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Title: Tyndall target
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076230/00058
 Material Information
Title: Tyndall target
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 27-36 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)
Publisher: Public Relations Office, Air Corps Gunnery School
Place of Publication: Tyndall Field Fla
Publication Date: 1942-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City -- Tyndall Air Force Base
Coordinates: 30.078611 x -85.576389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 16, 1942)-
Issuing Body: Issues for May 9, 1942- published by Office of Public Relations, Army Air Forces Gunnery School.
General Note: Title from caption.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076230
Volume ID: VID00058
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24602432

Table of Contents
    Cover
        page 1
    Main
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text





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THE TYNDALL TARGET


Ta arget .


PUBLISHED SATURDAYS BY THE SPECIAL SERVICES SECTION .FR PERSON-
NEL OF IHE AAF FLEXIBLE GUNNERY SCHOOL, TYNDALL FIELD, FLORIDA.
Copy Prepared Under Supervision of Public Relations Officer
Special Service Officer: Conrnanding:
Capt. Owen 0. Freeman Col. Leland S. Stranathan
Photographic Officer: Public Relations Officer:
Lt. J.A. Dickerman Lt. William B. Pratt
Editorial Staff: Sgt. Arnold Milgaten, Sgt. Saul Samiof, Pfc. Neil
Pooser, Pvt. P.H. Nickles.
Art:Work: T/Sgt. Oral Ledbetter, S/Sgt. Fred H. Slade, Cpl. Marshall
Goodman.
Photography and Reproduction: T/Sgt. W. Castle, S/Sgt. J. Mitchell,
Sgt. S. Upchurch, Cpl. W. Grout, Cpl. G. Neitzert, Pvt. L. Shaw. S/Sgt.
J. Montgomery, S/Sgt. R. Keough, Sgt. P. Terry. Sgt. J. Marsick. S/Sgt.
J. Webster, Pvt. W. Daniels, Cpl. E. Tackett, Pfc. H. Care. Pvt. Robert
A. Chapman.
The Tyndall Target receives material supplied by Camp Newspaper Ser-
vice, War Dept., 205 E. 42nd St., N.Y.C. Credited material may not be
republished without permission from Camp Newspaper Service.

IN DEFENSE OF CIVILIZATION
It has been several years since we have taken up the cudgel
for the cause of righteousness and humanity, but any leanings
we may have had towards retirement vanished immediately the
moment we were approached and asked if we would care to
raise a hand in defending the common people of the North
in their fight against grits.
The invitation was put to me by a colleague whom T had
presumed to be an intelligent native of the South, but the
expression of my sentiments in this case will not be curbed
nor dulled because of that acquaintance. It is my personal
belief that the serving of grits in Army mess halls is the
greatest crime ever perpetrated by the Government against
its youth--and the crime is all the more serious in view
of the war for freedom in which we are now engaged.
Our first encounter with this unmentionable grain occurred
during our first week at this field. We must admit that we
approached the chow line with a great deal of curiosity,
especially in view of the fact that as we approached the mess
hall and asked for opinions on the chow from those leaving
we were greeted with "#$g4&g" grits!" (When we:left the
mess hall, and were in turn asked by other GI's about the
chow, our reply was "%#$_&$#" grits!"
Several months after this episode one of my roommates,
a member of one of the aristocratic families of the "old
South," confided to me in a weak moment that his grand-
father was a waiter in one of Atlanta's restaurants when
Sherman marched through Georgia. And, he continued, the
general came to his grandfather's eatery for his first
breakfast in the capital city. Then, in- a very hoarse whis-
Der, our friend went on to.say that it was when Sherman was
served his scrambled eggs, bacon and "?#$ f*!" that he ut-
tered his now famous words,:brgarding war. :
We nave always considered ourselves as being broadminded
enough to carefullyexamine both sides of any argument be-
fore coming to a decision-and in this particular case too,
we shall not be accused of lacking in fairness. We have
come to two profound conclusions in the matter of this South-
ern counterpart of Firech fried potatoes. They;are:
a. The government, in dispersing the boys drafted from the
the north to Army camps in the south, has caused a new ad-
miration to be born in the hearts of the "damyankees" for
their brothers of the south. For certainly there are thous-
ands of northern boys who feel as we do that if.the men,
women and children below the Mason-Dixon line have been
forced daily, for decades, to eat grits and can still stom-
ach the stuff, then truly their perseverence through that
hardship deserves at least an admiration for their courage
from us.
b. The government, in dispersing its boys drafted from
the south to Army camps in the north, has opened the eyes
of these rebels to the fact that the most perfect break-
fast dish of all--soft-scrambled eggs and crisp bacon--does
not necessarily have to be spoiled by the addition of grits.
And even though their conversion to French fried potatoes
is slow, we know that if one hundred years from now one of
our children journeys to say, Kentucky, and does not find that
imitation of "Farina" on the breakfast table, then we'll
know that our missionary work here was not in vain and that
the south will once again rise to the glorious heights which
it once occupied in the history of our country.


Tyndall


SGf. PHILIP A. TIEEDY: "Getting
a chance to fly
a lot is t.he
thing about the O
Army thatI like
the6: most.. But -. .' .i""
my pet dislike
is sweating out
Iines. '


CPL. MAARSHALL GOODMAN, draft-
ing department:
S "I like the reg-
S ular hours the
best. I've gain-
ed 10 pounds on
Army chow and
^regular habits.
Waiting in line
A o .for everything
S from the chow
line .td buses
is the worst
part of the Army.


S/SGO. ODDIS WHI'IINGTON: "Of
all the things
I've run across
in the Army I ; s
think I prefer -"
a week-end fling
in Panama City.
I don't know
that there is
anything I real-
ly don't like--
unless it's my
supply sergeant.


S/SGT. GEORGE MICHAEL, mechan-
ic: "Three-day
passes to Mob- lw:
i e are the best
thing I have -....
-found so far. e :
And I think the ":
chow is my big-
gest dislike."



PPC. PREDERICK MacKENZIE, bil-
leting clerk:
"Best of all I
like my work,
because it's
*' the work I'm
accustomed to
and it gives me
,. a chance to live
with my family.
SBut I sure wish
S U.i KP. didn't exist.

S/SGf. RODNEY LEACH, crew
chief: "My fa-
vorite part of
the Army con-
sists of my .ob..
It's something
I've always Lan- '
ted to do and
probably never F
would have done
if it weren't
for the Army.
My biggest objection is not
getting transferred.


I


Page 2


s


DID YOU KNOW THAT: One of the best cracks of the week, or
any other week, for that matter, is credited to Walter
Winchell. The famous columnist says the new theme song of
the Nazi Luftwaffe is, "Don't Get Around Much Anymore."...
Think the Germans have lost their punch? In a recent
broadcast, Rome radio claimed that the Nazi air force is
using a new liquid air bomb, made from nitrogen, so power-
ful that its explosion is felt by the very bomber whici
drops it from 14,000 feet...

Did you hear the story about the little moron who always
drinks a pint before bedtime because his mother told him to
sleep tight...Cpl. Dick L. Sacchi of Camp Stewart, Georgia,
claims to be the only man who ever ran a mile in 4 minutes
and 35 seconds while wearing fatigue clothes. Any challeng-
ers?....erchant seamen who run the gauntlet of submarines
and Axis bombers to carry war supplies to the forces of the
United States and its Allies, are being welcomed in USO
Clubs in American and Caribbean ports, upon presentation
of their seaman's papers.

Toward the end of the last war, one British hospital in
France had 1300 severely wounded patients and of these 113
died. In the Tunisian campaign, a similar hospital had 1500
severely wounded and only five died. That gives somt
measure of the extraordinarily low mortality among our
wounded in this campaign.



QUESTION: WHAT DO YOU
LIKE THE MOST AND DIS-
LIKE THE MOST ABOUT



Interviews and Photos
By SGT. SI UPCHURCH







June 5, 1iVVMAT.T. TfhIrVT


INTRODUCES MEASURE TO

INCREASE FAMILY AID

ALLOWANCES

Here's more good news for en--
listed men who have promised "to
love, honor and obey, until death
do us part. "
Introduced into the Senate by
Senator Lodge of Massachusetts
was a bill which would increase
the Government's contribution to
servicemen's dependents allowance
by 15 per cent. Thus, an enlist-
ed man with a wife but no child.
would receive $32 from the gov-.
ernment instead of $28. Other
increases are corresponding.
Senator Lodge'explained hil
proposal was made because of
the increased cost of living. He
said that "indications multiply
that the number of dependents who
receive various forms of assist-
ance from servicemen is growing."
He also pointed out'that "the
rate of induction of men with
dependents will increase in the
near future."


Guardians
The Guardians seemed to have
grabbed "spotlight" honors during
the past week. We had our fing-
ers in quite a few "pots. "
Pvt. Jack Lyles' wife tops the
honors by being the first GI's
spouse to make use of the field's
maternity ward. The Lyles were
the happy recipients of a six-
pound boy.
Elaborate plans are being made
for a gala dance to be given at
the American Legion Hall at PC.
Sgts. P. Hamilton and C. Bull,
Cpl. J. Mashburn and your scribe
are in charge. Dates will be ob-
tained for the Guardians for this
event, to be on June 11.
We take time out to extend our
belated congratulations to Pvt.
Herman Hurst on his taking the
fatal "step" last week.
PERCOLATING PRATTLE: We hear
that T/5 R. Turner is going to
dog school, and that all he hears
these days is "Arf, Ar! "...Pvt.
M.B. Diaz has sworn off Demon
Rum--until next payday...Pvt.
Bill Searfoss sleeps with his
shoes on, so he can answer roll
call on time... And that all the
boys are sweating (not from the
heat). Can it be ratings, boys?
F/Sgt. O'Neil is going home on
furlough, having won the insur-
ance contest.
MAN OF THE WEEK: Pvt. V. Meola,
(Brcoklyn Mad) hails from Brook-
lyn. He is a confirmed bachelor
and doesn't believe in matrimon-
ial apron strings. He formerly'
was employed by a telephone comp-
any. pvt. Meola is manager of
our baseball team and his fervent
ambition is to go home on fur-
lough and see his beloved ,Brook-
lyn Bums" play baseball.
-Cpl. Sam Marotta.


Zebras
It's 'school days, school days,
dear old golden rule days--read-
ing and writing and sighting" for
Lt. Harwell, who was enrolled in
gunnery school last Monday.
It's just a matter of sweating
for Cronin, DeRosa, Irwin, Lubin,
Mink and Whitehurst. They're
waiting for the word which will
put them into flying suits.
/ Speaking of sweating, C.C.
Myers has been sweating out a
furlough for the past month and
is still keeping his bet that he
wouldn't leave the post until the
furlough starts. Although the
pace is telling, Myers is deter-
mined to be a model soldier for
his model girl in Chicago.
Off to OCS are S/Sgts. Ward and
Griffitts, Sgt. Lewis, Cpl. Hard-
in and Cpl. Landers.
The reason that S/Sgt. Manakie
is so happy these days is that
his girl from Indianapolis is
coming down for the summer in-
'stead of for the originally plan-
ned two weeks. -o/Sgt. Franklin.


Tyndall's number one clown,
Bob Paquin, will be cracking
funnier and louder gags now
that he is a "free" man. His
"ex" telegraphed him news of
their divorce on Tuesday, and
in all fairness to the girls
on the post we are issuing am-
ple warning that Bob's reputas-
tion as a "wolf" is almost
equal to the name he has made
as a corny jokester. (His
first words upon the receipt of
the telegram were, "Saddle my
horse, paquin rides again!")
*
Sgt. Wallace Murphy, former
Apalach reporter for this paper,
is now back at Tyndall with the
Ventures. Murphy lost no time
in getting back at his 'pals'
at the sub-base via the Venturas'
squadron scribblings. As long
as the boys keep it clean, we
intend to let the fur fly.
*
Pfc. Dave Einsiedler of the
69th rushed through Post Head-
quarters waving his. clearance
papers last Wednesday. He re-
ceived notice that he was to
leave for the U. of Alabama for
ASTP training, but the thing
that tickled him the most was
that he was scheduled for KP duty
the following day and he could
scarcely conceal his regret that
he wouldn't be here to take over
the controls of the "China Clip-
oer." Dave's been on this field
'or 4uite some time out never
found a job for his particular
qualifications. it looks like
ASTP is just what the doctor or-
dered for GI's who have had spe-
cialized college training.
We knew that the daily band
concerts eventually would cause a
few of us to break down and give
vent to some suppressed desires.
One such casualty was Sergeant
Major 'Hardrock' Stone. The
tech sergeant must have been
quite active in his home town's


political groups, for when the
band came around Monday with the
banner advertising the variety
show, Stone cast aside all inhi-
bitions and rushed out and grab-
bed the banner from the start-
led bandsman and insisted on
carrying it while the band
marched over to Personnel.
(We do not believe that the
fact that he was offered two
cokes to do it had anything to
do with the case. )
Also victims of the band's
bewitching strains were the girls
of Personnel, who, led by Kitty
'Let's do it' Safar, pooled nick-
els and purchased soft drinks
for the entire band.
COMINGS & GOINGS: Sgt. Steve Tru-
chan left Courts and Boards Wed-
nesday for Salt Lake. Steve is
a great all-around competitor and
his wise-cracks and pitching arm
(softball) will be missed by the
69th...Cpl. Austin "Boss" McE1-
ewee of the PAI is back from Ft.
Logan...Sgt. Howard MacDonald,
reputedly the fastest GI stenog-
rapher on the field, left for
Maxwell after a year of yeoman
service as courts-martial re-
porter.
*
UP & AROUND: Major Bryan, Sub-
Depot Commander, after an ap-
pendectomy at the Post Hospit-
al...Captain Shoftner, Finance
Officer, after a minor opera-
tion...Captain Wiseman, White
Flashes CO, up, but not yet a-
around--still being bothered
by a trick knee.
Oswald Geiger, electrician
with the Post Engineers, returned
from a night emergency call early
last week to find his house had
burned down. His wife and child-
ren were safe, but the house and
most of their personal effects
were destroyed. Generous mem-
bers of the P.E. immediately took
up a collection, which helped to
soften the blow.


EXTRA FOOD RATION

STAMPS FOR MEN
GOING ON PASS

Application Blanks to Be
Filled Out Before
Leaving Field
To save time for service men
home on brief visits, the OPA
has cut the "red tape" for
obtaining food rationing cer-
tificates, as well as shorten-
ing to three days the minimum
food-allowance period.
Effective June 2, all U.S.
servicemen, as well as Allied
soldiers and sailors, on leave
for/ 72 hours or longer may apply
for ration certificates before
leaving camp. Previously a week
was the minimum leave for which
extra food could be obtained.
A "furlough ration unit" based
on the anticipated amount of
'rationed food that would be eaten
'at nine meals has been establish-
ed, consisting of eight points
for processed foods, eight Doints
for meats and fats, one-quarter
pound of coffee and one-quarter
Soldiers going home on pass
or furlough are urged to apply
for their food certificates
before they leave camp in ord-
that their visit home will not
deplete the family's supply of
points.
Application blanks may be ob-
tained from Captain Emmnett Sing-
leten, Post Rationing Officer.



Ordnotes
We have tried several times to
no avail to get our armament mas-
ter sergeant to have his picture
taken for the Ordnotes column.
It's understood that either he's
afraid of the camera or vice-
versa. Neither does he like to
have his name mentioned in the
Target, because he does' t care
for unnecessary publicity. "None
of that stuff, Joe," he says.
Everyone' s either "Joe" or "Cor-
poral. "
He's the Ordmen's practical
joker, always pulling stunts on
someone. Miss Huddleston found
a snake under her typewriter
cover one morning, and hasn't
completely recovered yet. It
was only a wooden snake that the
sergeant has. We understand too,
that he's an outdoor man, liking
to sleep overnight in the woods.
It seems that he prefers to go
to Marianna for these pastoral
excursions.
Right now the sergeant is on
furlough, and it may be that he
gets married, but we have our
doubts, because he's much too
bashful, if wolves ever get that
way. Go into the armament shop
sometime and see him. He'll
offer you a coke or have you
,look at a gun. The only warning
we can give you is that you
might get the "shock" of your
life, if those electrical gad-
gets are still connected.
We hear that Pvt. Ostwals got
stung by a bee, butwhere, Ozzie,
where?
S/Sgt. Terry and Pfc. Freeman
received their discharges this
week. We saw Mr. Terry in town
the other night. Those civvies
don' t fit as well "Pop"; you
should be back.
A mascot has been introduced
into the armament shop. It' s a
kitten who was immediately
christened "Thomas". We're
still wondering if the "Thomas"
could be tor T/4 Littie.
This week's award will go to
the first person who can prove
that the Ordnance Office was
sane during the past week. Pfc.
Snodgrass .is still madly search-
ing for 1 ea. Tool, Combination,
and Pfc. Towle, a sparkplug.
Thousands of items were invent-
oried and. 9poed to the new
stocr record cards; certainly a
meritorious job.


Page 9


el Ma1f fNL
TijadMll Ic B


June 5, 1943


THE TYNDALL TARGET







'PUp 'PW.T~nATl TARfl~FiT


rage 10 ." .-.- -,---


FOUR BASEBALL TEAMS WON FIVE GAMES SUNDAY


TORNADOES, OFFICERS,

TWO COLORED TEAMS

MAKE CLEAN SWEEP



A record that may never again
b- equalled in Tyndall sports
history was made last Sunday
when four Tyndall baseball teams
emerged victorious over their
opponents, with the Aviation
All-Stars copping a twin bill to
boot.
The Tornadoes, facing the lo-
cal Coast Guard unit, banged out-
nine hits in the sixth and sev-
enth innings for a total of ten
runs to completely demoralize
the tars, who called the game
to a halt at the end of the
seventh. A home run with bases
loaded by left fielder Davis in
the stretch frame was the blow
that caused the Guardsmen to
drop anchor.
The Tornadoes were coached by
M/Sgt. "Woody" Busby, acting in
the absence of Lt. S.J. Dron-
gowski.
Over at pelican Park the Tyn-
dall Officers' nine were play-
ing off a previously cancelled
game and were trailing 3-4 going
into the ninth. A two-run up-
rising in the top of the ninth
provided a one run lead which
Capt. Dangler held to give the
Tyndall officers their second
win in the USO Twilight League.
With no defeats to i.Lr their
record, the team is tied for top
honors with the Coast Guard
nine.'
The post colored team journey-
ed to Eglin Field in an attempt
to avenge their 11-9 eleventh
inning defeat suffered last Sun-
day here. Their trip was not
in vain as the boys combed the
Eglin pitcher for fourteen hits
which resulted in 12 runs, while
Weaks of Tyndall limited the
Eglin batsmen to 9 runs.
Meanwhile, over on their new
diamond, the Aviation All-Stars
became the first field team to
win a double header as they took
the measure of the Iynn Haven
and Jinks Tigers nines.
In their first game of the
afternoon, with Gorham on the
mound, the All-StarS slammed out
a 13-7 victory over the Lynn
Haven team. Gorham allowed ten
hits, but kept them well scat-
tered, while the All-Stars, pac-
ed by shortstop Jernigan, con-
nected for twenty hits off of
the opposing pitcher, Chester-
nut.
Gorham became the first Tyn-
dall pitcher to hurl a twin bill
when he took the mound in the
nightcap and although allowing.
eighteen hits, managed to last
the game and receive credit for
a 15-7 victory. The All-Stars
garnered twenty-four hits from
ith. the Jinks Tigers flinger.
TYNDALL AB R H
Didier, c 5 O 1
Anderson, 3b 4 0 0
Brown, 2b' 5 2 3
Edwards, rf 3 3 2
Jackral, ss 4 3 1
Tarr., cf 2 0 0
Sed sak, lb 3 2 1
Davis. If 4 2 2
wulli'ns, p 2 0 0
Southard, p* 2 0 2
Busby. 3b# 2 1 1
Totals 36 13 13

COAST GUARD
Allen, tf 3 0 0
Haucker, lb 4 0 1
north c 3 0 0
Rains, as 3 1 0
Hess, if 2 0 0
Brazank, 2b 4 1 1
Chetta, cf 1 1 1
Anderson, rf 1 0 0
Nocheck, p 2 0 0
Rowell, If (#) 2 0 1
Totals 25 3 4
o Batted for Mullins in sixth.
# Batted for Tarr in sixth.


THE POST COLORED TEAM LINES UP FOR THE PHOTOGRAPHER


'- -


PICTURED ABOVE ARE THE MEMBERS OF THE POST COLORED TEAM WHO
DEFEATED EGLIN FIELD LAST SUNDAY BY A SCORE OF 12-9 TO AVENGE
THEIR PREVIOUS WEEKS LOSS AT THE HANDS OF THE SAME TEAM. THE
TYNDALL MEN FACE THE NAPIER FIELD NINE HERE TOMORROW AT 1:00
P.M.
KNEELING, LEFT TO RIGHT: MATHEWS, F; WHITE, RF; SGT. DAN-
IELS, TEAM COACH; BLACKMON, LF; COONCH, MASCOT; JENKINS, CF;
RHODES, F; AND MAYO, C.
STANDING, LEFT TO RIGHT: MCCLELLION, F; FOX, ss; HARRISON,
3B; DAVIS, 18; BASKET, P; ENGLISH, 2B; DAWKINS, C; WEAKS, P;
AND PFC. HAZEL WILLIS, TEAM REPORTER.


(#) Batted for
TYNDALL
COAST GUARD


Hess in fifth.


0 3
0.2


POST COLORED TEAM
Harrison, as
Mayo, rf
Randle, 2b
Dawkins, c
Blackmon, 3b
Baskett, If
White, cf
Davis, lb
Weaks, p
Totals
UMPIRE: Arthur King


0 0 0
0 1 0

AB
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
3
3
41


5 5 -13
00-3

H R
2 2
3 3
1 2
3 1
1 2
2 2
1 0
1 0
0 0
14 12


1st game


ALL-STARS
Dupree, lb
Jernigan, ss
pettaway, If
Gill, 3b
Sanders, rf
Leon, cf
Douglass, 2b
Odom, c
Conley, p
Gorham, p
Totals

LYNN HAVEN
Black, 3b
Davis, ss
Clyins, If
Cain, c
Chesternut, p
peters, cf
Myers, rf
Myers, 2b
Griffen, lb
Totals
UMPIRE: James

2
ALL- ST A
Dupree, lb
Jernigan, ss
pettaway, if
Gill, 3b
Sanders, rf
Leon, cf
Douglass, 2b
Ashford, c
Gorham, p
Totals

JINKS TIGERS
Tyre, c
Smith, p


4
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
31
Marshaond


nd game


4 3
4 3


GUNNERMAKERS WIN THREE

GAMES, TAKE LOOP LEAD

The Gunnermaker bowling team
shifted into high gear last.
Tuesday night and took three
games from the Redbirds to as-
sume the league lead with a re-
cord of eight wins against one
defeat.
Several records were broken
during the week's bowling and
among them was the new single
high game score rolled by Pvt.
Pete Russo of the Bluebirds who'
turned in a 254 score in his
second game. The QM quintet set
new highs in the single game team
score and also three game total
departments.
This week's results:
QM 3, Ordnance 0; 69th 2, White
Flashes 1; Redbirds 0, GM 3;
Zebras 2, Squadron C 1; Blue-
birds 2, Medics 1; Cloud Hoppers
3, Canaries 0 (forfeit).
Individual highs, each tean
Miller (QM) 202, 193, 218-614
Aur'mma (0) 180, 211, 210-601
Bianco (69) 244, 196, 184-624
Olenick (WF) 179, 181, 141-501
Gaylo (RB) 131, 176, 191-498
Loudis (GM) 158, 174, 169-501
Richu (Z) 222, 192, 145-559
Laughlin (SC) 155, 213, 169-541
Russo (B) 133, 254, 151-538
Kocur (M) 216, 187, 193-596


GAMES SCHEDULED FOR TOMORROW
Tornadoes vs. P.C. Naval Base
at Tyndall 2:00 P.M.
(Southard or Davis for T/F)
*Post Colored Team vs. Napier
at Tyndall 1:00 P.M.
(Weaks will pitch for T/F)
All-Stars vs. Jinks Tigers
at Tyndall 3:00 P.M.
(Gorham or Conley for T/F)


peterson, 3b
Revies, If
Webb, cf
Eddie, 2b
Leroy, lb
Dickerson, ss
Carter, rf
McRoy
Totals


4 2
4 2
4 2
1 1
1 1
2 1
2 1
2 2
28 18


UMPIRE: James Marshmond


FIELD'S FIRST TRACK

AND FIELD MEET

TOMORROW





Although originally scheduled
for this afternoon, Tyndall's
first track and field meet will
be held tomorrow beginning at
11:00 A.M. at the post athletic
field.
The Special Services Office
announced that the majority of
the squadrons will be represent-
ed at the meet.
Field events include discus
throwing, shot put, high jump
and broad jump.
Track events schedule:
220 yard dash........11:00 A.M.
1 mile run ..........11:15 A.M.
100 yard dash....... 11:30 A.M.
50 yard dash.........11:45 A.M.

THREE UNDEFEATED TEAMS

According to statistics re-
leased by Lt. S.J. Drongowski,
post athletic officer, the sec-
ond week of inter-squadron soft-
ball competition finds three un-
defeated teams, the Medics, Ze-
bras and Ordnance, sharing first
place honors.


Complete standings are as
follows: w L
Ordnance.................. 2 0
Medics...... .............. 2 0
Zebras..... .............. 2 0
Cloud Hoppers............. 1 0
Q. ............ ............. 1 1
69th............ ......... 1 1
Redbirds.................. 1
Band...................... 1
Venturas................. 1 2
Guardians................ 1 2
Cai.aries................. 0 1
White Flashes.............. 1
Gunnermakers.............. 0 2
Bluebirds................ ... 0 2

TOPS TORNADO BATTERS
Pvt. Louis Edwards of the
Guardians, with eight hits in
eighteen trips to the plate,
leads the Tyndall Tornade bat-
ting roster with a percentage of
.444, according to the latest
figures released by Coach S.J.
Drongowstl.
Sgt. Paul Brown of the Zebras
is close on the heels of Ed-
wards with a percentage of .441
in 34 times at bat.
The percentages follow:


PLAYER
Edwards
Brown
Jackrel
Hines
Davis
Southard
Sedmak
Didier
Tarr
Matonak
Anderson
Flanagan


AB t H
18 8 B
34 10 15
32 7 10
26 10 8
13 2 4
10 3 3
34 4 9
32 6 8
13 2 3
28 7 5
28 3 3
3 0 0
271 62 76


PCT.
.444
.441
*312
.308
.307
.300
.265
*250
.231
.179
.107
.000
.280



OFFICER'S BOWLING LEAGUE
With six teams entered in the
competition, Tyndall's officer
bowling league got under way last
Friday evening. Lt. Valentine
Day of the B. O.Q. #509 team garn-.
ered high scoring honors of the
night with a single game high of
247 and three game-series high of
611.
First week results:
Ordnance 0, B.O.Q. #508 3; QM 2,
B.O.Q. #502 1; Post Exchange O,
B.0.Q. #509 3.

Individual highs, each team:
Mitchell (0) 161, 152, 187-500
Goer'son (508) 164, 179, 199-542
Goldsmith (QM) 177, 158, 153-488
Harley (502) 213, 177, 143-533
Rickeman (PX) 203, 152, 114-469
Day (509) 200, 247, 164-611





Squadron F
We hear a lot of stories about
gunners "washing out" because of
defective vision. F/Sgt. Will-
cut has his own check on the
Flight Surgeon-a kitten which he
found in a ditch the other day.
)'You can't see the darned thing
unless you have 20-20 glimmers,
so if you can't see the cat your
eyes aren't good enough. We
don't know what happens when the
cat starts growing.
The clever work on the gunnery
student and his instructor in
last week's Target mentioned Sgt.
H.M. Johnson as the guy receiving
the cartoons-it should have said
Sgt. H.M. Foster.
Lt. Gomber says he's going to
get a pitchpipe to keep flight 2
on the ball. They have a little
trouble once in a while keeping
in tune when they sing. Loud ,
though!
AN ORCHID: To Sgt. B.F. Reinitz,
for his excellent show at the
Post Theater Monday night. Let's
have some more, Bert.
Whewt F's instructors really
"teed off" on the alleys Thurs-
day night. The officers were on
ithe receiving end and got shel-
lacked all three games, in spite
of their "ringer," Mrs. Berner,
who effectively stymied Sgt. Pis-
tone all evening. It really got
him! However, Sgt. Laughlin and
Co. took care of the situation
and Mgr. Delaney even added his
own southpaw slants to put on the
finishing touches. The officers
are now in secret session to de-
cide the plan of attack for the
return match.
LESSON OF THE WEEK: Always put on
your trousers before leaving the
barracks. For reference, contact
Pfc.'s Scheier and Russell, who
ran into Lt. Ference the other
night on their way back from the
orderly room, each jauntily clad
in a pair of GI shorts PERIOD.


Squadron C
With universal disgust the
fellows of this squadron have
picked up the field paper to
find it filled with the whys and
wherefores of some sergeant's
love affair.
These guys might just as well
go jump in the lake--for we don' t
give a damn about their love
life.
The boys in this squadron are
just like all others--only bet-
ter. Let us glorify a so-called
lowly private who is just a com-
mon guy with an uncommon story.
Pvt. Rogelio Bolado was born
in Hidalgo, Mexico, and educat-
ed in that country. When the
United States was plunged into
war he came to this country and
tossed his fortune in with ours.
Before coming to this country,
Bolado had never spoken a word
of English. But so apt and
alert is Rogelio Bolado that he
already has mastered the English
language with surprising per-
\ section.
Ever since he can remember he
has wanted to man a machine gun
from an airplane and now at last
Bolado is beginning to fulfill
that wish. Only seven months
ago he became a citizen of the
United States after having serv-
ed in the Air Forces for more
than four months.
The boys of squadron C like
him and he has accustomed him-
self to his new job very well.
He has gotten used to many
new things--but he laughs when
he thinks of Sgt. Cherry of
Skunk Hollow.
"He's the guy no one could get
used to," laughed Rogelio, "but
he tickled me very much."


"WINGED BULLET" WINGS

OKEHED FOR GUNNERS


BOTH AUTHORIZED
Wearing of the 'winged bullet'
badge was authorized for aerial
gunners this week in a Daily Bil-
tin quoting from changes to Army
Regulations.
The badge is described as a
pair of wings 'with a winged
projectile in the center of the
wings, pointed down, superim-
posed on a circular target.'
The badge, together with the
air crew badge more generally
seen, is pictured above.

Squadron B
Have you heard the question of
the week? "What mess hall do
the horse flies eat at? And why
can't we eat there too so we
also can be big and strong. "
Warning to A/C Casey...weather
tower reports low pressure area
moving in this direction. You
are advised to stay in bed next
Tuesday.
Eight of the cadets going
through gunnery school already
have received wings as glider
pilots. Upon completion of this
course they'11 receive gunners'
wings. Then off to navigation
and bombardiering for two more
sets of wings. They should be
ready to take off, literally.
The boys already are looking
forward to their graduation party
since they've uncovered some
real talent in A/C Dick Hough,
former member of Guy Lombardo's
band. Dick can really swing it
on his sax as any Lombardo fan
can tell you.
DID YOU KNOW? A/C Mike Abate
has seen action in the Southwest
Pacific. A/C John Browley is a
well-known amateur golfer, and
has held many titles.

Skunk Hollow
Once again Skunk Hollow has
become a center of activity,
welcoming incoming would-be gun-
ners. It' s an ideal place as
far as the permanent personnel
are concerned, but as yet the
students are not appreciative of
the surrounding beauty and four-
engined mosquitoes.
One thing is certain--there's
seldom a dull moment in Skunk'
Hollow! Ask Sgt. Carter to tell
you about his excursion and sub-
sequent adventures at Post En-
gineers last Monday, when he
tried to get some work done oh
the megaphone for the new drill
field. Quite an indoctrination
on going through channels.
Something which amazes all:
How does Frank (Atlas Maiden-
swoon) Shelnutt get (and keep up
with) all his women? Quite a
feat, although he occasionally,
has trouble with C.'A. P. men,
range officers, and the like.
Can anyone give us a clue as
to how "Brace" Cherry got the
name "Bubbles"? A zooty name
none the less...We' re all anx-
ious to get a good look at the
car (?) Sgt. Kempner got stuch
with.... bought some time ago.
If only he could catch up on re-
,pairs so he could bring it a-
round. -Sgt. Bob Haire


Squadron A
With the second week's exam
and the larger part of classroom
subjects finished, Squadron A's
embryo gunners embarked on their
range work with the proverbial
vengeance. In skeet, Pfc. Wayne
Bryant, on the first day at the
range, left the rest of the out-
fit behind nursing their bruised
shoulders to the tune of his 28
broken birds out of a possible'
26. For his first look at a
clay pegeon, this is all reet,
to say the least.
The boys also felt a cal. 50
buck for the first time this
week on the recently improved
malfunction range. If we may
paraphrase Abe Lincoln for the
benefit of the instructors, we
may say the class "will little
note nor long remember what we
said here, but we can never for-
get what they did here."
S/Sgt. John E. Bach and Sgt.
James E. Whitehurst will be
leaving soon for aviation cadet
training. Sgt. Joseph M. Grau-
bard left this week to enter
specialized training at the Uni-
versity of Alabama.
Sgt. Sanfred Trahan spent a
year and a half with the Zombies
and calypso singers in Trinidad,
serving as a ground operator in
the inter-island tactical net-
work. Stationed atWaller Field,
he was a member of the newest
organization the Army has ever
shipped to foreign duty, the out-
fit having been formed less than
a month when its orders came
through.
Squadron punishment took a new
twist last week when lst/Sgt.
Newell C. Cross told his "problem
children" that they would be
marched to the Guardhouse Sunday
morning, and later be put on a
detail to atone for their fre-
quent absences. As it later de-
veloped, the "Guardhouse" angle
was a myth, but the result was
nothing short of miraculous.
-Sgt. J.H. Cobb

.Squadron E
Squadron "E", has a new CO,
Lt. Joseph H. Glasser, who re-
placed Lt. D.W. Mendelson. Also
a new Adjutant, Lt. Ralph D. Put-
nam, who replaced Lt. I.H. Edel-
man. Ist/Sgt. Chas. D. Hafer is
back from furlough.
Lt. J.P. Harrison, Flight In-
structor for Flight 1, is now on
leave.
Our baseball team, under the
direction of Cpl. Bob Newell, is
still undefeated, going strong
and willing to take on all com-
ers. Bill Tripp who put in one
term with the "Gobs", prefers
the branch of the service he is
now in. Likewise, Norman Will-,
iams who put in four years with
the Marines.


Flesh Gordon says: 'It's a wise
student who knows his own gun.'


Squadron D
Well, our pledge came true
about our week at Apalachicola
with class 43-22. Our boys led
by Lt. Davis beat the averages
of Lt. Miller's sections by a
decisive margin.
The "King's Men" took top hon-
ors in Saturday's inspection
with a cool 96%, to finally take
first place after two successive
seconds. In addition, commenda-
tion was given by Lt. R.R. Har-
rington, inspecting officer, on
the new squadron headquarters
sign and the many squadron im-
provements. Other squadrons
please copy.
Sgt. Harry Nortman returned
from furlough still on air from
dancing with the Duchess of
Windsor at N.Y.'s, Stage Door
Canteen.
Sgt. Sol Haber bought a beau-
tiful "rock" through the PX and
all he has to do now is sweat
out the furlough.
S/Sgt. "Salute" Blanchard ap-
plied for O.C.S. and wound-up
being considered for Aviation
Cadet training. Almost found
himself in the kitchen helping
to unpack hogs if you can be-
lieve Blanchard. He said they
asked him everything from hog-
packing to irrigation problems.
We still have half of the ori-
ginal class 43-22 known now as
43-23 and they are due to grad-
uate next Monday. They have the
Jimmie Doolittle in their bunch
who was featured in a full length
story in the Target. Robert
Taylor, not of the movies, is
also represented in that class.
In class 43-22 we had a student
named Merlo who had to fire 1800
rounds in one day so that he
could complete his training as a
student and be eligible to ship
the next day at noon, for Avia-
tion Cadets. CpL now Sgt. Der
metro Merlo had his own gradu-
*ation and attired in coveralls,
dirty face, and hands, fresh
from his last mission he re-
ceived his wings and higher rat-
ing. That's the calibre of men
in this squadron who have the
determination and ambition to
keep going ahead to better
fields to help win this war.
Congratulatiors to Cpl. now Sgt.
Merlo.

Kadet Kapers
Two weeks ago, 180 cadets
arrived here at Tyndall from
Nashville. These men cre sched-
uled to become navigators, and
are taking the gunnery course
because of new AAF rules that
all future navigators are to be
schooled in bombardiering and
flexible gunnery.
The versatility that will be
attained by these cadets is self
evident. The trail is long and
tedious but the knowledge gained
will make these men capable and
worthy of the important positions
they are to play in combat
c rews
Some of the cadets have had
active foreign service. All
have had some pilot training.
Tyndall Field received the
cadets with warmth that matched
the weather. It didn't take
long for the cadets to gain the
friendship of the enlisted per-
sonnel--a fact made apparent by
the good-natured ribbing between
.them, especially as regards
singing.
The cadets are governed under
the guidance of Lt. Steen, Lt.
Goverts and Lt. Bailey.
-A/C S. Halpern

A fox has been described as a
wolf who sends flowers.


June 5 1943


N EWS FROM THE"
June5 193 TH TYNALL ARGE


Page 5


THE TYNDAIL TARGET

















I


Capt. E. Shofner


1st Lt. N. Howard


M/Sgt. J. Farr


T/Sgt. R. Costigan















S/Sgt. J. Hanak


T/Sgt. J. Beegle














S/Sgt. L. Lovitt


S/Sgt. H. Anderson


T/3 J. Cappiello


T/3 T. Astle


T/4 H. Lund


LT tt

T/4 F. Totten


T/4 F. Leon


T/5 T. Franklin


,A !

T/5 J. Fohner















T/5 C. Pennington


Pfc. A. Balliett


Pfc. P Tremoulet


Pvt. W. McGuffee Pvt. W. Tylutki


Pvt. F. Travers















Pvt. E. Scallet







THE TYEND)AIT, TARGET


A A SATHE TYNDA' LLTARGE


correspnden


LINE ENGINEERING Sgt. Wilbert
W. (Radio
Operator) Coon is still tell-
ing us about his. trip to Holly-
wood with Captain Clark Gable.
S/Sgt. Ben Holton, that tall,
dark and handsome Texan, says,
"Boy! I'd give my right arm to
get out to Hollywood -- with
etty Grable, Lana Turner and
Hedy Lamarr." Coon is always
torturing Ben with his tales
about Hollywood -- telling him
how he saw Betty Grable at the
beach, Lana at the pre-view,
etc. (How would you like a
transfer to March Field, Cali-
fornia, Ben?)
Sgt. Joe Sinclair, the boy.
who never gripes -- much, is
seriously contemplating mar-
riage. Perhaps this is the
reason why Joe hasn't griped
so much recently. The girl is
a local belle. Good luck, *Joe,
you'll need it.
Cpl. William (Worry Wart)
Brawner is still the chief of
the gas trucks. Brawner says
he wouldn't swap jobs with any
man. The only trouble with the
job says Brawner is, "I can't
get as many 3-day passes as I
used to."
Flight Chief Powell sent one
of his prize crew chiefs, name-
ly, Roscoe Deckard, to Air Corps
Supply to get a can of prop
wash. Deckard returned with the
story that "They said I needed
an '81' to get ItI" Incident-
ally, "All-American" Deckard is
one of the best ball players on
the post.
S/Sgt. Billy Bagwell, God's
gift to the fair sex of sunny
outh Carolina, has returned
from a stay at the T/F hospital.
Billy seems to be in good shape
and we' re glad to have him back.
.There is no doubt left as to
how well S/Sgt. Elliott has his
motorcycle trained it brought
him home one night while Gene
was about "three sheets to the
wind. "

DOVIAK MILLER Pvt. Doviak,
AND RAINY DAYS one of the able
bodied aerial
engineers, bears a slight re-
semblance to Captain Gable. Do-
viak now has a mustache that is
identical with the Gable type.
Incidentally, he was recently
seen in the PX purchasing some
shinola. Wonder what he' s go-
ing to use it for? We don't
wear black shoes in this army.
What has happened to H.H.
Miller and his local affair???
H.H., when questioned replies,
"I've been too busy towing tar-
gets lately -- haven't much
time for girls these days. "
"Keep towin' 'em," Miller, but
confidentially, the drug store
business pays off faster than
the towing business.
Rainy days are happy days at


"Ain't it great-they even gave me a policy!"


Apalach. It is on those says
that the Line Engineering Office
is known as the L.E. Casino.
High scorers are usually M/Sgt.
Passwaters, T/Sgt. Anderson,
S/Sgt. Elliott and Sgt. O'Neil.
'All. we need is a roulette wheel
(for rainy days, of course) and
a rake stick for Passwaters.

CHATTER Did you ever hear
S/Sgt. Charles "Blon-
die" Misiaveg sing? It's mur-
der, I says. "Blondie" cuts
loose every now and theh'and
the boys all sit around wonder-
ing if they can believe their
ears.
This post was honored (sar-
casm) by a visit from Sgt. Wall-
ace J. "Lonely Hearts" Murphy
recently. Murphy is the ex-
Tyndall Target reporter for this
field. What's thematter, Murph,
did they run you off already?
*Cpl. Alexander Muslin, one of
Apalach's favorite sons, left us
last week for parts unknown.

BOOKS MITCHELL Among the out-
AND MEDALS standing books
in our tech--
nical library is the volume
titled nAerosphere, 1942." The


book contains a full-page pic-
ture of Brig. General William
"Billy" Mitchell, one of the Air
Corps' greatest officers. In
the picture, General Mitchell is
wearing about 25 medals on his
chest and when all the boys a-
round here look at this remark-
able picture they all chirp up
with "That's the way I'll be
when I get back from Shangri-la."

Sub-Depot
Lt. George L. Trawick, Assist-
ant Engineering Officer, will
attend a three weeks course in
Technical Inspection to be held
at Chanute Field, the eaily-part
of June.
We are happy to report that
our Commanding Officer, Major L.
A. Bryan, is convalescing nicely
from his operation and has been
released from the Station Hospi-
tal to his home.
-B.J. Davenport

A cautious gal is one who
buys her soldier-friend a
flashlight so he won't have
to feel his way around in a
blackout.


Page 7


Venturas
Chubby Fannin, better known to
his intimate fellow men as the
man who possesses the million
dollar smile, says there is an
art to his smile, worked up
after many years of patience.
Jim (Golden Gladiator) Titus,
received a jolt in his plans for
one little wren down by Cafe-
teria way, when she suddenly de-
cided to pull stakes and hunt
for greener pastures. Why??
Rupp, the great impersonator,
is convalescing for fifteen days
on furlough in his native state
of Wisconsin...Eschwie (Para-
chute Dept. ) writes on the aver-
age of 10 letters a day, says he
has to keep up his fan mail.
Seems as if thq lad used to be
an adviser to the lovelorn for
his newspaper back home. An-
other Professor Anthony in our
midst.
Pop Daly shook the sand from
his shoes as he departed for the
shores of Buffalo, with an old
age discharge in his hands. We
who worked here on the line with
the old man will certainly miss
his presence around here...Will-
iams passed his final round to
becoming an aviation cadet last
Friday; he is now waiting to be
called, which should be soon...
Wise, the terrible, is now toil-
ing on the line, having been re-
lieved in the inspection depart-
ment due to shortage of man-pow-
er. Where are those WAACs?
Irresistable Smotek, right
hand of T/Sgt. Gainey in Line
Maintenance Hangar, is blessed
with the hidden power of humbl-
ing the opposite sex. For ex-
ample, a certain little lass in
Lynn Haven has already put the
seal of approval on the certif-
icate to take the last hundred
steps to matrimony with the guy,
and he hasn't opened his mouth
at this writing. What a large
pair of eyes you have, grandma'
FUNNY FEELINGS: Back in Eglin
Field, in the autumn of '41, the
80th Group had just arrived
there from Maxwell Field, where
they were to stay till the com-
pletion of Tyndall Field. On
the field, employed as a civil-
ian for the sub-depot was a
young man who is in the squadron
.now. Von Drehle happened to be
in charge of one of the ware-
houses on that field. Gainey
made the remark one day, "What
would I give to have you in my
squadron, and sure enough a
year later, the same man is in
the same squadron, and on the
same field, as the man who made
the remark.
-Sgt. W.J. Murphy


And then she said: 'Darling,
hope you're not on guard to-
night.
And the little devil re-
plied: 'Nope, are you?'

He: 'I see your husband has
been promoted to master ser-
geant. I suppose he's brill-
i ant and knows everything.'
She: 'Don't fool yourself;
he doesn't suspect a thing'


. -o a ra 0 11" -11




"Copyrighted Material



l,,, Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers



l11ma 10 W "sol fJlT2


June 5, 1943


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nns-, 0


ra- 0 m11 a. I kLL.A--5


Gunner Makers
Sgt. Coffer is anticipating a
June wedding...Has Sgt. Tucker
put in for separate rations yet?
He's elegible...The PEEKER is
appreciating the fact that all
of the fellows are working hard
on Friday nights.
I see Lt. Crumrine finally did
get that service ribbon...Why
doesn't our mascot, WAAC, grow,
Taylor?...Do barracks chiefs
have any friends? Ours doesn't
seem to... Sgt. Mattox is the
Casanova who has an income from
a certain blonde in Panama.
Sgt. Ambrosia was married just
a few minutes when he received a
telegram advising him not to do
it...Pfc. Matthews is back so
listen for the wolf call, girls.
If we ever should get that so
cherished "flag, who has a
cellophane bag for it?...Why Red
Boland even bothers to go to PT
is a secret. He never even mov-
es his little finger while he's
there...It is understood that
Capt. Salley is looking for
enough gunny sacks to make a
sail for his boat. The Red
Cross, I believe, will sew them...
Pvt. Willsey was noticed reading
a letter with large lip prints
on it. The envelope looked more
like the young lady had tried to
eat the thing than kiss it.
The coined phrases by "pro-
truding" men for this week are:
Coffer--"Why don' t you guys
fold these sheets right."
Goodsen--"Need a chaw? Spat-tt.
Hicks--"But now let me tell
ya.. ."
Remember, "if you must have
your hand in everything, put
your heart in it too. I' 11 be
hiding from you. --"THE PEEKER."


Group 2
As an introduction to Group 2
te will give you the men who do
the big jobs of the section:
Lt. A.C. Miller is the head
man and has the terrific job of
keeping all the pilots on the
ball.
T/Sgt. R:W. Austin has the job
of lining the armorers out and
seeing that all ships are ready
for the students to step into at
the minute that old clock on the
wall strikes seven. "Slim" or
"Shorty" are the two names he
responds to the most. His pet
peeve is to have some one drop
a lighted cigarette in his
pocket.
M/Sgt. F.G. Bilozur is the
mainstay around the instructors
bench and at all times of the
day you can hear him callingnot
for "Dr. Kildare" but' for'some
instructor who has goofed off.
Bilozur' s pet peeve is to have
someone tell him that it was not
that extractor assembly that was
the cause of the malfunction.
Heard in the 50 cal. class-
room, "What causes a run away
gun?" Student, quickly, "Grem-
lins".
That's all, 11 beseein' you.
-The Eye



Canaries
Well, the Canaries are still on
the beam with a 93 score on last
Saturday'ss inspection. Everyone
hbted very much to give up the
"E" Flag, which we had won the
previous week with a 94 score.
I might say at this time, that
members of this squadron are
taking full advantage of Tyn-
dall's beach in their spare
time and they are all anxiously
awaiting the opening of the
Recreation Hall.
Our softball team has some
games scheduled for this week
and we will give all teams a
battle royal- believe me.
Here's hoping things will
clear up soon and the ratings
start rolling again, because we
have some hard working boys who
really deserve more greens.
-Pvt. Lawrence D. Mangum


Army. Days Become School Days


Specialists will win the war. And specialists are what the Army
is turning out with its recently established Specialized Training Program
which is beginning to operate at colleges all over the nation. Here four
yardbirds who have been assigned for special training at Ohio State
University "take five" to admire a pet duckling owned by Miss Beryl
Collins, a freshman at the school.


Almost 15-months ago there came to Tyhdall Field the first
Catholic Chaplain assigned to the post. He watched the field
grow from a small field both from a physical standpoint and a
spiritual. The.Chapel was not finished, and religious serv-
ices were held in whatever place was available. His work
started with few men in attendance, and as he leaves us he can
say with pride that his services are well attended by the
Catholic men of the post. He has not been a Chaplain who has
limited his ministry and activities to any one certain group
but has served well all of those who have needed and asked for
his advice and spiritual guidance. For the past ten months he
'has been Post Chaplain. In this time he has made many friends
both among the military and civil population, and his presence
will be greatly missed by all who knew him, As he leaves us
for other assignments, we wish him God speed and good luck
with the full assurance that wherever he goes, he will make
himself a valuable part of his organization.






_.:. ...


SUNDAY
8:00 A.M............ ...Mass
9:00 A.M.... Protestant Sun-
day School
10:00 A.M.... Gunners Mass at.
Theatre
10:00 A.M....Protestant Wor-
ship Service
11:00 A.M.. Gunners Rotestant
Service at Theatre
17:30 P.M....Evening Worship


TUESDAY
7:30 P.M....Fellowship Club
WEDNESDAY
12:15 P.M....Protestant Wor-
ship Service
7:30 P.M....Choir Rehearsal
FRIDAY
7:30 P.M.....Jewish Service
No week-day Catholic Servic-
es until further notice.


Rugged ? 69th
Faced with a situation compar-
able to the one which confronted
the immortal Casey, Pfc. Ziar-
nowski stood at bat in the last
half of the last inning, with two
out, bases loaded, his team need-
ing two runs to win. Unlike Ca-
sey, Gene did not strike out, but
came through with a two-base hit
to defeat the 343rd, 5 to 4.
Special mention is due Pfc. Clamp
for a brilliant performance as
roving shortstop and Pfc. Mitch-
ell for excellent fielding at
third base.
We hear from the line that Sgt.
Eddie Gibbons, gas truck crew
chief, has had some doubt as to
what insignia he can wear on his
left sleeve. A friendshas sug-
gested a bottle of Schlitz
and a can opener.
We're sorry to lose Sgt. Mac-
Donald, and wish him best of
luck at Maxwell...Sgt. Hayes
returned from furlough with a
mixed Missouri and New Orleans
drawl...Now that Pfc. "Conductor"
Burns is getting new specs, we
have an idea the dust in the or-
derly room will really catch it.
It seems that Sgt. Holland is
finding it difficult to make up
his mind between his Shipyard
Sweet and his Miami Mama. You
know, Hulbert, if you have two,
you're supposed to turn one
In--ask Pfc. Nickles.
Postal patter has it that mor-
ale building lip prints on en-
velope flaps seem to be the fash-
ion now. Then there's the little
mouse that ran out of the mail
bag and caused a certain sargee"
who handles insured mail to
shriek and jump to a table, with.
trouser legs raised.


White Flashes
The high mark attained by our
squadron for the last inspection
may be accredited to Group 2.
For guys to meet for a full hour
early in the morning in order to
discuss and learn to take the
"proper steps" so as to win the
"E" is a great sacrifice that
can be motivated only by fine
squadron spirit. Now it is up
to Group 1 to follow suit for a
week's time and then there may
be a possibility of being award-
ed the flag before the war will
end.
To Capt. W.H. Wiseman, our CO,
who's having a knee recapping
job, our sincerest wishes for a
speedy recovery and an early
discharge from the hospital.
Our bowling team has all ready
marked up several victories.
With all the beautiful distrac-
tions about them it's remarkable
how they manage to keep one eye
on the pins. -S/Sgt. Wm. Solomon

Cloudhoppers
Our softball team lost to the
69th by 5 to 4. The original
team looked good and expects to
go places with Sgt. Alm managing
and Sgt. Shaw as mascot. Cpl.
Stewart, the "Mamaroncik Mar-
auder, reports no shortage of
liquor while he was on his "foi-
low. "
A soldier sometimes gets
strange bed fellows: For fur-
ther information on the subject
see S/Sgt. Houseal...Sgt. Porky
Stanley is all smiles now that
his roommate is back, we wonder
if they are related...Pfc. No-
gach had a dirty trick pulled on
him. Someone put some sand
crabs in his bed. He hopes they
don't get attached to him.
S/Sgt. Cook has been among the
missing to his old gang lately.
Is it Emma or his next door
neighbor?...S/Sgt. Griggs' room*
mate is worried about him lately.
Cary recently was sweating out a
tailor bill.
Congratulations toT/Sgt. Jones
on winning himself a coupe. S/
Sgt. Brad Berry was the unwill-
ing donor...We don't want to
write anything about Cpl. Nolan
because he would send about 30
copies of the Target to Jersey.


Fr'u T'VMnAT.T. rAnr.V'T










CADRE OF 14 WAAC'S REPORTS FOR DUTY HERE


The Camera Records Arrival of First W AA C's


1


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b' ;I :




.-- -


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'6.
r:63







i .


More Coming

Later; Area

Off Limits
Months of anticipation came
to a climax this week when
14 members of the Women's Army
Auxiliary Corps--two Com-
missioned officers and a doz-
en "enrolled members"--report-
ed for duty at Tyndall Field.
They are the cadre around
which it is expected that a
company probably numbering
nearly 150 women will be
formed.
Arriving here at noon Thurs-
day from the Second WAAC Train-
ing Center at Daytona Beach, they
moved into their barracks near
the Rec Hall--barracks which have
been completed and ready for the
WAAC's since March.
The WAAC area was placed off
limits to male military pers-
onnel, except for those having
official business there, in a
post General Order.
Just when more WAAC's will ar-
rive was not known, nor could
it be learned exactly how many
eventually will be stationed
here.
However, WAAC companies usu-
ally number from 125 to 150 wbm-
en, and if the case at this field
follows the usual procedure more
contingents of WAAC's will begin
arriving within a couple of
weeks.
Usually, companies of WAAC's
are formed by sending separately
groups of specialists from the
vardous WAAC schools, such as
cooks and bakers, motor trans-
port, administrative, and other
specialist training establish-
ments.
Most of the women to be assign-
ed to Tyndall are expected to be
from administrative schools and
eventually will replace men qual-
ified for combat service, after
the WAAC's have worked with the
men for a period and have learned
their jobs.
War Department policy is not to
replace civilian employes nor
limited service men by WAAC's.
Commanding the detachment here
is Second Officer Natalie yates
while the executive officer is
Third Officer Ella Stetson. Their
ranks correspond to first and sec-
ond lieutenants, respectively.
Lt. yates, who Is from New
Rochelle, N.Y., is the wife 6f
an Army officer, a graduate of
West Point, who was captured by
the Japs in the philippines. She
lived, herself, at Corregidor,for
a year, leaving there about six
months before Pearl Harbor.
She was graduated with the sec-
ond class of WAAC officers to be
commissioned at the Training
Center at Fort Des Moines, Iowa.
Lt. Stetson is from Vermont and
was a member of the third WAAC
OCS class. She was with the WPB
in Washington before entering the
WAAC.
"Enrolled members"--the phrase
corresponds to the words "enlist-
ed men" in the Army--are acting
First Leader Mabel A. pickett.
T/4 Emma L. Reid, mess serg-
eant; Junior Leader Naomi F.
Beeney, supply sergeant, and
Auxiliaries Alice Runion, de-
tachment clerk: Ethel Snow and
.Gladys Fairbanks, first cooks;
Rose Mary Lopaze and Sally Smith,
second cooks; Elta Moore, baker;
Nora Church, Kathryn Dively and
Allie Hayes.
WAAC FACTS
Here are summarized some facts
about the WAAC's:
Members of the WAAC, the Wom-
en's Army Auxiliary Corps, are
(Continued on Page U)


June 5, 1943


Page 3


~FIF TYNDAI;L TARGFI~


"'
: ""'~~9
~ -----i







Page 4


rm'I vnTArTyT r'AD fl-'rTa


14 WAAC'S REPORT

HERE FOR DUTY;

MORE EXPECTED


(Continued From Page 3.)
not in the Army-yet. They are
with the Army. A bill making
them a part of the Army has been
passed by the House and now a--
waits action by the Senate.
WAAC officers must be saluted.
In turn, WAAC enlisted women are
required to salute all officers.
The same rules regarding social
relationships apply to WAACs as
to Army personnel. Enlisted men
may not associate socially with
WAAC officers. Army officers
may not associate socially with
WAAC enlisted women.
Everywhere that WAACs have
been stationed, they have made
an excellent reputation as sol-
diers. They work hard and well.
High Army officers have requested
several increases in the number
of WAACs authorized, a fact which
proves that their value and effi-
ciency is recognized by men who
should know.
They are well-trained in Army
procedure, and their drilling
is, on the whole, above reproach.
Confidentially, soldiers, they
may make you look like recruits
when and if they are called upon
to participate in the daily re-
treat formations.
WAACs have a few disadvantages.
They are not entitled to send
free mail. They do not make de-
pendency allotments. WAAC offi-
cers give military orders only
to other WAACs.
The following is quoted from an
AAFSETC Personnel bulletin. "The
members of this Corps have been
accepted as equal partners in
the war effort. They, therefore,
deserve to be treated according-
ly. Having been trained along
military lines, they have an ap-
preciation of Army disciplinary
standards, such as saluting, de-
meanor, dress and appearance, as
well as similar amenities long
required in the Army. It is es-
sential for Army personnel to
maintain the highest standards
in their relationship to members
of the Women's Army Auxiliary
Corps, both on and off duty. It
Is, therefore, desired that this
subject be brought to the atten-
tion of all members of this com-
mand and that the highest stand-
ards of relationship be main-
tained at all times. "
In the WAAC, a first officer
corresponds to a captain in the
Army, a second officer to a first
lieutenant, a third officer to a
second lieutenant.
A leader holds the same rank as
sergeant in the Army, a junior
leader is a corporal, an auxil-
iary is a private. The WAAC has
the same different types of ser-
geants--tech, first, etc.--as the
Army, and also has technician ra-
tings such as technician fourth
grade, technician fifth grade,
etc. A chief leader corresponds
to a master sergeant.
Commissioned and non commis-
loned officers are distinguished
by the same insignia as are the
corresponding Army officers.
When addressing a WAAC com-
missioned officer you use the
word "Ma'am" to replace the "Sir"
you use in addressing a male of-
fi cer.
Second and third officers are
called lieutenants, leaders are
called sergeants and junior
leaders corporals.

SUB DEPOT TO GIVE
ATTENDANCE AWARDS
A device designed to lower
the percentage of absenteelsn
within the Sub-Depot by award-
ing War Bonds for perfect at-
tendance at work goes into ef-
fect this month.
According to the plan, slips
of paper bearing the names of
all employees who have not beer
absent from work for any reasor
during the month will be place


COMMENDED UOH 5YLLLIR i

$283, 000 WORTH OF

Gl INSURANCE


.. ... O[ I -

il" fOEM l .






This is Cpl. Joseph P. Mast-
roeni of the office force of the
Canaries, who has won written
commendation for his feat of
selling $283,000 worth of govern-
ment life insurance to soldiers
in a contest just ended.
'By sheer force of personality,
tact and diplomacy, Cpl. Mast-
roeni in his off duty hours sold
$283,000...,' stated in part a
ccmnendation written by his com-
manding officer, Capt. San Can-
zoneri.
Cpl. Mastroeni was advised in
a letter from Lt. George L.
Lasker, War Bond Officer, that
his production was the highest
on the field. 'You will be in-
terested to know that this was
far and away the largest amount
of insurance sold by ahy person
at Tyndall,' wrote Lt. Lasker,
adding 'Permit me to congratu-
late you and heartily thank
you.'
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Mastroeni,
423 Lawton Place, Perth Anboy,
N.J. are thecorporal's parents.
Leading the insurance paraue
is the Gunnermakers squadron,
in which the average policy is
for $8,145.
Capt. Reed S. Salley, squad-
ron OQ, commended S/Sgt. William
Oyler for leading the 'sales de-
partment' in the squadron, and
Sgt. Oyler won a cash prize for
'selling the insurance olan to
his organization.'


OCS COURSES LONGER
Effective July 1, the length
of the course of training at
officer candidate schools will
be increased from 12 weeks to a
minimum of four months, accord-
ing to an announcement made this
week by the War Deoartment.
Announcement was also made of
.a reduction in the size of the
classes of officer candidate
'schools. These steps appear to
be an accompaniment of approach-
ing stabilization of the size
of the Army and of the training
of a sufficient number of off-
icers to meet present needs and
demands in the near future.
NO CREASED SHIRTS
This is no time for Officers
or Enlisted men tobe fancy about
their shirts, and the War De-
partment announced recently that
"the wearing of shirts, the
fronts or backs of which have
been specially creased, is for-
bidden. "
in a box. The box is 'shaken up
and a name drawn. The winner
will receive a $25 War Bond.
Sub-Depot employees pointed
out that the plan will benefit
the person receiving the bond,
will aid the drive for War-
Bonds, and probably will sub-
stantially lower the percentage
of absenteeism.


RECREATION HALL TO BE REOPENED TOMORROW

WITH 'OPEN HOUSE'; IT'S ALL FREE;

DANCE FROM 7 TO 10 P.M.


Tyndall Field's Recreation Hall, refurnished with such trim-
mings as a beer bar, cafeteria counter and new stage, reopens
tomorrow with a G.I. open house from 12 noon to 10 P.M.
There'll be a dance, with
the Tyndall Field dance orch-
SQUADRON C STUDENT estra playing from 7 to 10 P.M.
And it will all be "on the
ONCE TRAINED FLIES house." Cash registers will be
conspicuous by their absence.
AS A HOBBY The party was arranged by th
Post Exchange and the Specia,
Services Office.
Squadron C has a student whose The dance probably will mark
civilian life hobby was raising the "debut" of the WAACs in the
and training flies. Honest! field's social life, because the
He's Pvt. Orie "Arkansasn 12 enlisted women who arrived
Blasingame, and he disagrees here Thursday undoubtedly will
with many authorities regarding attend the affair.
the history and habits of the Henceforth, the food bar of
winged pests. the "bigger and better" Rec Hall
He insists that flies are no will be open from 10 A.M. to
more filthy than human beings, 10 P.M. daily. However, no beer
despite the fact thay they have will be sold until after 4 P.M.
no method of cleansing them- Dances will be held every
selves. Their only reason for Thursday night, with the Victor-
biting human beings and other ettes invited.
animals, says Pvt. Blasingame, Plans are being discussed to
is so they can get the salt that arrange some form of dance for
forms on the skin. Saturday nights, also, but no
In the five years he followed definite schedule has been drawn
this hobby, he raised and train- up.
ed many flies, but he says it's "House rules" call for class A
impractical and unprofitable be-- uniforms at all times.
cause a fly has a very short The PX will operate the foor
life. and beer bars, with the Specia
A large green fly buzzed up to Services Office in charge of
a landing place on Pvt. Blasin- entertainment events.
game's nose at retreat Tuesday--
or so his squadron mates say.. THEY DO THE ODD JOBS
Suddenly the two buglers began
to play and "Arkansas" whispered
something. The big horsefly
jumped to his shoulder, did an
about face and held a stiff
brace until the last bugle note
had been played. .


VARIETY SHOW RECEIVES
PLENTY OF LAUGHS
By PVT. P.N. NICKIES
In reviewing the merits of
Monday night's variety-show,
"It's Rec Hall Nite To-Nite,"
we have been asked by certain
parties to submerge any de-
sires we might have of emula-
ting the acerbity of George
Jean Nathan or Dick Watts.
As one of the five hundred
GI's who saw the show, I see no
reason why anyone connected with
it should feel that excuses or
soft-pedalling are necessary.
Although it was by no means per-
fect nor original, it had spike
to it that brought laughter and
"amusement to all present.
A few of the acts were remin-
iscent of old vaudeville stunts
but were enjoyable just the same.
Considering the fact that the
show was arranged on compara-
tively short notice and that
all rehearsals and other prep-
arations were accomplished dur-
.ing spare time, the GI's and of-
ficers responsible for the pre-
sentation turned in a very com-.
mendable job.
On the subject of constructive
criticism we might mention that
while the vocalists were good,
.too many of the musical numbers
.were grouped together instead
of being separated by skits, -of
which there weren't enough. Also,
we felt that as long as the Glee
Club chorusters were singing,
they should have made that fact
known to the boys beyond the sec-
ond row.
However, we trust that these
shortcomings will be eliminated
in future productions and we,
along with the rest of last Mon-
day's audience, will be looking
forward to the next Special Ser-
vices offering. Meanwhile, the
members of the band, W/O MissaJ,
Paquin and Pullman, S/Sgt. Roths-
child, Sgts. Reinetz and Leon
and the others can take another
curtain call for their initial
attempt at bringing much needed
entertainment on the field.


/ g~r~


-,.


The above two men are in charge
of all carpentry and odd jot
that the Ordnance Company ca\
think up, which are plentiful.
They are the ones mainly respon-
sible for our orderly room and
barracks fences; the building
of the guard shacks to keep our
sentries'dry in inclement weath-
er, and a thousand and one dif-
feeent items that come up during
the year. Anything from making
a file cabinet to a table is
skillfully done. About the only
thing that Andy 'Wee Wau' doesn't
like to do is replace broken
glass.... gives him a pane.
Sgt. Cindric comes from penns-
ylvania and is quite the lady-
killer as his stack of daily mail
will testify. How he does it is
a secret but we suspect it's be-
cause he is the only one left in
Florida with a real honest to
goodness pair of rubber soled
shoes. &is motto is 'First i
war--first in peace--and the la,
one out for calishhenics in th,
morning.'
Sgt. Smieszek comes from New
York and was one of the first men
inducted away back in 1940. He
was discharged but recalled six
months after war was declared.
In civilian life he took pride in
his job as one of Nev York's
firemen, a job which gave him
knowledge which helped greatly in
his fire prevention chart of
the Ordnance Magazine Area. He
can describe in detail the best
places to go on a three-day'pass
and has the deepest tan to be
seen, which is probably the rea-
son he is now known as 'Black-
out.'


MUV MVXT"ATT MA I~nVM


rrr rriirirn






J3THE TYNDALL TARGE


0 0 o P.


M"O I E SEX



POST
SATURDAY, JUNE 5
"They Came to Blow Up Americ' George Sanders, Anna Sten
SUNDAY, MONDAY, JUNE 6-7
"The Human Comedy"- Mickey Rooney, Frank Morgan
TUESDAY, JUNE 8


"Swinging on Dowr


ESDAY, JUNE 9
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9


"Leather Burners"
"Follow the Band"
THURS., FRI.,
"The More The Merrier"


4K


.Copyrighted Material ,


I kSyndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"





V 7A


US3 Camp Show


Iilliac Boyd, Andy Clyde
Leon Errol, Mary Beth Hughes
JUNE 10- II
Jean Arthur, Joel McCrea


RITZ

SUN., MON., JUNE 6-7
'The Moon is Dban'
Si,r Cedric ffardwicke
TUES.,thru FR., JUNE 8-11
'Crash Dive'
Fyrone Power, Anne Baxter
SATURDAY, JUNE 12
'Border Patrol'
Willian Boyd, Andy Clyde
LATE SHOW SATURDAY NICGIT
'The Meanest Man in the World
Jack Benny, Priscilla Lane


PANAHA

SUN., MN., JUNE 6-7
'he Young Mr. Pitt:
Robert Donat, PhyllUs Cai'vert
TUESDAY, JUNE 8
'Street of Chance'
Burgess Meredith, Claire frevor
WED., IURS:, JUNE 9-10
'Roxie Hart'
Ginger Rogers, Geo. Montgomery
FRI., SAT. JUNE 11-12
''Arizona Cyclone'
Johnny Mack Brow


* e


Sally -is a WAAC from Holly-
wood,
Escaping all its perils,
Sally's reputation's good--
No hits, no runs, no errols.

Mary had a little skirt.
She stood against the light,
Who gives a damn for Mary's
lamb
With Mary's calves in sight.


A hillbilly had been court-
ing a mountain gal when one
night her father said to him:
'You have been seeing our
Nellie for nigh on to a
year. What are your inten-
tions--honorable or dishon-
orable?
Looking at the father with
a startled gleam in his eyes,
he exclaimed: 'You mean I
got a choice?'


TYNDALL TOM MY....... LEDBETTER


LEP FLEW IN FWRM TH LOW POWN-I SEEN DE DAME ANP SHE
C'ALVESTON ~I AINT NUT4IN'SPECIAL. JUST AN OL' MAID TEACHER
A HELICOPTER TYPE WITH ORN RIM SPEC'S. YOU"SE GUYS
SHES A PIF5ETI- CAN RELAX.SHE AIN'T
E TION. l h /I VNUTHIN' SPECIAL,SEEO,


SHE'S A REPORTER FOR A NEW YORK'
PAPER. NEW YORK'S IN THE GOOD OL'
U.S.A. IN CASE YOU'SE GUYS HAVE FOR
GOTTEN.THE GAL'S A LAPY ANb ALL
SHE'S LOOKING' FOR IS A FEW GOOD,
STORI ES. I'M THINKING' 'BOUT HAVIN
S HER INTERVIEW ME,POISONALLY,
'COULP THINK BETTER
/ / WWITH ANOTHER SODA -


June 5,'1943


THE TPWDAS;L TARGET


Page 11


- .Wm %NO,,,-d o


I









P aI 2T TINJ 5 1


should be sent to The Editors,
Tyndall Target, Post Headquart-
ers.
YOU'LL (NOT) BE SORRY
On arriving here at,Tyndall
Field
My Chicago luxuries I-did
yield.
No bellhop service, or break-
fast in bed,
But on to the chow house we
march instead.

No pri. ate baths or private
rooms;
Instead, we mop and sweep with
brooms.
No lady instructors that we
may date,
No sleeping too long, or
arriving late.

No evenings in town, or beer
at the bar,
No riding to class, cause the
walk is too far,
No more hotel service, or night
night clubs to boot,
But six weeks at Tyndall, to
learn how to shoot.

The learning of turrets, way
out on the line,
And looking through gun sights
till you're almost blind.
From two hours to four you're
out on the range
And learning of things that
sometimes seem strange.

But then at the end of this
gunnery course,
You can look at those guns and
say, "Now, I'm the boss!"
-Pfc. Robert Kramer
Squadron F
A GI'S DREAM
I dreamt I was First Sergeant
And gave my Sergeant hell.
I also was a Captain
And made those "Looies"
...well!
I woke up in the morning,
By that darn whistle's blast,
And found that on the KP list
My name is never last!
-Cpl. Sam Marotta
Guardians

YANKWIZ ANSWERS
1. The lightweight ones
wculd keep you warmer because
they provide more air space.
2. Golden, silver, ash,
honey, drab, platinum, pink,
strawberry, peroxide, milk,
taffy.
3. Seventeen years.
4. Pork. 72.5.
5. A cube.
6. In a tree.
7. Contemptible. (A contemp-
tible person is the object of
your contempt. A contemptuous
person shows contempt for sane-
thing or someone.)
8. Your olfactory sense is
your sense of smell.
9. Through glass--16,410
feet per second. Silver--
8,658 feet per second. Wood
(Oak)-12,620 feet per second.


YANK WIZ
By
BOB HAWK
Quizmster
"THANKS
TO THE YANKS"
Saturday, C S'


1. Suppose the thermometer
is hovering around zero, the
clock is about to strike
twelve and you're about to
jump into bed---which would
keep you warmer---one heavy
blanket or several light
ones that weighed all to-
gether the sante as the heavy

2. There are various kinds
of redheads---auburn, carrot,
titian. Can you name three
kinds of blondes?

3. Give within three the
number of years a patent is
good for?

4. Does the average Ameri-
can eat more beef, pork or


II POINTS EACH

60 70 Fair
70 80 Good
80 90 Excellent
90 zoo Superior


lamb?
5. What is the usual shape
of a natural grain of table
salt?

6. Would a titmouse feel
more at home underground, in
the walls of a house or in a
tree?

7. Is a man who is the ob-
ject of your disdain contemp-
tuous or contemptible?

8. How would your olfactory
sense help you to tell you
that you were near wet paint?

9. Would sound travel fast-
er through glass, silver or
.wood?


Never look directly up at air-
planes. Your face doesn't blend
in with the surroundings and can
be spotted easily from the air.


Don't be careless and attract
attention to your position. Any-
thing that will disclose the ene-
my's position to you will disclose
your presence to him.


Page 12


THE TYNDAll TARGET


June 5, 1943




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