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Title: Tyndall target
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076230/00093
 Material Information
Title: Tyndall target
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 27-36 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)
Publisher: Public Relations Office, Air Corps Gunnery School
Place of Publication: Tyndall Field Fla
Publication Date: 1942-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City -- Tyndall Air Force Base
Coordinates: 30.078611 x -85.576389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 16, 1942)-
Issuing Body: Issues for May 9, 1942- published by Office of Public Relations, Army Air Forces Gunnery School.
General Note: Title from caption.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076230
Volume ID: VID00093
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24602432

Table of Contents
    Cover
        page 1
    Main
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
        page 13
        page 14
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I Tyndall 1rar~et I


PUBLISHED ON SATURDAYS BY THE SPECIAL SERVICE OFFICE FOR PERSONNEL
OF THE ARMY AIR FORCES FLEXIBLE GUNNERY SCHOOL, PANAMA CITY, FLA.
Copy Prepared Under Supervision Of Public Relations Officer.
Printing and Photography by Base Photographic & Reproduction
Sect ion.
Art Work by Dept. of Training Drafting Department.
The Tyndall Target receives material supplied by Camp Newspaper
Service, War Dept., 205 E. 42nd St., New York City. Credited Ma-
terial may NOT be republished without prior,permission from CNS.

THIS MUTUAL INVESTMENT OF PATRIOTS

War is expensive and peace was never to be cheaply
bought. If there are still among us those who in-
cline to an opposite view, then truly America's
fears over the decline in her birthrate are ground-
less-for the infants are still with us.
Destiny has plainly marked this nation for her
own, and the role of favorite son while prefer-
ential, is without accompanying grants of legacies.
(But, in instrumenting the American Revolution she
gave to more than a million European colonists the
gift--of America).
The men who boldly affixed their signatures to
the Declaration of Independence were the first Amer-
icans to purchase War Bonds. For they had unreserV-
edly pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their
sacred honor, to the defense of their rights.
And there were men of the kind that Robert Morris
was--who gave unstintedly to the foundling govern-
ment. What could they expect in return? Surely not
interest on their money--for never was principal
more unsafe. Yet they were the first to back the
attack.
There were other wars in the years following the
critical period of the Revolution. Wars in which
the fortunes of the young republic stood at their
lowest ebb, and when seemingly all was lost for want
of enough money with which to buy supplies and pay
troops. But always, in the darkest hour, patriots
came forward with money to back the attack and save
the precious cause.
Back the attack! "I am tired of backing the at-
tack," said one well-intentioned American. Yes,
fellow American, we are all tired--but alive.
Look around you, and see in fallen France and
Poland, those who no longer have an attack to back.
Regard them carefully, fellow American, the faces
of the long hungry..the bodies of the dead.
Their fate will not be ours, fellow American, you
and millions of others like you decided that, when
you bought your first War Bond in the gray days
after Pearl Harbor.
Do you remember that first $18.75 you sent across?
What was your thinking then? "..the government needs/
this money now..in ten years I'll be older..it will
come in handy then.. and so you thought, all
through the second and third 'War loan campaigns, as
you continued to buy the bonds and back the attack.
We have come a long way since then--thanks to the
18.75's. It's no military secret that they built
the planes and turned out the guns that did the big
jobs in the South Pacific and in North Africa and
Sicily. There were casualty lists after those ex-
cursions, but you kept them low.
And now in the little time left before the great-
est attack..the second front..it will again fall to
you, fellow American, to back It. To see the 4th
War Loan strongly through to it's destined end.
On that great day, when the last cannon has roared
and the air grows sweet and clean again..you will
sense in the peace that rises slowly.. the true re-
turn on this mutual investment of patriots.
E. T. D.


ON THE ALERT
JESUSI INJUNCTION TO THE DISCIPLES IN THE GARDEN
OF GETHSEMANE ARE PARTICULARLY APPLICABLE TO MEN IN
THE SERVICE. "WATCH AND PRAY, LEST YE ENTER INTO
TEMPTATION! THESE MEN WERE PUT ON GUARD AND FELL
ASLEEP. I DON'T NEED TO TELL YOU WHAT HAPPENS TO A
SOLDIER WHO FALLS ASLEEP OR IS CAUGHT OFF THE ALERT
ON GUARD. GOD HAS A LAW TOO AND REPEATED OFFENCE
WILL MERIT A COURT MARTIAL MORE SEVERE THAN THAT OF
THE ARMY. GUNNERS WHO ARE NOT CONTINUALLY ON THE
ALERT ARE MOST LIKELY TO BE CASUALTIES, BUT THOSE
WHO ARE NOT SPIRITUALLY ALERT INVITE ETERNAL DEATH.
YOU ARE ON GUARD. "ALWAYS BE ON THE ALERT," SAYS
JESUS. "WATCH AND PRAY LEST YOU ENTER INTO TEMPTA-
TIONL "
Want to be a gunner, mar?
A gunner you can be
If you've a nerve, a steady hand,
An eagle-eye to see
Ere your crafty foe espies
And fills you full of lead.
If he takes you by surprise,
You'll be a gunner dead.

Want to be a gunner, man?
May God help you to be
Out to fell the Devil's clan,
Man's greatest enemy.
Let him take you by surprise,
Or catch you off your guard,
And you'll fall to never'rise,
When from God's help you're barred.

--Chaplain Franklin
SCHEDULE OF SERVICES
PROTESTANT
Sunday
Sunday School at Post Chapel......................... 9:00 A.M.
Worship at Colored Recreation Hall..................9:00 A.M.
Worship at Post Chapel.............. ............. 10:00 A.M.
Worship in "Skunk Hollow" ..................*..... 10:00 A.M.
Evening Worship at Post Chapel ..................... 7:30 P.M.
Tuesday
Fellowship Meeting ................................... 7:30 P.M.
Wednesday
Choir Rehearsal .................................. 7:00 P.M.
CAIHOLIC
Sunday Masses
Post Chapel ..................................8:00 A.M.
Post Theater................................... 10:00 A.M.
Post Chapel..................................11:15 A.M.
Dally Masses..........................................5:30 P.M.
Confessions............................ Saturday, 7:00 P.M.
/ / (and any time the chaplain is in office)
SJEWISH
Worship Service ..............................Friday, 7:30 P.M.


News From Your
East Haddam, Conn. (CNS)-A
local housewife *has managed to
keep her new maid content by
sitting up one night a week with
the maid's baby.
El Paso, Tex. (CNS)-Martha
Raye, large-mouthed movie com-
ediene, has filed suit for divorce
against her third husband, Capt.
Neal Lang, of the Army. She
charges incompatibility.
Hollywood (CNS)-Frank Si-
natra has been requested by his
Beverly Hills hotel to dissuade his
admirers from fainting in the
lobby.
Indiana, Pa. (CNS) -Harry
Turner's auto was stolen. Later
it was recovered by the police. It
had a tank full of gasoline and
there was a guitar on the front
seat.


Own Home Town
Monahans, Tex. (CNS)-A ten-
year-old girl recently gave birth
here to an eight-pound, eight-
ounce son, according to a doctor's
report. The doctor said that the
girl was of average size and
weight for her age.
Mobile, Ala. (CNS)-Mobile has
abandoned its brief experiment of
serving ladies only at state oper-
ated liquor stores. The plan was
discontinued by the Alabama
Alcoholic Beverage Control Board
after a one week trial.
Newark, N. J. (CNS) Like
three of his brothers, Andrew
Jupin, of Newark, has been ar-
rested as a draft evader. The
arrest of Jupin followed that of
his brothers Joseph, Nicholas and
John, who are already serving
five year sentences on conviction
'of dodging the draft.


THE TYNDAL;L TARGET


.Page 2









January 29, 1944 THE TYNDALL TARGET Page 3


TYNDALL MEN MAKE EXCELLENT SHOWING IN
PHYSICAL FITNESS TESTS; 75 PERCENT OF
PERMANENT PARTY IN TOP THREE CLASSES


25th Altitude Makes Best Record With Rating
Of 60; Field's Average Better Than
That of Most Stations
Student gunners and permanent antly higher than tha
party personnel of Tyndall Field ent personnel.
made excellent showings in the "e. The general di
physical fitness tests conducted age of the trainees a
between July 17 and December 31 party personnel is c
last year, according to a report influential factor. "
prepared by Lt. Harbin B. Lawson, The average fitness!
director of physical training, the organizations fol
The report stated that 75 per- 25th...60 349th..5:
cent of the permanent party was 40th...4 350th..5
69th. ..54 446th. 5:
in the "excellent," "very good" 30th ..54 2062nd.5:
and "good" categories. Of the 39th...52 Medics. 5
students, 98.39 percent rated 348th 52 965th. .
the top three classes.
Highest average by permanent LA TE NEWS IA
party organizations was recorded
by the 25th Altitude Training Anio was named as
Unit, which had physical fit- port where Allied
ness rating of 60. Three or- their amphibious 1
ganizations-the 40th, the 69th, week. The Allies occi
and the 30th--tied for second 24 miles wide and 6 n
place with 54. The U.S. State Dep
The average for permanent par- terday suspended al
of oil to Spain.
ty personnel in the three types T Snate is
The Senate is schec
of tests given was 39.6 sit-ups, upon the Lucas-Gret
9 pull-ups and 54.3 seconds for vote bill Monday, whi
the shuttle run, making an aver- is not expected to ta
age physical fitness rating of a similar bill until
52. London underwent i
Officers averaged 46 sit-ups, raid of the war last
8.1 pull-ups, 53.7 seconds for Berlin was again v
the shuttle run, making an aver- R.A.F. early this mo
was reported to be
age rating of 54. raid.
Students, on the average, did- The Admiralty Isl
5B sit-ups, 11 pull-ups, ran the So. pacific were bo
shuttle in 50 seconds and had and Navy planes fo
average ratings of 63. straight day.
Tyndall'spennanentparty show- The Argentine Cat
ing was good compared to the av- ported to have resig
in order to permit F
erages turned in by a group of mirez to choose a 1
other stations. Forty-five per- group.
cent of the Tyndall men were Nazis report that
rated "excellent," compared to are closing in on
18 percent excellentt" for the strongield in the Cr;
other group, 7.73 percent of the
Tyndallites were "very gpod comn-
,ared to 3.78, 65.83 were "good" BASKETB
compared to the other group's 46
percent in the sane category. TON ITE 8
The report said it was "illog-
ical to assume that the physical TORNADOES vs. M
fitness ratings of permanent parr
ty personnel can approach that of
the trainees for the following TUESDAY -
reasons: TORNADOES vs. C
"a. Permanent personnel engage TORNADOES VS. C
in only three hours per week. ( ist Half i nne
"b. Trainees engage in approx- Preliminary Gam
imately six hours per week.
"c. The physical training pro- (See Sports Page
gran for trainees is more intense.
"d. Generally the physical cal- AT THE NEW F
iber of the trainees is predoiin-


T/F BOND-A-HONTH BUYERS
(via the Payroll Deduction Plan)


t of perman-

fference in
nd permanent
e rtainly an

s rating for
lows:


2
2
2
2
2
0


932nd..48
344th..47
907th. .47
308th.. 46
1003rd. 45
Fin....42


BRIEF j


the Italian
troops made
ending last
upy a stretch
il es deep.
artment yes-
1 shipments

duled to vote
en soldiers'
ile the house
ake action on
Tuesday.
ts 700th air
night.
visited by the
rring in what
a very heavy

lands in the
mbed by Army
r the third

bjnet is re-
ned in a body
resident Ra-
ess militant

the Russians'
their last
nea at Kerch.


AI.1,!

P. M.

MARINE ELEC.


8 P.M.

OAST GUARD
r P ayoff)
es at 6P.M.

For Details)

'OST GYM


OUR FRONT COVER
.:;=:::i:: I::::::i Our front cover this week
***** is a timely shot of gunnery
student Pvt. E.C. Thompson of'
1. squadron B, buying a bond from
Sgt. Lovett of the Finance Of-
fice.
This scene is being dupli-
cated all over the country as
servicemen and civilians come
forward to do their share in
putting the 4th War Loan Cam-
paign across.
Pfc. Robert A. Coe took the
picture.


Pfc. Francis McArthur, Glen-
more, La., gunnery student;
purchases a $50 War Bond each
month.


Pvt. Charles Crittenden,
Birmingham, Ala.; purchases a
$25 War Bond each month.


Pvt. Mary Cashnavi, Ernest,
Pa., cook; purchases a $25 War
Bond every payday.


Pvt. Rudolph Schaub, Glen-
dale, N.Y., armorer; buys a
$25 War Bond every payday.
Above are but four of the
many privates on Tyndall Field
who, by purchasing a War Bond
each month, demonstrate that
rank and a large paycheck are
not necessary in order to back
the attack with War Bonds.
Capt. Reed Salley, post War
Bonds officer, announced that
the recent campaign among mil-
itary personnel on this field
resulted in a 10% increase in
bond purchasing through the
payroll deduction plan.
Meanwhile, the field's civ-
ilian employes are being can-
vassed by a group of officers'
wives in order to give every
employee an opportunity to par-
ticipate in the 4th War Loan
drive.


WHAT'S DOING NEXT WEEK

SIvnAY
12:45 P.M.--Musical Recording
Hour, Post Theater, CWO Missal
Commentator.
MONDAY
12:30 P.M...Squadron A&R Repre-
sentative Meeting. Athletic Ofc.
7:00 P.M.--Movies, Station Hos-
pital.
8:30 P.M.--Movies, Receiving Sq.
TUESDAY
8:00 P.M.--Weekly Dance, USO,
8:00 P.M.--Movies, Colored Rec
Hall.
WEDESDAY
12:30 P.M.--Special Service Non-
Com Meeting, Post Library
7:00 P.M.--Protestant Choir Re-
hearsal, Post Chapel.
7:00 P.M.--Weekly Varidty Show,
Receiving Pool.
8:00 P.M.--G.T. Dance, Rec Hall,
Permanent Party Only.
TIhURSDAY
3:30 P.M.--Tyndall Concert Band,
WDLP.
7:00 F.A.--Movies, Hospital.
8:00 P.M.--GI Dance, Rec Hall,
Students Only.
8:00 P.M.--Dance, Colored Rec
H all.
8:30 P.M.--Rec Hall Tonight,
8:30 P.M.--Movies, Receiving Sq.
FRIDAY
7:30 P.M.--Boxing, Receiving Sq.
8:00 j'.M.--Movies, Colored Rec
Hall.
SATURDAY
7:00 F.M.--Movies, Hospital.
8:30 P.M.--Moviee. Receiving Sq.
SEE S.S. BULLETIN BOARD
AT POST EXCHANGE FOR
LATEST ANNOUNCEMENTS


TYNDALL'S BAND HAD
BUSY YEAR
A check on the record reveals
that Tyndall's band has had a
very busy year. Between January
and December 31, 1943, the band
has played a total of 1,175 per-
formances, or more than three
per day for the entire year!
Tyndall's musicians, under the
direction of Cl Joshua Missal,
played for 246 dances; 48 variety
shows; 261 serenade programs fbr
post personnel; 45 graduations;
for eight parades in Panama City;
39 concerts; 30 reviews and guards
of honor; two ship launching;
382 performances, including re-
treats, escorting of gunnery stu-
dents and Christmas caroling,
and more than 0DO other events.


PRESIDENT'S BALL AT D-S
The annual President's Ball
will be held at the Dixie-Shennan
hotel in Panama City Morrday
night, it was announced this
week. The affair, given annually
for the benefit of the fund to
fight infantile paralysis, will
be under the sponsorship of the
Panama City Pilots club.
Music for the dance will be
furnished by Cy Delman and his
or~cestar. Tickets will be $150
per person and may be purchased
in advance at the Dixie-Sherman
or from any member of the Pilots
club.

WACS START NEW RADIO SHOW
Two weekly radio programs to
acq aint the public with the role
the Wacs are playing in this war
are scheduled to begin this week.
The Public Relations Office an-
nounced that the programs are to
emanate from the field over WIIP.
According to present plans the
programs will be heard on Mon-
day mornings, 9:45-10 A.M. and
Thursday evenings froa 8 to 8:15.
Cpl. Doris Crowley of the Tyndall
WAC detachment will produce the
air shows.


January 29, 1944


THE TYNDALL TARGET


Page 3








Pae4TETNALTRE


As I


P.Of. c.


[ IT
IT

NOW AND FOREVER
In a beautifully timed am-
phibious operation, Allied forces
landed on Italy's west coast at
an undisclosed point 30 miles
south of Rome. Allied strategy
may be presumed to be the strad-
dling of both the Appian Way and
the Via Casilina, 10 miles fur-
ther inland. These roads running
north and south are of vital Im-
portance to Field Marshal Albert
Kesselring's army, representing
as they do the German life-line
of supply. Augmenting their ini-
tial landing success against the
already outflanked German defense
lines--the Allied forces pushed
ahead from the Nettino bridgehead
and are now racing inland to seize
the all important Rome roads be-
fore the Nazis can mass in suf-
ficient force to counter attack.
The Allies are lacing the Italian
boot tightly and its effect has
been to throw the Naxis out of
stride. Another few weeks of this
sort of constriction should write
the closing chapter of their cir-
culation.
Just a few months ago, war risk
cargo insurance rates were higher
than the German High Command's
opinion of its undersea craft.
Coincident with an announcement
of a further reduction in insur-
ance rates, was the statement
issued by Air Vice Marshall R.M.
M.S. Saundby, RAF bomber command
deputy chief, 'that U-boats have
largely given up trying to attack
Atlantic convoys.' The men of
England and America 'who go down
to the sea in ships' are resolved
to keep the U-boats on it's bot-
tom--and more than one Wilhelm-
shaven 'cigar' has gone down smok-
ing for a nickels worth of sur-
facing.
Slowly, Leningrad is being wi th-
drawn fror. the infirm grip of the
Nazis and the attenuation of the
far North Ring of the Nibelung is
proceeding. Hourly under the
pulverizing assault cf the surg-
ing Soviets, Teuton strength is
waning and the tide of battle is
at ebb for the weary Hitlerites.
Almost literally speaking, the
German siege army of Leningrad is
within an ell's length of com-
plete encirclement. The Soviet's
trap has been carefully set, the
area of the snare is being stead-
ily reduced by the hunters, and
it remains only for the prey to
come afoul of the gleaming jaws.
For when better mouse-traps are
built--Nazidom's rats will surely
beat a path to the door of the
maker.
Earlier this week 51 planes
sporting the insignia of the slow-
ly Rising Sun fell out of the,
skies over Wewak and Rabaul to
risenomore. This partial eclipse
of the Rising Sun should not be
confused with the predicted solar
eclipse which will shortly be
visible to watchers in the South
Facific. Shooting the Rising Sun
has become a favorite practice of
Allied gunners who prefer a Cal,
50 machine gun to a sextant in
this delicate navigational oper-
ation. And their skill in 'dead
reckoning' is without challenge
by the steadily mounting lists of
Japanese dead.


MY FAVORITE PHOTO


This photo of Maj. Gen. Claire L. Chennault, commanding
general of the 14th U.S. Army Air Force, is the favorite of
Wac Pvt. Alta Chennault Moore, a second cousin of the general
of Flying Tiger fame.
It came to her in a Christmas card a few days ago from
"somewhere in China. "
Pvt. Moore's grandfather was a brother of General Chen-
nault's father. She is on duty in the post library here.
Her home is in Miami.
The general's Christmas card bore on the outside the tiger
emblem of the 14th Air Force. Inside were printed pictures
of Chinese scenes and the words "Greetings From Somewhere in
China. "
Oddly enough, the censor's stamp on the outside of the
general's envelope bore the signature of a lowly second lieu-
tenant.


Excessive Prices

For Train Food

Gouge Soldiers
By Camp Newspaper Service
Because the Restaurant Price
Branch of the Office of Price Ad-
ministration has received many
complaints from servicemen, par-
ticularly in the South and West,
about overcharges for beverages
and sandwiches sold by train
peddlers, moves have been made
to correct these abuses.
Soldiers, according to the OPA,
have been objecting to paying
25c for a ham sandwich and an-
other two bits for coffee-or milk.
Candy bars, they report, fre-
quently cost 15 or 20.
The OPA has published ceiling
prices on all these food and drink
items and railroads are required
to adhere to them. If the train
peddlers ignore the ceilings they
are liable to arrest by an MP or
a civilian policeman. Turn'em in.
The OPA ceiling on sand-
wiches sold in day coaches is 150.
A cup of coffee, a bottle of milk or
a coke should cost a dime. Dough-
nuts and cookies should sell two
for 10e and pies and cookies
shouldn't cost more than a dime
either. The ceiling on chocolate
bars, fruits and potato chips is
also a dime.
If a proprietor sells some par-
ticular type of sandwich at a
price higher than 15 or ice cream
at more than 100 he may con-
tinue to do so provided that the
price is plainly marked on the
wrapper and is identified as an
OPA ceiling price.
Servicemen have been urged
to report all instances of viola-
tions to MPs on the trains. The
report should state the badge
number of the peddler, the train
number, date and items sold at
prices in excess of the ceilings.


Soldiers Invent

Better Ways to

Lick the Enemy
England (CNS)-Soldiers of an
American Air Service Command
here are an ingenious bunch of
GIs.
Take S/Sgt. Robert Hammel,
for instance. Hammel, a mechanic
from Pittsburgh, figured that a lot
of time was being wasted in pol-
ishing the booster coils of bomber
engines. So he devised a 3-way
tool and fitted it to a drill press,
making a power-driven polisher.
Another inventive GI, accord-
ing to the Stars and Stripes, is
S/Sgt. Arnold Bruns who
dreamed up a new way of filling
oxygen tanks. This operation used
to be performed by two men
working a pressure gauge and a
hose. Bruns built an oxygen cart
that would carry two cylinders
of oxygen instead of one. Then
he moved the gauge closer to the
cart so that one man could work it.
Then there is S/Sgt. Felix
Zbikowcki of Milwaukee who in-
vented a special punch which en-
ables plane workers to mark the
center of a rivet head that is to be
drilled out for repairs. The punch
makes a small hole in the exact
center of the rivet thus making it
simple to place a drill there and
ream out the old rivets.
S/Sgt. Russell Schick of Cleve-
land recently started to wonder
about difficiencies in gun sights
which were not adjustable for
long-range firing according tc
some pilots. Schick invented a new
adjustable ring and post sight for
a certain type of gun. Now-with
the aid of his invention-gunners
may adjust their sights for vir-
tually any range within the hit-
ting power of bullets.
Just call it "GIngenuity."


Along The1e


L Main Stem

Gala President's Birthday Party
programs on air tonight and to-
morrow .. MBShow "America Sa-
lutes the President" with Hope,
Sinatra, Shore, Pons, Langford
and Whiteman, tonight 11:15-
12:15 .. The Escorts and Betty,
NBC stars, appeared on a Bond
Rally in Buffalo on the 23rd, an-
nounces NCAC .. They have recent-
ly appeared oh the Kate Smith
show .. .. .. Van Johnson will
portray Lt. Ted Lawson in MGM's
"Thirty Seconds over Tokio" ..
He was recently in "A Guy Named
Joe" .. .. .. Laird Cregar guest-
ed with Kate Smith last night .,
Her CBShow Is WWL'd Fridays at 7.
Marjorie Reynolds will become a
redhead in Paramount's Technicol-
or musical 'Bring on the Girls'
.. Sonny Tufts and Eddie Bracken
are themale leads .. .... Guest-
ing on Fred Allen's last Sunday-
eve WWL show was Jimmie Durante
.. And, of course, the inimitable
Umbriage .... .. Jean Parker re-
turns from 3-months personal ap-
pearance tour to co-star in 'One
Body Too Many' .. Jack HeaAy will
share the limelight in the film
.. .... Dale Carnegie's 'Little
Known Facts About Well-Known
People,' MBS-ed Thursdays, hon-
ored Josef Stalin recently .. The
moustached Red leader has had an
interesting political career ..
.. .. Wally Brown, describing his
nightclub to Dinah Shore, re-
marks: 'We have a chorus of 60.
Of course, some of the girls are
a little younger.'
Dorothy Lamour will star in
"Princess on the Warpath" for
Paramount .. Buddy DeSylva will
direct ...... Lionel Barrymore
lover roasted turnips .. A deli-
cacy cooked like the Old Romans
used to do it .. .... We thought
"Cry Havoc' was a great movie ..
Margaret Sullivan superb, as
u sual.


While some programs seem to
wear out their welcome, others
gain favor with each broadcast,
winning permanent places on your
listening schedule. "Basin St.,"
over the BLUE, is the habit-
forming kind. Georgia Gibbs, love-
ly vocalist, is this week's guest.

Frank Sinatra has purchased the
contract of his fighter friend
Tami Mauriello for 10 grand ..
Frank used to be an amateur
fighter himself, you know .. .,
.. For an entirely different ra-
dio show, give a listen to the
Blue's 'Blind Date' show .. Ar-
line Francis serves as emcee on
the hilarious show.


Page 4


THE TYNDAIL TARGET









Jatiuary 29, 1944 THE TYNDALL TARGE~ Page 5


QUESTION: "VWAT IS THE GREATEST
CHANGE THAT HAS TAKEN PLACE ON
TYNDALL FIELD SINCE YOUR ARRIVAL?
(ASKED OF,'OLD TIMERS")
Interviews and Photos
By PFC. R0BERT A. ODE


T/SGI. JOHE 9. MIICIELL, Post
Photo Section: "Many great
changes have taken place here
during the past two years, but I
believe the field beautification
program under Capt. Brunner has
brought about the biggest change. "


-- Squadron E --
Men Busy Building City

Of Tents; Sqdn. Gunner

Wins Prize For Speed
If, per chance, you have been in
the vicinity of squadron E recent-
ly, undoubtedly you would have ob-
served the "busy as a bee" atti-
tude of the men there, industri-
ously constructing the new homes
commonly known as "Tent City, in
which many or the students are now
making their quarters. They are
not proud, and in this case, cir-
cumstances alter cases. It can be
said, however, that these new
homes are a safe and clean place
to live in like the barracks, for
the students are seeing to that.
Coach Leith reveals that the
basketball team got off to a bad
start by losing, 36-26, to squad-
ron C in the first game of the
season. We do not like to make
excuses, but it was not until a
few minutes before the game that
Leith actually knew who the fifth
man on the team would be.
In regards to class 44-5, just
having returned from Apalachicola,
we find something of particular
interest; one of the-men in that
class completely dis-assembled and
assembled the 50 cal. machine gun
in a record time of 3 minutes and
30 seconds, winning himself a
prize of $25. Nice going, sold-
ier.
This week marks the completion
of school here at Tyndall Field
for all those in class 44-5, and
we wish the best of luck to you
all at whatever you may encounter
in the future. --SNAFT


-- White Flashes --
Squadron Orientation

Lectures Improved By

Use of P.A. System
Lt Goldstein and Cpl. Hardin
deserve a lot of credit for the
fine manner in which the orienta-
tion lectures are given every
Monday night The public address
system proved to be a success
Monday and it seems as though
most of the fellows really enjoy
attending these lectures.
Pfc. Koury, who got in his P.T.
too late last Saturday to get
credit for it, would like to ad-
vise the rest of us that taking it
during the early part of the week
is much better and far more easier
than taking it on Sunday at the
Number 1 area.
It is a mystery how Pfc. Deu-
ward Curry can bang that car of
his around like he does and still
live. It might be that he has
nine lives.
Most of the boys who had two
sheets on their bed cheerfully
turned in one of them but a few
fellows are afraid they' re going
to find it hard getting into a
short sheeted bed late Saturday
night or early Sunday morning
after enjoying an evening in one
of Panama City's night clubs.
We are all anxious to see how
our basketball team turns out.
If it is as good as our bowling
team, it will be a hard team to
beat as our bowling squad still
holds the lead over the other
teams in the inter-squadron
league.
-Sgt. C.A. Mat?


CPL. JAMES A. YAfERS, Post Office:
"Undoubtedly one of the greatest
changes to take-place on this
field in the past twelve months
has been the improvement in re-
creation facilities."


r/SGT. IPRED V. GILMORE, Supply
Maintenance: "From the stand-
point of quantity, the greatest
change on Tyndall Field has been
its personnel. For the past half
year it's been a case of 'Hello'
and 'Goodbye. '"


P7I. JOBS H. YOUNG, Mess Squad-
ron: "Since food plays such an
important part in building morale,
I believe the change to Field
'Rations and the subsequent 'dol-
ing out' procedure has had a
great effect on the enlisted men
of the field."


T/3GT. RPRBBRT ANDERSON, F ir..ne:
"Most of the old timers will back
me up ihen I say that the major
change on this field has been the
'evolution' of P.I."


1-Aleutian spot
becoming hot
for Japs


2-Kind of room
hard to find in
neighboring


By S/Sgt. Ray Crow
Reprinted from the Ft. Wood (Mo.) News


FREE DANCING LESSONS

TO VOLUNTEERS FOR

GI ENTERTAINMENTS
Plans for presenting a musical
show at Tyndall Field within the
next two months--using Tyndall
Field civilian personnel and G.I.
talent--are being made by the
Special Service Office.
A call for dancers who may wish
to take part in the show was
issued this week.
Max H. Barton, civilian employee
of the fire department, who was
a dancing teacher fr seven years,
has volunteered to give free
adagio, ballroom and acrobatic
dancing lessons to personnel de-
siring to participate in the
program.
Lessons are being given in the
administration building at Tyn-
dall Homes.
Anyone-maleor female, civilian
or military-wishing to take les-
sons in preparation fbr the show
may telephone Barton at 2133 to
make arrangements.
It is planned to have singers
and other talented personnel take
part in the musical event, which
is to be produced in conjunction
with the T/F band.
Enlisted men or officers with
talent who wish to volunteer
their services for entertainments
on the field are requested to
turn their names in to the Spe-
cial Service Office. 'A number
of entertainments are being plan-
ned for the coming months and a
large variety of talent is needed
to insure their success.

-- Squadron B --
Veteran Of 40 Missions

In Mediterranean Area

Joins Squadron
Although the results of the in-
spection last week was not good,
Squadron B promises to have the
"E" flag at the next inspection.
Let's not have another 57 on in-
spection.
Our basketball tean, which has
Rager and Regan as forwards, Cas-
anova as center, Ginger and Grant
as guards, defeated Squadron "C"
Sunday by a score of 46 to 28.
Nice going men.
T/Sgt. James H. Cox, a student
of 44-9, recently returned from
combat. He was with a B-26 out-
fit and during the invasion of
North Africa, Sicily and Italy
piled up forty (40) missions to
his credit. Sgt. Cox wears one
silver, and two bronze clusters
He is twenty-four years old
and comes from Natchitocher, La.
Sgt. Cox is to be stationed at
this field upon completion of
school. We will be happy to have
you with us and good luck, Cox.
Lt. E.S. Justice is back with
us again after a well earned
leave. Sgt. 3Bcker has a new
member in his family now-a boyl
Cpl. Deamus has left on .frlough.
Gone to the great White Way and
hopes to get married.
-Sgt. E.C. Cogswe]3

"Target' Back Issues
Available At Library
A large supply of back issues
of the Tyndall Target has been
turned over to the Post Librar-
ian for file purposes and also
fbr distribution to military per-
sonnel *ho are saving their Tar-
gets. A limited number of early
issues of the paper can be ob-
tained from the Target office if
the library supply is exhausted.
There Is no charge for the pa-
pers.


Page 5


Jah~uary 29, 1944


THE TYNDALZL TARGET








Pare 6


N EWSFROM THE
N.EWS6


SON OF FAMED TEXAS GOVERNORS, "MA" AND "PA"


--Instructors Squadron--
Solomon Becomes Dad;


FERGUSON, ARRIVES HERE FOR GUNNERY TRAINING Gibbs Runs Table;


Pvt. Truman E Ferguson, son
of "MA" and "PA" FERGUSON,
former governors of the state
of Texas, recently was assign-
ed to Tyndall Field for.aerial
gunnery training.
Young Ferguson entered the
the service in December, 1942,
as an aviation cadet. At the
time of his induction he was a
student at Texas University
where he was majoring in pre-
law.
Following his elimination
from pilot training, Pvt. Fer-
guson was sent to Lowry Field
for armament schooling. After
his graduation from gunnery
school here he hopes to be ac-
cepted for the Armament O.C.S.
When asked about post-war
plans, Ferguson repl ied that
he intends to return to school
and get his law degree.
His mother, Miram ("Ma")
Ferguson became the first fe-
male governor in the country
when the people of Texas elect-
ed has as their head in 1927.
At the conclusion of her. two
year term, Texans gave the
Fergusons a vote of confidence
by electing Jim Ferguson to
the gubernatorial position,
and then, in 1930, re-elected
"Ma" to the capital at Austin.
Although his parents have


PVT. TRUMAN E. FERGUSON
now retired from public life
and are devoting all their
time to their ranch, Pvt. Fer-
guson vividly recalls the ex-
citement and experiences that
go along with being the son of
a governor, whether it be your
mother or your dad. Among the
more famous personages he has
met were Will Rogers and a
former President of Mexico.
Also, he shares the friendship
of Texas' famed Congressional
pair, Representative Sam Ray-
burn, Speaker of the House,
and Senator Tom Connally,
chairman of the Foreign Re-
lations Committee.


--Cadet Detachment--
CADETS TICKLED PINK WITH P.T. PROGRAM
CHALLENGE CANARIES OF OTHER SQUADRONS


It is pure folly to introduce
110 characters like the cadets of
Class 44-8 without a master of
ceremonies but then, this column
is fully folly.
All of us took a crack at being
wild blue yonder boys. After an
average eleven months of A.A.F.
training and a rest cure from
pilot training shock, we arrived
at Tyndall to discover that G.I.
scalpings and Maxwell discipline
were not unfashionable customs.
One of the more delightful
things about Tyndall Field is its
varied P.T. progra--we don' t run
the obstacle course on Sundays;
it gives em a chance to wipe off
the blood. Seriously, we don' t
object to the P.T. program but
it's about time to quit showing
us that second reel of the "Battle
of Russia "
We want everyone to notice where
that big blue banner is staked
out this week. They tell us that
the "E" award rarely adorns the
Cadet Detachment. Only yesterday
a Naval officer dropped in with a
contract for 3,000 gross of roll-
er bearings.
Re-classified for bombardier
training, we gadgets of 44-8 are
well award of the importance of
aerial gunnery to our future corr-
bat job in the "greenhouse. "
Tyndall's new cadet course is a
rough and eager one--those who
doubt are invited to watch our
tour line go by. We will wear
our winged bullets with genuine


pride until bombardier's wings
replace them.
There's a new song about the
streets of Tyndall which we real-
ly want to sing, but all we've
heard is the refrain as we march
by the other squadrons. It goes
something like "the raggedy bot-
tomed cadets are on parade. Let
us hear the other lyrics, boys,
and we'll show you how to sing it.
Speaking of song; we may have
some doubts about being the best
gunners to leave Tyndall, but
there's no outfit in the Army
which will be able to stand up to
us when it comes to singing
"Ohio. Who is the local brass-
hat that spent his kollitch days
in Columbus, anyway?


'Before we dine boys, meet my
wife--and get those foolish
notions out of you head:'


Bryant Recoils

First of all, we extena our
heartiest congratulations to Sgt.
Solomon who became the father of
an eight pound baby girl this
week. Both mother and daughter
doing fine...S/Sgt. Bast, a big
wheel at the Weapons Dept., spent
half an hour the other day look-
ing for a very important memo he
spent half a day compiling. He
finally found it. Someone filed
it in the G.I. can just outside
the Weapons Dept.
Old Dead-eye Gibbs walked in on
a game of eight ball the other
day, looked the situation over,
picked up a cue stick, and polite-
ly ran the table ending the game.
Also known as a tough one to lose.
Saw Sgt. Bryant field-strip a
45 Automatic and when he replaced
the recoil spring and recoil
spring plug his finger slipped.
Oh well, 35 feet isn' t too far to
chase a recoil spring coil.
Got a good look at Sgt. Gary
spending a three-day pass chop-
ping stove wood. Closest Gary
has come to working in three
years. Look out Gary, sometimes
those things become habit form-
ing.
Last seen trudging down the
road was the instructors squadron
en mass spending a quiet evening
watching an incendiary demon-
stration. Someone said that they
were all burned up. Must have
been anger, huh?
Our squadron basketball team
went into battle for the first
time Monday nite. Overheard one
of the players say that even if
they didn' t win all of their games-
they sure looked good in their
uniforms. Well, if you don' t win
all of them fellows, don' t feel
bad. Remember even Notre Dame


KNOW YOUR ENEMYI


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Is!!4ug aql s,| ig 0 N 1O JON -a a q4 sr, ii 'ON JD ea0!


THE TYNDALL TARGET


Paee 6


-- Squadron D --
NEW SQUADRON SIGNS ARE
COMPLETED; CLAIM SGT.
DUFRANE IS IN DAZE

Well, this week sees our new
squadron signs being put up in
front of each of the barracks and
they sure look swell. Our squad-
ron commander had to work the
swing shift to get them completed,
working part days and part nights,
but the signs show that the work
was done very well.
SISgt. Smith and Pfc. Quick have
begun to follow in the footsteps
of S/Sgt. Snowden in their basket-
ball careers. Monday night they
played for the Instructor' s Squad-
ron, which lost their game with
the Finance squad, but still and
all they played their hearts out.
I see where Sgt. Dufrane's mind
seems to be running along the
Michigan border right now. Any-
way he received a telephone call
Monday night from way up there and
seems to be walking around with a
crowd of question marks above his
head.
If Cpl. Reed doesn' t keep away
from those meals he receives in
town he' s going to end up Mister
5 by % no kidding.
If there is anyone who wants to
have pictures put on their en-
velopes before they send them
home, just come to Squadron D and
see Pfc. Montague, he' s the ori-
ginal joker for such things as
that.

lost a game last season.
Cpl. Bennet really got a break
when Muggsy, the red cocker span-
iel, left the squadron. Everyone
was having trouble telling red-
headed Bennet from Muggsy. I
never had any trouble. Muggsy
was the one with the pretty ears.
Well, let' s not over do a good
thing.
-Sgt. Harvey Wine








Jaur 29 94TETNAL AGrPg


,ONE WEEK OF THE WAR4


The war this week has been
marked by violent Allied at-
tacks on two major fronts.
In Italy, a powerful Allied
force landed behind the Gennan
"winter line" at a point on
the west coast about 25 miles
south of Rome. Enemy sources
estimate the size of the land-
ing party at 50,000 men, and
concede that it already has
seized Nettuno, Littoria, Ap-
rilia and Velletri--all of
which are on or near the coast
south of Rome, but well to the
north of the German defense
line across the Italian pen-
insula.
The surprise attack already
has cut the main coastal rail-
road and highway supplying
German forces to the south,
and may well force the Nazis
to withdraw from their so-
called "winter line." Tn that
case, Rome would quickly fall
to Allied troops, and the next
Gennan defense line would be
established somewhere to the
north of the Italian capital.
However, Allied commanders
frankly declare that a power-
ful German counter-attack is
expected. On Monday and Tues-
day, fierce Nazi assaults com-
pelled Allied forces to with-
draw from some of their pos-
itions before Cassino, key
city on the German "winter
line." By Wednesday, these
attacks were diminishing, and
it seemed clear that Nazi Feld
Marshal von Kesselring was
withdrawing as many troops as
possible from the "winter
line" to deal a heavy blow
against the new Allied beach-
head in his rear. By mid-week,
the Germans were withdrawing
from Cassino.
However, the most critical
phase of any amphibious ex-
pedition is always in the in-
itial landing (as in the case
of Salerno) and this phase is
now over for the Allied troops
in the beach-head south of
Rome. In fact, the original
landings were made with prac-
tically no opposition, and the
Allied forces are now better
prepared to meet the counter-
attack when it comes, however
fierce it-may be.
*
In Russia this week, the Red
Army completely lifted the 2J-


year siege of Leningrad, Rus-
sia's second largest city, with
powerful drives that forced
back the Nazis south and east
of the besieged fortress.
Simultaneously, other Soviet
attacks 'ere in progress fur-
ther to the south. West of
Novgorod, a Bussian attack had
cut the main Leningrad-Vitebsk
railway, an important link in
German lateral communications
along the front.
South of the Pripet Marshes
in the central sector of the
front, Red Army troops of Gen-
erals Vatutin and Rokossovsky
had crossed the border into
pre-war Pol and, and are threat-
ening the supply lines of Ger-
man forces still in the bend
of the IDieper River.
The Germans are making no
pretense of the fact that their
situation in Russia is critic-
al. Question of the year: If
the Germans can not hold back
the Russians, what chance do
they have of holding back two
million additional British and
American troops when they land
in western Eirope?

*
It was a busy week for the
Allied air forces, too. Eur-
ope received another pasting
from British and American
bombers, which concentrated
their high explosives on the
heavily fortified "invasion
coast" of Europe. A week ago
Berlin was pounded with 2,500
tons of TNT, dropped at the
rate of 100 tons a minute for
almost half an hour.
In the Pacific, American
heavy bombers carried out pow-
erful new attacks on Paramu-
shiro, great Japanese base in
the Kurile Isl ands, northeast
of Japan. And other bombers
were dealing repeated blows at
the Japanese-held Marshall
Islands, in the western Pa-
cific just south of the Equat-
or.
There were indications that
the attacks on the Marshalls
might be a prelude to a land
assault on this important is-
land group. Late last year,
American marines seized the
Gilbert Islands from Japan--
and the Gilberts lie just to
the southeast of the Marsh-
alls.


`L- -7- 1PETRA1CA,DESPITE WARNINGS F2OM\ FELLOW SOLDIER
g, *-WENT TO AID MORTAR FRAGMENT CASUALTY..OVE2 CEEST
OF P IILL HE WAS FATALLY WOUNDED BY MORTAR FIRE.


8th Air Force
Destroyed 4,100
Planes in 1943
By Camp Newspaper Service
A dramatic report on the
Growth and accomplishments of
the British-based U. S. Eighth Air
Force was given in a transatlantic
radio broadcast recently by Lt.
Gen. Ira C. Eaker, the Eighth's
commander during 1943.
Gen. Eaker, who now has com-
mand of Allied Air Forces in the
Mediterranean, told his listeners
that in 64,000 offensive sorties
over Europe during 1943, the
Eighth Air Force dropped 55,000
Stones of bombs, destroyed 4,100
Nazi fighters, slashed German
fighter plane production by al-
most 40 per cent and escaped with
an over-all loss in heavy bombers
of less than four per cent.
Bombers of the Eighth have
penetrated as deeply as 800 miles
into the heart of Germany and
U. S. fighters have destroyed the
best the Luftwaffe could send into
the air, the general said. In De-
cember, the Eighth broke all rec-
ords for the weight of its offen-
sive against the Germans in the
west, he added.'
This massive assault provides a
striking contrast to the first
American raid on the continent
from England, last Jan. 27, when
the Eighth managed to send 53
Flying Fortresses over Wilhelm-
shaven. At that time the Eighth's
entire strength was about 100
planes. Today the Eighth is
strong enough to send 1,500
planes into Adolf Hitler's Fortress
Europe at once.
Summaries for 1943 were re-


I LIFVER


BEFORE CROSSING wire entangle-
ments examine them as closely as
possible for anti-personnel mines
which would warn the enemy of your


WHEN CRAWLING close to the
enemy at night move carefully and
cautiously. Feel the ground ahead of you
before each movement to be certain you
will not hit anything which will reveal
your presence.

Wacs May Follow
Invasion Force
London (CNS)-There is an
excellent chance, says Col. Oveta
Culp Hobby, that Wacs will be
sent to the European continent
after Allied forces have estab-
lished their lines. The Wacs may
take part in the rehabilitation of
Europe, she added.

leased as follows:
Fortresses and Liberators
dropped 34,976 tons of bombs and
U. S. medium bombers dropped
another 20,024 tons. Altogether
the Eighth destroyed 4,100 Ger-
man fighters and damaged 1,821
others.


January 29, 1944


Page 7


THE TYNDALL TARGET






P--e 8 THE TYNDALL TARGET


With War-Won Wings


"For I dipt into the future, far as human eye could see,
Saw the Vision of the world, and all the wonder that would be;
Saw the heavens fill with commerce, argosies of magic sails,
Pilots of the purple twilight, dropping down with costly bales;
Heard the heavens fill with shouting, and there rain'd a ghastly dew
From the nations' airy navies grappling in the central blue."
-Tennyson.
He who wrote these lines a century ago was more than
a poet-he was a prophet. In a day when the steamship
was still a marvel he envisioned the marvels of modern air
transportation.
He foresaw too that freedom of the airlines would
someday be threatened, as were once the ocean routes, by
savage pirate nations that the heavens he pictured as
alive with commerce would swarm instead with winged
killers that the airborne bales of peacetime would be
replaced by cargoes of destruction.
Men of the Army Air Forces, it is you and your com-
rades of the "airy navies" of all the United Nations who
are filling the heavens with shouting. Your guns will hunt
the killers from the skies. Your bombs will find the bar-
barous cargoes' source. Your brave white star will be the
morningstar of tomorrow's brighter world.
Already the sky pirates reel back across the high
frontiers. The heavens above Africa have been freed.
And those other skies of Europe China .
the Indies their turn will come.
You of the aircrews shall make possible all the wonders
of the commerce-teeming heavens Yes, and with your
war-won wings you shall pilot those "magic sails" to the
far corners of a peacetime world.

From the Laredo Army Air Base 'Cactus'
Furnished by Special Service for use on Orientation Bulletin Board


Pa.e R


TIIE TPhTDBCL TARGET








January 29, 1944

-- Band Box --
Jap Outer Ring Defense

Discussed; W/O Missal

Post Singing Officer


THE TYNDALL TARGF1'


Having taken up the invasion of
Germany from all possible angles
the week before, the Band last
week turned its attention toward
the defeat of the enemy in the
Far East. Again under the super-
vision of Capt. Freeman and Lt.
Rusher of the Special Service Of-
fice, the discussions this time
entered on the breaking down of
apan' s outer ring of defenses.
Various theories and ideas of at-
tack were discussed; even the book
written by Major Siversky, "Vic-
tory Thru Air Power, was men-
tioned. In the future, now that
the picture of how things look
all over the world has been cov-
ered, the happenings of the week
and their significance will be
discussed at these weekly Orient-
ation meetings.
CWO Missal returns today to
find in addition to his other
duties, he's now Post Singing
Officer. He's been on a well-
earned leave of absence out West.
For the benefit of those that
haven' t noted the Dance Band too
closely lately, it might be well
to state at this point that there
re two dance bands now. One
plays the Rec Hall on Wednesday
nights and the other plays the
same spot on Thursday night. You
be listening and we'll be looking
for you then.
Cpl. Stein

-- Medi cs --
PT Camouflages D.T.'S;

"Mac" Strays; Butch

Gets Gift
Our most recent addition to
Apalachicola already has solved
the transportation problem in
order to be near the little woman
over the weekends. He foolishly
admitted to me that he' s deliv-
ering newspapers on a suburban
route that pays for his trans-
portation back to camp.
It's nice to see so many men
it for PT nowadays--but it is
.ore difficult now to ascertain
whether the PT is responsible for
their beaten up looks-or whether
they have yet to recover from
Last night's hangovers.
Pvt. Rickenbrode was sadly
missed the other night by the men
in his immediate vicinity. They
all agreed that it wasn't like
home with Rick unheard from--but
Rick insists that it was more
like home than they could ever
imagine.
Those playful little taps on
the shoulders of PFC. Sapp by
VAC Fountain have a far greater
meaning than just "brushing off
flies. And speaking of the WAC
influence on our happy little
home--I'm told that McDermott
ow spends more time at the WAC
ayroom than in our own barracks.
Butch Pellerin received a most
appropriate gift the other day.
Prior to our departure to the
"Isle of Guadalcanal" he re-
ceives a foxhole cushion that is
supposed to "ease the pain. "
(Should no Butchers be called to
overseas duty again though we'll
give you a more appropriate place
where that little gift will come
in mighty handy.)
That was an amazing deal that
John E. McGinnis, financial ad-
visor for the Tidwell-Gagnard
estate, made in Mobile not so
long ago. At this writing, Tid-
well has an awful headache--Gag-
nard is a patient in his own


Becomes *Ace"
We have seen quite a few changes
in our squadron in the past two
weeks. The "welcome" mat has
been thrown out to all new mem-
bers of our outfit.
I'm sure everyone was sorry to
see Lt. Murphy transferred. We
wish him much luck in his new
assignment. Major Carnahan will
conduct our regular Friday night
"get-to- gethers. "
The basketball team, under the
supervision of lst/Sgt. Heidema,
got underway this week, and met
their first opponent. From the
looks of things in general, con-
cerning the team, we should be
victorious. We hope!
T/Sgt. Moore of the Aircraft
Rec Dept., has left us for Apala-
chicola. Replacing him will be
our "good buddy" S/Sgt. Mullins,
who has just returned from there.
We also Welcome a newcomer to
the Dept., Pfc. Oakley.
The Sighting Dept. haslost some
of its men to the Jam Handy or-
organization, and we do mean you,
Sgts. Hagan and Mooney. Speaking
about the Dept. "we all love, a
new fangled contraption that re-
cords hits and rounds fired has
been added, and Pfc. Kobriger has
been crowned "ace" since he has
demolished so many Jap and Nazi
planes on the screen. Definitely
combat material!


ward--and even poor McGinnis has
not been in the best of health.
It's amazing how such financial
wizardry was overlooked by the
Washington overlords.
News this week is very scarce.
All the boys are staying in
nights and trying to win a game
of checkers--of all things--from
Brother McAmis. To date we've
had no luck. It's my bet that
the Allies will be in Berlin be-
fore old Mac drops a game.
--Sgt. A.S. Jackrel


Concentrates On Curves
Down lower Minnesota Avenoo
way: Culprits Holloway, Cale and
the Sack (origin unknown) were
going to beat the line-up at chow
after retreat. Circumventing the
whole Wac area, standing a pri-
vate retreat formation of their
own, and then creeping commando
style and stomach turtle-wise be-
hind the formation, they reached
the mess hall door. Via the in-
ter-com system, Chief Mess Hall
Whipcracker Mary Lee sez (oh hor-
rible quote-) "Cale, Holloway and
Sack will stand at the end of the
chow line. More Wacs than seemed
possible appeared. And the three
sweated out each and every Wac.
From now on they will stand in
regular formation or walk bland-
ly out the front door a la Cozens
style or ostrich style a la Hed-
lund and Bowen. No more will be
said as 'twill only lead to
bloodshed.
Intellectucil Sgt. Cagle has a
huge volume on the painless re-
moval of excess avoirdupois and
she's really knocking .herself out
in the matter. She spends hours
all curled up in her bunk reading
of the various exercises, foods,
calories, etc. Anything partic7
ularly interesting or vital is
relayed over to Diers--also
perched at ease on her bunk. They
hash over the various exercises
recommended--from their bunks.
Reports are that Cagle's eye
muscles are really trimmed down.
And from shifting the volume from
right hand to left and turning
pages, many hand and arm muscles
are probably involved.
The swift demolition of food as
sent to Jean Amundson was the
mission for several chow hounds.
Connected with the project were
Jacobs and pickles, Perry and
olives, Matson and raw onions,
Fox and cheese crackers, Howard
and cookies, Coburn and Polish
sausage, Kolinsky and minced tur-
key, assorted Wacs, smoked her-
ring, and others.
Lt. Kathleen Shott didn't re-
alize she was being slighted. She
didn' t know she hadn't put in her


Page 9


J 'ACCUSE or Pass the

Biscuits Pappy we only

get one slice of bread
By PFC. GAWDHELPUS
Because of a night I spent
locked in a library, I have been
acting peculiar even considering
the tolerant standards of the
Waller Trainer. I was walking
through the PX wearing a handful
of steel wool fastened to my chin
with chewing gum, when I met a
young lady. She hailed me and
invited me to sit down and join
her in a bowl of Borscht.
"You must be someone I know"
she said "Because all the men I
work with are nuttier than fruit
cakes or left-handed baseball
players. "True, said I, "Sad
but true. I am old Gawdhelpus
himself and I wear this Bernard
Shaw spinach because on me it
looks good and besides I don't
want people walking up and con-
soling me. "Why should they do
that, said she, showing the usual
Wac lack of perception. "Because
the old Waller Trainer has gone
to pot, Myrtle. It has fallen on
evil days as any fool can plainly
see, even a person from Scramton,
Pa., can see. "
I wept for a while in my Bor-
scht and continued, "all my lit-
tle chums have been shipped out
even Runkle the Golden has been
shipped back to the states. Sgt.
Boyes and George are no more...
Hornack, Sciacca, Whiteman, Rita
Mersili have been sold down the
river. Moore the lovely Texan,
nacNamara and Butch Rishel...
"What about them, said the
gentle Myrtle, "were they shot
down in flames?" "Worse than
that," I moaned, wiping my eyes
with my fatigue hat, "they have
been sent to work down on the
line. "Now," I continued, "some-
one thinks we are a bunch of Welch
miners and that we can sing."
Sgt. Henderson (old blood and
film) thinks Namendorf is Frank
Sinatra and can lead us..this is
the severest blow to American
morale since Pearl Harbor. "Well"
said Myrtl e, "look at the Rus-
sians, they sing all the time.
Are you any better than the Red
Army?" I transfixed her with a
look full of daggers (Daggers,
steel M1) "That is propaganda
about the singing Russians. The
only Russian I know is Al Koplow-
itz and he sings worse than George
Kurchen. ". "Well, T. S. or Terribly
Sorry as we used to say in the
I.R.A.," said Myrtle as she rose
to leave. "Box, ole chum," I im-
plored as I grabbed her arm, "pay
for the Borseht and have them
send over a bottle of Vodka on
you. I played cards with Connie
Romerman last week and I haven't
a bean in my jeans."


appearance in THE column. She
has bravely carried on in spite
of the neglect. She hails from
Fall River, Mass., and was a bac-
teriologist; also studied aerial
photography. By the time inhab-
itants of the Wac Shack found out
why the area was so peaceful, se-
rene, quiet and stuff, the reason
therefore had returned. or. Sgt.
Pickett went and came back on and
from a 3-day pass. And, growl,
growl, the glint in her eye' (The
one usually reserved for glower-
ing.) Participants in the revel-
ry (not to be mistaken for rev-
eille) were the coal dust twins,
Eicher and Riker.
Waal, snuff out the lantern,
remove calloused palms from the
handle and lay that shovel down
for the week. Regards from the
--Wac Shack Sad Sack.


THE TYNDALL TARGET


-- Redbirds -- -- Wactivities --
New Arrivals Welcomed; Retreat Recalcitrants

Moore Leaves; Krobiger Review Line-up; Cagle







Page 10 THE TYNDAIJL TARGET


--The Flaming Bomb-
RIDULPH TO RETURN
SOON; GUARD TOUR
GETS ONE'S GOAT
The personnel of Ordnance is
changing fast. With regret, this
outfit bids adieu to Lts. Lake,
Applebaum and Langley. They
left for other stations. Coming
back into the Ordnance on Feb.
4th will be our former top-kick,
Sam Ridulph.
Congratulations to Sgt. Ingar-
giola. Tis rumored he married
while on furlough. Also good
luck to Cpl. Ediker, who also
took the "fatal" step...It sur-
prised quite a few of the boys to
find out that the orientation
lectures given by S/Sgt. Ponsio,
and Pfc. Delbyck could be enjoy-
able plus education I ... Cpl.
Evans' artistic drawings symbol-
izing Tyndall Field are worth
app] aiding.
QUESTIONS AND SUCH: Has Cpl.
Badker been smoking a corn cob
pipe very long, or is it a recent
birthday gift?... Have any of you
fellows been visiting Sgt. Harlan
at the Hospital? If so, who is
that pretty nurse working in his
ward?... Is it true about Sgt.
Clarence Wrenn having been an
undertaker and embalmer for a
period of 9 years? Pleasant
dreams, Sgt. Wrenn???...Who is
this Pvt. M., that is feudin with
Cpl. Knetter?
Thoughts of an Ordnance SNAFU
Guard Post #2: He mentally re-
views the General Orders, es-
pecially number two. At 7: 80 he
starts walking his post in a mil-
itary manner and noticing every-
thing within sight or hearing.
While marching, Snafu hums "I'm
Dreaming of a White Christmas, "
or thinks about the fine furlough
he just had. BUT-on the second
tour of guard duty (2: 80 A.M.),
the coldness makes him believe
Jack Frost lives in Florida. The
song he now tunelessly whistles
is "I'm Dreamingof a Warm Christ-
mas. That creaking door and
moving shadow does' t help mat-
ters. Yet a cup of coffee would
improve his morale. The marching
is seemingly making his flat feet
to curl upwards. His downhearted
thoughts are about the next fur-
lough--only 6 months away. A
certain rumor about being busted
for inefficiency is causing him
to sweat mentally. What a life--
what a life--good-nite all.
Ex Lax in Holland is known as
Dutch cleanser.
'Darling, I could sit here and do
nothing but look at you forever.'
'Yaah, that's what I'm beginning
to think, too!'
The slogan for a nice evening's
entertainment: So-fa and no-father.


SALLY SEEMORE


"' '- .


r


r- I
"I'm sorry, Captain, but this
is Wednesday night,
And neither major, colonel
nor Ace in flight
Could get me to break THIS
evening's date!
Hep G.I.s and the T/F band
are sol id bait,
And this gal Sal will be l -~.
Rec Hall bound
To display a figure enticing--
but gowned!"


Strafe-Bombing in

The South Pacific
A "double feature" on strafe-
bombing in the South Pacific,
thrilling detailed accounts of how
AAF light and medium bombers
are reaping big results by this dar-
ing and highly skilled technique,
appears in the February issue of
AIR FORCE.
Authors of the twin articles are
Col. Donald P Hall, C.O. of a
5th Air Force attack group, and
Lee Van Atta, International News
Service war correspondent. Mr.
Van Atta describes how Jap ship-
ping is strafe-bombed and Colonel
Hall discusses its application to
enemy airdromes.
In addition the AAF official
service journal in February con-
tains articles and photographs on
A-36 action in the Mediterranean
theatre, the Air Wacs, the Army
Airways Communications System,
movies from the combat theatres,
the aviation engineers, plus its reg-
ular maintenance and. technical
features.
FEBRUARY


AIR FORCE
THE OFFICIAL SERVICE JOURNAL
OF THE U. S. ARMY AIR FORCES





The Army Chair Corps
By One of Them
[A contributor has sent the following,
which appeared in the Tampa Tribune
with no other by-line than that shown.]
(Air-Army Air Corps Song)
Here we go, into the file-case yonder,
Diving deep into the drawer.
Here it is, buried away down under
That damned legal .stuff we've been
searching for.
Off we go, into the C.O.'s office,
Where we get one helluva roar-
We live in miles, of paper files,
But nothing will stop the Army Chair
I Corps.


-"Copyrighted Material



SSyndicated Content


lable from Commercial News Providers'


t W


Page 10


THE TYNDALL TARGET








J4THE TYNDALL TAREaT


...... New offi-
cers on post driving around PC
Sunday .. Discussing the beauties
of the local countryside, no
doubt.. .. .. Great fun, we hear,
at the Officers' Club Candlelight
dance last week .. A good time,
it was said, was had by all
.. T/Sgt. Bill Coultrap conduct-
ing the band in the absence of
Mr. Missal .. And doing a fine
ob of it, too ...... Casual
observation department: Life is
one fool thing after another;
love is two fool things after
each other.
Are you buying an extra War
Bond this month? .. The new 4th
War Loan is on, you know ......
Sgt. Horace O'Shields and his
missus head for South Carolina
on the first .. The town, gentle-
men, is Buffalo .... .. What
with Guido Conte and S/Sgt. Joe
Morales furloughing, Sgt. Dick
Morris is having a field day at
PT area 2 Suggestion: Cancel
all classes for the rest of the
year (!H$&!P) ..... ..Smitty and
Jean, Earl and Marie, Dick and
Bobbie, fishing' last Sunday on
Massalina Bayou .. Total catch:
?7 ....... A man paying alimony
s like a GI who saves his money
nd buys a bicycle, then lets
ill the boys in his squadron use
it.
Scores of officers arrived last
week for co-pilot training on B-
24s .. .. .. When M/Sgt. John
Tart goes to the commissary he
really puts out the points .. 183
in one dayl ...... Pvts. Chis-
hokm, Trammel and Mahorney off
for three days to Valdosta, to
get some dump trucks .. But
they're back again, none the
worse for wear ... i. .. Lt. Jack
Goldsmith in New York on leave ..
Taking in all the latest plays,
we'll wager ...... There are
now. two Stegers on the field, as
if one weren't enough .. There's
T/Sgt. Lawrence R. and Pvt. John
G. Steger .... ..Pvt. Louis L.
Sapienze has left Tyndall Tech
for Pigeon School .. No kiddin',
there's one at Gulfport, Miss.
THE GAG BAG: The Jap admiral
reported to the 'Son of Heaven':
'We blasted Pearl Ilarbor; mission
not so successful. We blasted
Wake Island, not so successful.
We blasted Midway Island, not so
successful. We blasted Bataan
and Attu, no good. We just a
bunch of no-good blasters.'


Big Hearted Yanks
Pay General's Fare
London (CNS)-Gen. Sir Fred-
erick Pile, Commander in Chief
of the Anti-Aircraft Command,
was approached by two American
privates during a blackout. The
GIs, who didn't recognize the
general, asked him the way to
West Kensington. Gen. Pile hap-
pened to be going the same way,
so all three piled into a passing
hack.
After an interesting conversa-
tion in the dark cab, they reached
their destination and the Amer-
icans offered to pay for the ride.
"Oh, no," said Gen. Pile. "I'll pay.
I'm senior to you."
"You may be," said one of the
Yanks, "but you don't get as
much pay."

Synthetic Rubber Use Grows
Washington (CNS) More
than 50 per cent of the needs of
the Army Ordnance Department
are now being filled by synthetic
rather than natural rubber, Maj.
Gen. L. H. Campbell, Jr., Chief of
Ordnance has announced.


PERT AND PURTY


Characters, meet Miss Ann Baxter.
The petite 20th-Century Fox starlet has been seen recently
in "North Star" and comes to the Post Theater soon in another
fine film. Look for her.
But right now .. look AT her.
Plenty nice, huh, bub?

--30tl Aviation Squadron--
BROWN BOMBERS BOAST BAND, BOJANGLES

AND BUSTLING BASKETBALL TEAM


Duke Ellington and Benny Carter
had better look to their laurels,
for a red hot jazz band is in
process of formation here, and
when it' s ready to go, the jit-
terbugs will have their day. "The
Brown Bombshells of Rhythm, as
our swingsters are known, have
been practicing faithfully for
the past week under the expert
leadership of S/Sgt. Willie K.
Daniel and Pvt. Purnell Williams.
Our band is expected to make its
formal debut at a War Bond dance
to be held in the Recreation Hall
early next month.
"Fred Astaire" Scott, as Pfc.
Franklin J. Scott is known to his
more intimate friends, really
stole the show at the bi-weekly
dance held last Thursday night at
the Recreation Hall. Scott, en-
ergetic keeper of our day room,
really wowed the onlookers with
his variety of steps.
With a weekend restriction star-
ing them in the face, members of
our squadron really went to work
on their barracks last Friday
night, and received the excellent
mark of 93 in the weekly inspec-
tion. As a result, our command-
ing officer lifted all restric-
tions, and most of the boys head-
ed for Panama City and its USO,


where a barn dance and a fish fry
was in progress. There were about
80 snappy looking Farmerettes
present, and our squadron did it-
self proud, to say the least Mr.
Jesse Word, director of the USO,
acted as master of ceremonies,
and turned in a No. 1 job.
Not satisfied with its showing
in the first game of the season,
the post basketball team held two
rugged practice sessions this
week, and is now ready to take on
all comers. Mistakes which crop-
ped up against Rosenwald High
were ironed out and an attractive
schedule is now in the process of
formation. Our team is expected
to be a member of a four team.
league, which includes clubs from
Panama City and the Wainwright
Shipyard. More about this later.
PERSONAL RUMORS: Wonder why
Pvt. Richard T. Odom is called
the wolf of the squadron...Or why
Pvt Charles Burns answers to the
name of Buck Jones... Another ping
pong tournament will be held in
the near future, and the present
champion, Logan Roberts, faces a
stiff fightto retain his title...
Our handyman, Pfc. Hubert Hall,
is doing a fine job of keeping
things in the squadron repaired.
Whether a broken window or door


Dear Aunt Lulu:
In what shape would a fellow be
if he listened to all the good
advice handed out? Keep his back
to the wall, his ear to the
ground, his chin up, his nose to
the grindstone, his shoulder to
the wheel, a level head, his
thumbs up, and both feet on the
ground. Perhaps you and I cculd
do it--but what about the one-
armed paperhanger with the itch?
Lovingly,
Launcelot Legerdemain
Private, AAF
Dear Launcelot:
He'd find some way to scratch.
Always,
Aunt Lulu-belle

-Rugged 69th--
SMOKEY BURNS UP AT

LINE CRASHERS;AND

LETS CHIPS FALL
Well, well, here we are again
with our toes all mashed and
mangled from being trampled on
Sunday evening at the Post The-
ater. Wonder why the MP can't
keep the officers from entering
the theater on the enlisted men' s
side of the building. I, and
several other enlisted men were
about fourth in line when the
doors opened and by the time the
other side of the line gave us a
rush about fifteen of us had to
stand back while someone else
shoved us aside.
Speaking of rushes and rushing
why not bring Sgt. "Curly" Me-
serve into the limelite. We hear
from very reliable sources that
he sneezed just once down town
Sattidy night and bit another GI
who was standing at least twenty
paces away. Sgt. Meserve says
his GI Dentures are still a trifle
loose.
From the looks of things it
seems that Pfc. (should be Sgt )
Billy Boins has Erwin "My Buddy"
Slezinger' s number about this old
thing called hitting the Sack
early. Why do you comb your hair
before retiring Erv; see your Gal
in your sleep?
What makes Cpl. Mealor so fat
and sassy? Cute, ain't he?
We' re going to move the full
length mirror into the Squadron
Supply Room so one certain S/Sgt
can stare at his itty bitty purty
self all he wants to.
It was just asked by some Pfc.
(no names mentioned) why T/Sgt.
John Mitchell goes and buys some
of this here whatchacallit--mabe-
leen or something like that. Now
John, you know your soup strainer
is supposed to be RED.
Just asked Eddie Swarts why he
was such a killer with the women
and he sure had an "on the ball"
answer. Says Eddie: "Just let
Nature take her course. Yeah,
but what kind of a course does
that leave a bashful boy like
Willie the Wink Thurston or that
Male Man Tormey?
For this Column I say I shall
at least get a Dental Appointment
or maybe a nice Tour of Guard--
it's bound to be one of the two,
so pray for we' uns.
Your, Smokey

hinge, an emergency call is is-
sued for Hubert, and the damage
is repaired without delay.
-Cpl. A.E. Williams


January 29, 1944


Pae o 11


L


HT E TYNDALL TARGET









Page 12 THE TYNDALL TARGET


TORNADOES TIED FOR TOP

HONORS AT HALF-WAY

MARK IN USO LOOP

Meet C.G. Here Tuesday
In Play-Off

Tyndall's vhirlwind court squad,
the Tornadoes, completed the
first half of the USO League's
schedule tied for top honors with
the Coast Guard quintet. These
two teens will meet here Tuesday
evening in a one game play-off to
decide the first half chaqpiorn
The Tornadoes lost but one game
during the first half competi-
tion, and that was to the Marine
Electric aggregation. The Tor-
nadoes face the Marine five at
the Post Gym tonite at 8:00 P.M.
The contest, not on the regular
schedule, was arranged in order
to give the Tyndall team an op-
portunity to avenge its defeat.
Four student quintets will meet
in two preliminary games sched-
uled for the evening. The first
will start at 5:00 P.M.
Paced by Pfc. Sid Friedman of
the Gunnermakers, the Tornadoes
domed the Wainwright Yard squad
in their league game at the ship-
yard last Tuesday. Friedman hit
the hoop four times from the
floor and converted three fbul
shots for a total of 11 points
as the T/F courtmen won out, 33-
28. Stevens and Snowden also
turned in good performances with
Snowden registering 10 points
and Stevens coming through with
6.
Although a closely compact
schedule keeps the gym busy
throughout the week, the Torna-
A-df Ia- e I b le I bl f +


in several practice sessions
under the guidance of their new
coach, Sgt. Pete Collodi. Col-
lodi, who was stationed at Miami
Beach as a.PT instructor prior
to being assigned here, has close
to 2) years of playing and coach-
ing experience behind him.
Last Tuesday night's box score:


lTWDALL
Friedman, rf
Snowden, If
Stevens, c
Patterson, rg
Sollon, Ig
Total
WANWIMIGHT
Stephenson, rf
Redman, if
Hancock, c
Moore, rg
Davis. Ig
Total


FG
4
4
2
0
1


3
1
3
0
3


FT Tp
3 11
2 10
2 6
4 4
0 2
33


INTER-SQUADRON BOWLING

LEAGUE STANDINGS
TSAM V L
Vhite Plashes 23 7
Dutch Sqdn. 22 8
Ordnance 21 9
Quartermaster 21 9
finance 21 9
Ounnernakers 19 11
Redbirds J1 14
Guardians 16 I1
Rugged 69th 13 17
Bluebirds 13 1-
A t. training 11 19
Canaries 6 82
Medics 4 26

BIOB SIOL GAOSB
Oeraco (RB) 258
BIOR 3-OAjMS
Oeraci (RB) 618
HIGO fTAH SCORI
Redbirds 924
BIOB 3-OAMr IEAM SCORE
Dutch Sqdn. 2645


EX-CINCINNATI COURT STAR NOW WITH TORNADOES GROUP I KEGLERS LEAD

IN OFFICERS' TOURNEY


Above is a shot of Pfc. Sid Friedman, a member of the T/F
court squad, as he poses for the cameraman in the field's
new gymnasium. Friedman, assigned to the Gunnermakers is
25 years old and hails from Cincinnati. Ohio.
He graduated from Cincinnati University in 1941 with a
B.S. in Physical and Health Education, but managed to squeeze
in quite a bit of basketball between studies. For three
years he won his "C," alternating between the forward and
center positions on the school's hoop team, topping off his
"amateur" career as team captain in his senior year.
In addition to basketball, Friedman also won letters in
football and baseball. Following his graduation he played
several years of semi-pro basketball and coached an amateur
team as well.


FOURTEEN T

COURTHEN B

Tyndall' s intA
under way once
ule as drawn up
among permanent
Wednesday, wit
games begin at
Tuesday matches
The following
25TH (26)
Martin....... 5
Hill.... ......0
Schrieber.....0
Role ..........0
Stevens...... 17
Hastings...... 2
Schriener..... 2




MEDICS (32)
Bernhart.. .0
Finley....... .4
Hughes.........0
Brown.........
Boswell....... 2
Stack ..........0
Weatherford. 4
Morat........ 1
Van Cott.....14
Mankin.........0

349TH (21)
Hansen.........3
Ross..........6
Davis.......... 1
Thurman ...... 0
Bennett....... 0
owl and.... 5
Schneller.....2
Lawton........ 4


69TH (52)
Angelli......
Cronek........4
Stone..........0
Brenner.......7
Genegrill ....0
Byrd......... .0
Walker...... ...5
Prysi........ .4
Jones... .. ...0
Hughes.........
Hunter........0


EAMS COMPETE AS INTER-SQUADRON

EGIN HOSTILITIES IN NEW GYM

er-squadron basketball league lost no time in getting
work on the new gymnasium was completed. The sched-
by Lt. Stan Drongowski calls fbr seven games a week
party teams Three games are listed fbr Mondays and
h a single contest on Tuesdays. Monday and Wednesday
6:30 P.M., 7:45 P.M. and 9 P.M. respectively, while
are set for 8 P.M.
are the box scores of last week's contests.


344TH (21)
Coon.......... 15
Crane.......... 2
Waite.......... 0
Alescavage..... 0
Clements...... .0
Brown. .........
Service........ 0
Higgenbotto. .. 2
Judge.......... 2


40TH (26)
Maswell ........ 8
Smith .......... 0
Jackrel........ 5
Shlodzik.......0
Keltner....... 11
Matonak........
Tit ko......... .0
Sollon......... 6



446TH (16)
Moskovich......0
Covaleski......0
Houssai........ 1
Wolf............
Flannigan...... 3
Jorgenson... 6
Gadd...........1
Gleeson....... 5
Hobbs..........O

350TH (22)
Ravenscroft.... 8
Beznoska....... 8
Carr............4
Churilll .......0
Black......... 14
Wagner......... .
Allenborg...... 5
Loudis..........2
Lemon..... .... 0
Sills.......... 0
Fritz.......... 8


The Snafus posted a neat 907
total in their opener against
Group I's keglers in the of-
ficers league Thursday night,
but they couldn't keep it up as
Lt. Canali rallied his league
leaders to take the next two and
the match, thereby maintaining
their 4-game advantage in the
loop standings.
The second place Bell Ringers
lost no ground as they -also won
two of three with Group II, and'
kept right after the loop leaders,
while the Gremlins took over third
place undisputed by virtue of
their twin wins over M.O.Q. The
red-hot Sluggers burned up the
Retreads twice in the last series
of the night to climb into a tie
for fourth position with the
Snafus, and thus extended their
winning streak to 11 out of the
12 games bowled.
Lt. Georgeson turned in a 235
for high single, but Lt. Johnson
rapped out 233-187-188 for 608
and third high triple of the
year. Team honors of the eve-
ning went to Group I with 2510.
The standings: W L
Group I 23 7
Bell Ringers 19 11
Gremlins 16 14
Snafus 15 15
Sluggers IS 15
Group II 12 18
Retreads 10 20
M.O.Q. 10 20


/ I I V IF i 6i /V /

-
g I-r l i< >_-e E_
1< ,e A I 'F -
A L. 1A AIS A K





cK Ll E C K P
2illIPErtl 7 f


FINANCE (38) INST. Sq. (35) A U I I L
Anderson...... 3 illhollen.....3
Hines......... 6 Smith.......... 0
Moore........ Stout.......... 3 S ....... 5
Costigan......7 Snowden........ 6
Leonard.......4 Whitefield. .... .0
Emanuel ....... 1 Brutto........ .0
Mullen........4 Bernardski.. ..0 POST
Edwards ........0
Patterson......5 Sun., Mon., 'THE SONG OF RUSSIA,'
Quick...........2 Robert Taylor. Susan Peters.
wisner..........0 'Iesday, 'THE SPIDER WOMAN, Ba-
aillespe ......12 sil Rathbone, Nigel Bruce.
Haber...........0
Graham..........2 Wed., Thurs., *"IE FIGHTING SEA-
BEES,' John Wayne, Susan Hayward.
848TH (51) QM (16) Fri., Sat., 'LIFEBOAT,' Tallulah
Massey........2 Jones...........5 Bankhead, Henry Hull.
Poleyn........6 Smith, G.......2
Paul .......... 0 Smith, J.......2
Hunt......... 16 Andrews ........3 RI TZ
Hsalin... ....4 Gregory.. .....2
Neill.........4 DeOrio........ .0 Sun., Mon., 'HAPPY LAND,' Dor
Martin........ 4 Alford......... 2 Ameche, Frances Dee.
Besinger ..... Tues., Wed. 'CRIME DOCTOR'
Comp .........9 STRANGEST CASE,' Warner Baxter.
Kleinfeller...2 Thurs., Fri., 'TRUE TO LIFE,
Franchot Tone, Mary Martin.
I TER-SQUADRON BASKETBALL sat., 'RIDERS OF DEADLINE,' Wil-
1 i am Boyd.
SCHEDULE FOR THIS WEEK
MONDAY PANAMA
Guardians vs. Quartermaster Sun., Mon., 'SOULS AT SEA,' Gary
Coo-er, George Raft.
Ordnance vs. Instructors Co George Raft.
Redbirds vs. gpth (Rugged?) Tuesday, 'SUNDOW JIM,' John Kim-
brough.
TUESDAY Wednesday, 'MOONTIDE, Jen Gabin,
Finance vs. White Flashes Ida Lupino.
VEDIESDAY Thursday, 'A HAUNTING WE WILl
Canaries vs. Medical Det. 0G, Laurel and Hardy,
Bluebirds vs. Alt. frng. Fri., Sat., 'KWVES OF THE RANGE,
Gunnereaker's vs. 344th Bob .vin.stn.


Page 12


THE TYNDALL TARGET


....... /AA


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'


, --~






Janury 9, 144 HE YNDAJL ARGE Pae 1


"YANK W1Z"

By BOB HAWK


1. Most of the crops in this
country are planted in the spring,
but some cereal crops may be
planted in the fall. Name two.

2. What is Scrooge's given
name?

3. There are several types of
laughter; what's the difference
between a giggle, a chuckle and
a guffaw?

4. If a dollar bill is per-
manently destroyed, is this a
loss or a gain to the U.S. govern-
ment?-

5. Cabbage prepared in differ-
ent ways has different names.
Mention two of these.

6. What is the difference be-
tween an ode and a sonnet?

7. What was the only cabinet
amber to ever address Congress?

8. Hull, Eden and Molotov are
considered the Big Three of the
Moscow conference. Name two of
the Big Four of the Versailles


conference?

9. On a standard piano there
are 52 white keys and 36 black
keys. How many complete octaves
are there?

10. Does an adult need nearer
1,000, 3,000 or 6,000 calories
a day?
YANKWIZ ANSWERS
1. Wheat, barley, rye, oats.
2. Ebenezer.
3. A giggl6is suppressed laugh-
ter. A chuckle Is just audible'
laughter. A guffaw is a loud
burst of laughter.
4. It is a gain.
5. Coleslaw, sauerkraut, red
cabbage, Dutch hot slaw, creole
cabbage.
6. Ode is a poem suitable to be
set to music; a sonnet is a poem
of 14 lines.
7. Cordell Hull.
8. Orlando Italy
Clemenceau France
Woodrow Wilson U.S.
David Lloyd George England.
9. Seven.
10. 3,000.
If she looks old, she's young;
if she looks young, she's old;
if she looks back... follow her.


"Copyrighted Material e


SSyndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"




"A^SF


,. 0 -


The guest was being shown to with this room?'
his bed in the haunted room by 'Not for over fifty years, sir.'
his host's faithful but rather 'And what happened then?' asked
sinister-looking retainer. At the guest with a sigh of relief.
the door of the room they paused. 'A gentleman who spent the
'B-b-by the way,' said the night here appeared at breakfast
guest, 'has anything, er-a un- the next morning,' came the re-
usual ever happened in connection ply.


January 29, 1944


THE TYNDALL TARGET


Paie 13


%* q



















* GUNNER OF THE CLASS *
U a


SGT. JESSE M. FOLSE
Squadron B


Sgt. Folse hails from Lockport,
La., is 20 years old and played
varsity basketball while attend-
ing the Lockport high school.
Has had 18 months of service
in the AAF. Was stationed at
William Northern Air Base, in
Tennessee, and at Drew Field,
after three and a half months
in the Aleutians as an armorer
for a bomber which was engaged in
bombing Kiska. Received armament
schooling at Buckley Field, Colo.


SGT. FRED W. HARSH
Squadron D


PFC. EARL G. RAU
Squadron C


PFC. JOHN F. SEGALLA
Squadron A


Pfc. John Segallad winds up his
gunnery training here as top gun-
ner of his class, having pre-
viously captured G.T.W. honors
two weeks ago. Hails from Can-
aan, Conn., where he worked as a
grinder operator in a defense
plant prior to entering the Army
two and a half years ago.
Has been stationed at Westover
Field and New Bedford Airdrome.,
and also completed Scott Field's
radio course.
Has three brothers in the ser-
vice who are presently scattered
to all corners of the world.


I
-..! l lII.r.


A/C JOSEPH HORGANI
Cadet Detachment


Pfc. Rau, a native of Brooklyn,
N.Y., is 31 years old. He at-
tended high school in Illinois,
where he played varsity basket-
ball.
Rau is married, and before in-
duction was employed as an auto-
mobile mechanic.
Entered AAF in April, 1943, at
Camp Upton, N.Y. Received basic
at Miami Beach and then was sent
to Keesler Field for A.M. train-
ing.
Chief hobby is building model
airplanes and auto racers that
run.


PVT. RALPH MARINELLI
Squadron E


Sgt. Marsh, who names Greens-
boro, N.C., as his home town, is
24 years old. Played soccer and
baseball duringhigh school years.
Entered AAF in October, 1942,
and was sent to Miami for basic
training. Remained there for 12
months after basic as a clerk in
shipping and receiving depart-
ment. Volunteered for gunnery
and was assigned to Tyndall.
Marsh is married and has an 18-
months old daughter. Employed as
a mechanic in a sewing machine
factory prior to entering the
A rmy.


A native of South Boston, Mass.,
A/C Horgan has been in the ser-
vice since last July. He is 21
years old and unmarried.
He managed a machine shop in
civilian life.


Pvt. Marinelli is 29 :years old
and was born in Dover, N.J. He
was inducted in July, 1943, at
Camp Upton. Had previously serv-
ed a hitch in the infantry (1933-.
36).
He has been married for five
years and is the papa of an 18
months old son. He was employed
as a traffic manager by a uniform
manufacturing and renting company
prior to his latest hitcn.
Expects to go into the chicken
farm business with his father in
New Jersey after the war is over.


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