANCAS AB R H E
Dellinger, if... 4 0 0 1
Marino, cf...... 4 0 0 0
Sisson, rf...... 1 O 0 0
Brown, rf....... 3 0 0 0
Davis, 3b....... 4 0 1 0
M1organ, c....... 3 0 0 0
Bonardel, Ib.... 3 0 0 0
Scott, ss....... 3 0 0 1
Neely, 2b....... 3 0 0 1
Schultz, p...... 1 0 0 0
Smith, p.. .......1 0 0 0
Bartimol, p..... O 0 0 0
Totals 30 0 1 3
TORNADOES
Patterson, lb... 5 2 3 0
Freeman, 2b..... 5 1 2 0
ines, ss....... 5 3 3 0
)range, If...... 4 2 1 0
Jackrel, If..... 0 1 0 0
Fenton, 3b...... 3 2 2 0
Suchenski, 3b... 1 0 0 0
Tarr, rf........ 4 2 2 0
Budd, cf......... 1 0 1 0
Matonak, cf..... 2 0 1 0
Polcynski, rf.... 2 0 0 0
Allen, c........ 3 0 0 0
Atton, c........ 2 0 0 0
Southard, p..... 3 0 1 1
Totals 40 13 16 1


Livingston Bested by
Petrich as Bronson
Wins, 2-0

Paul Petrlch, smooth working
right-hander and former hurler for
Purdue University, had the Indian
sign on the Tyndall Tornadoes for
the second time this season. Two
months ago, Petrlch was stationed
at the Navy's Ellyson Field and
while there pitched the Ellyson
team to. a7-4 win over T/F. Now
stationed' at Bronson Field, along
with Ted Williams, Ray Stovlak
and Nick Tremark, Petrlch was
Manager Tremark's choice to face
Tyndall on the mound here last
Sunday. The ex-Purdue hurler
stopped the Tornadoes cold with
five scattered hits, handed Tyn-
dall its first shutout of the
year, 2-0, with the loss snapping
the T/F winning streak at seven
straight.
One of the largest baseball
turnouts of the season was on
hand to watch the trio of former
major leaguers, Williams, Sto-
vlak and Tremark, perform. The
ex-big-time stars didn't let the
fans down, each of them collect-
ing two hits and Williams making
several fine catches out in right
field, in between posing for GI
amateur cameramen.. Although Wil-
liams collected two hits, both
of them were singles. In fact,
Livingston was nicked for, only
one 'extra base knock, a double
by former Phllly player Ray Sto-
viak. The T/F right-hander gave
up ten hits in all. Bronson
scored its first run in the-
fourth inning on two hits, and
repeated the act in the seventh.
Hub Freeman and Nick Orange
each tapped Petrich for a pair
of bingles, while Livlngston
singled to left in the third to
account for the five Tyndall hits.
Pat Patterson, Tornado first
baseman and leading batter, went
hitless for the first time in 13
games.
In the Tornado line-up was
Charles Hockenberry, a newcomer
and former backstop for the Al-
lentown nine in the Interstate
League. Hockenberry is the prop-


erty of Rochester
national League.
The box score:
BRONSON AB
Tremark, cf... 5
Schroeppell, ss. 5
Maznieki, 2b.... 4
Williams, rf.... 4
Stoviak, If..... 4
Lowman, lb...... 3
Hutchinson, 3b.. 4
Moore, c......... 4
petrich, p ...... 2
Totals 35
TORNADOES
itaiterson, lb... 3
Freeman, 2b ..... 4
Hines, ss....... 4
Orange, Iff..... 3
Fenton, 3b...... 4
Tarr, cf........ 4
Hockenberry, rf..4
Busby, c........ 3
Livingston, p... 3
Totals 32


in the Inter-


LANDOLINO, WRESTLING-BOXING MATCH,

PAPERWEIGHT GO HIGHLIGHT FIGHT CARD

A record crowd of more than 2200 was on hand last Tuesday night
ito witness an eight-bout boxing show which completely eclipsed all
previous cards in variety and zip. In the way of diversion, Lt. John
Gueder, boxing supervisor, offered a bout between two battling 41
pounders and a combined wrestling and boxing match, the first of its
kind here, which had the crowd tense with exc' tement all the way.


The six regular fights were all
fast-paced, two of them ending in
T.K.O.'s and another climaxed by
a knockout.
The knockout occurred in the
final go of the evening, when
Tyndall's leading light heavy-
weight, Manuel Coccio, sent Bill
Dugan to the .canvas for the full
count In the second round of
their fracas. Coccio, who halls
from Tucson, Ariz., was Tyndall's
representative in the recent
Golden Gloves championship,
reaching the quarter-finals in
the matches at Chicago. He comes
from a fighting family, with
three brothers also in the ring,
and in the service. He has won
all but three of approximately
40 fights, most of them via
kayoes.
Duggan, from Chicago, had an
advantage in weight over Coccio,
but was no match for the slugger.
Late in the first round Coccio
sent Duggan to the floor for the
first time, but Duggan was saved
by the bell as the referee reach-
ed the count of eight. Coccio
lost no time in the second round
getting to his opponent and after
a brief flurry of dynamite-loaded
lefts and rights Duggan hit the
floor and was counted out.
Lloyd Adsit and Gilbert Baker
started the evening off in a bout
which ended in a draw and made
way for the "bruisersn who step-
ped into the ring for the second
fight. The participants in this
match were the seven-year-old
sons of two Tyndall civilian em-
ployes, Don Roper and Roy Ander-
son. Both men tip the scales at
41 pounds. From the opening bell
to the final second this pair of
battlers slugged it out toe to
itoe, not letting up for an ins-
itant, except between rounds. It
was a rare treat for the fans to
see these embryonic Jack Demp-
seys setting such a fast and
Serious pace, without any damag-
ing blows being landed. Each
gave all he had and the draw de-
cision at the bout's conclusion
was received by a tremendous roar
of approval.
An unusual affair was the third
match of the evening, and at
first the spectators couldn't be-
1lieve their ears. It was an-
nounced as a "wrestling and box-
ing match between Lawrence Latti-
zori of Connecticut and Cnarles
Blankenship of Virginia." Latti-
zori was the mat man in this go,
with Blankenship, well-known T/F
boxer, as the man with the gloves.
SLattlzorl was restricted to the
I rules of wrestling,while Blanken-
ship was to abide by the Marquis
of Queensbury code. After three
rounds which saw both men take
punishing blows and falls at the
hands of the other, Blankenship
was declared the winner. The de-
cision: was somewhat anti-climac-
tic as the fans spent most of
their energy rooting for their
favorite with a hitherto unsus-
pected fervor.
Massachusetts' Charles Curran
and Billy Stillwell of Connecti-
cut were the opponents in the


fourth match. Curran held a
slight advantage until one minute
and three seconds of the first
round when he accidently struck
Stillwell with a low punch and
Stillwell was awarded the fight.
In the fifth bout of the evening,
George Carbin, one of the scrap-
piest boxers on the field, slug-
ged out a T.K.O. over Bob Beu-
miller of Kansas. It was a gory
affair with referee Don Zinni
stopping the fight in the third
round after Beumeller's cut over
his right eye began to bleed pro-
fusely. The pair fought toe to
toe throughout the first two
rounds, even fighting some 20
seconds after, the bell rang in
the second round, due to the
noise of the crowd, which smoth-
ered the bell. Beumeller took
the worst of it all the way, but
was game to the end, landing a
few of his own sweeping lefts and
rights to Carbin's head.
Joe Ippolitto of New York and
Russ Bush of Iowa traded blows in
the sixth fight, with Ippolitto
gaining the decision. The first
two rounds were spent mostly in
sizing up each other, although
in the initial round Ippolitto
had an opportunity to put his man
away when he drove him to the
ropes.
In the semi-windup, another
pair of Tyndall favorites, Arman-
do Landolino and Nick Ranieri,
went through three rounds with
Ranleri gaining a very close de-
cision. Landolino, from New York,
won by a knockout ,over his first
opponenthere two weeks ago, while
Ranieri has been nicknamed "One
Punch" as a result of his lethal
left hand which has dropped most
of his opposition in his seven
fights for Tyndall. The pair
showed a healthy respect for each
other during the three rounds and
it was only in the third that the
two southpaws let loose with any
telling punches.

WAR BOND GOLF TOURNEY
TO BE STAGED JULY 9
A war bond golf tournament will
be held at the Panama Country
Club on Sunday, July 9, and all
T/F golfers are invited to par-
t.lclpate. Pvt. Jim Gantz, tour-
nament manager, announced that
qualifying rounds or approximate
average scores must be turned in
to Bob Ford, club pro, by 8 p.m.
Saturday, July 8.
The first flight will tee off
at 8:50 a.m., with the succeeding
flights teeing off 20 minute-
later.
Prizes will be awarded in the
form of War Bonds and Stamps.
The entry fee is $2.

Skating Party
A skating party, sponsored by
the Fellowship Group of the Pres-
byterian Church, will be staged
at the St. Andrews rink Monday,
July 10, at 7:30 p.m.
All T/F enlisted men and women
are invited to the party. A
special price of 25 cents has
granted by the management for the
occasion.


BUY MORE THAN EVER BEFORE


SUPPORT THE FIFTH WAR LOAN DRIVE


Jul y 1, 1944


TYNDALL TARGET


Pane 9







Page 10 TYNDAL TARGET


Section I-3
WEE HOURS ONLY COMPLAINT
CLASS HAS ABOUT FLYING
Greetings from Sub-Section I-3!
At last we've started the long-
awaited flying! The only hitch
is the wee morning hours. Boy,
that bed feels better every morn-
ing!
Did you know that our CO is now
a first lieutenant? Orchids to
you, Lt. Lugo. The guys all know
that you are for us and that you
are doing a swell job.
Have you got your shoes polish-
ed? Is your bed straight? Have
you had your haircut yet? Do you
rise every morning with a Pepso-
dent smile? These are a few of
the things that Lt. Cantwell re-
quires' He says it's easy when
you get on to it. (Tt says here.)
Last week was "General Week,"
as you know, and in addition to
our new class we have four new
"humpbacks, who have been tu-
tored in the art of match pick-
ing. (We're ready for them this
time.)
By the way have you got a little
butter and salt to go with the
corn that our First Sergeant
"Smiley" (Oh, yeah!) Nelson has
been feeding the airlines with
lately?.... you probably heard
that old song, "Do You Miss Your
Buddy?" It seems to be popular
since the elimination board has
been buzzing....Here's a word of
advice to all graduates: "Rein-
force the buttons on your shirt."
During the heat of the day our
thoughts are carried away to our
new marching song composed by one
of our boys, namely Pvt. F.C.
Shaw, entitled "Fighting Men of
I-S." It's a humdinger sung to
the tune of the Notre Dame Vic-
tory March. We promise you, Pvt.
Shaw, we'll be singing it for a
long time to come. And now we
must close the book until next
week, which incidentally will
close all books. Good luck,
fellas, and I'll be seeing you.
--The Eager Pen
Section I-2
CLASS LOOKS FORWARD TO
GRADUATION, COMBAT
This week marks finis to a
swell course for all of the fu-
ture combat crewmen of this sec-
tion. Contemplation of gradua-
tion on Saturday gives us all a
little more pride in ourselves and
in our branch of the service.
Flight four has come through
nobly under the leadership of
T/Sgt. Robinson and his worthy
assistant, our own purple-hearted
Private, Jack W. Smith. This
combinationhas lent color to some
otherwise dull but necessary as-
signments and we will always re-
member this pair.
About the only ordeal we have
left unconquered (including Apa-
lachicola) is the battle of the
















& Avail


Boat Company
NEW ARRIVAL DUBBED
"FLYING BRIDGE"
The Emergency Rescue Boat
Squadron, or web-footed cousins
of Section C, is growing. Grow-
ing in personnel, growing in
equipment, and even the CO is
growing; He. Is now Major'Herman
Gundlach.
Additions to the Tyndall sea arm
include a third 104-foot patrol
boat which Is the-pride and joy
of her master and mate, John F.
Manson and M/Sgt. Rupert Mills.
This vessel was dubbed the "Fly-
ing Bridge" by the boys in the
back room because of its promin-
ent open bridge, but Manson and
Mills are just cra-azy about pac-
ing it and squinting at the sun.
Something' they read no doubt.
And speaking of new additions,
S/0gt. William Mc'Neil and Com-
mittee have completed plans for
converting the carpentry shop
into a sub PX. This new estab-
lishment will dispense small
stores and cold drinks after duty
hours. The carpenter, Sgt. Henry
Meyers, said with a South Pacific
glaze to his eyes that he thought
this conversion should be applied
to all shops. The PX will be
governed by a board of NCO's and
for a time will have a GI barten-
ah-attendant. To further give
those off-duty all the comforts
of home, a day room is also being
opened. These conveniences will
really be appreciated by the
members of this far-flung out-
post.
WHY SUPPLY SERGEANTS GET GRAY
DEPARTMENT: Or, so you think
you've got it tough! The supply
end of the boat company is a
unique business. They not only
handle all regular GI items but
may be called upon to issue any-
thing from middy blouses to pilot
houses. Sgt. Willis Baum and
Pvt. Earl Smith, of clothing,
handle a great deal of Navy issue
from Quartermaster Corps. Sea
boots, foul weather jackets sten-
ciled USN, white caps and dun-
garees, all go to the "sailjers.
While over in the stock room Sgt.
Dominick ("We ain't got it") Cal-
abrese lists anchors, bronze pro-
pellors and rope and not a shel-
ter half in the joint. When
asked how he handled the chow
situation, S/Sgt. Ray Croninger
ran a trembling hand through his
hairand said "Grief, I got grief.
A mess hall on every boat!" and
stumbled back into the galley.
(Kitchen, to you, gunner.)
--Sailjer Jack
barracks bags. We have employed
everything from beachheads to
battering rams, and still the
cockroach is king. The problem
of their extermination we leave
to future classes, and we go into
combat feeling unconquerable and
ready.


WHAT'S DOING NEXT WEEK
SUNDAY
7 P.M.--Bingo at Triggertown
M ONDA Y
7 F.M.--Movies, Hospital
8:30 P.M.--Movies, Receiving
Section
TUESDAY
7 P.M.--Entertainment in
Hospital Wards
8 P.M.--Dance, USO
8 P.M.--Bingo, Rec Hall
8 P.M.--Movies, Colored Rec
Hall

WEDNESDAY
12:30 P.M.--Special Service
Non-Com Meeting, Library
7 P.M.--Weekly Variety Show
at Receiving Section
8 P.M.--GI Dance, Rec Hall,
Permanent party only

THURSDAY
7 P.M.--Movies, Hospital
8 P.M.--GI Dance, Rec Hall,
Students only
8 P.M.--Dance, Colored Rec
Hall
8:30 P.M.--Movies, Receving
Section

FRIDAY
7 P.M.--Triggertown Talent
Review
8 P.M.--Movies, Colored Rec
Hall

SATURDAY
7 P.M.--Movies, Hospital
8:30 P.M.--Movies, Trigger,
Town

BOXING
Tuesday, 8 P.M.-Weekly bouts
at Post Gym Area


awe we .




"Copyrighted Material




1b Syn icated Content



able from Commercial News Providers'


MOVIE FARE FOR THE WEEK

POST
Sun.-Mon.. 'THE MASK OF DIMI-
TRIOS,' Sydney Greenstreet,
Peter Lorre.
Tuesday, 'STORM OVER LISBOI,'
Richard Arlen, Eric Von Str.o-
heim.
Wed.-Thurs., 'HAIL THE CON-
QUERING HERO,' Eddie Bracken.
Friday, 'THE GHOST CATCHERS,'
Olsen & Johnson.
RITZ
Sun.-Mon., 'UP IN MABEL'S
ROOM,' Michael Ayre. Gale
Patrick.
Tues,.Wed., 'STARS ON PARADE,'
and 'THE LADY AND THE MONS-
TER,' Arlen Ralston.
Thurs.-Fri.. 'AND THE ANGELS
SING,' Dorothy Lamour.
Saturday, 'OKLAHOMA RAIDERS,'
PANAMA
Sunday, 'EYES IN THE NIGHT,'
Harding, Arnold.
Monday, 'AIR RAID WARDENS,'
Laurel & Hardy.
Tuesday, 'SEVEN DAYS ASHORE,'
Oliver, Brown.
Wed.-Thurs.. 'YANKEE DOODLE
DANDY,' Cagney.
Fri.-Sat., 'BORDER PATROL.'
BAY
Sunday, 'NOBODY'S DARLING,'
Mary Lee.
Monday, 'YOU'LL NEVER GET
RICH,' Hayworth.
Tuesday, 'BURMA MYSTERY,'
Preston Foster.
Thursday, 'CAPTAIN FURY.'
Fri.-Sat., 'COWBOY CiOMIANDOES'
and 'FLYING FORTRESSES.'


Page 10


TARGET


TYNDAL




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