• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Main






Title: Tyndall target
ALL ISSUES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076230/00056
 Material Information
Title: Tyndall target
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 27-36 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)
Publisher: Public Relations Office, Air Corps Gunnery School
Place of Publication: Tyndall Field Fla
Publication Date: 1942-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City -- Tyndall Air Force Base
Coordinates: 30.078611 x -85.576389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 16, 1942)-
Issuing Body: Issues for May 9, 1942- published by Office of Public Relations, Army Air Forces Gunnery School.
General Note: Title from caption.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076230
Volume ID: VID00056
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24602432

Table of Contents
    Cover
        page 1
    Main
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text





























j/


A '-
?1^


4


.-


A
- .r~


AERIAL GUNNER ,


IY~it~i~ ~eP


~5i~P J


1Tl






Page 2 TEE TYhA]



STyndall Taret
PUBLISHED SATURDAY BY THE SPECIAL SERVICES SECTION FOR PERSCN-
NEL OF THE AAF FLEXIBLE GUCERY SCHOOL, TYNDALL FIELD, FLORIDA.
Special Service Officer. Commanding
Capt. Owen 0. Freeman Col. Leland 8. Stranathan
Photographic Officer: Photography and Reproduction:
J.A. Dikeran T/St. W. Castle, 8/Sgt. J.
Public Relations Officer: Mitchell, Sgt. S. Upchurch,
Lt. W.B. Pratt Cpl. W. Grout, Cpl. 0. Neits-
Editorial Staff: ert, Pvt. L. Shaw, S/Sgt. J.
Sgt. Arnold H. Milgaten, Sgt. Montgomery, 8/Sgt. R. Keough.
Saul Samof, Pe. Neil Pooser, St. P. Terry, Sgt. J. Marsiek
Pvt. P.M. Nickles 6/Sgt. J. Webster. Pvt. W. Dan-
ArtWork: T/gt. Ldbttr iels, Cpl. Tackett, Pfc. H. Care
Art Work: T/sat. O. Ledbetter
and Cpl. Marshall Goodman.
The Tyndall Target receives material supplied by Camp News-
paper Service, War Dept., 205 B. 42nd St., N.Y.C. The credited
material may not be republished without permission from C.N.S.

SPECIAL SERVICE
'The War Department considers Special Service of the
highest importance in reaching the one goal we all
point to in this war--utter defeat of the enemy.
'We have faith in Special Service...
-Brig. Gen. Joe N. Dalton,
Ass"t Chief of Staff for
Personnel, ASF.
Let's for the moment scrap such terms as welfare,
morale, orientation, etc., usually associated with
Special Service, and try to find a phrase that may
express fairly accurately just what is the goal of
Special Service. When it is really boiled down you
will find that the objective of Special Service is
to develop a "will to win."
Give a nation, in this case a group of nations,a
will to win, tell them just what they are fighting
for, add a bit of humor, and then just try to lick
them. Centuries of experience have proven that the
efficiency of a group of fighting nations, an army,
a post, or a squadron is in direct proportion to the
state of mind within the group. If an army is
happy, it is pretty sure to be efficient; and if it
is not efficient, it cannot be happy.
All of the above applies very definitely to
Tyndall Field. Let's look at the record and see
what has been done about it by Special Service here.
Under the constant direction of Lieutenants
Drongowski and Hunn, respectively, a real rec-
reational athletic program with playable facilities
is well underway, and a natural beach has been
developed into a veritable God-send.
Lieutenant Moore, in addition to ably managing
the Post Theater, has made the Post Library increas-
ingly popular. Appropriations have been allotted to
double the size and vastly increase both the quality
and quantity of the books, periodicals, etc., of the
library, and add thereto a musical library equipped
with the best of reproduction machines and records.
Accounts of the recent improvement of the Band and
orchestra, under the leadership of Warrant Officer
Missal, and the establishment of a GI entertainment
group directed by Lieutenant Goldsmith were pub-
lished in the last issue of the Target.
All of the above activities are under the juris-
diction of the Special Service Office. Many
individuals, in addition to those mentioned, deserve
immense credit for this general improvement. Credit
is due the men comprising the labor details on the
athletic field, beach, theater, library and "Rec"
hall. Sergeant Milroy, of the Special Service
Office,has had his fingers in all of these projects.
The Engineers, Signal Corps and Reproduction De-
partment deserve a hand for their cooperation.
In order to continue this general improvement
one element is vitally necessary--Special Serv-
ice must have the wholehearted support and co-
operation of the entire field. Each organization,
from c-mmanding officer to yardbird, should lend a
hand and submit suggestions. The old saying,
"You'll 5et more out than you put in," has been
kicked around a lot, but we suggest that you try
it with Special Service and see what happens.


- K QUESTION: IF YOU GO
OUT WITH A GIRL WHO
MAKES MORE MONEY THAN
YOU DO, DO YOU THINK SHE
SHOULD SHARE THE BII L?

7,P Interviews and Photos
By SGT. SI UPCHUtCF
r3--wD S


Pvt. EDWARD CROSBY, -echan- orer:
ic: "Of course it doesn't Under s
I ook nice but the idea is the gir
practical. I wouldn't ask a privil(
girl to share the bill, but with he
I certainly wouldn't refuse
if she mentioned it."






SPut.


S' "I thl
Suy ca
Sgt. VANCE EDWARDS, Civil- quick
tan Personnel: I wouldn't Too fe
ask a psrl to go Dutch, but much c
if she were to offer to I change.
think it would be nice of her Army.
and perfectly all right be trea


WILFRED SCHRINER, Arm-
"Certainly, I think so.
ome conditions I think
I should consider it a
ege to share the bill
r date. "


LEON THOMAS, mechanic:
nk it's practical. A
'n use up $50 mighty
if he goes out much.
w girls realize how
fellow's position
s when he gets in the
They think they should
ted with kid gloves.









BEER BAR, SODA FOUNTAIN FOR RECREATION HALL


VETERAN JAP-FIGHTERS HERE AS INSTRUCTORS


1' -001-


Two aerial gunners who learned their job the hard way--in
actual combat--have arrived at Tyndall Field to serve as ins-
tructors. They are S/Sgt. Lewis Coburn and Sgt. Lonnie Wright,
above, who received numerous medals for their part in the
fighting in Hawaii, the Philippines, Java, Borneo, the Coral
Sea, the Solomon Islands and New Guinea. (Story on Page 5.)

RELATIVE OF GENERAL DOOLITLE TAKING
TYNDALL GUNERY COURSE; HE'S HAD
AN ADVENTUROUS LIFE

James M. Doolittle, Member of Class
43-22, in Merchant Marine 7 Years
The name of Doolittle has become a legend to the average
tAmerican because of the exploits and heroic deeds of Brig.


Gen. James IF. Doolittle.
But in gunnery school here
a relative of the famed flier,
ures of his own.
He is Pfc. James M. Doolit-
tle, member of class 43-22,
whose father is a second
cousin of the hero of the
Tokyo raid.
Before entering the Army,
Pfc. Doolittle was a licensed
engineer in the Merchant Mar-
ine, traveling to all parts of
the world battling storms,
fires and enemy submarines. He
was in the Merchant \Marine for
seven years before he finally
qot into the Army Air Forces.
) Once while on convoy in the
"aribbean, seven of the ships
of his fleet were sunk by sub-
marines and Doolittle's
limned lamely to port at New
Orleans, badly leaking from
a torpedo hit.
During a voyage in the North
Atlantic, the ship he was on
narrowly missed an iceberg and
was forced to drop anchor for
the night. The temperature of
the water in which they had
been sailing dropped from
42 to 28 degrees in 10 min-
utes. 'ecaise of the danger


there is another Doolittle,
who has had plenty of advent-

of icebergs in the vicinity,
the captain of the ship would
not give the go-ahead signal
until dawn.
During his seven years in
the Merchant Marine lie had the
usual storms and fires to con-
tend with, each adding a page
tc~the romance that is the
stfry of the sea.
Doolittle returned to civ-
vilian life to work on trans-
portation problems and final-
ly entered the Air Forces. He
was sent to Lowry Field,Colo.,
where he took the course of
training in bombardment arm-
ament.
At Tyndall, Department of
Training officers said, he has
shown determination and aca-
demic proficiency to further
the name of his famous rela-
tive.
He has never met his more
famous relative, the war hav-
ing prevented a national
Doolittle family reunion
which had been scheduled for
this year.


Cafeteria Counter, New Public

Address System Included In

Improvement Program

Extensive alterations including installation of a
beer bar, soda fountain and cafeteria counter are
under way at Tyndall Field's Recreation Hall.
Rec Hall activities have been cancelled until the improve-


ments are completed. The work
probably will be finished
about the first of next
month.
A fully equipped stage for
the presentation of dramatic
and other shows also is being
built. The new stage will
have modern lighting facili-
ties and a new curtain. A
public address system donated
by two Tyndall enlisted men
also is being installed.
The food, soft drink and
beer bars are being installed
by the Post Exchange and will
be operated under its super-
vision. The new stage is be-
ing constructed by the Post
Engineers.
when the Rec Hall is reopen-
ed, the weekly dances will be
on Thursday evenings instead
of Friday as in the past, the
Special Service Office announ-
ced.
The hall will be "100 per-
cent off-limits to persons in
swimming attire," the SS Of-
fice said.

FREE MATERNAL CARE FOR
GI'S WIVES PLANNED
Free maternal care for wives
and infant children of enlist-
ed men of the last four grades
is being arranged by the chil-
dren's Bureau of the Depart-
ment of Labor.
An announcement from Wash-.
ington said the Children's
Bureau is arranging through
state public health depart-
ments for wives of enlisted
men to receive care at civ-
ilian hospitals. Application
forms will soon be made avail-
able through state and local
health and welfare agencies,
the Red Cross, and local phys-
icians participating in the
program.
NO DATE SET YET
A definite date has not been
set yet for the forthcoming
appearance here of Bob Hope
End his radio show. However,
notification is expected mom-
entarily from the show's man-
ager.

Army Sergeant, Sergeant
Army--It's All the
Same in His Case
It is all very confusing,
but Sergeant Army is an Army
sergeant.
Sergeant Army started out
as an Army private. When
he began the aerial gunnery
course here he was Private
First Class Army. Upon
graduation he became Serg-
eant Army.
His full name is Sergeant
Gerald J. Army, son of Mrs.
Fred W. Army, of Millbury
Mass.


Two Tyndall Gl's Donate
Public Address System
To Recreation Hall

Two GI's walked into the
Special Service Office last
week and donated a complete
public address system to the
Recreation Hall.
The men, Sgt. Warren Dur-
thaler and S/Sgt. J. Carda-
mone of the Zebras, made
their offer to Captain Owen
Freeman and it was several
minutes before the Captain
was convinced that the men
were not joking and that
they actually had a sound
system which they wished to
donate and install.
Inasmuch as the present
public address system at the
hall is not adequate, its re-
placement by a more power-
ful sound apparatus will add
greatly to the improvements
now being made to the build-
ing on the Gulf.
The two sergeants have
spent most of their free time
during the past week instal-
ling the new set, which also
has a record player attach-
ment.
Both men have received lett-
ers of commendation from
Col. L.S. Stranathan, Post
Commander, for their action.

POST CLEANERS OFFER SPEEDIER
CLEANING, REPAIRING SERVICE
One day service for dry
cleaning jobs, upon special
request, is the latest ac-
comodation to be offered by
the post cleaners. Also,
the management announced that
same day service may be had on
all minor repair work in their
tailor shop located in the
barber shop building.


Our Front Cover


This week's cover photo sub-
ject is Cpl. Charles Hopper,
a member of class 43-21. Hop-
per came to Tyndall after
graduating from the Aircraft
Mechanic school at Gulfport,
Miss.
His home is in Gadsden, Ala.


Vay 22, 19133


THIE TYNDAIL TARGET


Page 3






Page 4


BILL WOULD PERMIT
PAYMENTS THREE
MONTHS AHEAD

Measure Would Provide Aid
For Men Selected for
Overseas Duty

If you are lucky enough to
be selected for overseas duty,
you'll have no finance trou-
bles upon embarking because of
a bill recently approved by
the Senate Military Affairs
Committee in Washington.
The bill would permit the
War and Navy Departments to
pay salaries up to three
months in advance to men or-
dered to duty outside the
United States. Likewise tra-
vel expenses could be paid as
much as a year in advance.
The War Department says that
it is its intention, if the
bill is passed, to authorize
the advance payment of pay
rolls for the current month
for all units when the embar-
kations of such units occur
during the latter part of the
month, and that in cases
where it is anticipated that
it will be difficult to pay
men regularly at their over-
seas stations, they might be
paid even further ahead.
Previously, it has been the
custom to pay men about to
be sent abroad that part of
their month's salary which has
been served, but this proce-
dure has been unhandy for
bookkeeping.
Another bill introduced in
:he House would credit over-
seas duty as doubletime when
figuring longevity pay.


Tyndall's Navy
The QM Boat Company, popu-
larly known as Tyndall's Navy,
is rapidly growing up under
the supervision of the Harbor
Boat Officer, Captain Herman
Gundlach, Jr.
From a couple of tents pitch-
ed on the shore of the baydu
near the salvage dump, the
company has expanded till it
now boasts a dozen boats rang-
ing from 18 to 100 feet in
length and excellent docking
and boathouse facilities situ-
ated near the west gate.
Chatter: The sailing sol-
diers of this outfit are hard
at work putting our new 104
foot patrol boat in shape...
The idyllic location of our
barracks seems to arouse do-
mestic inclinations in our
group because no less than
five of the 27 GI's here are
sweating out furloughs that
will see them embark on the
stormy oceans of matrimony.
2ver since this outfit began
taking part in the weekly com-
petitive inspections we have
been gigged for not having a
day room. And on two occasions
this discrepancy has cost us
the coveted pennant. In spite
of the small number of men in
our outfit and the spacious and
well equipped barracks, plans
are being formulated for a day
room. When the plans become a
reality we will give any out-
fit a run for its money.
-Cpl. Flavin




The ole Yardbird has had a purty
ruff time this weak. I got invited
ot ter the beech ter a beech party
an got hooked up with a rite purty
gurl who wuz all most wearing a bath-
in soot an whin she menchuned gittin
a littel sun I sayed sho rite kwik
like on account uv I aint nevur
found nothinkwite as injoyable as
layin ot on the beech with a mity
purty gurl who is all most wearing a
bathin soot. But I hadn't ought ter
uv dun it. I got plum blisstured
all the way frum ma ears ter ma an-
kles--on both sides.. This Florryda
sun sho does play fur keeps. I'd
do it agin, tho.
Since i is bin ailin an havin ter
stay in purty close, there jest aint
nothing much happened unusual so i
aint got nuthin ter gripe aboot eck-
sept that since the PX don't sell
Bull Durham no mo i is had ter git
ma gud buddy from carrylina ter ord-
er sum frum his brother whut wurks
in the factory. And thin whin I wint
on sick call ter git ot uv a detale
the pill roller slapped sum drops in
ma eyes an i aint seen nothing since,
an i had ter salvage wun pare uv ma


blue coverhalls.


I sho did hate ter


Mild mannered Webb Banks,
veteran squadron clerk for
the Cloud Hoppers, pro-
vided us with the heartiest
chuckle in weeks when he went
over to one of the notion
counters in the Post Ex-
change and asked the startled
sales girl "What have you got
that a man would like?" Banks
was only seeking a suitable
birthday gift for a friend,
but the PXette was no clair-
voyant and turned sharply on
her heels and walked away!
A pre-view of GI styles for
1944 was presented last week
at Post Hq. The fashion show
was under the supervision of
Major T.B. Carnahan, with Lt.
Jesse Nimocks as the model.
A khaki-colored undershirt was
the only garment modeled, and
W/D Howell was the principal
spec tator. No sales were
made.
Tyndall's "Cholly Knicker-
bocker" left us for furlough
last week, but there is a gen-
eral feeling that it was more


do that on account uv them ole faded
tore up close is aboot all I is got
ter sho that I aint a rekrute.
I did git the oportoonity ter tell
off a rekrute, tho. He's married an
his ole lady is eckspectin an he
cant git a furlow ter go home whin
the little kid cums an he wuz sho
agripin aboot not seeing his ole
lady fur the past six months. I
tole him rite kwik that he wuz dang
sho lucky on account uv my sister
Slutsie aint seen hur ole man in a
yeer an a half and she jest give
burth ter twins. Now that is trooly
sad. Well, I reckon I better be
agoin. --The Yardbird (No. one)


or less a "French leave." Un-
doubtedly we will hear more
about "L'Affaire Barrette"
uponhis return.
A.C. Croley, the 'Read and
Relax' man (of the Pensacola
News-Journal of course) has let
us in on some vital statistics
concerning the proceeds derived
from the sale of his papers. He
states that he averages about
$75 a week, the hard way, and
buys with the proceeds a $100
war bond weekly. He has two
sons in service, one of them,
a sergeant, being a veteran of
the North African campaign.
And speaking of the N. Afri-
can battlefront, we received a
letter this week from Lt. J.W.
Timberlake, the first editor of
the Target. The V-mail missive
was written three weeks ago and
in it he comments that "Things
are pretty quiet for the moment
over on this side, but we're
all sweating out the close of
this campaign." And, as news-
paper headlines revealed, the


"sweating" was not in vain.
Apalachicola scribes report
that many pilots at that sta-
tion are doing a heap of wish-
ful thinking and are getting
rid of their automobiles. Oth-
ers not so hopeful of getting
transfers are doing the buying.
(Sounds like a good spot for
a used car lot.)
Also from Apalach comes word
that on Thursday, May 13, the
pilots and gunners there broke
their previous station record
for rounds fired by one grout
in one day. They upped it by
26,800 rounds.
ASKS FOR FREE FISHING
An appeal to members of the
Florida legislature to enact
a law permitting members of
the armed services to fish and
hunt in Florida without paying
a license fee has been made by
D.G. McQuagge, Bay County tax
assessor. McQuagge suggested
that county judges be permit-
ted to issue permits without
charge to members of the ser-
vice during wartime, with pro-
vision that the law terminate
at the end of the war.


P e 4IU- r L tJ-^W V n r' A-.^U M-L5


HT E TYNDALL TAR(EI'







May 22, 1943

Guardians

Cupid made a wholesale round
up of the boys during the last
week by ensnaring in matri-
monial bonds Pvts. A. Snyder,
H. Schreiber, J. Flasick, and
T. Jessup. Pvt. H. (Polar
Bear) Schreiber was the only
Guardian who brought back his
wife from up Nawth. The rest
of the newly weds left their
spouses home. We extend our
heartiest congratulations to
the Class A allotment boys.
We also venture to say that
bachelorhood is destined for
an early grave in this Sqdn.
Our men again made all con-
cerned oroud of the work that
they accomplished in acquir-
ing 10 extra points in last
Saturday's inspection. Keeo
up the point gaining and we
will have the flag by next
time.
Incidentally,, we have had
no end of ceaseless ribbing
on this scribe's new (Wet)
Gabardine suit. Never again.
ODDS AND EDNS: Pvts. Sou-
thard and L. Edwards seem to
have earned a berth on the
post team and we're proud of
them. There seems to be an
upswing in insurance buying
lately. Next to bonds, it's
the best thing for your fam-
ily...And now Sgt. Leo Petchik
seems to complain of gremlins
in his motorcycle. Couldn't
you see the fence, Leo?...Fam-
iliar downtown scene: Pvts.
Mullaney and Martinelli trying
to 'divvy up' a girl...Cpl.
Hyde brings back a tale of woe
from his three-day pass..And
Pvt. Duggan still dreams of a
girl whose initials are Vera.
MAN OF THE WEEK: Sgt. John
Moose from North Carolina.
Moose is a dependable sergeant
of the guard and performs his
duties in a highly satisfact-
ory manner. He always has the
respect of all his men when
going about the tedious task
of working as sergeant of the
guard. John is a veritable
jitterbug when off duty, and
likes to listen to swing music
as interpreted by Tommy Dor-
sey.
-Cpl. Sam Marotta


White Flashes
Having removed the Miss. mud
from his shoes after returning
from his furlough, lst/Sgt.
Pollard is back to take up his
duties. Furthermore, he claims
to be ready to resume his so-
claL program at the Embassy.
What an endless source of vi-
tality!
Our good-will ambassadors to
the Cuba Cabins are laying a
foundation of lasting friend-
ship between this field and
that colony. Our appreciation
to T/Sgt. Darrah and S/Sgt.
Onnstede for their farsighted
diplomacy.
S/Sgt. Hough was seen in a
local night club last Saturday
evening. Why the splurge? Is
he looking forward to Kathleen
or is he just tired of shoot-
Ing pool?
Our static chaser, S/Sgt.
Wiley, has taken up tempor-
ary residence at Skunk Hol-
low in order to qualify for a
hunting license and to learn
recognition other than air-
craft. He said he felt like
a S/Sgt. in recruit boots
(It's not necessary for him to
inquire "what's cooking" he's
familiar with the next day's
menu.)
Our loss is the 89th's gain.
Sgt. P. Lawrence left us for
the so called "rugged" squad-
ron. The cause for the Sgt.'s
sudden development of rug-
gedness is a mystery to us all.
Good luck, Paul.
S/Sgt. W. Solomon


THIE IYNDAII TAPL;GT


TWO GUNNERS BACK FROM FIGHTING

JAPS ARRIVE AT TYNDALL FOR

DUTY AS INSTRUCTORS


Two Men Now Here Have Accounted
For More Than a Score

Of Japanese Planes

Two aerial gunners who have knocked more than a
score of Japanese planes out of the sky have ar-
rived at Tyndall Field to serve as gunnery instruct-
ors.
One of them was at Pearl Harbor whep the Japs made
their "sneak" attack. The other was in the Philippines at the
start of the war. Both have seen plenty of action in the
Southwest Pacific and both wear numerous medals.
They've spent more than a year battling the Japs in the
skies over Hawaii, the Philippines, New Guinea, Java and the


Solomon Islands.
The flying gunnery instruct-
ors, who are in a position to
give their students some real
tips on what it takes to "keep
'em flying" when the chips are
down, are S/Sgt. Lewis Coburn,
of Niagara Falls, N.Y., and
Sgt. Lonnie Wright, of North
Platte, Neb.
The two men are credited of-
ficially with 16 planes shot
down and others probably des-
troyed. Both have recovered
from wounds and wear the
Purple Heart medal along with
ribbons for four major en-
gagements.
Both sergeants learned how
to be aerial gunners the hard
way. They had received no
gunnery school instruction
when they volunteered to man
machine guns against the Jap
attackers.
Sgt. Wright was one of the
first soldiers to volunteer
as an aerial gunner when the
Japs attacked Pearl Harbor.
Further west, Sgt. Coburn
was at Clark Field, near Man-
ila, and he fought in the
Philippines before the meager
United States forces there had
to withdraw to the south.
Both saw action inthe battle
of the Coral Sea, in the Dutch
East Indies and in the Solomon
Islands.
In a 45-minute battle over
Lae, New Guinea, Sgt. Wright
was wounded when an explosive
shell struck the Flying Fort-
ress in which he was a gunner.
He received wounds in the arms,
legs and back. But the plane,
with two of its four motors
out of commission, returned
safely to its base.
Sgt. Coburn was in Australia
for a week after leaving the
Philippines and then went to
Java and Borneo where he saw
much action on bombing raids
against the Japs. It was
there that he received his
wounds.
The two gunners were brought
back to the United States and
allowed to spend last Christ-
mas with their families. Then
they visited another gunnery
school and were sent to Tyn-
dall to pass on their hard-won
knowledge to the students.


MEN ON FURLOUGH CAN

GET EXTRA GAS NOW
Members of the armed forces
on leave or furlough may ob-
tain five gallons of gasoline
for "personal errands" for
which no other means of trans-
portation are available, press
dispatches reported last week.
Under the plan announced by
the OPA, a man or woman in the
service may go to his local
rationing board, present leave
or furlough papers good for at
least three days, and receive
permission to buy five gallons
of gasoline.
Hitherto, no set policy has
been followed on allowing such
men gasoline. Some soldiers
home on furlough have been
able to get virtually unlim-
ited supplies of gasoline,
others could get none because
the law made no provision for
them, and ration boards fol-
lowed their individual whims
in making the decisions.

Zebras
it seems that S/Sgt. Berry,
the Gestapo chief of the Re-
pulsive Club, recently has
spent a goodly sum on pic-
tures of himself. Now is this
a true tradition of the Club?
And speaking of the Repulsive
Club, the boys could stand an-
other haircut. As their hair
grows, they become handsomer.
This will never do. So, snip
those curls, girls.
After much sweating, we fi-
nally won the coveted pennant,
and it looks mighty swell flow-
ing out there, fellows. What
say we just keep it there?
The writer would like to
apologize to the boys in his
room for inviting them to a GI
party last. Friday night, then
not showing up himself. But,
that toad didn't get in his
bed because it wanted to
keep warm.
Did you see Cpl. Richu knock
the maples for a 667 count
last Monday night? Richt says
hit them right and they can't
stay up. Nice bowling, shorty.
From the crowd gathered a-
round Pfc. M. Hanson in the
latrine the other morning such
comments could be heard: "Easy
now," "It won't hurt," "Watch
it," "That's the way." But
Hanson paid no heed. He worked
himself up a lather and came
out of the struggle unscratch-
ed, uncut, and a new man. His
first shave had been completed.
-S/Sgt. W.D. Franklin
ife


THE T TAR= _5


Finance Fanfare
Cpl. Orion Roberts has tqk-
en over the Supply Sgt's job
-- lock, sock cotton, khaki,
and barrel.
T-Day was celebrated at the
Finance Det. with the arrival
of Pfc. Tremoulet and Privates
Tylutki and Travis, from Mac-
Dill.
Pfc. Mart-in Sutterer of Com-
munications was on the legit
stage in St. Louis. Sutterer
is at present rehearsing with
the Post Drama Group in Jour-
ney's End. His lines come
trippingly to the tongue, but
for some ironic reason the
last two times in which his
name appeared in official or-
ders he was listed as STUT-
TERER.
"Only four days," the Fin-
ance yardbird goes around
muttering to himself bewil-
dered "And I get my laun-
dry bock. "
Weather report--Dunder-
heads followed closely by the
Fourth of July .
--Sgt. Felix Leon








POST

SATURDAY, MAY 22
'Squadron Leader X'
Eric Portsan, Beatrice Farley
SUN., MCN., MAY 23-24
DOUBLE FEATURE
'Desert Victory'
British 8th Army
'A Stranger in Town
Prank Morgan, Richard Carlson
TUESDAY, MAY 25
'Dark Conmand'
Clair Travor, Falter Pidgeon
WEDNESDAY, MAY 26
DOUBLE FEATURE
'I Walked With a Zombie'
Frances Dee, orn Conway
'Shantytown'
Mary Lee, John Archer
THURS., FRI., MAY 27.28
'Lady of Burlesque'
Barbara Stanwick,Michael O'Shea
SATURDAY, MAY 29
'Holiday Inn'
Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire

RITl
SUN., MCN., MAY 23-24
'Slightly Dangerous'
Lana Turner, Robert Young
TUES., WED., MAY 25-26
'fir Raid Wardens'
Laurel and Hard
THURS., FRI., MAY 27-28
'A Stranger in Town'
Frank Morgan, Richard Carlson
SATURDAY. MAY 29
'Raiders of San Joaquin'
Johnny Mack Brown, Tex Ritter
LATE SHOW
'Flight for Freedom'
Ros. Russell, Fred McMurray

PANAMA
SUN., MON., MAY 23-24
'Buckskin Frontier'
Richard Dix, Jane Vyatt
TUESDAY, MAY 25
'7 Miles From Alcatraz'
James Craig, Bonita Granville
WED., THURS., MAY 26.27
'Song of the Islands'
Betty Grable, Victor Mature
FRI., SAT., MAY 28-29
Legion of the Lawless'
George O'Brien

<$^NS^^
-.L. 7 P1~


Pae 5




































Corp. E. Tackett


1st Lt. J. A. Dickerman


Sgt. J. Marsick


S/Sgt. J. A. Webster


Sgt. F. P. Churchill


S/Sgt. J. M. Montgomery


Sgt. P. Terry S/Sgt. R. F. Keough


Sgt. A. A. Loudis


Pvt. W. E. Daniels


Pvt. L. A. Shaw






MTHE TYNDAL TARETI


1 1 1 1f IIIRSH O
A PA ACorrespondent


cONNOR


Did You Ever T/Sgt. Andersen
Notice? on a Saturday
night -- par-
ticularly last Saturday
night? Andersen was standing
in the center of the Apalach
main drag and traffic was hal-
ted for a full half hour while
citizens waited for Andersen
to change to "green."
S/Sgt. James B. Powell ought
to be reprimanded about run-
ning around town barefooted.
Someone should remind him
that he isn't back on the
farm.
Sgt. Marr was seen trying to
get his "Prepare for Combat"
pin back from a local belle on
a recent Saturday afternoon.
After Marr got his pin back,
some MP came along and carried
the lovely lass off for a
stroll through the park. Bet-
ter get on the ball, Archie.
Something to notice is the
broad smile being sported by
Sgt. Demeter D. Zahas since
his return from furlough. He
is the latest addition to the
Inspection Department. Could
the smile be caused by the new
job, or by the dame he bought
the new dress for on his way
to Chicago? He won't buy apal
a brew to cover his thirst and
yet he'll go out and spend a
double saw-buck on a dress!
Boss, Sinclair Sgt. Sinclair
& "Pop" goes to Tyn-
dall Field
every day for parts. Is it
love or is it parts? He
walked around the house four
times before getting up enough
nerve to knock -- he's only
been going with her for six
months. After all, he's no
"wolf" like some guys.
Sgt. Joe Sinclair was re-
cently observed to be in a
very "griping" mood. Why?
Well, it seems the church was
closed and so was the court
house. How old was she, Joe?
Sgt. Passwaters remarked the
other day that he would run for
president in '44 but he hasn't
kissed a baby in a long, long,
time. (He must have meant a











Available



$ min


SM


Ei^ q

"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"

IF i


real baby.) He doesn't like
to fish, either.

target Gets It makes us feel
reen Light good to hear some-


one say that we
have the best page in the Tar-
get. However, we really be-
lieve that those shutter click-
ers at T/F have been right on
the well-known beam in "shoot-
ing" the covers and our hats are
off to them.
Ford Gets Nod Who is it that
Over Movies brings his girl
to the Post Th-
eater and then prefers the dark
seclusion of his Ford? What a
place to park! Oh, all right,
we won't tell; but weknow!
Gas-less Take-off We have some
of the best
aerial engineers and some darn
good maintenance men, but it is
a well-known fact that an air-


plane will not take off with
the gas cut off. One of our
new "Zoot" pilots found that
out recently when he tried to
take off with his fuel select-
or valve in the "Off" posi-
tion.
Siiratt To Johnny Suratt is a
Be A/C fine chap and will
make a good offic-
er, but we remember the day
when he thought Rudybegger was
a radio crooner -- he still
thinks Manual Labor is a Mexi-
can diplomat.
The Mystery Our grapevine tap
Is Solved has finally yield-
ed the answer to
"How come Apalachicola?" The
way we heard it was that back
in the old Indian days the word
"cola" meant "door" or "flap"
to a wigwam. Now in those days
there was a great chief known as
"Apple" who was awfully sweet on
a certain squaw. One night he


Copyrighted Materialr


Synd icated Content


from Commercial News Providers"


I i A-


T
G


May 22, 1943


Page 7


E HT TYNDALL TARGET


called on her fairly late and
quietly let himself into her
wigwam. She looked at him and
smiled and said softly, "Apple
latcha cola." And so the place
has been known to this day as
"Apalachicola."
Sgt. Evans (The Mad Lover):
"Buckshot, do you really like
that girl?"
Sgt. "Buckshot" Gallaway:
"Like her! Why man, I'd walk
barefooted on a barbed wire
fence from here to Chatta-
nooga just to see the laundry
wagon that takes her clothes
away "
Chatter Our new hangar looks
more like a hangar
every day. Those contractors
are certainly going to town.
T/Sgt. Anderson already has
his new cap and we can hardly
wait to christen it in the new
hangar with a coke bottle. Oh
my, yes, Andy must wear the cap
while the ceremony is in prog-
ress.
S/Sgt. "Bugger" Powell has
written a new song entitled,
"I Have To Wait Until Satur-
day Night Blues." It seems
that some power beyond his
control moved his girl to
Tallahassee in great haste and
the only time he can see her
now is on Saturday night and
Suidays. Poor Bugger.
Overheard on the beach:
"Is that bird a gull?"
"Now how can I tell from
here whether it's a gull or
boy?"


A


I







Rotge 8 TETNALTRE


WAR DEPT. WARNS ABUSE
OF FREE MAIL MUST
BE STOPPED

If abuse of the free mailing
privileges continues, changes
in the rules nay result, the
War Department recently an-
nounced.
Despite the ruling that
free mail privilege is appli-
cable only to personal mail,
including post cards, men and
their families have tried to
send packages, announcement
cards and other mail in vio-
lation of that order. Another
violation is the use of free
mail by former business men
to carry on their business.
The ruling, according to
the War Department circular,
states that the name of the
sender, his grade, the desig-
nation of the service to
which he belongs, and the
word "free" must be in the
handwriting of the sender.
Greeting cards, such as
Mother's Day cards, are ac-
ceptable free of postage.
The free mail privilege
does not apply to air mail,
registered, insured or C.O.D.
mail, parcels or packages,
newspapers, printed or mimeo-
graphed materials, cards, ex-
cepting the postcard size and
letters of Officer's Clubs
and other organizations.


Ordnotes
The company roster reads
like KING JAMES' ENGLISH
READER these days with its
collection of names, adject-
ives, nouns and VERBAS. Just
turn the PAGE and you'll find
a BOX to sit on; AKE and AKIN,
who are not at all ill; a
GREENLEAF BUSH; a CASSEL in
the WOODS; VESSELS to ride
in; BROOKS to sail on; a HARE
who is not a rabbit; a SIMON
but not simple; a SHEPHERb
without a flock; a WAITE who
cooks, a COOK who doesn't.
CANARY's not a bird, and
GIBSON is definitely not one
of the girls. You can find
TARR listed. Also TOWLF calls,
HAMMERS, prickly EURRS, lamp
WICKS, War BONDS, etc.
Then there are words of des-
cription as KEEN, MOODY,BRAGG.
T/4 Pappas enjoys the calis-
thenics so much these days
that when someone turned the
lights on in his room at 10:30
PM he rolled out of bed, began
dressing and said to the other
fellows, 'Come on, boys, let's
get going,' and was duly in-
formed by irate roommates that
he had several hours wait.
Then Sgt. Vessels bought a
hard-to-get pair of shoes and
found on reaching his barracks
they were both for left feet..
..Miss Huddleston, typing a
list of telephone numbers, in-
cluded her own and added: 'Do
not disturb before 9:30 on
Sundays' which reminds us
that she can't be reached un-
til 1:30 AM on most week-
days...Congratulations to Pfc.
and Mrs. Motschman on that boy
born on May 15.
A letter from Lt. Gilmore,
our former CO, reported that
he was in Casablanca recently,
and that T/3 Shepoard was
with him.


}1


SGT. T.0. LITTLE S/SGT. E.B. fMOORE
The two men pictured above are in charge of the Ordnance
Machine Shop. They do everything from making rivets for
machine gun plates to rebuilding a shotgun, machine gun or
37 mm. cannon.
Guns which ordinarily would have to be shipped back to
arsenals for repair are now fixed in the machine shop, saving
anywhere from a few days to several weeks. The equipment is
of the Dest and run by men who know their jobs. Tools are
made, guns repaired and Ordnance machines kept in running
condition. In fact they can do anything from opening a can
of sardines to welding a suit of armor if the need arises.
Sgt. Moore is married and comes from Cleveland, Ohio. He
definitely wants it known that he's from Cleveland, and
doesn't care whether Ohio is mentioned or not. Mrs. Moore
also comes from there. If all the women look as pretty as
she does then we'd like to go to Cleveland ourselves.
Sgt. Little calls Alabama his home and has been a member
of this company since its organization a year and a half ago
at Egl in Field, where everyone was a private and future
clerks, armorers and Officers spent the days scraping and
painting bombs with the lucky ones sorting ammunition.


TYNDALL TOMMYb~IL~. LEDBETTER


it?3


TYNDALL TOMMY......,


LEDBETTER


Ptae 8


THE TYNDALL TARGET







Mru' qVNAT.T TAfIP' Pll 9


Sub-Depot
Four departments of Sub-De-
pot Engineering, Administra-
tion., Wood Shop, Fabric and
Welding and the Personnel and
Training department of Sub-
Depot Headquarters now have
100% payroll bond deductions.
These average above 10% of the
individual earnings in each of
the four Engineering depart-
ments, with Mr. Frank Campi-
si's Wood Shop ranking highest
with 12%.
Harold M. Brock and James L.
Smith of the electric shop are
proudly displaying their cer-
tificates from Sperry Gyro-
scope. Yessir, the two went
all the way to New York for a
five week course and, in add-
ition to obtaining first hand
knowledge of the gyroscope,
they managed to take in most
of the sights. Smith, a true
'cawn bred' Southerner, was
duly impressed by his first
visit north. However, Brock
a 'damyankee' and no stranger
to the big city, admitted
that he yearned to get back to
Florida.
Gordon Shurtleff was recent-
ly elected to the Executive
Committee of the Welfare As-
sociation to fill the vacancy
created by the transfer of John
L. Merkling. Other changes
made in the officers of the
organization, due to transfer,
include D.A. Dennis replacing
James Hughes on the Welfare
Committee; Carl Varlin re-
placing Mrs. Robert W. Clarke
as chairman of the Membership
Committee- and Miss Olyne Ken-
nington filling Mr. Varlin's
vacancy on the Membership Com-
mittee.
THIS AND THAT: What this
Sub-Depot needs is more and
better grass to keep down fly-
ing sand and reduce sun glare.
Pitifully but hopefully, the
grass which has been set out
struggles to survive.
Truman Kirby of the Signal
Section, in a carefully guard-
ed statement hinted that he
may plant some zinnies and pe-
tunias around his 'lawn' when
and if said 'lawn' reaches ma-
turity. We'll be waiting and
watching!
If you haven't been getting
your additions correctly, you
should call in Ouincy Hutson,
office appliance repair man,
who has just returned from a
calculator machine instruc-
tion and repair school in At-
lanta. He can make your cal-
culator do everything but
talk to you.
H.B. Mays, along with sev-
eral others, has received his
'Greetings.' His pals are
promoting him on a rank-a-
day' basis and hope to have
him a full-fledged, four star
general by the time he arrives
in camp. At ease, General!
R.W. Guinn

Brown Bombers
The squadron had a time at
the USO dance in Panama City
Saturday night. The rhythm
was strictly good, and every-
one was a regular hep cat.
What a time!
Baseball Manager S/Sgt.W.K.
Daniel shows signs of falling
in love with a certain little
cut ie. If he goes through
with his plan, I'm giving the
Sarge my best wLshes. I won-
der...? And the top kick
seems to be in the same state
of mental confusion but with
whom I can't find out. Won-
der what he and Daniel will
decide? (It's my turn to won-
der because they had me all
married off a few weeks ago.
A good many of the fellows
got away on furlough, saying
goodbye to PC for 15 days. The
squadron gave the fellows a
quick getaway and hope for a
fast return.
The gang can't cry ;n it any


SUNDAY
8:00
9:00
10:00
10:00
11:00
11:15
7:00
TUESDAY
5:30
6:30
7:00


A.M...............Mass
A.M....Protestant Sun-
day School.
A.M... Gunners Mass at
Theatre.
A.M....Protestant Wor-
ship Service.
A.M... runners Protest-
ant Service.
A.M................Mass
P.M....Evening Worship
P.M............... .Mass
P.M..Instruction Class
P.M....Fellowship Club


Band Box
By now most of you readers
of BAND BOX know of the fame
of the baseball team that em-
anates from the Band, but how
many of you are aware that
there is another group of
'Addicts' in the Band? Yes,
there are; these fiends
thrive on volleyball! Zooks,
but they'love the stuff! Right
now they're quite happy and
quite thankful, too, for the
clay that was laid on the
courts of Phys. Trng. Area 2.
When Pfc. John Vance came

more because it's been taken
away. Yeah, just as theweath-
er turns hot, no more beer in
the PX. Not that we can blame
the beer for Pfc. H.H. Willis'
gain in weight. He's a real
chow hound.
The ballclub's new uniforms
were worn yesterday for the
first time. Just about allthe
men who weren't out on pass
watched the Post team play a
bunch from the squadron when
the Aviation Squadron from Eg-
Sin disappointed.
-Cpl. Marvin Carter


WEDNESDAY
12:15 P.M...Civilian Worship
Service.
5:30 P.M ........... .....Mass
:00 P.M....Choir Rehearsal

THURSDAY
5:30 P.M............... Mass
6:30 P.M..Instruction Class
FRIDAY
5:30 P.M................Mass
6:30 P.M.....Jewish Service

SATURDAY
5:30 P.M................Mass
7:00 P.M........Confessions


back from furlough it was
learned that it was a case of
'tied notes.' Yen, he up and
'got hitched, as they say
down in Memphis. (That's
where that certain someone is
from. (Upon being interviewed
John said, 'Two can live as
cheaply as one--if one doesn't
eat. John is eating, so that
leaves us to wonder.
And while we're on the sub-
ject of furloughs...most of us
try to get our furloughs as
often as possible (every six
months if we're lucky) but
T/Sgt. Coultrap, assistant
bandleader, took off on his
first furlough in three years
last Friday. Both he and Sam
Sirianni started out after
playing a concert-broadcast
with the band at the Bay Coun-
ty high school. Sgt. Coultrap
is visiting up in Ohio while
Sgt. Sam is probably digging
up coal in Pennsylvania.
FLASH!! The first league
ballgame is nicely tucked in
the bag. Or should we say
Band Box? The Band swung out
to the tune of a 7 to 5 vic-
tory over the 344th.
--Pfcs. Stein & Bartholomew


"The successful man lengthens his stride when he discovers
the sinrmost has deceived him; the failure looks for a nlace to
sit down.
Edison didn't sit down and give un when his first efforts to
find an effective filament for the carbon incandescent lamn met
with failure. He lengthened his stride! He carbonized every
conceivable thin -fish line, cardboard, tissue inner, thread.
He sent men to China, Janan, South America, Asia, Jamaica, Cey-
lon and Burma in search of fibers and grasses to be tested in
Rurbank, the nlant wizard, is another mon who didn't say cuit
when obstacles blocked his way. At one time he personally con-
ducted 6,000 ex-eriments before he found the solution.
George Westinhouse was treated as a mild lunatic by most
railroad executives: "Stonning a train by wind! The man's
crazy!" Yet he persevered and finally sold the air-brake idea.
James Watt built model after model of his steam engine before
he ot one that worked efficiently. Call the roll of all the
builders and you will find that they were men who lengthened
their strides.
Every man jets on the wrong@ rood at times. fle comes union
hills, rough ooin4 and dangerous detours. What he does when he
meets these obstacles determines his destiny. The worTd never
hears from those who look for a nlace to sit down. Lengthen
your stride!"

Jewish services will be continued as usual each Fridiy eve-
ning at 7:30 PM in the Post Chapel.


E. M_ : .'",::< 7::::::" "; : :'..:~:: :':'V*',:*'. =' .:.& .: -f.';% .


THREE ENLISTED MEN
TO EACH TWO SEATS
ON TROOP TRAINS

Effective immediately, it
will be three Enlisted Men to
each two seats in a day coach
on troop trains, the War De-
partment announced in a
.change, dated April 26, to AR
55-130. If modern reclining
chairs are provided, then the
car may be filled to 90 per
cent of capacity.
.These requirements may be
overlooked, however, "if the
military situation in either
case dictates otherwise."
Smile, you Gunners smile.

Rugged ? 69th
Official opening of the
squadron's new softball dia-
mond took place Monday night
in a hard-fought 11-inning 6-6
tie with the 343rd.
The boys looked mighty good,
and the team shows promise of
developing into a winner. Tru-
chan pitched a mean curve to
shut out the heavy hitters.
Foster pounded several into
the bleachers (or where the
bleachers would be if there
were any.) Foley, Dolan anr'
Beznoska were in excellent
form on the bases, with Ed-
wards, Clamp, Lupica, Eisen-
stat and Durant effectively
covering the outfield posi-
tions.
It has come to our attention
that Sgts. Pfoltner, Gay and
Meserve have been giving les-
sons in the fine art of roller
skating. The fact that they
are taking meals from the
position of attention would
indicate that their skating
technique involves a good deal
of sitting down.
The latest fad (a beauty
treatment known as The Blush
of Innocence, or, How to ap-
pear perpetually embarrassed)
has many enthusiastic follow-
ers in this outfit. What they
say: 'You too can acquire a
beautiful set of blisters'
,(S/Sgt. Wadsworth); 'Cooked,
fried, baked or stewed, there's
nothing like it' (T/Sgt. Bout-
well); 'I don't believe in do-
ing anything in a half-baked
manner (ouch!)' (T/Sgt.Stone);
'All aglow again...'(M/Sgt.
Boone.)

Cloudhoppers
"Father Time" Jones is try-
ing to put Brad Berry on the
straight and narrow. Berry
may stop smoking, but he'll
need much more straightening
out, especially swinging those
automobile deals...There are-
n't any signs of a ballclub
yet. Work schedules seem to
be the main cause...We're won-
dering if Cpl. "Crooner" Stew-
art is doing any swinging with
the Salvation Army back in
Mamaroneck. All three street
lights (Stewart too) have been
lit since he got home...Pvt.
Calhoun is having foot troub-
le and the consensus is that
S/Sgt. Chauncey keeps him on
them all day...Cpl. Nolan ask-
.ed us if we heard about the
who sprinkled his victory gar-
den with alcohol: seems he
wanted to raise stewed toma-
toes...You don't have to be-
lieve it but I was not telling
my troubles to Chaplain Fin-
nerty in front of the Post
Theater. He was telling me
his woes...Sgts. Dippre and
Keelty claim S/Sgt. Bob Fair
is quite the concrete layer...
Just because you got a ring
around your neck don't think
you're a racetrack, Bob.
-Sgt. Ed Strong


May 22, 1943


PAp 9


r'-'T PVTn ATT. rPAnP.TFT







THE TYNDALL TARGET


TYNDALL OFFICERS TAKE 1ST GAME IN USO TWILIGHT

..


























Pictured above are the members of Tyndall's Officer baseball
team who won their opening game last Monday night by a score of
5-4. The team is scheduled to play again Friday night at the
Pel ican Ball Park. Time: 5:30 P.M.
Standing, left to right, are Lts. Johnson, Cleary, Edelman,
(team captain); Captain Dangler, P; and Lt. Lasker. Kneeling
are Lts. Gibson, Gross, McDaniel, Drongowski and Mendelson.
Missing from the picture are Lts. Glasser and Bailey.


TYNDALL COLORED TEAM CLASHES WITH

OUTFIT FROM EGLIN FIELD


By Pfc. HAZEL WILLIS
Although originally sched-
uiled for last Sunday the game
between the Tyndal1 colored
tean andi the Fglin Field nine
will be played tomorrow after-
noon at Tyndall Field.
The Tyndall men were noti-
fied last Saturday afternoon
that the Eglin Field team
would be unable to make the
trip. In lieu of this they
scheduled a game with the avi-
ation Groun diamond men and
demonstrated a great deal of
nower with a 12-5 victory.
The Post team was cantained
bI Willie Daniel with Deauford
Dawkins coaching from behind
the niate.
Among the many spectators
who enjoyed the game were Col.
I..S. Stranathan, Post Conmand-
,'-r, Cantain Owen Freeman, Spe-
cial Service Officer, and Mr.


Dan liowel l, assistant


Aidjutant.
The box score.






r '
' r3:


Post


C lt QxI 1U1) P1 *771 F TI I'I ITON


!t T 1,1 r! T N T



vA',11A4 ~ I
EEPJTT IiI,, /I

!7 7- L 71 v i L-: ie IL


_V AIN 9 11 )1 ; F
Ev jE 4 T l T E 1 T2 T ;/ k


017 E 7 E ILlifi~


Davi 1t


Jenkins, cf
Ba-k -2'-,
Totallt

AVIATION QODN
- L -an, n
R~nd~, n
Ma-thevs, s
Cupre-, 1'
Erj,]n, 3b
Dniula lb
wo,-t n, C-
warr~n, If
S hcmrn, if
-r:,,rijht, rf
,- aa-y, rf

Ha r C', c
DM- n 5
WeakC, p
Trtt`,

T c -)a, ci
ac m- n. Th
Ra nd I S t 1
1-11rr son. Vq
'ct 1 UM


4
5
5
42
AB
1
3
4
1
3
4
2
1
2
2
1
2
3
2
33

h its:


Fox and


hree base hits:
n bases: Davis,
inning pitcher,
p i re: Art hur


Kinq. Time: 2:05.


INTER-SQUADRON SOFTBALL
LEAGUE UNDER WAY
The inter-squadron softball
lea gue got off to a flying
start last Monday with the
Ordnance, Quartermaster and
Medic teams showing a great
deal of power at the plate.
The onl\ forfeit of the week
was hy the Canaries, who fail-
to show iu for their contest
wi th the Guardians.
First week results:
Ordnance 23, White Flashes 1.
Vo'dics 13, Redhirds 7.
Q' 16, 'thite Flashes 5.
Ilnud.F'i.&- Sig. 7, Venturas 5.
Otli 6C, C. Hoppers 6 (11 ins.)
7ebras 7, Gmnnermakers 6.
(iiardijans 9, Canaries 0 (::)
::-forfeit.


TORNADOES TO TANGLE

WITH ELLYSON
AT PENSACOLA

Play Air Base Team
There; Down Mari-
anna, 14-4

Fresh from their 14-4 tri-
umph over Marianna last Satur-
day, the Tyndall Tornadoes
traveled to Pensacola today
to take on the Ellyson Field
nine in the first of two games
scheduled with that team for
the week-end.
Pfc. Norman Southard of the
Guardians is slated to take
the mound in the opener for
the Tornadoes, with S/Sgt.
William Davis handling Sun-
day' s pitching assignment.
Coach Drongowski announced
early this week that Sgt.
Clyde Didier, capable back-
stop, was his choice as team
captain for 'I" games against
Ellyson.
In their game against Mari-
anna last Saturday,the Tor-
nadoes evened their score with
that team by blasting out a
total of 17 hits, one of them
a homer by Centerfielder Ma-
tonak, good for 14 runs. The
biggest explosion came in the
second inning when the Tyndall
men crossed the plate six
times on four hits, Mean-
while, Southard and Davis lim-
ited the Marianna batsmen to
8 hits and 4 runs.



BROWN TOPS TORNADO

BATTERS WITH .409

PERCENTAGE

Brown, with nine hits in 22
trips to the late, leads the
Tyndall Tornado batting list
with a percentage of .409,
according to figures released
by Coach Stanley Drongowski.
Second on the list is Didier
with a percentage of .392 in
18 times at bat. Hines is
third with .350 in 20 trips.


PI
Br
D
H
JE
M
Se
Ar
Gr
De
S
Ed

S
L<
F


The per
LAYER
row n
idier
i nes
ackrel
atonak
ddmak
nderson
rubard
avis
hea
wards
arr
ut hard
aug hl i n
I n i g n
TEAM


centages


follow:


AB R H PCT.
22 7 9 .409
18 5 7 .392
20 8 7 .350
21 2 7 .333
21 6 5 .238
23 2 5 .213
17 3 3 .177
1 0 1 1.000
5 0 2 .400
3 0 1 .333
7 3 2 .285
9 1 2 .222
6 3 1 .166
10 4 1 .100
3 9 0 .Q00
139 32 33 -239


Two little boys stood on the
corner. A little girl passed
hy.
First little boy: 'Her
neck's dirty.'
Second little boy: 'Her
does?'


TORNADO FIELD GENERAL


-44



Sgt. Clyde Didier of the Gun-
nermakers was named by Coach
Drongowski to act as field
captain of the Tornadoes in
their games last Saturday
and Sunday against the Elly-
son Field nine.
The games were played at the
Pensacola Naval Station field.

TRACK AND FIELD DAY TO
BE HELD JUNE 5

Tyndall's first inter-squad-
ron track and field meet has
been scheduled for Saturday,
June 5. The meet is being
sponsored by the Special Ser-
vice Office under the super-
vision of Lt. S. J. Drongowski,
post athletic officer.
Track events will include
50, 100 and 220 yard dashes,
a mile run and a 400 yard re-
lay.
Shot putting, discus throw-
ing, running broad jump, high
jump and standing broad jump
will comprise the field events.

QM AND REDBIRD KEGLERS
SWEEP LEAGUE OPENER

The Quartermaster and Red-
bird bowlers made their ini-
tial bid for the new kegling
crown by sweeping their three-
game match from their oppon-
ents, the Bluebirds and Squad-
ron C teams, respectively.
Honors for the high single
and three-game scores went to
Cpl. Anthony Richu of the Ze-
bras, who bowled 248 in his
first game and went on to
compile a 667 total for the
evening.
Results: OM 3, Bluebirds 0;
Cloud Hoppers 2, 69th 1;
White Flashes 2, Canaries 1;
Medics 2, Ordnance 1; Gun-
nermakers 2, Zebras 1; Red-
birds 3, Squadron C 0.
Individual highs each team:
Sim'man (BB) 160,199,174-533
Hnylka QM 175,177,197-549
Bianco 69 245,171,190-606
Bishop CH 162,148,190-500
Chavers (WF) 155,144,194-474
Roths'ld (C) 153,183,173-509
Kol 'zar (rd) 165,203,166-534
Senk i nc M) 189, 201, 169-559
Sink'ky GM) 180,158,180-518
Richu (Z) 248,186,233-667
Geraci (RB) 182,168,226-576
Heard (SC) 139,187, 160-486


Many a sober-faced little
lamb goes riding in the moon-
light and comes home with a
sheepish grin on her face.


Pn:r 10


AR R n E

2, ;


7


Pq-- 10


c,
5









THIS WEEK'S X-WORD PUZZLE


Across


1. Army camp in
Missouri
8. Communication
15. Distress of
conscience
16. Alloys used in
making cheap
jewelry
17. Prefix meaning
"out of"
18. Leaping animal
19. Sour
20. Part o he
Bible: ab.
21. ranch of the
service
23. Aim
25. Witness
26. Be agreeable to
28. Spike of corn
29. Certain
30. Ireland
31. Exists
32. What?
34. English trolley.
35. Derricks for
stowing cargo


i. These look well
.n pants
2. Rookie
3. Mystical Hindu
word
4. Know: archaic
5. What our planes
do to bombs
6. Brother of Jacob
7. What we shall
exact from Hitler
8. How we traveled
in the old days
9. Epochs
27. Seesaws
29. Bee's weapon
31. That is: ab.
33. Pronoun
36. Solemn promise
38. Grow sleepy
41. Opposite
42. Issue forth
43. Baseball team
44. When the bugler
blows reveille:
ab.
45. Welcome ar-
rivals from home
46. Bewails
47. Type measure
48. Heroic tale


37. Refusals
39. Toward
40. Ahead
41. Resumption
46. Account books
51. Arabian military
commander
52. Myself
53. Article
54. Fencing sword
55. Advance guards
56. Head covering
58. Prevalent
59 Compass point
80. Affairs
64. Worthless dog
65. Our old sun god
66. Part of the ear
67. Back of the neck
69. Chemical symbol
70. Dyer
72. Small things
74. Traps for catch-
ing eels
75. Long seats


Down


10. Angry
11. Occupy a chair
12. Public nnounce-
ment
13. Prosser's title
14. Regards
22. Hard stuff to ad-
vance through
24. He may have
been in the last
war
25. East Indian fer-
mented beverage
49. War victim
50. Prophetess
57. Near
60. Prefix meaning
-One ,
61. What we do not
do to the enemy
62. Scarce
63. Roasting stake
66. What you do not
give your supe-
rior officers
68. Small salaman-
der
71. Man's nickname
73. Football posi-
tion: ab.


Answers on Page 10.


u. 77 .^Hli


A truck should never be parked
with the windshield uncovered.
Any reflection is liable to attract
the wrone kind of visitors.


Avoid gathering in groups. The
dispersion of men insures longer
life for all.


K/i:
\\F K\





1/\\\ \\


-O



(N\i$II -O / I


~'I


//'~' --e
~


==- ~~ ^--'l




(:( ((
y r\ / si ^{^/^^^-s^


K __
-- i ^- -^ I -


1.'

3 -- E -L ZW


^ 6Ff
i5?

k~3 ~p~ Y3 -






I- -1 \ M







^^\\\ 44\1
'- S /*\' f


-- / / / /- -
( / W 'L







b~\


t


- .


May 22. 1943


Page 11


HT E TTNDAIL TARGET'




II


4 ; /


- YOUR


INS


URRNCE-


NRTIONRL SERVE CE LIFE


NSURRNCE


NO PHY S I CAL
SRe 24 c&


EXAMINATION REQU I RED-
^idu~&u49c6 @p--^a ^<#7


yc~u4e~


, It


i


#m


8&e




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs