• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Main






Title: Tyndall target
ALL ISSUES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076230/00057
 Material Information
Title: Tyndall target
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 27-36 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)
Publisher: Public Relations Office, Air Corps Gunnery School
Place of Publication: Tyndall Field Fla
Publication Date: 1942-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City -- Tyndall Air Force Base
Coordinates: 30.078611 x -85.576389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 16, 1942)-
Issuing Body: Issues for May 9, 1942- published by Office of Public Relations, Army Air Forces Gunnery School.
General Note: Title from caption.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076230
Volume ID: VID00057
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24602432

Table of Contents
    Cover
        page 1
    Main
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
        page 13
        page 14
Full Text
*I~'~l p~. .,


::;:~
'''
-
:;
;;

'' :' i`:
.r'




b


F .- -- '- .
IR%


C,


C7* I m~


x x1


jL /


/100


,-


...,


-,. ...._;-..1 i
c
i~Sb~ '







Paag 2> THE TYNDALL TARGET


STyndall .. Target
PUBLISHED SATURDAYS BY THE SPECIAL SERVICES SECTION FOR PERSN-
NEL OF THE AAF FLEXIBLE GNNERY SCHOOL, TYNDALL FIELD, FLORIDA.


Coimanding
Col. Leland S. Stranathan
Photography and Reproduction:
T/Sgt. W. Castle, S/Sgt. J.
Mitchell, Sgt. S. Upchurch,
Cpl. W. Grout, Cpl. O. Neitz-
ert, Pvt. L. Shaw, S/Sgt. J.
Montgonery, S/Sgt. R. Keough,
Sgt. P. Terry, Sgt. J. Marsick,
*/Sgt. J. Webster, Pvt. Dan-
iels, Cpl. E. Tackett, Pfc. H. Care


The Tyndall Target receives material supplied by Camp News-
paper Service, War Dept., 205 E. 42nd St., N.Y.C. The credited
material may not be republished without permission from C.N.S.


A GAP IN THE TRAINING PROGRAM
The guys that run one Army made a serious error
when they failed to include in the basic training
program a lo-day course in how to eat grits.
There is an art to eating grits. Some people
are born with it. Most of them acquire the proper
technique only after years of practice.
Grits is, or are, a strictly southern dish. The
damyankees, as the southerners spell it, don't know
how either to cook or eat them. Or is it it?
Our dietary experts say they're good for you, and
are chean. Unfortunately, the way the damyankees try
to eat them is a sacrilege.
To see a damyankee scoop them into a bowl like so
much cream of wheat and put cream and sugar over them
makes the sturdiest rebel shudder. It's comparable
to nutting gravy on apple vie.
(Speaking of pie, incidentally, we'll admit
right now that southerners can not cook apple
pie, just as northerners can neither cook nor eat
grits.)
Grits are hard things to serve. That's one rea-
son why, usually, the GI variety is either like so
much soup or tough like a rubber tire.
Grits should not be so soft that they splash
when you drop a spoonful into your tray nor so hard
that they come down, as the Yardbird says,"kerplunk,"
all in one lumD.
Then, you should NEVER put sugar and cream on
them. They say that one rebel put sugar and cream
on his grits one time and was promptly banished from
the society of magnolia blossoms and cape jasmine
and forced to move to Cleveland.
There is only one way to eat grits. You take
a good-sized hunk of butter--after vigorously snow-
ing the KP--not too much and not too little, and let
it melt on the hot grits. (Cold grits are unmen-
tionable.) You shake a little salt and a little
pepper over them and, if you've got the right pro-
portion of each, you've got a delectable dish. If
you haven't got exactly the right amount, you might
as well toss the grits out and try again. It takes
skill to get the right amount of seasoning. And if
you don't get exactly the right amount, they aren't
worth eating.
There is a story, obviously Axis-inspired, that
the damyankees eat potatoes for breakfast.
Next week: A Northerner strikes back.


Special Service Officer:
Capt. Owen 0. Freeman
Photographic Officer:
Lt. J.A. Dickerman
Public Relations Officer:
Lt. W.B. Pratt
Editorial Staff:
Sgt. Arnold H. Milgaten, Sgt.
Saul Sa liof, Pfc. Neil Pooser,
Pvt. P.M. Nickles
Art Work: T/Sgt. 0. Ledbetter
and Cpl. Marshall Goodman.


GRAYCO PALLIfZI, Clerk in PX
salesroom: If a couple to
together regularly and the
girl knows how much the boy
earns, he shouldn't object if
she suggests they go Dutch. As
a girl, I wouldn't expect my
date to think I was bei"- in-
dependent if I made such a
suggestion, nor would I ex-
pect him to take it as a blow
to his pride. I think that is
the only practical viewpoint.








LILA MERRIAM, Mimeograph Ma-
chine Operator, Orders Sec-
tion. I never have helped a
date pay the bill. Paying the
bill is about the only chiv-
alrous thing a man does any
more. I can sympathize with
them, though. I know how my
brothers feel about it. But
generally speaking, I don't
ike the idea.


UNA EVANS, Stenographer, Pers-
onnel Dept.: I think if a boy
and girl are old friends and
are keeping steady company it
is the patriotic thing to do.
however, custom keeps a boy
,from expecting those things on
first dates and girls usually
are afraid to offer hel for
fear of hurtuTg the boy's
feelings.






(K-
JOSEPHINE GRINSLBT, Clerk,
Central Piling Office: I
don't make a date with a bank
roll. I make it with a man.
If he doesn't have any money
he can still be good company.
If he hasn't but a nickel--
well, I get a kick out of eat-
ing a bag of popcorn with a
guy I like. Personally, I
think a gentleman would enjoy
a nickel or dime that way more
than he would a dollar some
girl spent on him.


DID YOU KNOW THAT: Here's the laff of the week.
Victor Mature, now in the Coast Guard, went on pa-
trol duty on a vessel which was outfitted with a
movie screen, projector and nine Victor Mature mov-
ies. Every night after dinner there was a Victor
Mature movie. His buddies were very frank and out-
spoken in their criticism...A bachelor is often de
fined as a man who didn't have a car when he w-
young...A yardbird is a guy who would like to drown
his troubles--but he can't get the sergeant to go in
in swimming.
*
Some girls experience love, but others love ex-
perience...Webster's dictionary offers a new dis-
tinction to the corporal, stating that he is a non-
commissioned officer of the lowest grade...It is-
n't what a girl does that fascinates us--it's what
she won't do...One 25 cent War Stamp will provide
a soldier's mess kit...Underwear will soon be is-
sued in olive drab to the armed forces. Why? Be-
cause white underwear on a clothesline makes a per-
fect target for enemy planes.

Forty percent of the present U.S. Naval Academy
first class prefer submarine duty...Bill Lee., cap-
tain of Alabama's great 1934 Rose Bowl team--the How-
ell to Hutson masterpiece--now is serving with tY
U.S. fleet...Here's something few baseball fans know.
The New York Yankees' name was created to fit news-
paper headlines. They were first known as the High-
landers because they played on Washington Heights
and because President Joseph W. Gordon's name sugges-
ted the Gordon Highlanders, a famous Scottish reg-
iment. However, the title was too unwieldy for the
papers, and Mark Roth, then a reporter, conceived the
name Yankee.


P ae






STHE TYNDALL TART


May 29, 1943


THE TYMIATJ, TARGE~I~


Paee 3


BOB HOPE SHOW HERE IS Tun MFr Am n TrFI vpF .TA.
CANCELLED DUE TO
CROWDED SCHEDULE

Appearance of Radio Come- ,B
dian Is Called Off;
Was Expected Thursday
.Cancellation of a scheduled
visit to Tyndall Field by Bob
Hope and his radio show was
amroed today.
Hope and the other performers
have been making a tour of
other military establishments
in the southeast, and for a
while this week it had been 'r :
expected that he would appear .
at Tyndall Thursday night. -
However, his tightly packed .
schedule, calling for three
performances in one day, be-
came delayed and in order to
catch up it became necessary-
to eliminate Tyndall from the
list.
MAJOR NEWMAN'S SON TO BE
GRADUATED FROM WEST POINT
GRAmong te cadets graduating WHEN YOU SEE A WORLD WAR I VICTORY RIBBON STUDDED WITH STARS
Among the cadets graduating,
from the United States Military THAT MEANS YOU'RE LOOKING AT A MAN WHO'S REALLY SEEN ACTION.
Academy at West Point June t will EACH STAR REPRESENTS A MAJOR ENGAGEMENT IN WHICH THE WEARER OF
beGeorgeE. New- THE RIBBON PARTICIPATED. THE STARS REALLY SHINE IN THE BASE




S tor Lister Hill, Inn remembering our honored Some three dozen members ofa-
San Alabama New- HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON, WHERE CAPT. GJAES W. MEDIAN, SUPPLY OF-
ter D. Newman of FICER, WEARS FIVE OF THEM AND lST/SGT. WILLIAM H. NEWSOM HAS
Tyndall Field. SEVEN.
Receiving his -
ed Hppowntm oln to IN hard RI un GUNNERMAKERS TO FORM
Sr the military ay to dr up aons
dey t rom Senia-ry A SOCIAL ORGANIZATION
ator Lister Hill In remembering our honored Some three dozen members of
Pointof Alabama, New- dead on Monday, Memorial Day, the Gunnermakers have banded
anman wasgraduated we soldiers here on the home- together to form an organiza-
from high school front can pay no finer tri- tion to further their social
in Guntersville, activities.
Ala., andattend- bute than resolving to work The new clbb is still in its
ed Howard Coll- ever harder until final vic- formative stage and will meet
M, Bicatigha, foron e year, and story. this week to draw up a consti-
te West Point Preparatory School tuition and by-laws. Although
at Fort McPherson, Ga. At West Although other soldiers a- the charter members are all
Point he turned out for football broad have won great battles, Gunnermakers, it is not their
and wrestling. HAwasacadet sup- we must not relax into over- intention to limit the member-
ply sergeant, anda representative confidence: Every battle won ship to e1's of any particular
of the Pointer, cadet bi-weekly group.
publication, and of the owitzer, should act as a spur to keep Their most pressing problem
year book. Whengraduated he will working and fighting until is that of finding a suitable
receive his commission in the in- t.he last remnants of the en- "home, hall, barn or tent" In
fantry. His father is Tyndall's which to hold their social
Training Aids Officer. emy shall have uncondition- function The club recently
TWO T/F ENLISTED MEN ARE ally surrendered, ran a no e in the local news-
NAMED WARRANT OFFICERS paper re, esting anyone who
Sgt. George P. Reno and BOOKLET PUBLISHED FOR knows or has avaible such a
T/Sgt. Clyde S. Richardson were GUNNERY STUENTS building to get i touch with
half years of service, arrivin The booklet was prepared S/Sgt. Louis Getin, chairman
notified of their appointment Making an appearance on the On e youse go tody Tyn, dalhr
to the rank of warrant of- field this week was The Aerial ough the squadron's orderly





His present position is with of Training and was printed opened and since that time
ficers, je.g., by the Post Adju- Gunner, an eight-page booklet room.
tant's Office yesterday. for distribution among gun POST THEATRo PASSES
Sgt. Reno has had three and a nery students.
half years of service, arriving The booklet was prepared by FIRST ANNIVERSARY
at Tyndall Field with the first the Public Relations Office at One year ago today Tyndall's
group of men assigned here. the request of the Department Post Thealre was officially
His present position is with of Trainiug and was printed opened and since that time
the Post Technical Inspector's by the Base Photographic and over 275,298 tickets have been
Office. Reproduction Section. sold to (4's officers and
Sgt. Richardson, ammunition The booklet contains pic- civilian employees residing on
chief of the Ordnance unit tures and articles stressing the field.
here, enlisted in the Army the importance of aerial gun- The building was constructed
July 10, 1941. He was assigned nery in the war. under the supervision of the
U.S. Engineers at a cost of
FASTER SERGEANT BERTHAUME APPOINTED A CAPTAIN approximately $80,000.
r nt Ma Captain William H. Wiseman
Master Sergeant Maurice Ber- was the theatre officer at its
thaume, probably the oldest premiere and he was succeeded
enlisted man at Tyndall Field by Lt. Nicholas Zemo. Lt. D.
in point of service, has been G. Moore is the present offlc-
commissioned a captain in the er in charge, with M/Sgt.
1 Army of the United States. Johnny Farr as the assistant
The announcement was made manager. Sgt. Winslow Balluff
early last week by the Post has been the chief operator at
Adjutant's Office. The corn- the theatre ever since the
mission is effective as ofI first picture, "Fly By Night"
today. was thrown on the screen, and
Berthaume enlisted in the Pvt. William H. Bennett is en-
Aviation Section of the Signal trusted with the keeping of
Corps in January, 1916, and has clerical records and statis-
been one of the pioneers in Army tics.
aviation communication systems ATAI
ever since. LT. BIGBEE IN AUSTRALIA
Here at Tyndall the sergeant 4\L Lt. Jesse North Bigbee, who
has been the NCO in charge of was Public Relations Officer for
Post communications. His pres- several months last winter, is
ent orders are to report to now in Australia as representa-
Maxwell Field and it is unknownwt ...t-. tive there of Yank magazine, the
whether he will be assigned Army weekly publication dis-
to this field. -closed in the current issue.


SPECIAL SERVICE TO
GIVE VARIETY SHOW
MONDAY NIGHT

Tyndall's Top GI Talent
And Others to Be
At Post Theatre

By SGT. ARNOLD MILGATEN
Monday evening at the
Post Theatre promises to
be a memorable one for the
several hundred GI's who
will be fortunate enough to
gain admittance for the last
show at 8:40 P.M.
Scheduled for its premier
at that time IJs the Special
Services' extravaganza, "It's
Rec Hall Nite Tonight.
Without any previous ballyhoo
whatsoever, this show of
shows threatens to break all
precedents and standards set
for good entertainment at
Tyndall Field.
The presentation will be
the first effort put forth by
the newly organized dramatic
group, glee club, band and
free lance GI entertainers.
It will feature such top-
notch looneys as Pvt. Paquin
and Sgt. Pullman; music by
the band under the direction
of W/O Missal; soloes by
Dwight Boileau and Jimmy Con-
Iff; songs by the Victorettes
and last but not least, sev-
eral numbers by the ANDREWS
SISTERS
The hundreds of production
details are being handled by
Sgt. Bernard Reinitz while
the stage manager's responsi-
bilities are resting on the
slight shoulders of Sgt. Felix
Leon.
And for those who are skep-
tical about the performers
giving their best, the Special
service Office announced early
today that unless the entire
cast receives an unanimous
vote of approval by the audi-
ence, every GI participating
in the show will be placed on
KP for one week.
CHANGE IN TYPE STYLE
The Target editors hope that
the readers aren't too confused
by the variety of body type used
in this issue.
We've been receiving so much
more news than before that we've
had to do something drastic to
get it all in. Therefore we've
reduced the type size.
This issue is to some extent
experimental, as we try differ-
ent styles of type to determine
which is most legible in the
smaller size.
OUR COVER PHOTO










..-


Pictured this week is one of
the AT-GA training planes used
at Tyndall principally to car-
ry student gunners on their air-
to-air firing missions. It is
a two-place ship with a cruis-
ing speed of 145 miles an hour,
powered by a 550-horsepower air-
cooled motor. It has a wing-
spread of 42 feet. The girl
in the picture is Miss Betty-Jo
Temple, formerly of Civilian
Personnel, but you're supposed
to be looking at the plane.







O,,- A


PINNEY


RfnTE5


By Pvt. BILL PINNEY
Posing as the Inquiring Report-
er we went out this week and ask-
ed some representative girls on
the field the following question
quote If you went out with a sol-
dier and he made (and that's as
far as we could get.) We were
going to ask about him making
more money and all that stuff.
Maybe it was the look in our eye,
or us being married or something.
Anyway, how can Si Upchurch get
to finish his questions and we
can't?
So we decided to forget women
and talk about something else we
don't know anything about.
We see where Prime Minister
Churchill has appealed to the
Italian people to get out of the
war. Nothing has astounded us as
much since the University of Flo-
rida announced it was giving up
football for the duration.
Italy being in the war is just
like Florida being in the South-
eastern conference. The Itali-
ians have been about as much of
a threat to the world as the
"Fighting Gators" were to Notre
Dame. All the Italians being in
the war meant was that Mussolini
could make speeches from a bal-
cony and Florida had a football
team so Sam Butz could have a
column in the Times Union.
From his balcony overlooking
whatever it overlooks old Mush
Mcuth used tc spout off his
mouth about what Italy would do
to France, lanand and the United
States. and then they jumped on
Ethiopia and folded up wen Coach
Churchill sent hn some reserves.
And Sammy used to write reams
and reams about what the "Fight-
ing Gators" were going to do to
Georgia. Georgia Tech and Auburn
and then Rollins College would
jump on the Gators and whip 'em
something to nothing.
Yessir, Italy getting out of
the war will cause about as much
of a stir internationally as that
ripple that went unheard through
the sports realm when the U. of
Florida announced it was giving
up football for the duration.
Personally we think the Florida
announcement was made back in
1917 and they just got around to
releasing it to the press.



Bluebirds
What S/Sgt. in the 349th
donated fifty dollars back
home for the purpose of build-
ing a new church. Ask S/Sgt.
C.A. Thomas.
The boys in the barracks
have created a new fad. While
cleaning the barracks Friday
night they discovered that the
porches when wet became slick
as ice. Needless to say, the
porches were being utilized as
sliding ponds in all three
barracks. A few of the men
had water fights; however,
nothing was broken and the ex-
cess energy brought our score
up 10 points on Saturday's in-
spection.
Hats off to the OM and Ord-
nance who nipped us in our
first two bowling games. But
the rest of the squadrons
shouldn't sell us short, we
have a surprise coming up for
our next competition.
The en tire squadron bids
farewell to Senor Cpl. Lopez
and Pvt. Miller. Lopez made
our day room the best on the
field and then made the OM
the next best. His excited
English will be sorely missed
by the boys. Miller, one of
the better barrack orderlies,
will be hard to rep lace.
Good luck to both of you from
the squadron. -(A pinch hitter)


<$e YARDBI RD!A&C-


The ole Yardbird has bin sort uv used up
this weak. Last weak i slipped off frum
wurk on sick call an the man slappet sum
drops in ma eyes an they bin so 'ot uv fockus
I wint bak agin ter see iffn he hadnt put in
the wrong stuff fur blue eyes an whilst I
wuz setting around waiting looking at the purty
seckerterrys an sweatin ot the little blonde
nurse ter cum aftur cole drinks frum the ma-
shine on account uv it is a mity big pleas-
ure ter look at sech a purty lady, I met up
with wun uv ma ole gud buddies who is a
pill roller by profeshun an a bull an clap
shooter by trade an since i is allus admired
a man whut deevotes a larje porshun uv his
life ter bull an crap shooting (even iff'n he
is a'pill roller) i set around an swapped
lies with him for a while. He found ot in a
very shawt time that i wuz aboot the best
avyator that evur hit florryda an nine
othur states included an that the only rees-
on I wuznt flyin a P52 rite now is on ac-
count uv there aint no vacancies opin fura
majur nowhur (uv coarse the only times I
evur bin higher than huntin eggs in a hay
loft wuz on the ferrys wheel at the county
fare) .
Jest whin i figgered I had him aboot snowed
he axed me iffn i had evur bin in a barrynee
chair an I sayed sho rite kwik. Uv coarse
I hadnt nevur heard uv but wun kind uv charge
whut wuz run by the gov'mint an that's the
kind that the state used ter have a tendency
ter plase my oldur relatives evur wunce in a
while an whin he axed me iff'n i felt like
setting in it an i told him sho on account uv
I figgered the MP's did all the eckseecootin


The policy of exposing a male
squadron clerk to the wiles of
his female counterpart at Pers-
onnel proved successful until
last Saturday.
After 12 months of close assoc-
iation the Guardians' S/Sgt.
Harold D. Price popped the ques-
tion to Tyndallette Gertrude
Spradley-the ceremony took place
last Saturday.
S-2's T/Sgt. Earl Boutwell has
at last laid legitimate claim to
the limelight. He not only di-
rected the rescue of a drowning
woman, but he topped that by
bringing the victim back to con-
sciousness by expert application
of the prone pressure method of
resuscitation.
The rescue took place early
this week and as a tribute to
Boutwell's modesty we'll bet that
only a few of his immediate
friends know about his act.
We understand that over at
Personnel there is a movement
afoot to groom Tyndallette Kitty
Safar as a successor to Clara
Barton and Florence Nightingale.
In fact, judging from newspaper
reports, Miss Safar's long list
of charitable efforts on behalf
of GI's will soon be read into
the Congressional Record.
Tyndall's No. 1 lyric writer,
Cpl. Sam Marotta of the Guard-
ians, reports that his latest
ballad, 'I Heard Your Tears,'
has already been played several
times over the leading networks.
Sam says he hasn't heard from


fur the army an not the pill rollers evun tho
I is had ma doubts aboot that on several
ockashuns. Him an a bunch uv his friends put
me in a roundshaped deel, maid me put ma haid
down an turned me around lickety split in
all different direckshuns at the same time
an thin stopped reel kwik like an jurked ma
haid up. Ch deer Lawd. Ma haid wint round
an round an i seen a hole regiment uv pi
rollers an the walls wuz whizzin around like
I had jest drink a kwart uv Loosyanna moon-
shine an thin i figgered iff'n I didn't want
ter unsanitize the horsepital I better git
on the outside and that's what I did. Whut
maid the hole thing so eckstreemly sad wuz
the fack that all those purty seckerterrys
an that purty blond nurse wuz awatchin the
hole thing an besides that ma eyes was so
dadgummed messed up the capting sayed I wud
hafto ware glasses-jest like a clerk. Sad,
paint it? Well, I reckon i better be agoin'.
The Yardbird (Number one)


the publisher yet, but he expects
the number of copies sold to fall
just short of Wilkie's 'One
World'
In the "Miscellany" department
we have the item about Pvt.
Clause of the Gunnermakere who
wrote home to his wife that he
had a broken leg and then walked
down to the Post Office to mail
the letter. The little wom-
an found out it wasn't so through
the Red Cross.
Lt. A.C. (Air Corps) Miller has
been appointed commander of
Flight Group II, according to a
self-appointed scribe from that
unit who signs himself as 'The
Eye.' However, what the 'Eye'
didn't tell us is that Lt. Miller
and the Mrs. expect a little pi-
lot several months hence.
Sgt. Charles Laubly of the
Medics is one of the Target's
most able squadron scribes and as
an example of the esteem in which
he is held, we cite the following
incident: Laubly is now on DS in
Atlanta, but prior to his depart-
ure he prepared enough advance
copy for the Medics to take care
of the time he would be away.
However, one of his fellow Medics
was not aware of Laubly's sense
of responsibility for his job,
and sent us in a separate "squad-
ron scribbling." The payoff was
that this anonymous scribbler
signed the letter "Charles Laub-
ly," probably forgetting that the
envelope would carry a Panama
City date mark and that we were


very familiar witn Laubly's
scrawl.
We have been told that the
69th's Lt. Aylor recently visit-
ed his sweetheart, from Texas, in
New Orleans. The report is that
everyone had a grand time, in-
cluding the gal's mother, who
came along, presumably, for the
ride
Pfc. Irving Stabinsky had a
rather awkward time of it this
past week-end. His sister came
own from Tallahassee for a visit
and the introductions went like
this: "...I'd like to have you
meet my sister, SERGEANT Sara
Stabinsky." (The young lady is
a WAAC stationed at Dale Mabry.)
Congratulations were being re-
ceived all week by Tyndall's sec-
ond ranking staff sergeant, Fred-
erick W. Gilmore. Everyone con
cedes that he played a great game
even if he didn't get beyond
first base. Coach 'Hardrock'
Stone also came in .for a share
of- the applause for his valuable
'moral support.'
The game was halted when the
opposition (Betty-Jo Temple) had
to leave Tyndall in order to keep
a wedding date in New Orleans.
Game time: 4 weeks, 3 days.
Umpires: Liles, Edwards.
Re-cap: No runs, 1 hit (a
scorcher out at Panama Beach),
no errors (as far as we could
see).


Apre THE TYDALL TABGE


THF4 TVNTATI., TAIRHT








May 9, 94~ THETYNALLTAJ~r Pge


May 29, 1948


AS A CIVILIAN SEES IT.


Squadron A
Nearly every class at Tyndall
boasts among its number several
interesting personalities. Af-
ter a little research, we found
that ours is no exception.
Among our Brooklyn boys, the
name of Pvt. Vito Rubino stands
out. A lightweight' leather
pusher of the first water, Ru-
bino won the Diamond Belt Title
and the New York State amateur
championship in 1935, and in the
following year, turned profes-
sional..
As a pro, he met such top
flight men as Tippy Larkin and
Freddy Archer in prelims at
Madison Square Garden.
In 1937, Rubino worked out with
Lou Ambers in preparation for
Ambers' successful title shot at
Tony Canzoneri.
In the future Rubino hopes to
use his slight build and fight-
ing instincts twirling a lower
ball. We feel that with his
past record, he' 11 be one of the
lads to put Tojo on the canvas
for the count.
Of course, we have our "char-
acters" as does any other out-
fit. However, only Class 43-26
has Pfc. Harold J. Grossman.
Actually a "backstage" baby,
Grossman has been in.show busi-
ness since childhood, doing ju-
venile parts with his parents
at the age of three. Since
that time, he has had numerous
associations with prominent
)people in the entertainment
field.
As "emcee" at new york' s
Ubangi Club, he made the ac-
quaintance of several celebri-
ties, notably Zero Mostel and
Hazel Scott, with whom he worked
in the Broadway show, "Craz'y
With the Heat." Later he had
a part with Joe 0' Keefe in "On
the Beam. "
A true comedian, when asked
about his recent accomplish-
ments, his reply was, "Tell
them I have just completed a suc.
cessful week in the Receiving
Squadron with S/Sgt.. Cherry in
"Skunk Hollow Serenade."

Squadron B
Compliments to Lts. Stein and
D'Orsay for their capable hand-
ling of class 43-20's party.
Really was swell. Hidden talent
was found among the instructors
of the squadron. Kerr or Cros-
by? Bouquets to the Post or-
chestra for its hot licks.
Two w' eks up in the Smoky Moun-
tains made a wreck of S/Sgt.
Tom Hagen. Was it a Doneym'oQa
or a combat assignment, Tom?
Have any trouble with the re-
venooers?
"Ye Gods- Annihilate but
space and time, and make two
lovers happy." Or, in language
we can understand ourself, how
is Sgt. Dan Wedge going to visit
his little heart throb on a
three-day pass now that she
has moved to Miami?
"He smelled the battle afar
off..." Be patient, Pfc. Hart-
man, you' l get there sopn
Our heads are still ringing
with the praises our new CO,
Lt.' Mendelson, bestowed upon
his charges- We hope you weren't
kidding, Lt-
Not boasting or anything like
that, but we bet all those hot
shot gunners who have been mak-
ing a name for themselves of
late in combat were turned out
by Squadron B instructors.


Squadron E
We no longer kn a whether we
are nursing students or other-
wise.
Added to our newest roll are
four pups and a kitten, all
mothered by a fiery little fox
terrier which has no respect for
rank nor the usual canine-feline
rule which says the two can not
get along together.
Lt. Ralph D. Putnam, squadron
adjutant, was nearly eaten up


Here's how a civilian artist sees the woes and troubles of a
Tyndall gunnery instructor. The artist is Tot Silva of Tampa,
Fla. who always includes a sketch of some kind in his letters
to his friend Sgt. H.M. Johnson, squadron F instructor.


Squadron F
Squadron F won the inspection
among the student squadrons
on Saturday, May 22.
Squadron F has no less than
10 "Smith" boys. Not one of
them is a "Smythe. Five are in
the same section, and Sgt.
Pistone, their instructor, al-
ways gets an answer when he
asks a question of Smith.
F's Famoup Feller
Robert E. Lee, of Louisville,
is a great-great-great etc. (he
lost track) grandson of the
famous Robert E. Lee. Lee is a
dyed-in-the-wool-sout herner,
whose ancestors have always
lived in the south. He also
has a brother, Harry, serving
in the Arm.y in Australia, who
was named after General Lee's
father, Light-Horse Harry Lee.
The other day in the squad-
ron orderly room someone
brought up the subject of bowl-
ing. During the conversation,
Pfc's Delaney and La Chance in-
timated they were pretty good.
Lt. Berner, the CO, thought
maybe the officers were pretty
good, too, so a challenge match
resulted. Mgr. Delaney set up
an elimination system for all
prospects for his team, and the
officers are plenty worried.
Thursday night will come the
showdown. The GI's say they'll
bet their three-day passes--Lt.
Berner says "We shall see what
we shall see. "

by the diminutive canine when ne
approached the kennel the other
day.
The parent seems to worry more
about the kitten than she does
her pups, possibly due to the
fact that in spite of her best
efforts she can not get the kit-
ten to eat.
At the present rate we will
soon be in the dog business,
rather than the gunnery.


Squadron C
GREETINGS: To Class 43-28, which
we have high hopes will surpass
all previous proteges.
GREETINGS: To Lt. I.H. Edelman,
our newest faculty member, adj-
utant and supply officer, we
welcome you, Sir, and we know
that the instructor to whom you
issued the Pfc chevrons will
soon be able to wear them as he
now is very much on the ball.
GREETINGS AND BEST WISHES: To
Lt. Herman Cook, on his latest
big step in life, by walking
down the aisle of happiness with
the hand of Miss Dolores Ann Kern
while on leave in Berkeley,
Calif. Good luck, Lt. Cook, be-
cause we know that you will be
toeing the line from now on.
SALUTATIONS: To Class 43-21,
of whom we have many,pleasant
memories, especially the "Beer
Bust" and the gala graduation
which included our first for
the famous Frenchmen. Lt.
Langelei of the French Army
heartened the French lads by
inspiring them with his talk,
in their native tongue, to
greater victories. Sgt. Lonnie
Wright gave his version of the
many thiilling events that oc-
cured during his encountering
the enemy over-Lae, New Guinea.
Many of the boys left the ex-
ercises with a new incentive
to combat the foe. Col. Stran-
athan, Lt. Col. Randolph, Lt.
Col. Eadesand Major Fox were
honor guests at the graduation
exercises.
LATE FLASHES: What favorite
first sergeant obtained a two-
day pass for that much needed
rest cure?...What sergeant ins-
tructor, after what Flight Lt.
gave his wishes that all his
instructors would obtain the
well known and very well for-
gotte.n GI haircut, had his
lip, against his protest, clean-
shaven.


Squadron D
Well, sections 25-82 gave been
leading Lt. Goldstein's boys
around by the nose... tough luck
they won't catch up to us.....and
we know they are really in for
a snow job when the results of
our air-to-air firing at Apalach-
icola are tallied next week.
We are in for quite a treat,
I hear, when our CO gets his tac-
tics room off the drafting board
and into actual production in
our dayroom.
The CO and adjutant are strict-
ly on the beam. An unbeatable
combination in administration,
and as designers, painters and
carpenters. What's their union
designation? Along with the car-
pentry dept., a glad hand should
also be extended to the boys who
are working around the squadron
in their spare time. On Sunday,
I mean. Pfc. Matese, Pfc. Bosc
are indeed student gunners who
are to be looked up to with the
noted improvements around the
orderly room already. Some of
the other dormant talent should
come to the fore and express it-
self.
Pvt. Altieri is quite an artist
as well as a draftsman. If he
can use a gun the way he pushes
a drawing pencil and brush around
we can look forward to a string
of campaign ribbons on his tunic.
All in favor should let him know
your appreciation in making this
squadron the best on the field.
Now, if along with the rest of
the improvements around here, we

could learn to sing in formation,
we'd be the fast word. We must
concede the singing merits to the
French, however.


Tyndall's Navy

BILGE-WATER
The romantic title of this
epistle came as an inspiration
to your correspondent as he was
in the process of removing a six
months accumulation of dirt, fuel
oil and water from the inner bot-
tom of our largest boat.
If any of you boys wish to get
in real physical condition just
crawl around the water pipes,
fuel lines and electrical con-
duits located in the bottom of
our vest pocket battleship. I'm
sure that no obstacle course
will hold any terrors after that
ordeal.
Another barracks is being erec-
ted in a clearing chopped and dug
out of the forest primeval in the
rear of our present abode. More
old sea dogs may be expected when
these new quarters are complete.
Supply Sgt. Baum has been in a
daze since he returned from his
furlough during which he tied the
proverbial knot. He doesn't show
any signs of snapping out of it
for days to come either. Best
wishes from all the boys, Baum.
Our new and largest craft will
soon be due for a trial run so
there may be news of thatnext
time.
--Cpl.Flavin



Cloudhoppers
The Yankee gang came back
from furlough recently. Main
event was the wedding of S/
Sgt. Robert Cook to Miss Emma
Skrivanek. Cpl. Stewart wit-
nessed the ceremony and was
well pleased with the refresh-
ments.
Cpl. Nolan zigged with his
tray at the mess hall when he
should have zagged. He says
before his cup hit the floor
he was putting his name, rank
and serial number on the dot-
ted line.
S/Sgt. Aldridge requested a
late pass to visit visiting re-
latives; it's rumored his CO
saw him in town with the
"folks." John claims they
were the Burlapps -cousins of
his. -Sgt. Ed.Strong


May 29, 1943


iN '7//s i. -


Page 5


THE TYNDALL TARGET

















Sgt. G.H. Neitzert

BASE


PHOTOGRAPH


DE PARTMEN T


Pfc. C.E. Toler


Pfc. R.A. Harvey


TYNDALL FIELD
FLORIDA






TIWP TYNni)TT, TARO~FF


Q M MOTOR POOL VITAL COG IN TYNDALL MACHINERY


FOOD, EQUIPMENT AND ^

PERSONNEL CARRIED

BY QM TRUCKS

Lack of Transportation Fa-
cilities Puts Heavy Load
On Trucking System
Unheralded and unsung, yet
a vital cog in the machinery
which makes Tyndall Field one
of the most efficient operat- --
ed stations in the AAFSETC is e
the Motor Pool conducted by
Lt. Theophil C. Polakiewics "
of the Quartermaster Corps. P .ie. :
To say that the responsibil- .
ity of keeping the very life-
lines of Tyndall Field open
lies on the shoulders of Lt.
Polaklewlcz and his aides STARTING THE DAY'S WORK
Would be putting it mildly. Lt. Polakiewicz, officer in charge of the Quartermaster Mot-
Its very location makes Tyn-
dall one of the most diffi- or Pool, is giving instructions for the day to T/5 Francis
cult in this section of the Curran, dispatcher, and Pvt. Fred Hentschke, truckmaster.
country to bring supplies in-
to, as it Is situated 13 miles
from Panama City and eight
miles from the nearest rail- im
head. .J
The only way food supplies
can be brought here, and the .' '
only way these same supplies
can be sent to Apalachlcola, '
our sub-base, is by truck
convoy. Other war essen- U
tlals, such as ammunition
and clo thing, are also o._
brought in by trucks. Cloth-
ing is taken to Marianna for
salvage, tires and spare parts 9
are trucked from Camp Rucker;
mail is picked up and deliver- .
ed, personnel Is transported
and food is delivered by ..
trucks, all kept at the Quart-
ermaster Motor Pool. I -
To handle these numerous du-
ties, Lt. Polaklewicz needs a THEY ALSO SERVE
right hand man, and has a cap- Doing their part in the war effort are the six young ladies
able one in Monroe Branning, pictured above. They serve as drivers of staff cars. "recons"
principal dispatcher. Mr.
Branning, a man who has had and, when necessary, can handle larger vehicles. Complaints
considerable experience in the about their driving are few and far between, according to of-
trucking business, is called
the "straw boss" of the dis- ficials of the Motor Pool.
patchers.
Serving under Mr. Branning
are the dispatchers Cpl. Fisch,
recently transferred here from
Apalachicola; T/5gr Hank Cur-
ran, Pfcs. Von Hegel, Zall and .-.
Barry, all of the 907th Quar-
termaster Detachment and Mr. .,
Harmon, a civilian. --
Between them, these men ans- ;. I 1 ;
wer an average of 200 telephone -
calls daily, and work in three
shifts, covering 24 hours. .' _--
Calls for future runs are en-

date and time wanted, but when I
a car, truck or other vehicle. :
is needed immediately, a driver .-
from among the group waiting at -* .. .
the door is summoned. The .
name, truck number and des-
tination, as well as other A FAMILIAR SIGHT
pertinent information is re-: S
corded on the Daily Dispatch: Truck convoys are an important part in any camp, but here at
Record, and a trip ticket for Tyndall Field, eight and a half miles from the nearest rail-
the truck issued. Upon com-
pletion of the trip, the mil- head, truck convoys can be seen every hour transporting food
eage, as well as the gas and and materials to and from this station.
oil consumption, is noted.
With the exception of a few localities before the draft law jobs that aren't assigned to
civilians, the drivers are was passed, someone else. She issues all
members of the Quartermaster The drivers' ,straw boss" is the driving permits, keeps the
(Aviation Service) Detachment the Truckmaster, Pvt. Fred Hen- files of all trips, gas, oil
and the Aviation Squadron. tschke, who, for the past 13 and mileage records, in addi-
Some of these men, like fire- months, has had the "simple" tion to her other duties, too
men, are always on call, and responsibility of knowing prac- numerous to mention. She also
if a motorcycle is needed for tically everything about every serves as secretary to the
patrol, in case of an emer- truck in the Motor Pool. In Motor Pool Officer.
agency shipment arriving or addition, it is his job to make There are eight other young
leaving, or the Autocar wreck- frequent spot checks, in order women working at the motor pool,
er is needed at the scene of to make repairs when needed. most of them engaged as drivers
an accident, these men are He also leads most of the con- of either staff cars or "re-
routed out of bed, regardless voys and he conducts, with Pfc. conns. Despite their femin-
of the hour. Whenever possible Zall, periodic instruction Inlty, these girls are all ex-
a driver is assigned to a par- courses for the drivers, pert drivers and complaints
ticular truck or car, on which The oft used expression, about them are few and far be-
he performs first echelon main- "Cherchez la Femme," takes on tween.
tenance. It is interesting to a new meaning when applied at The Air Forces have a slogan,
note here that many of the men the Motor Pool. Most prominent "Keep 'em Flying," and the
who now spend most of theil among the ladies employed there phrase used time and time again
time at the wheel of a G.I., is Dixie Porter, who, as she by Lt. Polakiewicz and his co-
were never outside their own, modestly puts it, has all the horts is "Keep 'em Rolling."


th y 29 1913


Page 6-A

Guardians
After contemplating marriage
for several months, S/Sgt. H.
D. Price, personnel clerk, has
took unto himself a wife, Miss
Gertrude Spradley. They were
married at the First Baptist
Church in P.C. The marriage
incidentally, lef-t S/Sgt.
Cartwright without a barracks
mate.
The boys are still befuddled
at the rapid service that they
have been receiving from the
QM laundry. It just can't be
true'
Most of the boys will soon
be qualified firemen after
falling out to fight three
fires in one day. But the
boys like it ever since we ac-
quired those new squirt guns.
'Twas refreshing indeed to see
Cpl. S. Keyes and M.B. Diaz
squirting water all over the
place.
QUIZ KORNER: Who got lost
on the way to 'Perry' and wor-
ried his companion sick by
by stopping every five minutes
and looking at the sign posts?
..Who wants a three day pass
to visit the Mardi Gras city
and doesn't want his girl
back home to know about it.-
Incidentally, he's the one who
believes in "Picking them young,
treating them rough, and not
telling them a darn thing."
FLASH: The stork is hovering
feverishly over the homes of
Sgt. H. .Mullins and Sgt. C.
Dodd. Both are anxiously shop-
ping for diapers and safety
pins... And Ist/Sgt. O'Neil' s
young 'un says, DA DA now.
MAN OF THE WEEK: Pvt. Norman
Southard hails from Long Island,
New York. He lives with his
wife in P.C. Norman is a hard
worker and one of the neatest
soldiers in the outfit. He was
under contract to one of the
major league farms and had a
promising career as a pitcher
before his entrance into the
Army. He now plays for the
Post team and has pitched sev-
eral good games. After the war
you might see him in the uni-
form of a Cub or a Giant.
-Cpl. Sam Marotta


22 TYNDALL GI'S LEAVE
FOR KEESLER TO BEGIN
TRAINING AS CADETS

Twenty-two Tyndall GI's select-
ed for aviation cadet training
have departed for Keesler Field
Biloxi, Miss., where they will
receive preliminary training.
The men chosen for training as
pilots, bombardiers, or navigat-
ors are:
S/Sgts. Charles R. Cames, Wilm-
er E. Herring, Clarence L. Har-
rington, Bill M. Madsden, Glen
E. Mills, John W. Scriven, Wil-
liam H. West; Sgts. Robert E.
Bartlett, Samuel C. Hansen,Jr.,
Burt Gordon; Cpls. Salvadore C.
Merlo, Howard D. Wilson; Pfcs.
Junious Buffington, Timothy 0.
Hurst, Russell C. Johnson, Ken-
neth M. Levtow, Bruce R. Lock-
wood, Marvin A. Pennington, Sey-
mour Tabacoff, Pvts. Normand G.A.
DesRosiers, bonald P. Dillard,
Ralph Holman.

CROSS'OR PUZZLE SOLUTION

/A L L LA


M 112 S H / L Z


/ v / / L -/ /,6 ^L




o o ~/A m/ E / C o /w

oC C o N0 V 6r G
-p E -PA T FPo 0D








I-------------------------------------




You can still be an


AVIATION CADET I


If you want to fight for your country in If you have already been called for in-
the air, where there's need for your skill duction, you cannot apply direct for
and daring-if you want to be ready for a Aviation Cadet training. But, if you are
future career in aviation-the opportunity assigned to the Army, you have the same
is still open to you. opportunity open to every soldier, 18 to 26
years old, inclusive, to apply for Aviation
1If you are 18 to 26 years old, inclusive, Cadet training after you are in the ranks.
and have not yet been called for induc-
tion under Selective Service, you may apply If you are 17 but not yet 18, you can go
at once at the nearest Aviation Cadet Ex- now to your Aviation Cadet Examining
amining Board to take your physical and Board and volunteer for enlistment in the
mental examinations. No school or college Air Corps Cadet Enlisted Reserve. Air
credits are required. If you pass the exam- Corps Enlisted Reservists are called to
nations and are found acceptable, you will active duty for pre-flight training at the
be given a letter to the Armed Forces end of the first school semester after
Induction Station requesting your assign- reaching the age of 18.
ment to the Army Air Forces upon induc- *
tion. You may then volunteer for induction
THIS ANNOUNCEMENT IS MADE WITH
through your local Selective Service Board. THE APPROVAL OF THE JOINT ARMY-NAVY
After induction you will be assigned for PERSONNEL BOARD.
preparatory training, upon completion of
which you will receive your appointment as
an Aviation Cadet and have an opportunity Write to The Adjutant General of
to become a Bombardier, Navigator or the Army, Washington, D. C., for
Pilot--one of the "Three Mus- booklet entitled "Aviation Cadet
I keteers of the Air"! Training for the Army Air Forces."



L ---.0--------- ---------------------- agig


U. S. ARMY


Go to the nearest Aviation Cadet Examining Board (see list of
addresses on the back of this leaflet) and find out if you are qualified to become an Aviation
Cadet. You may also obtain information at any United States Army Recruiting Station.
There is one in the Post Office or the Federal Building in nearly every important city or town.






yJRv 2 1043 TTup nNnATT TARGET


CONNOR

t


CPERATIONS Taking a hint from
SOB STORY Line Engineering,
a wailing wall has
been installed in the pilot's
room of post operations under
the supervision of F/O Klassen.
This wall is for the use of
pilots who have wearied of,
playing the ancient and honor-
able game of "switch," and
wish to bless someone else
with their woes. The wall is
especially dedicated to F/O
Hendricks who is continually
wailing with no just cause.
OPERATIONS We regret the depar-
30B STORY ture of our Ordnance
Officer, Lt. Milton
J. Drain. At the same time we
welcome his replacement, Lt.
Denver W. Kinney.
Until recently we have had
a fairly serious labor short-
age; however, the addition of
Pfc. Francis Rave and Pvt.
Mattis Schesley, III, seems to
have filled the gap.

CHATTER Pfc. Naive, who is
allergic to hill bil-
ly music (?), comes to work
every morning with bags under
his eyes, complaining "I have-
n't slept a wink all night--
that damn hill billy stuff is
driving me nutsl If it isn't
Joe Sinclair at 5:00 A.M.,
it's that .4-&! Grand Ole Opry
at 10:00 P.M.! What's a guy
gonna do?
According to Daily Bulletin
No. 116, dated May 19, 1943,
no one but a graduate gunner
may wear "Crew Member" wings
on this field. That's really
too bad, especially for Cpl.
Coonrod -- he dotes on 'em.
Some of the boys say that they
don't want a furlough now be-
cause they can't wear their
wings home. It is kind of
tough First they "freeze"
the ratings and now they re-
frigerate the wearing of wings.
As they would say in Russia,
it's "toughke."
M/Sgt. Passwaters is quite
proud of his caps (mechanic's)
that he had made in the Philip-
pines. He also had some chev-
rons made of the same material
while in Manila. Recently, we
were discussing various fields
and which one we'd rather be
stationed at, and "Pop" said
"Make mine Manila!" 00ooo!
Congratulations are in order
for S/Sgt. Vanwelsanare on his
marriage last week. He is al-
ready experiencing a serious


problem of married life. Is
there anyone who can tell Van
where he might pick up an
apartment?
F/O "The Shadow" Utes, the
fa-a-ast AT-6 pilot of this
station has at last succumbed
to the disease known as B-17F-
itis. His combat choice was
fighters, so take heed all you
fa-a-ast AT-6 pilots.
SNORING TO Barracks #1, with
VICTORY an all-star team,
claims they have
the champion snorers of all
time. Sgt. Strong gets going
with a noise worse than the
5:30 A.M. siren and much less
pleasant. Sgt. Norton comes
in with a high alto someth ing
like a frog with tonsilitis.
Pvt. B. Thompson completes
their bid for the crown with
a roll very much like the
movies would have you believe
the drums go at one of Hit-
ler's executions.
However, all of the above
mentioned masters of the nasal
roar are overshadowed by Pvt.
Butterworth who has a rippling
rhythm effect which would have


put Shep Fields to shame even
in his best days.
The barracks will back this
quartette against anything in
the service. They also have a
second-string team which they
will back against any amateur
aggregation.
PHILOSOPHER Moses, the gent-
leman of color
who sweeps out the buildings
on the line, is quite a sage.
His latest words of wisdom are
that a gunnery student's dream
of heaven is an ever-sharp
pencil and five miles of clean
latrine walls.
Another one of his recent
observations was, "If'n de big
bosses knowed dese boys on de
line lak ah do, den dere'ould
be MORE STRIPES seen around'
here." Moses, we are really
on your side.
. . ^


SAFE-h
THE WA
nations
this i
nation
detach


"Copyrighted


S'Syndicated(

Available from Commerci

L.t


iUADUING We know that
ACS T/Fis making-
great prepar-
for a WAAC outfit and
s causing much conster-
here at Apalach. If a
ment of WAACs is sent to





Material


content)


al News Pr


^I"


t"Copyrighted Material

: Syndicated Content L

Available from Commercial News Providers"

I,


MUST SERVE 6 MONTHS TO
GET TECHNICIAN BADGES
Students graduating from me-
chanic schools will have to
wait six months before they
will be eligible to receive
their silver technician badges
which will identify them as
Army Air Forces technicians,
according to an advance copy
of Army Regulation 600-80.
This new change in Army Re-
gulations states that the re-
quirements for eligibility to
receive the badge are that the
graduate of a specialist
school must have completed six
months of actual service in
the Army Air Forces duty re-
quired of the technician.
Organization and detachment
commanders will initiate re-
quest for the award of the
badges. The commanding officer
of the unit must certify that
the minimum reauirerrents have
been met by the application
for the award. A requisition
for the number of badges will
be submitted with each request
for awards.












oviders i


Pa e 7


Pa _


SGTL JAMES


Ma 29 1943


THE TYNDALL TARGET'


.

sGT. JAMES "IRISH" C
,nden
correS


this love-starved post, who is
going to protect them?
It has been suggested that
we have a competent guard unit
and we aren't questioning the
fact that the guards could
keep the rest of the camp at
bay. TIt only question in our
minds is 41) will protect the
poor girl from the GUARDS?

F/O "Bad Buy" Wileon has
turned over a new leaf and is
well on the way to recovery
under the careful guidance of
F/O Spaararen.
Lt. Efinger brought his bet-
ter half down from Wisconsin
and she is now residing in the
capitol city, Tallahassee,
The Lt. will undoubtedly have
to stretch a local clearance a
long way every weekend.
Lt. "Herky" Bercik came back
off leave with that far away
look in his eye. The poor fel-
low is in love and can't even
get a local clearance.
The byword at Apalach is
still, "L2B or not 12B!"







Page 8 THEt 1 YN I4lanufl


Medicwoes

Those corsage boys of last
week were joined by that super
promenader, Sgt. Scullio.
Pfc. Sandone has at last
come into his own. A reclas-
sification down here hasplaced
him in the hospital barber
shop. We understand that San-
done is expecting an addition
to the family the latter part
of June. Congratulations!
We know of one officer pati-
ent that is most happy to see
Pvt. Sam Lane return from his
furlough.
Sgts. Mullins and Terrell
are reading, "I Found Africa"
and "Congo Song". Incidental-
ly, these men have applied for
OCSJ
Cpl. Fitl and McDermott can
be seen any day going through
their manual.
We can't imagine why Sgt.Da-
niels went to church in Mill-
ville this past Sunday.
T/Sgt. Matonak is a quiet
man these days after attending
a certain beach party. Come,
come, Casanova'... Sgt. Davis-
on is sweating out ASTP we
hope he'll make it.
Attention, fellows. An or-
derly Retreat for this Detach-
ment is held this way: The
NCO in charge gives "Dress
Right-Dress, then he gives
"ready FRONT." He does not
ask the Sgt. Major if he wants
to do anything while the men
are at Dress Right Dress' The
men are at attention now. The
Commissioned Officer in charge
then gives "Parade REST."
The buglers sound o*f. Upon
completion of this the officer
does an about face and calls
the Detachment to attention.
He then gives "Present ARMS"
and at this time the Sgt. Ma-
jor and the NCO in charge pre-
sent arms. The officer does
an about face and presents'arms
(Salutes in this case.) The
buglers sound off, and at the
last note the officer gives
"Order ARMS" after he has
executed order arms and about
face. The officer then gives
this command to the NCO in
charge and the latter then
dismisses the Detachment.
We haven't been away from
training so long that we for-
get how to execute the most
beautiful (if it is done
right) ceremony of the day.
Then the Acting First Sgt.
of the 26th Altitude Train-
ing unit went out for Retreat
with his cap on backwards.
Once in a lifetime: Cpl.
Fitl was handed his furlough
the other day much to his
surprise he had asked for
it some time in June.
--Sgt. C. S. Laubly


Gunner Makers

Another week is here and so
is the hot Florida summer sun.
Whew- Last Sunday evening the
Gunnermaker bunch looked as
would, a basket of over-ripe
tomatoes. About Thursday they
began to peel. I had a lot of
fun Friday night. The guys it
my bay are all bathers,
Open letter to Captain Sal-
ley: "Sir, your new boat is
beautiful, especially the four
inches which remain ab ve wa-
ter on a calm day. ow I
wouldn't want the captain to
think that we were under the
impression that the new boat
resembled a sieve in the
slightest degree, but confi-
dentially, Sir, will it hold
water--out? May we take the
liberty of suggesting a name
for this streamlined craft...
"THE SPONGE?"
We'd like to depart from the
whimsical for a moment to di-
rect a few words of praise to
some deserving men of this and
other organizations. Who are
they? The cooks, my friend,


THE CHAPEL
The Chapel stands as a silent but eloquent witness to the
presence of Almighty God in our world today and at this base.
It undertakes to make the Unseen Seen, the Unknown Real, the
Hoped-for a Present Fact. Its spire, pointing upward, symbol-
izes the never-ceasing search of the soul for God. Its altar,
ever open for man's worship, invites the penitent heart to con-
secration and spiritual renewal. Its Holy Bible, spread nwde
for revealing truth, provides assurance and hope to fearful and
doubting souls.
Let the Chapel become a vital part of your life while sta-
tioned at the base. Utilize its privileges for worship, for
meditation, for consultation and for fellowship to the fullest
of your ability. The bravest and best soldier is one who has
faith and confidence in Someone better and bigger than himself.
The words of Lt. General Sir W.G.S. Dobbie, hero of the island
of Malta, Acting Governor and Commander-in-Chief of that val-
iant band of men who have endured so much, are worthy to be
remembered and emulated by every soldier:
"To serve God and to follow Him is a very real and practi-
cal thing in the Army. The help that He gives is also very
real and practical, as I have proved times without number. I
COULD NOT FACE LIFE WITHOUT HIM. Those who are trying to live
Without Him little know what they are missing. It is no small
thing to known that all the past has been forgiven, that help
from the hands of the Almighty God is available for the pres-
sent, and that the whole future for eternity is assured. "

"I HAVE SET THE LORD ALWAYS BEFORE ME: BECAUSE HE IS AT
MY RIGHT HAND, I SHALL NOT BE MOVED. "


fl.''.A ztp ;: WI.' % tt.,-::' .- .iii! -t"t"w':..t ", .:: :.."'=<:j. .


SU


FNDAY
8:00 A'.M ...............Mass
9:00 A.M.... Protestant Sun-
day School.
10:00 A.M....Gunners Mass at
Theater.
10:00.A.M....Protestant Wor-
ship Service.
11:00 A.M...Gunners Protest-
ant Service.
11:15 A.M............... Mass
7:00 P.M....Evening Worship


TUESDAY
5:30
6:30
7:00


P.M............... Mass
P.M..Instruction Class
P.M....Fellowship Club


and other permanent kitchen
p e rs o n n e 1.
There are few who have a
tougher job than these men who
rise-at all hours of the day
or night to make sure that
something is at the mess hall'
for you when you pass thru
that chow line. Who do you
think is responsiblefor those
three meals a day? Who's the
muscle behind that roast beef
you ate yesterday, and those
"seconds" and "thirds" on cof-
fee that you can have at any
meal you desire? It's all
done by the boys who sweat in
Mess Hall #2. Next time you
pass thru the chow line, ask
yourself, "Would I trade jobs
with him?" Don't gripe, they
are doing their best.
Woof, woof Sgt. Taylor has.
a pet which he is rearing to.
'become the squadron's mascot.
The first thing that our pooch
is learning, and it's a "must".
for all potential mascots, is
how to be a good chow hound.
The boys in the lime lite


WEDNESDAY
12:15 P.M...Civilian Worship
Service
5:30 P.M................Mass
7:00 P.M....Choir Rehearsal

THURSDAY
5:30 P.M............... Mass
6:30 P.M..Instruction Class
FRIDAY
5:30 P.M............... Mass
6:30 P.M.....Jewish Service

SATURDAY
5:30 P.M...............Mass-
7:00 P.M........Confessions


this week with a slanguage all
their own, spoken in their own
inimitable way, are:
MacDonald "Hallo, Semmy."
Laudis "No, I had this sto-
mach before I got in the army. "
Gerhskowitz- "Hello; sports,
how go by you, no?"
Reagan "Too many profit-
eers in Panama."
Griffin "Ain't it the
truth? "
Adomo "Look Sarg, I had to
work late. "
Michael "The bump in my
bed isn't my barracks bag. No
kidding!
Horn "Don't tell me that,
boy. "
THE PEEKER


'Ah burnt mah lips on a dish
of hot chocolate.'
'Yeah man. Ah knows her.'


When a girl looks good in a
bathing suit, a man usually
looks good too.


mrrfrlTm~ ITT mA nflC~


---


Sub-Depot
The Sub-Depot Engineering
Department recently received
a letter of commendation from
Captain H.M. Myers, armament
officer, through Major Wm. P.
Kevan, director of flying, ex-
pressing the appreciation of
the armament section for the
cooperation rendered by the
Engineering Dept. in the de-
seigning, manufacture and re-
pair of armament equipment.
Specific mention was made of
the effort of Captain J.C.
Bristle, engineering officer,
to cut red tape to the minimum.
Also mentioned were Harold
Dill, general foreman of the
engineering shops; George F.
Love, foreman of the machine
shop; L.R. Bechtel, sheet me-
tal foreman; and Frank Camp-
isi, foreman of the woodworking
shop.
It is estimated that this
cooperation has increased the
efficiency of the aerial gun-
nery equipment here and at
Apalachicola by approximately
30%, thus enabling this sta-
tion to fire more rounds per
aircraft than any gunnery
school in the country.
Mr. J.B. Story, personnel
and training officer of the
Sub-Depot, announced last week
the appointment of Mr. I.M..
Roche and Miss Lila Childs as
instructors to supervise the
Sub-Depot Civilian Training
Program which is to be inaug-
urated.here in accordance with
A. S. C_ regulations.
"Ronald, go get the mail,"
"Ronald, check the baskets,"
"Ronald, run this stencil. "
All day long it's Ronald do
this and Ronald do that. Ron-
ald is the messenger boy for
Engineering and one of the
unsung (as yet) heroes of the
war. Rain or shine, hot or
cold, he can be seen scurrying
hither, thither and yon, per-
forming a thousand and one
menial tasks. Only a messen-
ger boy. But has anyone ever
stopped to consider just what
a messenger boy has to do and
contend with?
In addition to Ronald Howze,
the Sub-Depot has two o their
messengers, T.F. Russ, Jr. and
William Clemmons, and the du-
ties they do each day are too
numerous to be set down in
print, but suffice to say, they
are far from easy.
-I.M. Roche
The entire Sub-Depot joins
in wishing a speedy recovery
for its commanding officer,
Major L.A.. Bryan, who was the
"victim" of an appendectomy
last Friday. Reports to date
are.very good, and we all hope
that he will be with us very
SOO L0
We bid farewell to Lt. H.L.
Jacob, who has been trans-
ferred to another station. We
all shall miss him. Always
friendly and anxious to help
solve any of the numerous and
perplexing problems with which
the Sub-Depot employees con-
fronted him, he had gained
the admiration and respect of
all who knew him. Our best
wishes go with him.
-B.J. Davenport







Ma 14TMIA TPaze 9


Rugged ? 69th
When an emergency arises,
it's a knowledge of what to
do, and the presence of mind
to do.it, which mark a leader
and a good soldier. These
qualities were admirably dem-
onstrated by T/Sgt. Earl Boutwell
in a recent real-life drama in
which a woman, having rescued a
drowning boy, herself went under
in the bay near Victory Circle.
Sgt. Boutwell directed her res-
uue by boat and revived her by
artificial respiration.
You've heard the story about
the girl of questionable sanity
who hoarded pancakes? They say
with John Sansone it's ladies'
bathing suits.
Sulking in his "tent" and con-
templating the scarcity of good
whisky, M/Sgt. Fisher of Post
OperaticTns was heard to say:
"Sherman was right, war is hell".
'Though not the ardent lover
type, whisper has it that Sgt.
Solomon is wooing one of "Burk-
hart's Biddies". He has even
taken to shining his shoes.
Finding the 5:30 AM exercise
session inadequate, Cpl. Clayton
works out on the beach of an
evening. What's the dope, Clay-
ton? Can you really get tan by
the light of the moon?
According to a snooplin (news-
gathering gremlin) Cpl. Honey
has been checking on train con-
nections for New York City.
Wouldn't be planning to slip off
on a little trip, would you Bill?
Cpl. Garcia, they say, has his
hat in the ring for Mayor of Port
St. Joe.
We suspect that S/Sgt. "Slick"
Hearn comes from a long line of
horse traders. First a Packard
(something Sherman overlooked)
and now a sporty Ford.


Ordnotes
That song about Rosie the
Riveter might well apply to Pvt.
Zeke Eberhard of the Ordnance
garage. He has eyes only for a
local dish who rivets all day
at the sl pyard. Seems that
Zeke goes about singing with that
riveter influence, "R-R-R-Rosie
the R-R-R-Riveter. "
With June approaching (and
we mean the month) the men are
getting nuptial ideas. What the
thought of separate rations won' t
do' Sgt. Knowles is all set to
take the plunge on June 19, while
a certain first three grader iith
a picturesque vocabulary is about
to embark on the idea that two
can live as cheaply as dne.
We were witness the other night.
to a bowling match between the
Ordnance officers. Tch! tch!
a sad affair. After careful ob-
servation we have these suggest-
ions to make which might increase
their scores: (1) Use two balls.
(2) Wave a dollar bill at the pin
boy. (3) Take up golf.. If this
column isn't written next week,
have patience; we'11 continue as
soon as we get out o, the jug.
Our congratulations to Cpl.
and Mrs. Sigmund, who were re-
cently married.
Sgt. Burnett does not like to
have his name mentioned in print
so please Sgt. Burnett we will do
our utmost in the future to see
that Sgt. Burnett's name is not
mentioned. Is that okay with
you, Sgt. Burnett?
-Sgts. Witham & Ponzio


Suspicious Gal: 'Look here,
soldier, what's your object-
i ve?'
G.I.: 'In the words of Roos-
evelt and Churchill-----un-
conditional surrender.'


THEY SUPERVISE REPAIRS


Band Box
The band' s daily parades
have now stretched so much
that we walk eight miles a
day. Try this some time with
a 36-pound bass horn on your
shoulder. (We have no pic-
colos'.) Newest stop of the
matinee program is at the
main intersection where we
play, at the request of the
Department of Training, to
give the marching students a
"musical lift" back to after-
noon classes. All this plus
the ,,r,,n1 DT


Staff Sergeant Sergeant The band s'oftballers took
HOWARD McDONALD HENRY HOEY the Ordnance into camp by 3
In the transportation of su- to 2 in a practice game.
In the transportation of sup- We've picked a spot in the
plies and personnel at ny Army orderly room for the trophy.
fiedd, many trucks and cars
are required. To carry out
this program successfully, an wn mB
fleet of well-equinoed and well rown ombers.
operated vehicles are essential. Pfc. Lewis M. Sessoms came
To complete this program a ga- back from his furlough a few
rage with skilled mechanics days ahead of time. The
is necessary. fellows are wondering why he
Sgts. McDonald and Hoey are returned so soon. Is it that
in charge of the Ordnance 2nd a certain little "cutie" here
in Panama City has taken his
and 3rd echelon garages. Their in Panama Ciy has taken hi
work is to supervise and accomo- mind from his worries back
lish the many necessary repairs home.
to motor vehicles needed with The squadron nad a large
transportation requirements as number out on Sunday to see
transportation requirements as the game between Tyndall's
high as at this station. the e between Tyndall' s
igh a at this ta N J boy colored baseball team and
Sgt. Hoey is a New Jersey boy Eglin Field, the first for-
who attended school at Aberdeen. mal game we have had on our
He cane to Tyndall Field with the emal game we Eve hon our
detachment from Eglin Field. new diamond. Everyone en-
while on furlough in December, joyed te game even if we did
after attending an automotive The squadron seems to think
school in New York, he married that Pvt. William H. Smalls
a home town girl and they live will be out for the crown in
in Panama City. wil be out for the crown in
Sgt. McDonald is from Hast- the swimming tournament and
ings, Mich., and he also took i m estimation he's going
an Aberdeen automotive course. for it aol right. Pretty
Mac is rather quiet but always tough competition for Sgt.
'on the ball.' He came here Thompson.
fon the ball.Field in May o The fellows enjoyed another
from Napier Field in May of dance Saturday night at the
1942. U.S.O. club. -Cpl. Marvin Carter


TYNDALL TOMMY.......


LEDBETTER


FOUR HOURS LATER THE COLONEL'S PLANE IS
SEEN BREAKING THRU ANP HEAPING POWN -


HERE COMES THE ANNIE MARY
ETS GO FELLAS,SNAF TO. WE
MUSTN'T KEEP THOSE JERRIES
OR WHATEVER THEY ARE WAITING'
TOO LON&.THE COLONEL'S
IN A HURRY, I KNOW.


YUP IT'S HEAH AGIN, THE OL'MAN
HAS MAPE ANOTHERR ONE OF HIS HOPS
AS SHO AS MY NAMES MIKE GALL-
A&HEA WE'LL MAKE A RAID ON AN
ENEMY BASE. HE'LL VO IT EV'RY
TIME, SA HELP:.a ME-.


7-//~~


7 &


FSHO, SEE THEAH,AS SOON
AS THE COL. GETS BACK HE GOOD/
HAS AMEETIN& ANP THEN MAYBE I'LL
THE WOAKS STAHT TO FLY. GET A CRACK
INSIP-AH NO TIME AT IT THIS
WE'LL BE ON OUAH [TRIP, EH,
SWA -MIK E?


BY THE WAY, COLONEL,
HAVE YOU SEEN HER YET?
A STRANGER-A WOMAN
REPORTER CAME INTO
CAMP STAYING ON
TO CATCH THE NEWS-
A MISS POOT__Y


I


May 29, 1943


Page 9


THE T"NDALL TARGET







Pscrc IE


TYNDALL WEAKENS IN NINTH TO LET ELLYSON

FIELD SCORE FOUR RUNS AND WIN BY 5-4;

TORNADOES PLAY COAST GUARD TOMORROW

Local Nine, off to Good Start With Four Runs in
First Frame, Unable to Stop Late Rally;
Lose Second Game by 6 to 5 Score


Despite their building up of a four-run lead in
inning of their opener against Ellyson Field last
the Tyndall Tornadoes weakened in the ninth to allow


to cross the plate and thereby
lost the game, 4-5.
Matonak began the scoring for
Tyndall men in the first when
he reached base on a walk, and
crossed the plate several min-
utes later on successive singles
by Brown and Edwards. Jackrel,
the sixth man up, walked, fill-
ing the bases. Then Sedmak,
the first baseman, promptly
doubled and three more runs
were scored to bring the inn-
ing's total to four. However,
after this barrage, Higdon, the
Ellyson pitcher, settled down
and held the Tornadoes score-
less for the remainder of the
game.
Meanwhile, Davis held the
Pensacola nine in check until

COAST GUARD HERE TOMORROW
Coach Stanley Drongowski an-
nounced that the Tornadoes
would attempt to get on the
winning path again tomorrow
in a game against the local
Coast Guard nine.
Johnny Nocheck, former Tor-
onto hurler, is scheduled to
take the mound for the Coast
Guardsmen, while Southard or
Davis will do the flinging for
the Tornadoes.
The game will be on Tyndall's
new athletic field. It will
negin at 2 P.M.

the fifth when they scored a
lone run on an error, walk and
single. Still holding a three
run lead, the Tornadoes played
good ball until the ninth when
three singles, a walk and a
wild pitch brought in four runs
for Ellyson and spoiled a four-
hit mound performance by Davis.
On Sunday the two teams took
the field again and played
through the nine innings in
continual rain. In this game
both teams scored two runs in


ALL-STARS DEFEAT
LYNN HAVEN, 16-7

A star-studded aggregation,
of ball players from the Avia-
tion Squadron, exclusive of
the members of the regular
post colored team, thoroughly
trounced the Lynn Haven Tigers
in a game between the two
teams last Sunday.
Because of wet grounds the
game was slow and numerous er-
rors were committed. However
the dampness didn't hinder the
Tyndall men at the plate as
they banged out 16 hits which
they converted into a like
number of runs. The sluggers
were paced by Pfc. John A. San-
ders who connected for the only
home run of the game.
Lonnie Gorham was the win-
ning pitcher for the Tyndall
team, giving up eight hits and
seven runs.
The "All-Stars", under the
competent managership of Cpl.
Ernest Lupoe, are scheduled to
meet the Lynn Haven team in a
double header tomorrow here on
the field with the first game
starting at 1:00 P.M.
All-Star box score H R
Dupree, lb 3 1
Jernigan, s 2 2
Cartrlght, 3b 33 3
Gill. 2 1 4
Leon, cf 2 1
Pettaway, if 2 1
Sanders, rf 2 3
Odoms, c 1 1
Dennis, p 0 0
Gorham, p 0 0
Conley, p 0 0
16 1


TORNADO OUTFIELDER


the first
Saturday,
four runs


the early innings and then
waited for the ninth to unload
their power.
The Tornadoes began their
blasting in the top half of the
frame as Hines walked, Edwards
singled and both were advanced
by Jackrel's one baser, with
Hines scoring. Sedmak then
singled sending home Edwards
and advancing Jackrel to third
Anderson, next up, grounded out
as Jackrel scampered across the
plate with the third run of the
nnir i.
Southard returned to the mound
as Ellyson came up foi their
final turn at the plate. He,
like Davis, had yielded but four
hits in the past eight innings
but weakened as he walked the
first two men to face him. He
tightened up a bit and caused
the next man to pop up to
second, but Wolfe, Smith and
Kerner, the next trio of Elly-
son batsmen came through with
singles to bring in two runs
and then two more runners cross-
ed the plate as Jackrel allowed
the ball to pass through his
legs into deep left field.


1st game
TYNDALL
Matonak, cf
Didier, c
Brown, 2b
Hines, ss
Edwards, rf
Jackrel, If
Sedmak, lb
Anderson, 3b
Davis, p
Totals
ELLYSON
Zorich, lb
Sovanski, if
Weaver, 3b
Franks, c
Long, rf
Scott, ss
Donofrio, 2b
Wolfe, cf
Higdon, p
Totals

2nd game
TYNDALL
Matonal, cf
Didier, c
Brown, 2b
Hines, ss
Edwards, rf
Jackrel, If
Sedmak, lb
Anderson, 3b
Southard, p
Totals
ELLYTSON
Spellman, 3b
Donofrio, 2b
Savonski, rf
Scott, ss
Zorich, If
Franks, c
Wolfe, cf
Smith, lb
Kerner, p
Totals


AB R
3 1
5 0
3 1
4 0
4 1
3 1
4 0
3 0
4 0
33 4
4 1
2 0
4 1
4 0
4 0
2 0
4 1
2 1
3 1
29 5


ORDNANCE TOPS FIELD IN
INTER-SQUADRON EVENTS
With the first quarter over,
a tabulation of the results of
inter-squadron competition in
basketball, pocket billiards,
horseshoes, table tennis and
the cross-country run, show
that Ordnance leads the field
with a score of 65 points.
Close behind the Ordnance
men are the Gunnermakers with
a total of 61r, with the Cloud
Hoppers nestling in the third
slot with 56 points.
Below ai'e listed the squad-
ron standings as released by
the Special Service Office:


Squadron
ORDNANCE ...............
GUNNERMAKERS............
CLOUD HOPPERS...........
BAND, FI. & SIOG AL .....
o0 ARDI A S. ..............
MEDICS. .................
69TH....................
BLUEBIRDS.. ............
WHITE FLASHES ..........
VENTURAS...............
CANARIES...............
ZEBRAS. ......... ......
QUARTERMASTERS ........


Points
65
616
56
51
50i
41
34
28
27j
24
24
192
121


SGT. ABE JACKREL OF THE MEDICS
WHO IS SLATED TO PATROL ONE OF
THE OUTER PASTURES FOR LT.
DRONGOWSKIlS MEN IN THEIR GAME
AGAINST THE LOCAL COAST GUARDS-
MEN HERE TOMORROW.
GAME TIME: 2:00 P.M.

MEDICS, GUNNERMAKERS
LEAD BOWLING LOOP

With Cpls. Max Senkinc and
Al Kocur leading the way, the
Medic bowlers swept their
three game series with the
Squadron C Keglers and jump-
ed into a tie for first place
with the Gunnermakers. Both
teams have a record of five
wins against one loss.
Senkinc bowled the highest
single game of the evening
when he turned in a 215 for
his second game. However,
the score of 248 rolled last
week by the Zebra's Cpl. Ri-
chu still stands as the sea-
son's highest individual
mark.
The Medics also broke the
single game team high when
they bowled 904 in their
second game. A new three
game team high was set by
the Zebras with a total
pinnage of 2548. The in-
dividual high three-game
series for the evening was
made by Koleszar of Ordnance
who totalled 585 for his
three games.
This week's results:
QM 1, Cloudhoppers 2; Can-
aries 0, 69th 3; Ordnance 2,
Bluebirds 1; Medics 3, Squad-
ron C O; Redbirds 0, Zebras 3;
GM's 3, White Flashes 0.
Individual highs, each team:
Hnylka (QM) 172, 179, 199-650
Gret'art (CH) 188, 191, 165-554
Blanco (69) 154, 180, 212-546
Cruz (C) 175, 191, 150-516
Koleszar (0) 211, 203, 171-585
Russo (BB) 201, 184, 155-540
Kocur (M) 165, 179, 165-509
Bernhard (SC) 156, 133, 174-463
Holcomb (RB) 142, 159, 142-443
Green (Z) 180 176 213-569
Olenik (WF) 119, 123-490
Laudis- (GM) 168, 176, 196-540
MEDICS, ORDNANCE LEAD
SOFTBALL LEAGUE
The "murderers row" of the
Ordnance and Medics softball
teams continued to keep their
squadrons on top as the league
enters its third week of com-
petition.
Only four of the seven games
scheduled for the week were
played off, the other three
have been postponed to a later
date.
Second week results:
Zebras 10, White Flashes 4.
Ordnance 6, Venturas 1.
Medics 13, 69th 2.
Redbirds 15, Guardians 5.
Fi-Sig-Band vs. Cloud Hoppers5
Gunnermakers vs. Canaries
QM vs. Bluebirds*
postponed.


TYNDALL AB R H E
Harrison, 2b 5 2 5 1
White, if 5 1 3 2
Blackmon, 3b 5 1 1 1
Randle, ss 5 2 3 0
Dawkins, c 4 2 3 0
Fox, rf 2 0 1 1
Davis, lb 5 1 2 1
Jenkins, cf 2 0 1 1
English, cf 3 0 2 1
Baskett, p 4 0 0 0
Weaks, p 3 1 3 0
Total 43 10 24 8
EGLIN FIELD AS R H E
Townsend, 3b 5 0 2 1
Barfield, rf 5 3 3 0
R. Allen, if 5 2 3 0
Brown, c 4 0 2 0
Harris, 2b 5 1 2 0
Robinson, lb 4 2 4 2
Smith, ss 4 1 2 1
Warren, p 4 1 3 0
Lee, cf 3 1 2 1
Falk, p 1 0 0 0
Moore, rf 2 0 0 0
Total 42 11 23 6
Two-base hits: Harrison 1,
Blackaon 1, Davis 1. Three-
base hits: RFndle 1. Home-
runs: Dawkins 1. Stolen
base: Harrison 1, Blackson
1. Double plays: Blackmon
to Harrison. Winning pitcher:
.Warren. Umpire: Arthur King.






MO OVIE Sj


POST
SATURDAY, MAY 29
'Holiday Inn'
Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire
SUN., MON., MAY 30-31
'This Land Is Mine'
Laughton, O'fara, Sanders
TUESDAY, JUNE 1
'Tonight We kaid Calais'
John Sutton, Annabella
WEI1ESDAY, JUNE 2
DOUBLE FEATURE
'Good Morning Judge'
Dennis O'Keefe, L. Albritten
'Redhead From Manhattan'
Lupe Velez
THURS. FRI., JUNE 3-4
'My friend Flicka'
Roddy McDowell, Preston Poster

RI TZ
SUN., MON., MAY 30-31
'Hello, Frisco'
Alice Paye, Jack Oakie
TUES., WED., JUNE 1-2
'Sssignment in Brittany'
Pierre Aumont, Susan Peters
THURS., FRI., JUNE 3-4
'Flight for Freedom'
Ros. Russell, Fred HacMurray
SATURDAY, JUNE 5
'The Avenging Rider'
fi RHolt, Cliff Edwards

PANAMA
SUN., MON., MAY 30-31
'Margin for Error'
Joan Bennett, Milton Berle
TUESDAY, JUNE 1
'Dr. Kildare's Victory'
Lew Ayres, Lionel Barrynore
WED., THURS., JUNE 2-3
'Remember the Day'
Claudette Colbert, John Fayne
FRI., SAT., JUNE 4-5
'Overland Stage Coach'
Bob Livingston


THE TYNDALL TARGET


PQra I 0


COLORED TEAM BOWS TO
EGLIN IN OVERTIME
GAME BY 11-9
By PFC. HAZEL WILLIS
Although outhit by the Tyn-
dall team, the Eglin Field
Aviation Squadron managed to
eke out a 11-10 triumph in
ten innings in their game
here last Sunday.
It was the Tyndall team's
second game of the season
and while hitting well, the
boys showed a lack of prac-
tice by committing light
errors.
The biggest explosion of
hits came in the fourth frame
when the Eglin men batted
around.
The teams will meet in a re-
turn game tomorrow afternoon
at Eglin Field.
Box score:











THIS WEEK'S CROSSWORD PUZZLE


/ 2 3 4 5 7 F /0





///
/1 / ,


7 1 /7 10


2.q 20 3-1 2Z 2


72(, 27







3- 3/ 7 3F 31
-^//


34 / Z7

////
-<3 yi/


///

Across


, I7 -


"NO
'NO!"


1-Britain is ours
5-What Hitler
gives the people
of Europe
11--You often
march to this
in drilling
12-We'll soon have
to all the
barracks
13-This General
commands our
Army
15-Shoulder Arms
(ab.)
16-Half an idea
17-Our campaign
will be '- out'
till the Axis is
in'
18-Greeting Engi-
neer Recruits
(ab.)
19-What the rookie
who asked for a
30-day furlough
was
22-What a snow
soldier travels
on


24-What appetites
do in the Army
25-Engineer Train-
ing Replacement
Center (ab.)
28-What officers are
often called
30-Alaskan rec. hall
31-A warrior (obs.)
33-This organiza-
tion is doing a
lot for service
men
35-Beginning of
militarism
36-Double nothing
37-You're proud to
be one
40-Ft. Stevens is in
this State
42-Little letter
43-What the Japs
decided to do
from Attu and
Agattu
44-What soldiers
think of most
often


Down
1-What Americans 9-What a soldier
are doing to the is often at
teeth 10-A brigadier gen-
2-He reports the eral wears this
squad at reveille 14-The Cavalry
3-Caterpillar's uses this for fuel
back end 18-Your letters
4-Short years from this party
5-Russian sea are usually
6-The Navy tells signed XXXXX
time with these 20-Johnny Dough-
7-Maj. Gen. Fred- boy found one
erick E. in Ireland
8-Beginning of 21-Victory-Winning
selective service Infantry (ab.)
23-What Napoleon 32-Our Army is a
kept his powder far cry froin
in what it was in
26-Kind of grenade days of -
27-The Army has 34-Army messages
many new are by the
words since the Signal Corps
start of the war 37-Allies grind
29-This dame is Axis (ab.)
always running 38-Important
around the post branch of the
J--Intelligence Army (ab.)
Observes Radi- 39-What first ser-
cals (ab.) geants don't
31-There's an Army usually do when
post named after they give orders
this World War 41-Enlisted person-
general nel (ab.)








-a Zp





r'^^^05


CHARGE OF QUARTERS














S:00PM 00 M.-
5:ooPM. V ~ -- '7:00 P.M / 9:00 P.M


111 0 .M

11:00 P.M


o00oo M. \


or









o AM
1;00 A.M.


S3:00 A.M.


Liquids should never be poured
into a wounded man's mouth if
he is unconscious as they may
choke him.


4:- 59 A.M.


4:00 A. M-














5:00 A.M.


7/PII:O 00 P.M. i

09






/A0A





2: 00 A.M-


A4:51 M.














8:0 0AO.M.


Page 11


May 29, 1943


THE TYNDALT, TARGET







/:-OH IT ISMT THAT HEOS
A TIGHT16HT A ITS
JUST THAT HED I LrHER
PUT HIS PAIY I "TO
HATL .SER.IC LFE
TS^ IHBuanncE ^


SI,


.L..--C

'a


IwL4. *


NHTIONRL SERVICES FE INSURANCE


anowmm,




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs