• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Main
 Main






Title: Tyndall target
ALL ISSUES CITATION ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076230/00063
 Material Information
Title: Tyndall target
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 27-36 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)
Publisher: Public Relations Office, Air Corps Gunnery School
Place of Publication: Tyndall Field Fla
Publication Date: 1942-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City -- Tyndall Air Force Base
Coordinates: 30.078611 x -85.576389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 16, 1942)-
Issuing Body: Issues for May 9, 1942- published by Office of Public Relations, Army Air Forces Gunnery School.
General Note: Title from caption.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076230
Volume ID: VID00063
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24602432

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
    Main
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
Full Text





















prisoners of
Russia; a
thousands


ar; food for starving
the scorched eart
meless refugees.


reece; medical supplies
China; assistance i


for gallant
bldreds of


affiliated war funds.
Tyndall Field person I,
upon to give to
published
fits
Born o
cies for health, welfare a
thropic federation with there
and extent of the
chance to contri
raised wherever Americ


nd il itary, has been called

e Target has been
e the bene-



e agen-
und is a philan-
irst, to determine the nature
,to see that everybody has a
and third, to send the sums
4*needed--enough and on time.


These aims of the federation lead to but one objective--to
t.in tho Iinr n Anor m,1th n minimum m Inee nf I f


nii v UO V I I I l IIIUVV U LIV II I) U LII i I (AI I u L A LIUII I1U.
surely b re quickly, and lives will be los
fighters I our Allies and their lies are sustained
.st weapon of them all--the will tn win-


TV I T V i II I I
pg as our
the great-


O/mNIf/.f


TYNDALL FIELD. PANAMA CITY. FLA.







THE TYNDALL TARGET


TYNDALL FIELD PERSONNEL ASKED TO GIVE



ONE DAY'S SALARY TO NATIONAL WAR FUND!


ONE DAY'S PAY MEANS
LITTLE BUT IT CAN
DO MUCH GOOD


One day's pay--the amount
you will be asked to give to
the National War Fund--may
seem like a lot of money to
some people. But the chances
are they are people who never
needed the help of others.
One day's pay amounts to
less than one third of one
percent of your annual salary.
Americans have a habit of giv-
ing much more than that away
to people who need it much
less than the refugees from
Japanese and Nazi oppression.
Through the National War
Fund you can help shorten
the war by contributing aid
to the people who have given
so much for the cause of
freedom and who ask so lit-
tle in return.
The dollar you give will
take care of the family of
sane French, Czechoslovak or
Belgian soldier who is fight-
ing with American, British and
Russian armies against the Na-
zis, or will save the family
of some Chinese soldier fight-
ing the Japanese.
Your money will feed the
starving people of Greece-,
Norway, Italy and other coun-
tries which have been overrun
and stripped by the Nazis.
It will make the conquest
of Europe easier in many
ways and bring peace to the
world more quickly.
As an example of what your
money can do, a table based on
past administration shows:
That 25 cents will supply
a refugee family with bread
for a week.
That 50 cents will enable
a refugee to have a daily
portion of soup for a
month.
That $1 will buy a pair
of warm gloves to protect
a refugee child during the
severe European winter.
That $2 will send a pack-
age with toilet articles:,, a
sewing kit, a pocket knife,
puttees and cigarets to a
soldier fighting at the
front.
That f3 will provide a
refugee with A warm blanket.
That $5 will feed an un-
dernourished refugee child


THE PRESIDENT REQUESTS YOUR AID






THE WHITE HOUSE
WASHINGTON


TO THE HEADS OF ALL DEPARTMENTS, ESTABLISHMENTS,
AGENCIES OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT:


AND


Once again the citizenship is to be approached with
a request for contributions to the National and Com-
munity War Funds. I ask all persons in authority
in offices of the Federal Government throughout the
United States to extend their full cooperation to the
local campaigns for this cause. Such cooperation
logically includes both the organization of effective
solicitation and the subsequent setting up of an ade-

quate collection method for the convenience of those
who wish to make subscriptions on an installment bas-
is.
The agencies included in local war funds affiliated
with the National War Fund include three types of
service which are: firstly, those dedicated to the
aid and comfort of our armed forces at home and a-

broad; secondly, those devoted to the assistance of
our allies both in occupied and unoccupied territor-
ies; and thirdly, those services which are included
in local welfare and community chests. To each in-
dividual anxious to do his part to support these exr
tensive services one advantage is obvious; he can
make one pledge to cover these essential welfare
needs for the coming year.
I ask all (federal) employes to remember, when they
are approached for their contributions, that this is
an opportunity through sacrifice to reach their
friends and neighbors at home and our men and women
in service, and also to carry a message to the far-
flung fronts which are our shield.





Z-o
^ f/7 y

-y-^ ^^ ----&


for two weeks.
That $10 will clothe a
refugee child for the win*
t er.
That $15 will rehabili-
tate a citizen released
from Fascist internment
Camps in Spain and North
Africa.
That $25 will clothe an
dult refugee for the wint-
er.
That $100 will outfit with
garments a hospital unit
for refugees.


FLIER WHO BOMBED
TOKYO TELLS OF
CHINA RELIEF


An example of the work which
will be done by the money you
give to the National War Fund
is described by Capt. Ted Law-
son, one of the Doolittle fli-
ers who bombed Japan, in his
book, "Thirty Seconds Over
Tokyo."
Captain Lawson was aided by
facilities and personnel which
were made available by United
China Relief, one of the agen-
cies which will benefit from
the war fund drive.
Here is a quotation from his
book:
'...Near the edge of the
settlement the stretcher bear-
ers stopped. They carried us
into the patio ot a clean-
looking little building...some
China Relief posters stuck on
the surrounding walls.
'We felt better after the
Chinese nurses had washed us
with hot water. The man in
charge of the dressing station
came in that night. I was
glad. I felt so low about so
many things.
'I told him I had passed up
the collection for China Re-
lief more times than I had
contributed. I told him I was
so damned sorry I could cry.
Maybe I did. He smiled there
in the dim room.
'Don't, he said. 'Your
money went a long way. Try to
sleep. '
'I kept thinking of those
brave, tireless and loyal men
and women who picked us up af-
ter our crashes, carried us on
their backs, fed us, nursed us
back to health and got us
away.'


17 AGENCIES IN NATIONAL WAR FUND
Here is a list of the 17 agencies which have been
selected for membership in the National War Fund,
with the amounts each will receive if the total
fund of 125 million dollars is collected:
USO, $61,127,000; United Seamen's Service, $4,125,000; War Pris-
oners Aid, $2,320,000; Russian War Relief, $10,155,000; United China
Relief, $9,873,000; British War Relief Society, $5,698,000; Greek
War Relief Association, $5,122,000; Polish War Relief, $3,750,000;
United Yugoslav Relief Fund, $2,238,000; French Relief Fund, $2, 183-
000; Belgian War Relief Society, $325,000; United Czechoslovak Re-
lief, $234,000; Queen Wilhelmlna Fund, $200,000; Norwegian Relief,
$200,000; Friends of Luxembourg, $121,000; Refugee Relief Trustees,
$2,809,000; U.S. Camnittee for Care of BEropean Children, $812,000.







NATIONAL WAR FUND EDITION


WOMAN SERGEANT TELLS
HOW GIFTS HELP
THE RUSSIANS


Fighting every step of the
way, millions of Bussiarn had
to fall back before the enem:,.
suffering from war wounds,
starvation, disease and ex-o-
sure.
They left nothing for the
Axis forces, but as the tide
of war turns, they are return-
ing to devastation.
Services to rehabilitate
them cone from Russian War Re-
lief, a member agency of the
National War Fund.
A woman sergeant in the Rus-
sian Arnty writes her gratitude
for the work done by the re-
lief organization:
'I am one of many women who
carry your gifts of cigarets,
chocolate and knitted clothing
to our guerilla fighters at
the front. Their families
are grateful for the clothing
that comes also. Millions of
us have been driven from our
home regions and traveled on
foot, by truck, by rail and
by horse to new regions. We
break ground for new homes
with your tools. We plant new
gardens with your seed, and we
keep up our hope with your
friendship. Behind are our
homes, hospitals, nurseries
and schools, in ruins. As we
return we are building new on
ruins of the old.
'Your gifts are a proof that
America is with us. It oblig-
es us to be stronger, to fight

harder.
'As for me, in the cold
nights my hands in your warm
gloves will be firmer on the
wheel of the truck. I am used
to cold but your gift warms me
and my heart. I press your
h and.


Though they've gambled with death in the performance of their
duty these merchant seamen can't forget the sea, even on a holiday.
BHere they are recuperating at one of the many rest centers which
the United Seamen's Service, a member agency of the National War
Fund, mantatins here and abroad, in cooperation with the Wal
Shioninr Administration.


HOW MUCH YOU SHOULD GIVE

How much should you give to the National War Fund?
The accompanying table, showing base pay and the
daily pay of the enlisted grades,. should be your
guide when you are asked to contribute to this worthy
cause.


RANK BASE PAY
Private $50
Private First Class 54
Corporal 66
Sergeant 78
Staff Sergeant 96
Tech. Sergeant I 14
Master Sergeant 138


DAILY PAY
$1 .67
I .80
2.20
2.60
3,20
3.80
4.60


EX-SPORTSWRITER JIHMH

HOW USO HELPS
Sgt. Jimmy Cannon was a New
York city sportswriter before
his neighbors said "Greet-
ings!"
Here he writes about the
United Service Organizations-
the USO--one of the National
War Fund member agencies:
'The USO don' t give you a
Guggenheim fellowship or an
X card, but they get a guy a
shower bath when he's dirty,
and a place to shave himself.
'They get him a laugh in the
shows they put on and music to
dream to in concert halls and


WAR FUND MONEY GOES
TO AID PRISONERS
IN ENEMY CAMPS

The War Prisoners Aid is one
of the agencies which receives
funds from th.e National War
Fund.
What the prisoners think of
War Prisoners &id Is told in
this letter from an Allied
soldier in a Nazi prison camp:
'...to thank you very much
for a parcel containing draw-
ing books, 12 bottles of India
ink, 12 drawing pencils, char-
coal pencils, paints, fixative,
mapping pens, gramophone need-
les, etc., which have arrived.
HoB deeply my men here apprec-
iate all your efforts to ob-
tain those articles for us
through your Y.M.C.A. repre-
sentative. This year we held
tao remarkably successful ex-
hibitions. Your most recent
gift has supplied enough ma-
terial to keep these men oc-
cupied for many months now and
has paved the way for more ex-
hibitions to brighten and
raise the standard of this
life of waiting.
'Your previous gifts are
still well-used and appreciat-
ed: the indispensable type-
writer, the musical instru-
ments, the piano accordion,
the sports gear, the hymn-
books, bibles and library
books.'


NATIONAL WAR FUND








ItHREE FRONTS-ONE CAUSE


Y CANNON WRITES ABOUT
THE SERVICE HAN
a cup of coffee and a desk to
write a letter on. They have
classes where guys can do, in
their off-duty hours, what
they did back home at their
jobs.
'They throw dances and.par-
tiec. They have gyms, relig-
ious services. All these are
small things, I guess, but a
soldier will tell you how im-
portant they are to a guy who
came to the USO because he was
lonely or hungry or dirty or
unshaven or tightened up with
the blues.'


DURING convalescence at St. Alban's Naval Hospital on returning from
SGuadalcanal, Sgt. Barney Ross, U.S.M.C., former world's lightweight
and welterweight champion, was visited by high school pupils, bringing
him a scrapbook and a pair of wooden shower sandals made at their
school for the USO. USO, a participant of the National War Fund-
a united war chest of war related appeals-encourages such activities as
providing recreational and comfort articles for service men, as an ea
cellent outlet for teen-age energy.








u


p


FORNATIONAL
THE -- NATIONAL


WAR


FUND


JUST ONE DA Y
PAY ON PA V.0 V.






Af ,JJi
~.



''?i ai~c :
Ni
N'I
f" A


Ai r -
I CI.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs