Title: Tyndall target
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076230/00111
 Material Information
Title: Tyndall target
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 27-36 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)
Publisher: Public Relations Office, Air Corps Gunnery School
Place of Publication: Tyndall Field Fla
Publication Date: 1942-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City -- Tyndall Air Force Base
Coordinates: 30.078611 x -85.576389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 16, 1942)-
Issuing Body: Issues for May 9, 1942- published by Office of Public Relations, Army Air Forces Gunnery School.
General Note: Title from caption.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076230
Volume ID: VID00111
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24602432

Full Text





TYNDALL FIELD, FLORIDA


MINUTEMAN FLAG TO BE
RAISED IN CEREMONY
HERE NEXT WEEK


The Minutemen of Tyndall
Field, the workers who recently
put over a campaign to boost ,
the percentage of civilian em-
ployes investing at least 10
percent or their pay in War
Bonds, will be honored with
the raising of the Minuteman
flag at a ceremony next week
which will coincide with the
beginning of the Firth War
Bond Drive.
The exact time of the flag-
raising ceremony will be an-
nounced today or Monday by
Capt. R.S. Salley, War Bond
Officer. It will take place
at the main flagpole in Wash-
ington Circle in front of Post
Headquarters.
During the recent campaign
the Minutemen raised the per-
centage of civilian emDioyes
investing at least 10 percent
of their income In War Bonds
from 72 to 100 percent. The
goal was achieved one month
ago, but the flag raising
ceremony was delayed pending
arrival of the flag.
The War Bond campaign was
under the direction of War
Bond Officers Captain Salley
and Lt. A.T. Radka, now public
relations officer, and Major
R.L. Mccullough and Captain
C.E. Harris of Civilian Per-
sonnel.
Minutemen taking part in the
recent campaign and who will
strive to reach the goal of
$100,000 set for Tyndall Field
in the Fifth War Bond Drive
are Fire Chief Guy V. Aren-
dell, Franklin Hunter and Sid-
ney Folsom, of the Fire De-
partment; Mrs. Eunice Rhyne,
E.D. Simons, J.B. Ellis, S.K.
Phyne and J.L. Carter, of Post
Engineers; Miss Jewell Dunn,
Miss Jill Stanley and Grace
Makowski, of the Sub-Depot;
Miss Mae Cude, Post Hospital;
Hiss Anita Sorrentino, Civil-
ian Personnel; Miss Jo Ellen
Vickers, Military Personnel;
Mrs. Hazel Thompson and Theo-
dore B. Fuller, of Quarter-
master; Paul Rose, or the QM
laundry; Claude Koon and Ray
Nixon, of the Water Department;
Sgt. Frank Parker, Ordnance;
Miss Ellen Coleman, Signal
Office; Miss Josephine Grims-
ley, Post Headquarters; Miss
Mary Whited, Special Service;
Miss Fay Williams, Department
of Training; Mrs. Ruth Lisle,
of Finance, and Miss Marian
Ooverts, of the Boat Dock.

T/F LAUNDRY WORKERS
GIVE TWO HOURS AS
INVASION TRIBUTE
As a tribute to the thous-
ands of U.S. soldiers who this
week stormed the shores of
Axis-held France in the world' s
greatest amphibious assault,
the employes of the Tyndall
Field laundry yesterday worked
two hours extra without pay.
The gesture was the result
of a unanimous desire to show
the men "over there' that the
fighters on the home front
were backing them to the hilt.
Already ranking high in the
percentage of employes par-
ticipating in the 10 percent
War Bond payroll deduction
plan, the laundry workers felt
that the invasion merited their
extra time on the job in ad-
dition to their War Bond back-
ing


WING COMMANDER PRAISES FIELD, INSTRUCTORS


"T/F FOLLIES OF '44"
SET FOR RITZ BOND
SHOW TUESDAY
The sale of War Bonds good
for tickets to the "Tyndall
Field Follies of 1944" is al-
ready under way and a full
house is expected at the Ritz
theater in Panama City Tuesday
night when the all-Army stage
program is presented.
Bond sales began Friday night
at a booth at the Ritz and
will continue through Tuesday.
The "Follies" presentation
will follow a parade in Panama
.City Tuesday afternoon as the
Fifth War Bond campaign offi-
cially gets under way. Units
of the Army Air Force from
Tyndall Field, the infantry
and mechanized troops from
Camp Gordon Johnston, the Navy
and the Coast Guard will take
part in the procession under
the direction of Parade Mar-
shal Fred Phillips.
Such well known Tyndall
stage performers as "The
Whirlaways,* a roller skating
team composed of Pvt. Erwin
Axe and his wife; Jimmy Coniff
and Ruth Vunkannon, vocalists;
Mrs. Joyce Horner; Cpl. John
Plackmier, formerly with the
St. Louis Opera Co.; Frankie
Perry, popular Negro singer;
the Tyndall Field orchestra
and the T/F band under the di-
rection of CWO Joshua Missal
will be featured on the two-
hour show.
Military and civilian per-
sonnel may purchase War Ronds
and obtain tickets for the
show at a special booth which
will be located at the main
Post Exchange. The booth will
open Tuesday and remain open
throughout the Fifth War Bond
campaign.

ROGER MEANS OKAY"
MAKES WDLP DEBUT
With Ist/Sgt. Al Nelson as
master of ceremonies, and PRO
Lt. Al Radka as the announcer,
Tyndall's Little Radio Theater
Group last night presented its
first in a series of summer
broadcasts over WDLP.
The show, which is entitled
'Roger Means Okay!," included
numbers by the Tyndall Field
band, an interview with Pfc.
Bernice Pllske of the T/F WAC
Detachment, and an original
dramatic skit written by Pfc.
Bolling Branham.
Taking part in the dramatic
skit were ist/Sgt. Nelson, Lt.
Radka, Cpl. Lawrence Stein,
CWO Joshua Missal and Lt. John
Zuker.

AQUATIC MEETS PLANNED
WITH OTHER FIELDS
Plans are being made by the
Special Service Office to ar-
range aquatic meets with
neighboring fields in the near
future. Included in the meets
will be swimming, diving, row-
ing and various beach sports
competition.
Tyndall Field enlisted men
who wish to compete in any
of the water sports are asked
to leave their names with
Capt. 0.0. Freeman, Special
Service Officer, or to notify
their section Special Service
representative.


TOP GUNNER OF CLASS
44-24 SCORES RECORD
MARK IN FINAL EXAM
Pvt. Graham A. Hatfield, al-
though no relation to the
famed feudin' Hatfields of the
Blue Ridge hills, would have
been a valuable member of the'
Hatfield team against the Coys
or anyone else, judging from
his gunnery school records.
The 19 year old private was
not only chosen gunner of his
class (44-24) but he made the
highest score in the schools
history on the final compre-
hensive exam, 146 points out
of a possible 150. Soldiers
of all ranks, up to and in-
cluding colonels, have been
graduated from the Tyndall
gunnery course but it remained
for this youngster from Wichi-
ta, Kansas, to break all ex-
isting records with his almost
perfect score.
Hatfield is married ano,
.prior to entering the AAF, he
was employed by the Boeing
Aircraft Company as a ditto
operator. Tinkering with ra-
dio sets Is his hobby and he
names his hours on the moving
base range as the most inter-
esting phase of his training
here.
Accompanying him on his ex-
pense-paid weekend in Panama
City today will be Pvt. Jack
Bertholdt of Kansas City, Mo.
Here are Pvt. Hatfield's
other gunnery school scores:
Cal. 50.....96% Skeet......88%
Turrets.....94% Moving Base69%
Sighting...100% M.ov. Targ.36%

ELEVEN STRi


S/Sgt. Bob Patterson, fleet-i
connected for his eleventh str
Tuesday. Patterson began his
day's game against Bronson Fiel
ly in each of his five trips to
The Tornado lead-off man is p
and will be out this afternoon
at the expense of Whiting Fiel
place on the Post Diamond at 3:


BRIG. GEN. BRADY LAUDS GUNNERY TRAINING

PROGRAM, EMPHASIZING IMPORTANCE OF
INSTRUCTORS' PART IN COURSE

"You chaps are doing a damn good job!
Those were the words of Brig. Gen. Francis M. Brady, new
commanding general of the 75th Flying Training wing, upon com-
pletion.of a thorough inspection of the training program here.
General Brady, a veteran of both World Wars, recently re-
turned from overseas to assume command of the 75th Wing, with
headquarters at Fort Myers, Fla. He is credited with person-
ally leading the first flight
of American bombers to blast
B U L L E T I N Nazi-held Holland, and has
served in England, Java, Aus-
Maj. Gen. William 0. Butler, tralia, Burma and India.
commanding general of the AAF His combat experiences have
Eastern Flying Training Com- taught him to lay the maximum
mand, visited Tyndall Field of stress on the training of
on a routine inspection yes- men before they go overseas,
terday, giving high praise to and his every effort is being
the military personnel of this devoted to giving the men in
station for the excellent im- his command the type of train-
provement shown on the field. ing which will best prepare
General Butler particularly them for duty on the front
was impressed by the military lines.
conduct of the soldiers and "The gunnery training pro-
the neatness and cleanliness gram at Tyndall Field is ex-
of the entire station, with cellent," he said, "and every
emphasis on commendable con- officer and enlisted man
editions in all mess halls, should be complimented on the
The commanding general was job being done in preparing
escorted on his tour of in- the graduates of this school
spectlon by Col. John W. Per- for combat duty.*
sons, post commander, and he "However, too much stress
gave credit to the officers cannot be given to the irm-
and enlisted men under Colonel portance of making a gunner's
Persons' command for the "vast training complete. He must
improvement' shown on the not only know how to fight the
field, enemy, and how to kill the
General Butler also showed enemy, but he must also know
great interest in the gunnery how to take care of himself.
training program and stressed He must knowhis guns and their
the importance of the gunnery limitations. He must know by
school in the overall effort actual experience what he's
of the Army Air Forces getting into. He must prepare
now, if he is to live to-
AIGHT HITSI morrow."
The general described the
experiences of men overseas
who learned too late that more
attention should have been
given to some phase of their
individual training. He told
of a heavy bomber returning
,from a mission, shooting red
-- flares to indicate that wound-
ed men were aboard, and of one
man saying afterhehad alight-
ed from the ship:
"Why didn' t I give more at-
tention to the training they
gave me on the application of
a tourniquet. I might have
saved a man's life. "
He also emphasized the im-
Sn portance of military disci-
Spline, saying, "The lack of
proper discipline with troops
by officers and non-coms con-
tributes greatly to manslaugh-

S"c. i must be disciplined or many
lives will be lost."
In his tour of the field,
Sthe general was impressed by
the prompt saluting of the men
and their military conduct. He
was quick to praise the job of
the instructors, andhe stress-
ed in each case, that no mat-
ter what the instructor was
teaching, it was important.
"The instruction you give
.these gunners will mean their
success or failure in fighting
the enemy. Your job may seem
monotonous at times, but re-
footed Tornado first sacker, who member this, the instruction
aight his against Moody Field on you give a certain man may be
sensational streak in last Sun- the very thing that will save
d in Pensacola when he hit safe- his life. You are just as much
the plate. a soldier on the front line as
recently batting at a .569 clip, your buddy is overseas. The
n to stretch his hitting string gunners who graduate from this
d pitchers. The game will take school are depending upon you.
30 p.m., weather permitting. Don' t let them down."







Page 2 TYNDALL TARGET


r Tyndall r TarAet

PUBLISHED ON SATURDAY BY THE SPECIAL
SERVICE OFFICE FOR PERSONNEL OF THE ARMY
AIR FORCES FLEXIBLE GUNNERY SCHOOL, TYNDALL
FIELD, PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA.
Copy Prepared Under Supervision of Public
Relations officer.
Printing and Photography by Base Photo-
graphic & Reproduction Section.
Art Work by Department of Training Draft-
ing Department.
The Tyndall Target receives material sup-
plied by Camp Newspaper Service, War Dept.,
205 E. 42nd St., New York City. Material
credited to CNS may NOT be republished with-
out prior permission from CNS.



LANDING OF THE LIBERATORS


To an expectant and listening America,
the radio on the morning of June 6
blurted the epochal news of an Allied
troop landing in northern France; The
invasion had come at last.
A tidal wave of excitement then swept
over the land washing it clean of rumors
and speculations and all of that day the
churches of the land kept filling with
people seeking through prayer an audi-
ence with their God.
Once before in June had a force of
British and Canadian troops crossed the
Channel to Dover. Now in company with
the Americans they were going back to
keep a promised rendezvous. Surely this
would have been in their minds as their
feet found the sands of France again,
after four restless years of living in
the shadows of Dunkirk.
They were the last to leave France and
are among the first to return. The eyes
of the little people of the world have
accoutred them in the knightly armor of
the Crusaders. For in verity, the ruler
of the Huns is a Saladin who would
scourge and hold in helotry an entire
Christian world.




THE PAGAN IS DRIVEN OUT


Now the pagan has fled the city and
the vicarage of the early Christians is
returned to caring hands. Rome is again
at peace and all is well with her citi-
zens.
The liberationofthe city of adoration
came on Sunday during the early morning
hours when the devout were readying
themselves for church. The fervid read-
ing of the mass was frequently punctuat-
ed by the rude speaking of cannon. Out-
side was the swagger and din of war, but
within the houses of God could be only
the rapt voices of the faithful making
their devotions.
Bitter was their way, but no returning
Caesar or centurions of old marched in
greater triumph into Rome than did the
legions of Allied fighting men. Waiting
for them were the Romans, cheering and
vying with one another to bedeck the
liberators with roses, lately plucked.
There were many who had no roses to toss
but whose wet eyes signalled their grat-
itude.
Along the famous avenues that held the
awkward German dead, they marched, and
long before night had fallen on the
Eternal City the American eagle was
securely perched among the pigeons in
the basilica of St. Paul's.


CO L U AfV


"I was transferred in a hurry, sir.9




KNOW YOUR PLANE







CONSOLIDATED PBY-4 (NAVY)
RAF DESIGNATION: "Catalina."
TYPE: Twin-engine all metal long-range
patrol-bombing flying boat,
WING: Semi-cantilever high-wing mono-
plane; center section of wing supported
above hull by a streamlined super-
structure; square wing tips; outer wing
panels slightly dihedralled.
FUSELAGE: Two-step semi-circular topped
hull of all-metal construction; re-
tractable floats form wing tips when re-
tracted.
TAIL UNIT: Fully cantilever tail as-
sembly; lower fin built integral with
hull; swept-back tail plane with round
tips; straight trailing edge; vertical
fin and rudder slopes up to a round
tip.
POWER PLANT: Two 1,200 hp Pratt & Whit-
ney 'Twin-Wasp" radial air-cooled en-
gines; electrically operated reversible
propellors.
DIMENSIONS: Wing span 104 feet; length
65 feet 1 inch.
ARMAMENT; Two gun blisters in sides of
hull art of wing.
PERFORMANCE: Maximum speed 190 miles an
hour: ceiling 25,200 feet.


CHAPEL SERVICES

PROTESTANT
Sunday
Sunday School, Post Chapel.......... 9 A.M.
Worship, Colored Rec Hall........ 9 A.M.
Worship, Post Chapel ............,.. 10 A.M.
Worship, Trigger Town...... ... ... 10 A.M.
Worship, Post Chapel.............. 7:30 P.M.
Tuesday
Fellowship Meeting........ ..... 7:30 P.M.
Christian Science Service............ 8 P.M.
Wednesday
Choir Rehearsal......... .......... 7:30 P.M.
CATHOLIC
Sunday
Mass, Post Chapel................... 8 A.M.
Mass, Post Theater.................. 10 A.M.


WILL HITLER BE YOUR COMPANION

THROUGH ETERNITY?
Isn't this a startling question...and
a strange one to be asking a soldier of
the Allied cause? Surely no member of
Uncle Sam's army would wilfully choose
to be Hitler's bedfellow either here or
in the hereafter.
However, death makes many changes. Be-
yond her shores lie only two abodes, and
it is not hard to guess where Hitler and
his kind will most likely be! I have no
desire to plead mercy for him. The
question is then, "Where will you spend
eternity?" The Pearly Gates will not
swing open for us merely because we have
have been on the side of the Allies.
If we have been with the devil and his
crowd, if we are strangers to God and
His.grace, if we know nothing of the
forgiveness of sins through faith in
Jesus' blood, if we know nothing of a
holy walk, our sad lot in eternity will
be in the companionship of the enemies
of God. Of course, there will be plenty
there, but what a company it will be and
what small consolation.
God in his great goodness has decreed
that nothing shall ever mar the bliss
of the holy redeemed in heaven. In that
place God himself shall wipe all tears
from their eyes. There shall be no more
sorrow, suffering, sin or death and
there shall be no night there, for the
former things shall have passed away.
Neither shall the nations learn war any-
more.
In hell there shall be endless weeping
and gnashing of teeth. The Hitlers and
sins of earth have already caused me
trouble enough. I do not care to follow
them beyond the grave. Yet the sorrows
of that place will not be the Hitlers
who may be there. They themselves will
be weeping out their own remorse, shorn
of all braggadocio. The sorrows of the
lost will be their own sinfulness, their
own separation from all that is holy an
good.
There, is only one way to escape such
a fate. Jesus said, "Except a man be
born again he cannot enter the kingdom
of God." America. has multitudes who are
living for the world, the flesh and the
devil; who are Christian in name only;
who have never been truly converted. To
such I say let this startling question
be an eye opener to your own lost con-
dition, your own sinfulness, your own
God-dishonoring speech and in repentance
and in forsaking of sin turn to Christ
and receive him as your Saviour and
Lord.
"Let the wicked forsake his way, and
the unrighteous man his thoughts: and
let him return unto the LORD, and he
will have mercy upon him; and to our
God, for he will abundantly pardon."
--Isa. 55:7
"Except ye repent, ye shall all like-
wise perish." --Luke 13:3
--CHAPLAIN A.J. GRAY

Mass, Post Chapel.................11:15 A.M.
Mass, Post Chapel................. 6:30 P.M.
Daily
Mass ............................ 5:30 A.M.
Monday
Novena................... ................ 7 P.M.
Choir Rehearsal............... ... 8 P.M.
Saturday
Confessions........................ 7 P.M.
(and any time Chaplain is in his office.)
JEWISH
Friday
Worship Service................... 7:30 P.M.


. I


Page 2


TYNDALL TARGET








Jn &


THE INVASION BEGINS

Battle to Death and Victory.
The early editions of Tuesday morn-
ing's papers were full of news of the
fall of Rome and the pursuit of the Nazi
armies fleeing into northern Italy. King
Vittorio Emanuele III resigned as king
of Italy and handed the throne to his
39-year-old son, Crown Prince Umberto.
President Roosevelt in a broadcast
hailed the capture of the Eternal City.
As he talked, the President knew that
the invasion troops were setting out
across the Channel in landing ships.
General George C. Marshall, the United
States Chief of Staff, was at the Rus-
embassy in Washington to receive a Sb-
viet decoration. Accepting the award,
4e said "the final action in this ter-
rible European war is now focused on a
single battle in which every Allied
force will be represented-a battle to
the death for the Nazis and a battle to
victory for the Allies."
General Marshall, too, knew that the
invasion would begin minutes after his
talk ended.
The final battle began shortly before
midnight, Tyndall Field time. The first
news came from Germany in a broadcast by
the Nazi news agency Transocean;
"ALLIED TROOPS HAVE BEGUN LANDING
NEAR LE HAVRE IN THE BEGINNING OF IN-
VASION OPERATIONS. ALLIED PARACHUTE
TROOPS HAVE DROPPED ON THE NORTHERN TIP
OF THE NORMANDY PENINSULA. "
For more than three hours the air was
filled with news of the invasion-all
coming from Germany. Then, at 2:32
a.m., Allied Supreme Headquarters issued
this Communique No. 1:
"UNDER THE COMMAND OF GENERAL EISEN-
HOWER, ALLIED NAVAL FORCES SUPPORTED BY
STRONG AIR FORCES BEGAN LANDING ALLIED
ARMIES THIS MORNING ON THE NORTHERN
COAST OF FRANCE"
*
The Reports Come In
That one-sentence communique was fol-
lowed by news dispatches from the scene
which revealed that:
The invasion front extended for a hun-
dred miles along the coast of Normandy--
in the same general area where King
Henry V of England landed the British
archers who later overwhelmed the French
in the famous battle of Agincourt.
The immediate goals were the great
French ports of Cherbourg and Le Havre,
harbors which are needed desperately if
the Allies are to pour the necessary
tremendous amounts of men and materiel
into France to meet the full strength
of the German army.
Parachute troops had landed 40 miles
inland near Rouen and were battling Ger-
-man anti-invasion forces some 65 miles
from Paris.
The fortified cathedral town of Bayeux
four miles inland in the center of the
*Normandy front was captured.
Caen, where the first of the German
-armored counter-attacks came, was hotly


TI E TRENDS


ONE YEAR AGO THIS WEEK
British bombers lashed the channel
fortifications and installations of
Germany's Atlantic Wall.

TWO YEARS AGO THIS WEEK
Japanese naval and military forces
landed on the Island of Kiska in the
Aleutian group.

THREE YEARS' AGO THIS WEEK
The British naval base of Gibraltar
was attacked by Italian planes flying
from Sardinia 800 miles to the east.

FOUR YEARS AGO THIS WEEK
The great battle of the Somme raged
in France. The French armies were fall-
ing back in retreat.

FIVE YEARS AGO THIS WEEK
Allied world sits back and watches
developments as Italians finish con-
quest of Albania.

contested. Caen is 29 miles southwest
of Le Havre.
The Allied attack threatened to cut
off the Cherbourg peninsula.
Allied intelligence officers have
identified, through questioning of Ger-
man prisoners and other means, 10 dif-
ferent Nazi divisions engaged so far.
The Germans reported that the Allies
had 20 divisions in Normandy.
The American First Division, which
spearheaded the American landings in
North Africa and in Sicily, and the
British 50th Infantry Division, led
the Allied seaborne landings.
Canadian infantry and armor captured
a dozen towns and 600 prisoners and ad-
vanced southward through the woodlands
and farms between Caen and Bayeux.
*

The First Hurdle Was Easy
The initial attacks met surprisingly
little resistance. But it did not take
long for the Germans to throw their re-
serves into counter-attacks, and the
full force of the Nazi armies is expect-
ed to be hurled against the Allies with-
in a week.
The German radio was constantly fill-
ing the air with reports and propaganda.
Some of their reports were admitted to
be true by the Allies. Others were un-
confirmed.
There were hints that new landings
were coming elsewhere. Allied broad-
casting stations warned the people of
Norway, Denmark, Holland, Belgium and
France not to fish in Coastal waters
from 9 p.m. Thursday night until 9 p.m.
next Thursday, lest they "hinder the
operations of Allied forces." Fishermen
at sea were warned to hasten back to
port.
The Germans at the same time declared


that great concentrations cf shipping
were in English ports, supposedly pre-
paring to start the movement across the
channel.
Air forces of the Allies flew more
than 27,000 individual sorties in the
first 54 hours, despite bad weather. In
that time, 176 enemy aircraft were des-
troyed in air combat, and the Allies
lost 289, including unarmed troop car-
riers and transports.
Secretary of War Stimson warned
against overconfidence. Only the first
hurdle has been taken, he said. Ger-
many's real strength is in the mobile
armies concentrated inland, and the
greater part of that strength will not
strike until General Rommel has reached
a decision on the power and main di-
rection of the Allied attack..
*

Disaster in Italy

The forward drive past captured Rome
was continuing at a lightning pace.
American troops have advanced as much
as 26 miles in 24 hours against only the
slightest resistance. An Allied spokes-
man said the German 14th Army in Italy
had been reduced to battered remnants.
There was no indication of where the
enemy would attempt to halt the Allied
steamroller.
Valuable ports along the Italian coast
have fallen intothe hands of the Allies.
Also captured was the former head-
quarters of Nazi Field Marshal Albert
Kesseling, an elaborate, tunnelled
underground stronghold.
Allied spokesmen said there was no
chance that the German armies in Italy
would be able to send troops to rein-
force the Nazi forces elsewhere.
*

On the Third Side

The Germans announced that the Rus-
sians have started an offensive north
of Iasi, which if true would mean that
a triple-barrelled assault upon Germany
was under way. The Russians said noth-
ing about the rumored offensive, but a
dispatch from Mosc6w predicted that
"Russian infantry soon will march across
German land."
*

PACIFIC FRONT
*
The Jap Fleet May Fight
Japanese warships were making their
appearance in the southwest Pacific. A
Jap heavy cruiserwas attacked off north-
west New Guinea by American bombers on
Wednesday. It was the third enemy com-
bat vessel reported in that area this
week. Previously, none had been en-
gaged for months. Presence of the ves-
sels was taken as a possible indication
that the Jap fleet may soon fight rather
than yield more territory to the Ameri-
cans advancing across the Pacific.


June 10, 19q44


Pa e 3


TYNDALL TARGET








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ONE MAN'S OPINION

What's Yours ?


QUESTION: "SUPPOSE THE 'DURA-
TION AND SIX MONTHS' WERE UP,
WOULD YOU PREFER TO RECEIVE
|YOUR DISCHARGE FROM AN OVER-
SEAS STATION?"
By COE and BARDI
CPL. GEORGE H. BARfTO, Vil ing-


ton, .ll.:
"Certainly not.
The U.S.A. is
good enough for
me every day of
the week. How-
ever, I would


like to visit England sometime
in the future.,

PFf. DONALD f. RKuFER, Bethlehem,
Pa.:
,40'k "NO Sir! I don't
want to lose any
time getting back
to my wife and
) daughter in Penn-
sylvania. I'll
do my travelling
with them in the good old U.S.A."

PrP. JAMES M. MACKEY, Fort Worth,


fexas:
'I'd rather re-
ceive my discharge
in the U.S., al-
though it doesn't
really matter too
much because the
satisfaction will
be the same no ma
ceive it.

PTf. WILLIAM R.



"
g

d
w


they give it to me!'


P.-





tter where I re-


LEE, Franklin,
a.:
Look, son, you
an tell the Tar-
et's readers
hat I'll take my
discharge any-
here and anytime


PRV. JAMES J. fUNfER, Boone,
Iowa:
"I'd rather re-
ceive my dis-
charge over here.
I'm anxious to -
get back home and
start civilian
life over again. I don't care
for foreign countries, and I'm
just tickledpinkwith the U.S.A."

PTf. SIfANLY R. URENOVIffH, Ce-
darhurst, N. Y.:
"Brace up, fella;
S but I don't care
S to receive my dis-
charge anywhere.
4 Someone has to be
in the Army in
peacetime and I've found a home.
Besides, I know my General or-
derslt

He Did His Part
Camp Kilmer, N. J. (CNS)-
When the Army rejected Joe
Rogers for physical reasons he be-
came so miffed that he persuaded
his wife to join the WAC. Now
she's stationed here and he comes
to call on week-ends.


"* '
~8k.,.


THE TIE THAT BINDS
Dear Ed:
Very seldom, if ever, does the
Army issue an order which borders
on the naive, or suggests a fa-
cetious motive underneath. Take
any Army order, put it on a table
and examine it closely and nine
times out of ten you'll find that
the order is hard and fast, that
there are no loopholes, and that
from the Army's viewpoint there
is a reason 'why?"
But not so is the recent EFTC
order on the wearing of neckties.
I was fascinated by the wording
of it. Here, for once, the Army
appears to have landed a half-
hearted punch, leaving itself
ridiculously open for unfavorable
comment and criticism.
First of all, if a station is
located in a climate where it is
considered to be too warm and
uncomfortable for military per-
sonnel working outside to be
wearing neckties, by what line of
reasoning can the conclusion be
reached that it is cooler in-
doors and that military personnel
working indoors do not suffer to
the same degree as those out of
doors? And, according to the
ruling, "those engaged in outdoor
work' may go without ties--ls
there anyone who will dispute
that picking up papers on a
clean-up detail is not outdoor
work? (Yet, how many section
commanders will permit their
clean-up details to police the
area necktie-less?) And, sup-
pose a clerk, working indoors and
wearing a tie, is asked to lend
a helping hand in moving furni-
ture from one building to an-
other-as soon as he steps out-
side carrying a desk or a chair
he is presumed to be "working
outdoors, Isn't he? 'But can he
take off his tie while doing it?
Yes...if he wants to stop and
give explanations to every offi-
cer who may stop him in the
course of his work.
Then there is that part of the
order which permits personnel
'engaged in manual labor" to go
without ties. NO detailed ex-
planation of just what consti-
tutes manual labor accompanies
the directive, but here, again,
is there anyone who will deny
that punching a typewriter key-
board, or pushing a pencil or
filing special orders is not
manual labor-particularly when
shirts are soaked through with
sweat and the perspiration is
falling in droplets from the
brow?
However, let us assume that the
two rulings on "outdoor work" and
"manual labor" are iron-clad.
Now, does the Army expect every
soldier to adhere to those rules
to the letter? Of course it
does, otherwise they would never
have been issued. But, usually
when the Army issues an order it
has ways and means of determining
and insuring the degree to which
those orders are carried out. In
this case, I personally do not
believe that the Army intends
every officer to question every
GI without a tie to see whether
that GI is qualified to go tie-
less-and yet, In what other man-
ner could it possibly be deter-
mined to what extent the orders
are being obeyed?
Certainly in the light of the
above presumptions, the orders
on the wearing of neckties were
issued on a tongue-in-the cheek
basis.
Another detail which merits


-~


PaoGe


attention is the fact that at
Eglin Field all Personnel are
permitted to go without ties.
Eglin Field is but 60 miles away
from Tyndall, directly westward,
and if it is any hotter at Eglin
than it Is at Tyndall, the dif-
ference is not due to the sun.
The final point I wish to make
is a touchy one for most of us.
If you have ever gone on sick
call or approached a medical of-
ficer, with a case of prickly
heat, then you are familiar with
the gesture of raised hands in
the air signifying that medical
science has not as yet come
through with any cure for this
summer scourge. They tell you
the only thing to do is to keep
cool and dry-both of which are
impossible in this climate. And
no mention is made that the wear-
ing of neckties gives any relief
to the stricken.
A soldier with a case of
prickly heat is an uncomfortable
soldier. An uncomfortable sol-
dier does not execute his duties
with the greatest efficiency.
--A GI WITH PRICKLY HEAT.

HONOR FOR HEROES
To the Editor:
Thousands of gunners have re-
ceived their silver wings at Tyn-
dall Field. Out of those thous-
ands there must be a few real
heroes. For my money anybody
who goes up in an airplane where
the Germans or the Japs can shoot
at him is a hero, but there prob-
ably are a few Tyndall grads who
are outstanding.
Why can't we honor them in some
way? Can't somebody find out the
names of some of these heroes,
and then can' t we name some of
the buildings and areas on the
field after them?
The post baseball diamond, for
instance--call it "Jones Park,"
or whatever the name of the hero
Is. The beach, too, could be
named the same way, as could
streets, hangars and other prin-
cipal buildings.
--SGT. J.E.T.


Taking every advantage of tide
and weather conditions, Allied
troops on Tuesday effected land-
ings on the Norman coast in north
France. The initial operations
which aimed at the establishment
of beachheads were begun shortly
after midnight, Eastern War Time.
It is early for a calculation of
immediate results, but judging by
the description that was given of
the Allied sea and air armadas
that figured in the invasion,
there was enough strength on
hand to do the job. The ability
of the parachutists that were
dropped behind the enemy's lines
to accomplish their objectives
will be of major importance and
in this connection one must not
forget the people. No one knows
better than the Germans of the
wonderful work that is being
done by the French underground in
support of the Allied assault on
Fortress Europe. Now the Allied
foot is planted in France and
more than ever these patriots may
be depended upon to assist in an
early fitting of the conqueror's
shoes. Meanwhile the people of
France know hope again as the
battle for their liberation rages
on the beaches of Normandy.

Now that the battlA for Rome is
a closed issue, the Nazis are
proposing a plan to make it an
open city. That their offer
comes a little late even they
must realize, but this is no
deterrent to minds that so im-
pudently house the falsisms of
National Socialism. Not so long
ago when the Nazis were occupying
the saddle they announced to a
concerned world that Rome must be
regarded as an open city. Then
their propagandists went on a
talking spree to convince the
Allies of the sincerity of their
intentions. But Teuton glibness
could not conceal the apparent
lie for it was well known to the
Allied command that the Germans
were shuttling men and materiel
across the city and using it as a
headquarters for their Italian
operations. possible the present
Nazi extensions are intended to
raise a cloud of fine dust for
the examining eyes of all those
citizens of the Reich who long
ago discarded the rose.colored
glasses distributed by the German
Ministry of Propaganda. Which
would make it seem that in the
German lexicon of war there is no
such word as 'failure.'

In air sorties over Babo, in
Dutch New Guinea, Biak island,
and Truk atoll in the Carolines,
American planes shot down 30 of
Mr. Mitsubishi's best Zeroes. On
the ground patrol clashes in the
Maffin Bay and Hollandia areas
sent 341 more Japanese reeling on
their merry way to perdition.
Only on Biak, in the Schouten
group, did the Tokyo tyrants
achieve a modicum of success.
Here at least they still retained
possession of Biak's trio of air-
dromes. Of these, Mokmer is the
most important and is the immedi-
ate objective of the two American
columns now bearing down on it.
Two American columns who know the
days of the Japanese are numbered
and are out to add a few air-
dromes to an already impressive
total.


June 10, 1944


L LADNYT TA R G ET


JOAN EDWARDS, co-starred with
Frank Sinatra on CBS' famed "Hit
Parade. (All in favor of tele-
vision say 'Ah!').





Page 6

S--INVASION


COMMAND


E


INTELLIGENCE


Intelligence must be precise and
detailed. PRU planes flew over
the western coast line and photo-
graphed coast defenses, rail cen-
ters, barracks and gun emplace-
ments. This information has been
supplemented by maps and data from
prisoners. This information was
of vital importance to the inva-
sion leaders. Intelligence found
out about the tides of the coast
and the effect of these tides on
LST's and LSI's. All this was
necessary to the success of the
invas ion.


AIR OPERATIONS
Air domination was a "must" in
the recent invasion. Planes that
were used for the strategic bomb-
ing pattern had to be diverted to
the western front. Fighter planes
were of vital help in the attack,
Another problem of air power was
the impairment of communications.
A final problem was the carrying
in of airborne troops.


Five Problems


Of


Invasion


TI
on
tra
tac'
of
wor
wer
the
the
bef
lac
expi


t I


C I





Page 7


TYNDALL TARGET


MII


SUPPLY


AMPHIBIOUS ASSAULT
The bulk of the invasion rested
on the shoulders of the troops
trained in amphibious and assault
tactics. D-day was the final test
of all the months of training and
work. The initial assault troops
were lightly equipped but behind
them came all other branches of
the services. The chief problem
before the invasion was not the
lack of equipment but the lack of
experience.


NAVAL OPERATIONS
Sea domination was in the Allies'
hands. Their job was legion. They
had to conduct the barges in to
the shore. The shore guns had to
be silenced. Cover for the land-
ing troops was to be provided by
the Navy. When the beachhead has
been secured the Navy must sub-
stitute for a ferry. The Navy
must also be an ambulance service
for evacuation of the wounded.


The laws of logistics govern the
art of war. The supply of the
Allied armies invading Europe has
taxed our experts of supply to the
full. The solution of this prob-
lem started in the factories of
America months ago. The great
mass of supplies in England is
enough to support a campaign for
a length of time but these sup-
plies must be gotten across the
narrow strip of water called the
Engl-ish Channel. The supply prob-
lem does not stop with the beach-
head, it must be carried on to the
interior wherever the Army fights.


I


CANDIN AVA FRC
Vice Adm. Percy W. Nelli


June 10, 1944


U. S. NAVAL TASK FORCE
1 6 Rear Adm. John Wilkes
---








P aa e 8 TVMfAI I T A D(IT


TORNADOES SNAP LOSING STREAK AS



PATTERSON SPARKS TEAM TO WINS



OVER BRONSON AND MOODY


TYNDALL FIRST SACKER CONNECTS FOR IITH

STRAIGHT HIT AS TORNADOES BATTER MOODY

FIELD 15-9; UZONYI CREDITED WITH WIN


With Sunday's win over Bronson
a matter of record, the Tornadoes
on Tuesday turned their attention
to the Moody Field Flyers in a
contest at Valdosta, Ga. It was
a free-hitting game in which the
Tyndall team "poured it ong from
the third inning and coasted
through to a 15-9 triumph over
the home squad. 3/Sgt. Bob Pat-
terson, Tornado first sacker and
more popularly known as the
"sheriff of Triggertown," etched
himself a permanent niche in
Tyndall's baseball hall of fame
by hitting safely in six consecu-
tive trips to the plate, which,
coupled with his 5-for-5 in the
game against Bronson, gave him a
total of 11 straight hits.
Patterson's phenomenal hitting
streak boosted his batting aver-
age to .569, 200 points better
than his closest rival, Lt. "Hub"
Freeman, hard-hitting T/F second
baseman. Patterson, a former
Mississippi State diamond star,
tripled in his first time at bat
on Tuesday and followed up with
five successive infield hits,
which included two bunts. Also,
Freeman and Nick Orange each
found Moody hurlers for three
hits which contributed no little
to the Tornado cause.
While the Tyndall batters were
enjoying a field day, their base
running,,at one point in the
game, resembled the Brooklyn
Dodgers in their heyday of daffi-
ness. In the fifth inning, with
Backstop Duv Allen on base, big,
righthanded hurler Frank Uzonyl
dumped a single into center field
and when the Moody second baseman
muffed the throw in, Uzonyi
rounded second and kept right on
running for third, never bother-
ing to see if the base were un-
occupied, which It wasn't. Allen
held third until Uzonyl was more
than two thirds of the way over
and then feinted for home, draw-
ing a throw. In the ensuing
catch-as-catch can, Allen out-
witted his pursuers and scooted
home when the Moody third baseman
dropped an easy toss from the
catcher. When the dust cleared
away, Uzonyi could be seen sit-
ting down on second base, Im-
mensely enjoying the proceedings,
while Manager Woody Busby, who
was coaching third, was espied
looking for a suitable bat with
which to impress Uzonyi with the
finer details of base running.
Veteran right-hander Joe Flana-
gan started on the mound for Tyn-
dall. But Joe, whose arm hasn't
been "right" since he injured it
in a game last year, just didn't
have the stuff, and for the
second time this season was forc-
ed to retire after two innings.
Joe was tagged for six hits,
which Moody batsmen converted
Into two runs. Uzonyi came in to
pitch In the third and during his
five-inning stay yielded six runs
on seven hits. Dale Livingston
took over the hurling for T/F In
the eighth. He retired Moody in
order in the eighth, but in the
ninth the home team rallied to
score a run on three hits.
Tyndall's biggest barrages came
in the fourth and sixth innings.


In the fourth, Billy Hines
doubled with two on to drive in a
pair of markers, and Orange fol-
lowed suit shortly afterwards
when his single into left brought
in two more tallies. In the
sixth, four Tornado safeties and
three Moody errors permitted five
T/F runners' to cross the plate.
Cpl. Gordon Beach, former
hurler for the Alexandria, Va.,
White Sox, went four and two-
thirds innings for the Valdosta
squad, giving up seven runs and
ten hits while walking two. Sil-
verman relieved Beach and the
former fared no better at the
hands of the T/F batsmen, who
were too much "in the mood.' The
Tornadoes found the relief hurler
for ten hits and eight runs.


JOHNSON BESTS SOUTHARD

AS MARIANNA DEFEATS

TORNADOES, 3-2
The Marlanna Air Base nine,
leaders of the South Georgia Bor-
der League, took on the Tornadoes
last Saturday afternoon on the
Post Diamond and handed the Tyn-
dall team its third straight set-
back by the score of 3-2. Three
T/F errors in the third inning
aided the visitors in scoring two
runs and gaining a lead they
never relinquished.
Norman Southard, Tyndall south-
paw, was charged with the de-
feat. Turning in one of his best
performances of the year, Lefty
allowed eight scattered hits,
struck out 12 Marianna batters
and issued only one free pass-an
intentional walk in the first
inning. "Fireball" Carl Johnson
was the winning Marianna chucker.
He gave up two runs on eight hits
fanning seven and walking two.
Marlanna opened the scoring in
their half of the first with a
lone run on three hits. Tyndall
grabbed a one run lead in the
second by scoring two runs on one
hit and two walks. With Becker
and Jackrel on base, Manager
Woody Busby tagged one of John-
son's offerings into center field
for a clean double to drive in
the only pair of Tyndall runs.
The win gave Marlanna a count
of 8-2 for the season, while Tyn-
dall's 1944 record dropped to
.500 at 6-6.


IINTER-SECTION SPORTS

SOFTBALL


Sec. W
C-5 ...... 3
A-3....... 2
C-3....... 2
Photo..... 2
A-2....... 1
B-1.......0
C-7...... 0
C-6....... 0
C-4.......
C-4.......0


Sec. W
E-2.......
B-2.......2
E-1....... 2
B-4..... 1
C-9....... 1
B-3.......0
Fin ..... .0
C-2 ...... 0
A-1....... 0


RESULTS
A-I 0, E-2 6; A-2 4, E-1 7; A-3
11, C-9 7; Photo 7, C-6 2; B-I 5,
C-5 13; B-2 5, C-4 0; B-4 9, C-2
0 (F) ; B-6 4, C-3 5; E-1 3, A-l
2; C-9 2, E-2 13; C-7 1, A-2 17;
C-6 4, A-3 4; C-5 3, Fin. O; C-4
2, photo 10; C-2 6, B-2 8; C-1 8,
B-3 2; A-I 4, C-9 5; E-2 13, C-6
1; A-2 8, C-5 9; A-3 7, C-4 3.
BASEBALL RESULTS
A-1 2, E-3S ; B-5 6, C-7 5; C-7
0 9-2 2; C-5 6. C-6 5.


TORNADO PLAYING MANAGER [




-P


r
-4.
I i
ra~

p--c~A6~i


A hustler from the word "Go!, "
/Sgt. Woody Busby, playing mana-
ger of the Tyndall Tornadoes, is
a ballplayer's ballplayer. Bel-
lowing orders and hurling good-
natured tirades at his players in
a tone which prompts spectators
to look for a hidden loud speaker
system, Buz has injected new
life into the Tyndall nine since
taking over the reins several
weeks ago.
A veteran of last year's squad,
Woody is primarily a catcher, but
on many occasions in the past, he
has proven his ability to handle
almost any position on the dia-
mond. In addition, his stick
work is far from weak and he has
built up a sturdy reputation as
oneof the team's leading "clutch"
hitters.
Busby hails from Mobile, Ala.,
and is entitled to wear 3 1/3
hash marks denoting his 10-year
stint in the AAF.


We'll Get 'em Next Timn
MARIANNA AB R H
Darowish, Ib...... 5 1 1
Humphry, 2b....... 2 1 1
x-Murphy, rf, 2b.. 4 1 1
Gunkel, ss ........ 4 0 1
Dawkins, cf....... 3 0 1
Webster, 3b....... 4 0 1
Moran, c........... 4 0 0
Streetnan, If..... 4 0 0
Johnson, p........ 4 0 I
xx-Barries, rf.... 1 0 1
Totals 35 3 8
x-replaced Humphry in 7th
xx-replaced Murphy in 7th
TYNDALL AB R H
Hines, ss......... 4 0 0
Freeman, 2b....... 4 0 2
patterson, Ib..... 4 0 1
Becker, 3b........ 3 1 1
Tarr, If.......... 4 0 0
Matonak, cf....... 4 0 1
Jackrel, rf....... 1 1 0
Busby, c .......... 2 0 1
Southard, p..... 3 0 1
x-Atton, rf....... 1 0 0
xx-Allen, c....... 1 0 0
xxx-0'Shields ..... 1 0 0
Totals 32 2 7
x-replaced Jackrel In Sth
xx-Replaced Busby in 5th
xxx-Batted for Backrel in 7th

Patterson Pounds Pill


TYNDALL AB
Patterson, lb..... 5
Freeman, 2b ..... 4
Hines, ss......... 5
Becker, Sb........ 5
Tarr, f .......... 3
atonak, f ....... 3
Jackrel, rf....... 2
Atton, c ........ 2
Glasser, p........ 2
x-Allen........... 2
xx-Busby........... 3
xxx-Livingston.... 3


H
5
2
2
2
2
0
1
1
0
1
0
1


e
E
o
0
0
o
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
3






0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
o
o
o1


T/F DOWNS NAVY BOXERS;

ANGELO HANDS GRAZIANO

FIRST SETBACK

By Cpl. J.J. Doonis
Tyndall's boxers, under the
supervision of Lt. John Gueder,
won their second straight match
from the local Naval Section Base
when they downed the sailors
Thursday night, 2-1. George Car-
bin and Dinty Moore were the two
winners for Tyndall, while Mickey
Graziano suffered his first de-
feat in the ring here when Lou
Angelo of the Navy took a three
round decision from him in the
evening's final bout.
Moore won by decision over Don
Campion and Carbin was awarded a
TKO in the first round over War-
ren Danison.
At the regular weekly boxing
show Tuesday night, fans witness-
ed one of the most grueling bouts
ever fought in the Tyndall ring
when Joe Ippolitto of New Jersey
slugged out a three-round de-
cision over the rugged George
Carbin of Maine.
Ippolltto, winning the first
round by a close margin, lost the
second as Carbin Kept his oppo-
nent off balance with a sharp
left jab and won the round by a
good margin. In the third round
Ippolitto caught Carbin with a
right to the jaw that rocked him
from stem to stern and continued
to pound away at his opponent
until the bell, winning the last
round and the fight and keeping
the crowd on its feet cheering
both fighters.
In the opening bout Tuesday,
Bob Alexander, 159, Ithaca, N.Y.,
Pounded out a decision over
Charles Curran, 146, Boston,
Mass., after three sizzling
rounds.
John Anderson, 152, Idaho, and
Bob Beumeles, 155, Kansas, ended
up even after three rounds. Both
fighters mixed it freely all the
way and the decision was well re-
ceived.
Lawrence Lattizorl, 156, Conn.,
and Charles Blankenship, 150,
Richmond, Va., were featured in a
wrestling exhibition which proved
highly entertaining.
Lt. Walter Nelson of the Pro-
vost Marshal's office refereed.
Totals 39 9 17 3
x-Batted for Jackrel in 5th
xx-Replaced Atton In 5th
xxx-Replaced Glasser in 5th
BRONSON AB R H K
Tremark, cf..... 5 2 2 1
Schroeppel, ss.... 5 0 1 1
Kennedy, 3b ...... 5 2 2 0
Williams, rf...... 4 2 2 0
Stoviak, If....... 5 0 3 0
Tschuden, c....... 5 0 1 0
Lowman, Ib ........ 3 0 0 0
Holcombe, 2b ...... 0 2 0
Heinz p .......... 3 0 1 0
x Ba er.......... 1 0 0 0
xx-Larry........... 1 0 0 0
Totals 42 6 14 2
x-Replaoed Heinz in 7th
xx-Batted for Baxter In 9th

The Victory March Is On
TORNADOES AB R H E
patterson, lb..... 6 4 6 1
Freeman, 2b....... 6 1 3 0
Hines, ss........ 5 2 1 1
Orange, If........ 5 3 3 1
Becke.r, 3b........ 5 1 1 1
Tarr, rf......... 4 0 1 0
Matonak, f....... 2 0 0
Allen, c......... 4 2 1 0
Flanagan, p....... 0 1 0
x-Jackrel, rf. 2 0 0 0
xx-Uzonyi, p...... 1 1 1
xxx-Livingston.... 1 0 0 0
xxxx-Busby, c..... 0 0 0 0
Totals 43 15 17 5
x-replaced Matonak in 4th
xx-replaced Flanagan in 3rd
xxx-replaced Uzonyl in 8th
xxxx-replaced Allen in 9th
MOODY AB R HI E
Heirick, 2b....... 8 1 3 0
Morgan, cf........ 6 2 5 0
Nichols, lb....... 6 1 3 1
Caudle, 3bb........ a 1 1 1
McBride, f ....... 5 0 0 0
Valiando, ss...... 4 0 1 2
Fodrea, c......... 4 0 0 0
Farmer, rf........ 1 1 01
Beach, p.......... 2 1 0 0
xx-Stuart, rf..... 4 1 2 0
xxx-Silverman, p.. 8 1 0 0
Totals 47 9 16 4
rx-Batted for Farmer in 3rd
xxx-Replaced Beach in 5th


Paae 8


L LADNYT T A R G ET







,TYNAL TARGET Paae 9


TYNDALL NINE EVENS SERIES WITH BRONSON AS

GLASSER RECEIVES CREDIT FOR 9-6 TRIUMPH;

PATTERSON GETS 5 FOR 5; WILLIAMS TRIPLES


Sal t SLeemore
y


Snapping a three-game losing
streak at the expense of a team
with four ex-major leaguers in
the line-up, the Tornadoes re-
turned from Pensacola Sunday
night with a well-deserved 9-6
triumph over the Bronson Field
diamond squad. The Tyndall win
squared the series between the
wo teams at 1-1. Prior to the
ronson game, the Tornadoes had
gone down in defeat in three suc-
cessive contests, the longest
losing streak In T/F baseball
history. However, their tri-
umph over Bronson's Ted Williams,
Bob Kennedy, et al, was ample
proof that the Tornadoes had not
lost their grip, and were once
again ready to begin a victory
march.
Bob Patterson, fleet-footed
Tornado first sacker, stole the
batting spotlight in Sundayis
game when he connected for five
straight hits in five official
trips to the plate, scoring three
times. Patterson, who hails from
Mississippi, was in the lead-off
position and in his last time at
bat was walked by Baxter, the
ronson hurler.
Joe Glasser started on the
mound for Tyndall, and although
relieved in the fifth, with one
away, received credit for the
victory. Glasser gave up four
runs on nine hits, and issued 10
free passes, one of which was in-
tentional. Ted Williams, former
American League batting champ, was
the biggest thorn in the T/F
right-hander's side. Williams
singled in his first trip to the
.plate and then in the third inn-
ing, tripled to right, for his
only hits of the day. Glasser
walked him in the fifth on pur-
pose; in the sixth, the lanky
left-hander hit into a double play
and in the ninth he lunged on one
of Livingston's pitches for a
"humpbacked liner" (a mile up and
a mile down) which Third Baseman
Becker caught after several
xious moments.
Livingston, entering the game
In the fifth with one down and
bases loaded, set down the next
two batters on a strikeout and a
ground ball to first. He was
nicked for two runs on six hits,
of which only one, a triple
by Tremark, was good for extra
bases.
Heinz was the initial Bronson
hurler, and in six innings he
gave up eight runs on 13 hits,
striking out seven and walking
three. He was charged with the
loss. Baxter, another right-
hander, relieved Heinz in the
seventh, and in yielding one run
was nicked for three hits in his
three innings on the mound, is-
suing three walks and fanning a
like number.
The Tornadoes, whose recent de-
feats were mainly the fault of
their own laxness, turned the
tables against Bronson and took
advantage of Navy errors in the
advantage of two Navy errors in-
the third inning to score three
runs on three hits. With Patter-
son and Freeman on base in that
third inning, Billy Hines sent a
sharp single into center field to
score a pair, and later crossed
the plate himself when Johnny
Becker drove a :ground ball
through Bob Kennedy, the Bronson
third sacker.
Bronson scored their first run
in the first on three successive
singles. In the third the Navy
team tied up matters at 3-3 by


scoring two runs on one hit, a
triple by Williams, and a T/F
error. Tyndall jumped into the
lead again in the fifth when "Hubn
Freeman tripled and singles by
Becker, Tarr and Jackrel ac-
counted for three runs. Bronson
added one In their half of the
fifth on two walks and a pair of
singles. In the sixth, singles
by Patterson and Hines accounted
for two more T/F markers, with
the aid of two Bronson passed
balls. At the end of the sixth
the count was 8-5 in favor of
Tyndall. Each team scored a
run in the eighth for their fi-
nal tallies of the game.
--Band Notes--
BROTHERS OF T/F BAND
MEMBERS IN NAVY, SEA
BEES AND MARINES
Mall call for the 608th AAF
band seems to be a fraternal ser-
vice these days, with almost 50
percent of the fellows having
brothers in the Armed Forces
throughout the world and in all
branches of the service. These
brothers are fighting in all the
theaters of war and send in
amusing reports along with the
fighting side of their lives.
CWO Joshua Missal has a brother
In the Sea Bees. He is a petty
officer and is in band work also.
Cpl.. Stein, band clerk, had a
visit from his brother recently.
He is stationed at Camp Wheeler,
Ga., in an infantry band. Their
father Is judge advocate for a
Coast Guard flotilla stationed in
Chicago. Pfc. Manasco has a
brother in the Navy. Sgt. Joe
Ivey's brother writes him from
Anzio with a paratrooper return
address.
Pfc. Eddie Wasserman received
word from his brother in New
Guinea about duty with a medical
unit. Sgt. Sam Sirianni writes
to his brother with a California
naval base address. Cpl. Jimmy
Coniff, vocalist with the Tyndal-
laires, learns of his brothers
doings in England with a Special
Service outfit.
Pfc. Brown Spiva just calls, or
walks, to the orderly room of
Section A to hold "high council"
with Sgt. Spiva over the use of
the car for the 'evening. Cpl.
Bartholomew, drum major, gets
V-mail from Sgt. Donald, a gunner
on a B-24 of a combat mapping
squadron in the New Guinea region.
He graduated from Tyndall in the
class of 43-43.
If you miss the concert band
over WDLP on Thursday afternoons
it's because the band is taking a
summer "furlough" to try and be
of more service in entertaining
you fellows on the post. The
radio program and rehearsal time
will go into working up a musical
setting of sparkling show tunes
for variety shows. These shows
will be offered for the Trigger-
town "show-goers" and then will
be brought to Theater NO. 1 at
this end of the Post. These
shows will display the combined
talent of the field and the Tyn-
aallalrs. It is the wish of CWO
Missal to spread the band's enter-
tainment possibilitiesbefore
more of the men on the field.
Beginning in the near future,
the concert band will give con-
certs on alternate Sunday eve-
nings. This will be part of the
plan to find new listeners.
--Cpl. O.L. Bartholomew


../





Ni


7...


"DOUBLE EXPOSURE"


Q. My mother is bedridden and
70 years old. As a civilian I con-
tributed $10 a week to her sup-
port while my brother contrib-
uted $25 a week, then more than
50 per cent of her total income.
My brother now sends her $50 a
month as her chief supporter. May
I claim her as a dependent and
also contribute to her support?
A. Yes. If the $10 a week you
gave your mother as a civilian
amounted to a substantial part of
her income, you may apply for a
Class B allowance for her, which
will entitle her to $37 a month, of
which $22 comes out of your Army
pay.

Q. Is it OK for me to wear my
decorations, service medals and
badges on my khaki shirts during
the summer months?
A. It's all right for you to wear
fruit salad on your summer shirts,
providing the shirt is being worn
as an outer garment. AR 600-40,
Para. 68a (1) states that decora-
tions "may be worn on the ser-
vice coat or the shirt when not


equipped for combat or simulated
combat."
Q. Here's a sticker: I have five
dependents, my wife, three chil-
dren and my mother. Recently
my wife divorced me. She re-
ceives no alimony. Now I wunt to
marry again. Will my second
wife be entitled to receive an
allowance and, if so, will my
mother and children still be en-
titled to theirs?
A. If you remarry, your second
wife will receive the usual Class
A allowance of $50 a month. Your
first wife, not having been granted
alimony, will receive no allow-
ance. Your children will continue
to receive $70 a month, $30 for
the first child and $20 for each of
the others. Your mother will con-
tinue to receive her allowance,
too, provided that her status as a
dependent has not changed. There
will be no additional deductions
from your pay for the Class A
allowance to your second wife as
you are already paying $27 a
month, which is the maximum
amount that may be deducted
from a GI's pay.


it iJ







T 7
() r


June 10, 1944


TYNDALI


TARGFT


Paoe 9







TYNDALL TARGET


Page 10


Sun., 'TROCADERO,' J
Downs, Rosemary Lane.
Mon.-Tues., 'MR. BIG,'
O'Connor, Peggy Ryan.
Wed., 'LIVE WIRE,' R
Paige, J
Fri.-Sat., 'MINESWEE
Richard Arlen, Jean Park


'ohnny

Donald

robert

'PER,'
er,


IM 0 V. E Si
POST
Sun.-Mon.,'MAKE YOUR OWN BED,'
Jack Carson, Jane Wyman.
Tues., 'THE SCARLET CLAW,'
Basil Rathbone, Nigel Bruce;
Also 'CALL OF THE SOUTH SEAS,'
Alan Lane.
Wed.-Thurs., 'THE EVE OF ST.
MARK,' Michael O'Shea, Anne
Baxter.
Friday, 'SONG OF THE OPEN
ROAD,' Bergen, McCarthy, Fields.
RITZ
Sun.-Mon., 'FOLLOW THE BOYS,'
all-star cast.
Tuesday, 'SOUTH OF DIXIE,' Ann
Gwynne, David Bruce.
Wed., 'PARDON MY RHYTHM,'
Gloria Jean, Patrick Knowles.
Thurs.-Fri., 'PASSAGE TO MAR-
SEILLES,' Humphrey Bogart,
Michele Morgan.
Saturday, 'LARAMIE TRAIL,'
Smiley Burnette.
PANAMA
Sun.-Mon., 'JACK LONDON,'
Michael O'Shea.
Tues., 'MAJOR AND MINOR,' Ray
Milland, Ginger Rogers.
Wed.-Thurs., 'CRASH DIVE,' Ty-
rone Power, Anne Baxter.
Fri.-Sat., 'WESTWARD BOUND,'
Ken Maynard, Hoot Gibson.
BAY


This joker would make
a lousy soldier---


Page 10


WHAT'S DOING NEXT WEEK

SUNDAY
7 PV.--Bingo at Triggertown
Y ONDA Y
7 F.M. --Movies, Hospital
8:30 F.M.--Movies, Receiving
Section

TUESDAY
7 P.M.--Entertainment in
Hospital Wards
8 P.M.--Dance, USO
8 F.M.--Bingo, Rec Hall
8 P.M.--Movies, Colored Rec
Hall

WEDNESDAY
12:30 P.M.--Special Service
Non-Corn Meeting, Library
7 P.M.--Weekly Variety Show
at Receiving Section
8 F.M.--GI Dance, Rec Hall,
Permanent party only

THURSDAY
7 P.M.--Movies, Hospital
8 P.M.--GI Dance, Rec Hall,
Students only
8 P.M.--Dance, Colored Rec
Hall
8:30 P.M.--Movies, Receving
Section

FRIDAY
7 P.M.--Triggertown Talent
Review
8 P.M.--Movies, Colored Rec
Hall

SATURDAY
7 P.M.--Movies, Hospital
8:30 P.M.--Movies, Trigger-
Town

BOXING
Tuesday, 8 P.M.-Weekly bouts
at Post Gym Area


.~~


And his brother
wouldn't win
any medals---











But this Joe has the
right idea when it
comes to safeguarding

military information.


DON'T TALK

IF YOU SEE OR HEAR ANYTHING

TELL INTELLIGENCE

Phone Ex. 3104




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