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Title: Tyndall target
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076230/00054
 Material Information
Title: Tyndall target
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 27-36 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)
Publisher: Public Relations Office, Air Corps Gunnery School
Place of Publication: Tyndall Field Fla
Publication Date: 1942-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City -- Tyndall Air Force Base
Coordinates: 30.078611 x -85.576389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 16, 1942)-
Issuing Body: Issues for May 9, 1942- published by Office of Public Relations, Army Air Forces Gunnery School.
General Note: Title from caption.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076230
Volume ID: VID00054
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24602432

Table of Contents
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    Main
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        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
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        page 9
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I -V_ 2L 'rr4..r .1 _fA- __ -.1


STyndall Target
PUBLISHED SATURDAYS BY IHE SPECIAL SERVICES SECTION FOR PERSON-
NEL OF THE AAF FLEXIBLE CLNNERY SCHOOL, TYNDALL FIELD, FLORIDA.


Special Service Officer:
Capt. Owen 0. Freeman
Photographic Officer:
Lit. J.A. Dickerman
Public Relations Officer:
Lt. W.B. Pratt
Editorial Staff:
Sgt. Arnold R. Milgaten, Sgt.
Saul Samiof, Pfc. Nell Pooser,
Pvt. P.M. Nickles
Art Work: T/Sgt. 0. Ledbetter
and Cpl. Marshall Goodman.


Commanding
Cql. Leland S. Stranathan
Photography and Reproduction:
T/Sgt. W. Castle, 8/Sgt. J.
Mitchell, Sgt. S. Upchurch,
Cpl. W. Grout, Cpl. G. Neitz-
ert, Pvt. L. Shaw, 8/Sgt. J.
Montgomery, S/Sgt. R. Keough,
Sgt. P. Terry, Sgt. J. Marsick,
S/Sgt. J. Webster, Pvt. W. Dan-
iele, Cpl. E. Tackett.


The Tyndall Target receives material supplied by Camp News-
paper Service, War Dept., 205 X. 42nd St., N.Y.C. The credited
material may not '' republished without permission from C.N.S.

WHY.PHYSICAL TRAINING?
The purpose of physical training is to develop
and maintain that degree of physical fitness and
mental alertness necessary in the fulfilment of the
many and varied duties of the members of the U.S.Ar-
my Air Forces.
Some reports from fighting fronts state that in
numerous instances men have lost their lives and the
lives of their comrades through the lack of physical
agility.
It is a known scientific fact that a person's
physical and mental reflexes, or responses, are in
direct proportion to his physical condition. A per-
son in poor physical condition is sluggish and slow
in his reactions...
Men in the combat zone do not know how much
sleep they will be able to get, in fact, there may
be spans of 48 hours or more in which they do not
get to close their eyes. Who do you think will be
better able to stand such loss of sleep, a man phys-
ically fit or one in poor physical condition? The


answer is
It is


self-evident.
realized that a great number of men do not


like PT. The reason is two-fold: man is innately
lazy and most men do not possess adequate physical
skills in games and sports to participate without
dampening their ego...
The ideal program in physical training would be
where all participants compete of their own free
will. This can only be achieved after everyone pos-
sesses those skills necessary for enjoyable partici-
pation.
To keep physically fit is your sacred duty to
our country. A soldier who does not fulfill this
duty is shirking just as much as a mechanic who fails
to learn to service an airplane, or a pilot who does
not devote his best abilities to learning to fly.
--By Lt. Percy E. Arthur in
the Goodfellow Field (Tex)
"Flight Time."
THE KP'S VOW
(With apologies to the author of "The Gunner's Vow")

I wished to be a sergeant
And you along with me,
But if we all were sergeants
Where would the mess halls be?
It takes guts to be a KP,
To get up in the morn,
When the morning mists are heavy
And you feel so God forlorn.
The sergeant's just a bossman,
It's his job to eat the food,
But it's we who do the fixing,
Though we are not in the mood.
If we all must be KP's,
Then let us make this bet,
We'll be the worst damn' peelers
That have sliced the taters yetl
--Contributed.


An-





Interviews and Photos by
SGT. SILAS UPOCRGH

THIS WEEK'S QUESTION: WHAT
DO YOU THINK SHOULD BE DONE
WITH JAPAN WHEN WE WIN THE
WAR?
THE ANSWERS:


S/IST. ROBERT FAIR, cre chief
line maintenance hangar: "The
Jap has never shown any pity
nor decency toward us. I fav-
or doing the very worst pos-
sible-complete annihilation
nf +Hh ..Aln. h..,h. ,


S/SGT. JOtlf /ALDRIIGE, crew
chief, line maintenance hang-
ar: "There should be no Japan
after the war. "


TWIST. ALBERT hiOTW, line
chief: "Japan should be kept
under close surveillance of
the United States to prevent
rearming and prevent any trag-
edy such as Pearl Harbor ever
occurring again. Other than
that let them alone as much as
possible. Punishment would
only lead to a lasting hate.


*********HfflMM e .',&Xit als I
S/IST. ELROY IMSE, purchasing
,agent, Post Exchange: "I
wouldn't attempt to give a se-
rious answer to that question.
Even men whose business it is
to study such problems made
grave mistakes in the armistice
of the last war.


Pinney


Antes
By PVT. BILL PINNEY
Tomorrow is Mother's Day,
the one day in 3~ annually
set aside for us to pay honor
to our mothers. Really it's
to make us feel ashamed for
the way we've acted for the
past 364.
We're really no authority on
Mother's Day or motherhood. In
fact the closest we ever came
was when we fathered an idea,
only to learn later that even
that was adopted. But we had
seven brothers and have a fair
idea of what some mothers go,
have gone and will go through.
With the coming of Mother's
Day we have come face to face
with one of the most difficult
problems of a difficult car-
eer. We have rolled and toss-
ed at night, we have searched
the library and read Bnily
Post. We even consulted lu-
cius Beebe and looked entirely
through the works of the late
Cholly Knickerbocker.
We have gotten nowhere. We
have consulted with military
authorities ranging from the
newest draftee to a retired
four-star general. We have
consulted society editors and
discussed the matter with the
first four of the 10 best
dressed men in America without
any results except to start a
controversy whichmay rage from
Burma to Burma the long way a-
round for months to come.
Through the cooperation of
the California Chamber of Com-
merce, which became so inter-
ested in the matter it put a-
side the weather propaganda
program, we are having the
state archives searched in the
hope that the records of the
late great Luther J3urbank, of
the Burbank Burbanks, may re-
veal something which may set-
tle the question.
Up to last midnight we had
received no word from Calif-
ornia, so tomorrow millions of
men must face this problem:
Each in his own way must de-
termine where a carnation may
properly be worn on a G.I. un-
iform.
OUR FRONT COVER


This week's cover shows a
typical American mother stand-
ing before her home, the home
from whi.h she has seen two
sons and a foster son go off
to war.
She is Mrs. M.A. Coleman of.
Panama City, who recently was
chosen regional mother in the
annual contest to pick the
"Typical American Mother."


Dura 2


TOP' TVNnATT. rPARGRP






Paze 4


91=


COLONEL'S WIFE JOINS VAACs I


I


T/Sgt. Earl Boutwell stepped
AORP : into the limelight again this
SOFFIpj O- P week as a result of his ear-
P, F splitting "Tentshut!' at the
69th pep meeting on Wednesday.
(Those nearby commented that
Earl was in unusually 'good
voice' that night.
It's in the air that a new
squadron will soon be formed,
SECOND LT. and strangely enough, not one
G.I. 'has as yet put through a
request for transfer to the
new unit. (When interviewed
Recently, Pvt. Joe Doakes, ex-
( pert "China Clipper" pilot with
over 150 hours experience, re-
plied, "I don't mind 'sweating
over the courses' once a week,
FIRST LT. but I never planned to make it
my career.")
1 Sgts. Witham and Ponzio, the
r Ordnance's challenge to Pearson
and ANlen, came through with
two choice items this week.
They d relate the story that
Their; incomparable Chris Chris-
tina has taken to chasing the
CAPTAIN clerks in Lillian Kilpatrick's,
the local women's apparel shop.
S Chris. entered the shop one day
recently and after blushing
and loosening his collar, blur-
ted oijt that he '...would like
to see something in a girdle.'
S('And who wouldn't" is the
S'uWitham-Ponzio retort.)
SMAJOR Also from the same source
comes the tale of Cpl. Schae-
fer's comment after their pil-
grimage to the beach opening
last Sunday. When asked for
an opYnion on the Tyndallettes
in their abbreviated togs he
said, quote, "Never before have
so many owed so much to so
COLONEL little." (Tyndallettes desir-
ing to express opinions to Cpl.
Schaefer may reach him through
the Ordnance' orderly room.)


BRESSER-GRANT
Sgt. Samuel Robert Bressler,
of the Gunnermakers, married
Miss Yvonne Grant, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Grant of
Panama City, at the Post Chap-
el last Saturday.
Sgt. Bressler is from New
York city. He attended Colum-
bia University and New York
University.


!. GENERAL



Finance Fanfare
Cpl. Eddie O'Hearn is the
only Gremlin we know who can
park a quid of tobacco in his
cheek while eating G.I. chow.
]vt. Walter McGuffee,recent-
ly of the infantry, nas joined
the Finance Dept. here. "I've
looked far and wide," says
Walter, "for a rugged outfit,
and at last I've found it."
Sow that the Comnunications
Sqn'. is attached to Finance,
1st/`gt. Bobby Costigan is
sp9uting a new lingo. "ZZA,"
helhollers, "ZZA."
Lt. Howard (and Mrs. Howard
too) has come through in the
be~t of tradition-a 7 pound
girl on pay day. "Just my
luck," sighs Lt. Howard, "the
Federal Reserve Bank has to
send the money a day late."
One of the Frenchmen on the
field asked us, "What means
this, 'Take it easy'?" It was
a little-hard to explain but
we managed to get the point a-
cross.
Well, tell next week---take
it easy. -Sgt. Felix lean
Many a man has made a monkey
out of himself in reaching for
the wrong limb.


Dere Privut Pinney
c/o Rinney Antes


I is in reseat uv yore comoonikashun
as uv date. It is corny.
I is aboot as pore a hand at reedin
as you are at writing but i maniged ter
git the ginnerul drift uv
yore thawts. You seem -
ter think that the ole
Yardbird aint on the ball
in kwite a fuw instunces,
seeing as how i don't nevur
try ter sell no bonds er
insurance with ma colyum
an that I don't nevur write _
aboot, the grate big war -
that i' goin on across
the waturs, an as you puts it----i jest
aint got no skope. In the same breath
you states that you is bin a reedur uv
mine fur minny months. There is a grate
possybillytie that you are mity slow
whin it cums ter reedin with understan-
din on account uv in the past yeer an
three months i is wrote uv minny dif-
ferunt preedickamints which i is bin in,
fur instance, the time i wuz whupped by
the saylors in Pensycola, an the time i
wuz orur the hill an the Captin cuvver-


ed up fur me, an the time me an ma civ-
ilyan gud buddy got shot at steelin wa-
termelluns in Gawgia, the time i wint
to sleep on a rich ole ladies frunt porch
in Nu Awleens, an whut aboot that trip
i tuk last fall that wuz five months an
five states long? Privut Pinney iff'n
that aint enuff skope fur a half a duz-
en Yardbirds I will jest have ter kwit
on account i aint making enuff munny ter
finanse enny mo unusual esperrienses
than i is had in the past year.
Gittin back ter selling bonds. I is
only a soljer, an I cum inter the Army
twu an a half yeers ago ter fite----not
write, an it is ma furm beleef that
iff'n i jest stick ter doin whut I'm
tole ter do an honistly try ter be a
gud soljer i will be doin all that is
eckspected uv me. By the way, I will
match the bonds i is bawt with enny en-
listid man on the feeld. Incidintally,
iff'n peepul don't reelize by now that
there is a war goin on I sho don't be-
leeve that a man with no mo sinse than
i got cud write articulls with forse an
feeling enuff ter wake thim up ter that
fact. Do I make myself kleer. Well, I
reckon i'd better be agoin
-The Yardbird (No. 1)


The Yardbird SEZ-


AN ARNY COLONIL'S WIFE became a private in the women's army
recently at Dallas, Texas. She is Mrs. Elizabeth Haas, shown
above taking the oath as an auxiliary in the Women's Army
Auxiliary Corps. The oath is being administered by Captain
George E. Bushong, 1AAC enrollment officer at Dallas under the
command of Colonel Claude K. Rhinehart, district army recruit-
ing officer. Observing is Mrs. Haas' husband, Lieut. Colonel
William R. Haas, Medical Corps, of Camp Barkeley, who came to
the recruiting office especially to see his wife enrolled in
the WAAC. "It's the finest place I know for her to be of ser-
vice to her country during this national emergency," Colonel
Haas said.


SOLDIERS BELIEVE WAR
WILL END IN 1944
Fifty-four percent of 500 U.
S. soldiers, questioned at a
Red Cross club in London re-
cently, said the war would end
in 1944. A victory in 1943
was the guess of 28 percent,
while 14 percent thought it
would be in 1945, the AP re-
ported.


I %


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--


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]
(







MR- R 1'd) TIIT. TVNflATT TAPuCII a


French Here Vanguard
Of Others Who'll
Train in U.S.
The War Dept. Bureau of Pub-
lic Relations today released
the information that 20 French
soldiers and one officer who
were freed from the Nazi yoke
when the U.S. invaded North
Africa have arrived at this
gunnery school for training.
A lieutenant and the 20 men
with him here fled France, a-
head of the Nazi army in June,
1940, and went to Africa to
Soin French forces there. When
the Germans took over that
part of Africa, they were with
French units which were dis-
armed.
With the landing of American
troops around Oran and Casa-
blanca, the men were creed
and are now the -,uard of
Frenchmen vhz will train in
the U.S. and fight with the
French Air Force later.
The men here saw some action
when the French resisted the
Nazis in Africa, but the re-
sistance lasted only about 10
days.
The new French students were
at Casablanca when the Ameri-
cans landed. Later they went
to Oran, from where they sail-
ed to the United States. All
of the men here have families
in France and have not heard
from them since they evacuated
their homeland. They are anx-
ious to complete the gunnery
course here and go back into
action against the Axis.
Pfc. George A. lavoie, whose
home is in Springfield, Mass.,
and who speaks French fluent-
ly; will go through the gunnery
course with the Frenchmen as
an instructor and interpreter.

-OST LIBRARY NOW RECEIVES
OTHER CAMP NEWSPAPERS

Publications from more than
one hundred and fifty military
units in the United States are
now available for reading at
the Fbst Library.
These camp publications are
received by The Tyndall Target
on an exchange basis and in
turn are being sent over to
the library for Tyndall men
who have friends or relatives
in the service and wish to
check the papers for possible
news of them.


NERE ARE ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR
ARMY SPECIALIZED TRAINING PROGRAM


Of interest to all enlisted
men at Tyndall Field are the
revised eligibility require-
ments in the Army Specialized
Training Program for the train-
ing of Army specialists which
.will give more men\ an opportu-
nity to receive this college
training.
Under the new set-up, those
selected for advanced training
may go in their grade at the
time of selection, but soldiers
sent to basic schools must go
as seventh graders. Non-com-;
missioned officers have the'
option of accepting reduction
or returning to their troops,
but privates andprivates first
class must go to a specialized
school if selected.
The present general eligibi-
lity requirements announced by
.the War Department are:
1. A score of 115 or better
in the Army General Classifi-
cation Tests.


"Meanest Thief" Breaks
O'en Wishing Bridge
Coin Box
The "meanest thief" has in-
\vaded Tyndall Field.
Monday night he stooped to a
riew low level when he broke
open the coin container on the
"Wishing Bridge", the romantic
little structure on the walk
between Headquarters building
and the PX.
No one knows how much the
thief stole from the families
of soldiers. That is, no one
except the thief. It's his
secret and no doubt he's the
only man who could carry it
and still face his fellow man.
Money dropped into the little
coin box on the bridge goes to
the Army Emergency Relief fund.
Every soldier and most civil-
ians.know the AER and what it
stands for.
With the small amount of
cash the thief took he took a
million dollars worth of sent-
iment. But he wouldn't under-
stand that.
Army Intelligence isn't bo-
thered about the thief. Neith-
er is the FBI. We all know
that anyone guilty of such a
low crime can not long remain
a free man. Tc Americans, he
isn't free now. But that's
something else he can't under-
stand. He won't understand a
lot of things until he's lock-.
ed up, which he will be--for
one of his other crimes.

NAVY TO WAR GRAY
Navy officers will don gray
uniforms for working and fight-
ing when they become available
next fall, according to press.
dispatches.
The gray color. will blend
with the battleship gray with
which warships are painted,
making it more difficult for
enemy aerial gunners to shoot
down personnel on the ships.


2. Evidence that the 'best
interests of the Army would be
served by further training in
the ASTP.
3. If under 22 years of age,
the soldier must have at least
a high school education, or
its equivalent.
4. If 22 years of age or
over, the soldier must have at
least a year of college work,
with one year of mathematics
at college level. If a man
can speak a foreign language
profusely, however, the year
of mathematics is not required.
. ASTP units have already been
established at the following
institutions: Massachusetts
Institute of Technology; Rut-
gers, New York University,
Princeton, Virginia Polytech-
nic Institute, Georgia School
rof Technology, Purdue, West
Virginia,University, Michigan,
Minnesota, Oregon State Col-
lege, and the Agricultural and.
Mech. College of Texas.


EXTRA COPIES OF THE TYNDALL
TARGET NOW AVAILABLE
in response to the increased
demand for the new Target the
number of copies printed has
been boosted.
Each organization will re-
ceive a proportional increase
in its share of the Targets.
In addition, any G.I. or of-
ficer desiring extra copies of
the paper for mailing purposes,
may obtain them at the Target.
office in Post Headquarters.

CIGARS GIVE WAY TO STAMPS
ON PROMOTION (?) DAY

An idea which originated in
the mind of Sgt. Saul Samiof,
a member of the editorial staff
of the Tyndall Target, is ex-
pected to give added impetus
to the sale of War Stamps at
this field in the near future.
It is an age old custom among
officers and enlisted men to
pass out cigars to friends and
fellow workers when promotions
are announced. Sgt. Samiof
contends that instead of cigars,
War Stamps should be passed a-
round, and our country, as well
as the receiver, would benefit
by this novel idea.
Many promotions are expected
to be announced in the near
future when the revised Tables
of Organization are issued,
and Sgt. Samiof thinks this
would be an excellent time to
inaugurate his idea.
The slogan of all newly pro-
moted men at Tyndall Field in
the future will be "STAMP out
the Axis."

AIR CORPS SONG,
The Army Air Force band will
play "Men Who Fly," an Air
Corps song composed by Col.
Clarence B. Iober of AAF Head-
quarters, on a National Broad-
casting Corporatjon program to
begin at 2 o'clock Central War
Time this afternoon.


FREE LEGAL AID CLINIC
:IS FORMED TO ASSIST
SOLDIERS, EMPLOYEES

To Advise Individuals About
Their Iegal Rights in
Strict Confidence
Establishment of a legal aid
clinic, to give free advice on
legal matters to soldiers and
to civilian employees living on
the post, was announced last
week at Post Headquarters.
Legal Aid Officer is Captain
,Gabriel Powers, who also is
Courts and Boards Officer.
Soldiers and resident civil-
ians who need legal guidance
on matters of all kinds may
consult the clinic's staff of
experienced attorneys free of
charge.
Captain Powers pointed out
.that the service was compara-
ble to the free medical and
dental service that the Army
gives to its personnel.
Members of the clinic staff
will not take cases to court
'for trial but will advise the
'individuals concerned as to
what they may do legally to
solve their problems.
SCaptain Powers stressed the
fact that the relationship
between clinic clients and
personnel will be of strict
.confidence, exactly as is the
relationship between civilian
attorneys and their clients.
Captain Powers' assistants
are Lt. H.M. Fagin, Sgt. Steve
Truchan, Cpl. Carl Himnelfarb,
Cpl. Morris Lieberman, and
Pvt. Jack Sperry, alloof whom
have had extensive legal ex-
perience.

MOTHER'S DAY PHONE CALLS
Tomorrow IsMother's Day, and
countless soldiers on this
post will be making long-dis-
tance telephone calls to extend
greetings to man's best friend
his Mother.
Officials aof the Southern
Bell Telephone and Telegraph
Co. Inc., Panama City, have
requested soldiers planning to
make long-distance phone calls
tomorrow to put through their
calls early in the day. By.
phoning before noon, soltlers
will avoid delay and conges-
tion. The lower Sunday rates
.will be in effect.
GROUP SINGING AT THEATER.
Fifteen minutes prior to the
start of the first shoving of
the movie, "group singing"'
will be attempted again at the
Pdst Theatre each Monday, be-
ginning May 10.
This event will ocCtur only
'once a week, and will last for
only fifteen minutes. No in-
terruptions of the showing of
the movie will result:

'PARTY POSErPONM
The Rebel-Yank Club party
planned for tomorrow has been
postponeduntil Sunday, May 16,
because tomorrow is Mother's
Day and many members will be
visiting their parents.


Page 3


"Mav R. aLL


TGNT-E rvT TATT TArnACVf







May 8, 1943 THE TYNDAIL TABlET


Page 5


11lsvll O'CONNOR
JOES


HIS CAR'S LIKE S/Sgt. James
BENNY'S MAXWELL Powell is a
fairly nice
looking chap when he puts on
his new "zoot" uniform with two
pairs of pants...He's having
trouble with his car (it res-
ables Jack Benny's Maxwell).
He installed a new tire on it
and now it won't run. He re-
marked the other day that if
it doesn't "snap out of-it"
soon he might start running on
the rims again. Incidentally,
Booger is getting married the
10th of May. He won't talk as
to who the lucky girl is.
WANTS TO BE T/Sgt. Frank C.
CUB CREW CHIEF lnnerman has
heard that Camp
Gordon Johnston (Carrabelle)
has a new landing strip and
also a plane to go' with it.
The plane is an 14-B (a mons-
trous ship used by the AAF for
observation purposes, etc.)
Well, Zimmerman has requested
transfer to the camp--he
hopess to become crew chief on
the 4-cylinder job--almost as
good as being crew chief on a
glider, eh Frank?
AMBITION: TO T/Sgt.JohnnyH.
BE MOTOR COP (Quiz Kid) Sur-
at is really go-
ing for this PT in a big way--
he rides his bicycle to and
from work. His ambition after
the war is to be a Fla. state
motorcycle cop. Well, that's
one man who'll be in Florida
after the war, anyway.
NO MORE ORDERS Pfb. Naive, that
FROM HIS GIRL WAAC man, has
filled out his
pars for OCS--his girl is a
WAA sergeant, so Herman says
he's tired of taking orders
from a dame.
*
S HE AFTER S/Sgt. Eugene
ulRLS OR FOOD? flliott is a
real "killer"
with the grls in Apalach.
Most every Sunday you'll find
him riding around with several
pretty damsels. Some stuff.
He also eats the same people
out of house and home with all
those ration points and stuff.
*
MURPHY GOES Peace reigns at
BACK TO TF last ar Ocd the
Line Engineering
Office since Sgt. Wallace J.
(Cosmopolitan Lover) Murphy,
better known to his close



T ,1


Available

vi la


A a"Coprighted Material


ISyndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers'


"chums" as "lonely Hearts Mur-
phy," has been transferred back
to Tyndall Field. Now that
Wallace has gone maybe there
will be a spare typewriter a-
vailable in the office.
When CpL G.W. Simons report-
ed to the induction station
for entrance into the Army the
officer in charge stared with
amazement to find that he was
slightly pale--not an ebony
chap. Oh, well, what's in a
name.....George Washington Si-
mons.
The new production line main-
tenance system now being used
is really showing results. Al-
so the boys on the line .are
now able to get a little much
deserved rest. This is anul-
tra-modern version of the swing
shift.


HANGAR CHIEF, T/Sgt. Earl N.
BUT NO HANGAR Andersen now has
a job-ashangar
chief. We don't have a hangar
yet but nevertheless Andersen
has his share of headaches and
in spite of it all is doing a
good job. Andy's going to cel-
ebrate the new hangar by requ-
isitioning a new mechanics'
cap--the one he has now looks
like it was hit by ack-ack
fire.
Pop Passwaters is still sweat-
ing it out---but according to
inside information it won't be
long now. When M/Sgt. Pass-
waters becomes an officer the
Army will have to issue him a
special uniform...pants that
button around thebottom. It's
gonnabehot down here this sun-
mer, Sergeant.


ORDNANCE DETACHMENT
AT APALACH HAS
WORKED HARD
On October 3, 1942, the ac-
tivity of a new detachment was.
begun here at Apalachicola.
The beginning of such activity
lies to the credit of S/Sgt.
Earl Killingsworth, Sgt. K.L.
Lange and Pvt. Earle Martin.
Things went along fairly
well until the 15th of Novem-
ber, when it was decided that
more men were needed. On that
day the four "minute men" ar-
rived on the scene to give a
hand to the faithful three
previously arriving. These
men were Lt. Milton J. Drain,
Ordnance Officer, Cpl. Paul W.
Skornia, Cpl. Joseph M. Som-
merhalder, and Cpl. John E.
Spicezenski.
Toward the latter part of
January it was discovered that
extra help was needed, and the
vacancy was filled by Pvt. Al-
vie Blagburn.
These men, through the wint-
er, struggled and worked hard
and got the Ordnance Detach-
ment at such a point of recog-
nition that it can be taken
for a Tyndall Field, Jr.
As business continued to in-
crease, a clerk, Pfc. Alva B.
Lynn, was transferred here on
March 1, 1943.
Further responsibility has
been placed upon our Ordnance
Officer, Lt. Drain, who also
has been made Transportation
Officer.
Through the cooperation of
each concerned here in this
detachment it is rapidly pro-
gressing and is becoming one
of the outstanding detachments
on this post.
-Pfc. Alva B. Lynn
*
Captain: 'I hope the next
time I see you, you'll be a
second lieutenant.
Private: (flustered) 'Yes,sir,
thank you sir, same to you,
sir.


'Pardon
asked the
operation


Copyrighted Material



SSynrdicated Content


from Commercial News Pro\


me, may I cut in?'
young surgeon as the
began.

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iders"


14 ;


May 8, 1943


THE TYNDAIL TARGET






The Photo Section Goes To The BEACH ,


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Ma~, 8, l944~ ThE TYNDAJI TARCET Page -


Guardians

We extend our somewhat be-
lated congratulations to our
squadron adjutant on his hav-
ing acquired another silver
sliver. It's Captain Preston
now. A note of welcome is ex-
tended to Lt. Bonk who is back
from a short leave to the
Windy City.
Idle banter: T/5 Leto is
now known as Flying Leto, due
to an episode that occurred at
the Armory...We have it that.
T/Sgt. Price and Sat. Sissom
are contemplating matrimony in
the very near future...A new
club is being formulated in
this Sqdn., named the "One-a-
Month" Club. It's for Guard-
ians who go home on a three-
day pass once a month...Chart--
er members are M.B. Diaz, Cpl.
G. Helms, S/Sgt. P. Ryan, T/5
V. Leto and Cpl. R.M. Hyde...
T/5 Mashburn is still carrying
the torch for Miss B. Jones of
Personnel. Why not give him a
break, Bernice???.. .Who tried
to snow a young PC girl going
to St. Pete, but she melted
the snow right away?
Man of the Week: Our man
this weeks another Tampa boy,
T/5 Nilo Menendez. Nilo used
to work at the Waldorf Astoria
and at Miami Beach's best res-
taurants. He is known for his
ability as a "cuisine" and can
prepare many a tasty dish des-
pite the face that he is an
MP uptown.
Hisbest wooing jobs are due
to the fact that he has a very
heavy Castillian accent. Nilo
hopes to go into the restaur-
ant business when he goes back
to civilian life.
-Cpl. Sam Marotta


Venturas
Down on the line in Lt. Lid-
don's office the young lady's
face turned a flaming red, she
jumped up, knocked a book off
the desk and took off like a
P-38--all because someone men-
tioned S/Sgt. Cafmeyer's name.
"Hakeem the Great" attended
the Bay High concert at the
USO Sunday afternoon. He was
seen not listening to the mus-
ic but calmly playing with a
plume on the majorette's hat.
Cpl. Vallet is a bit per-
plexed. He is trying to fig-
ure out how the Frenchmen get
along so well with the girls.
He says, "They can't talk Eng-
lish, and the girls can't talk
French. Still, one Frenchman
will walk down the street with
five girls." He's willing to,
be an interpreter, so French-
men take note.
Sgt. Worley took the final
step this past Sunday. Both
he and the Mrs. have the best
wishes of the entire outfit.
Man of the Iour: T/Sgt. Her-
bert M. McIntosh. Sgt. McIn-
tosh enlisted in January, 1941,
and has been assigned to this
organization since March, 1941.
He is a graduate of AM School
at Chanute Field. During his
time in the organization he
has acted as squadron clerk
and at one time was acting
first sergeant.
Sgt. Mcntosh is 6 feet tall,
has brown wavy hair, a dark,
neat mustache, brown eyes and
a wonderful personality. He
hails from North Carolina and
he IS SINGLE.
-Ist/Sgt. A.J. Barbier


Quarter


VETERAN QM SERGEANT
LEAVES FOR CAMP LEE
A man's wortn to his com-
munity in civil life or to his
organization in military life
is usually measured by the kind
of memory he leaves behind.
The void that T/Sgt. Nolan
T. Ashby has created in Tyn-
dall's QM Detachment is a great
one. His leaving for O.C.S.
at Camp Lee, Virginia, has
created a gap that will be dif-
ficult to bridge.
Sgt. Ashby is a soldier of
the old school, having enlist-
ed in the Army back in Febru-
ary, 1928. His first assign-
ment was with the Field Artil-
lery at Fort Sam Houston, Tex-
as. He served there for three
years before being transferred
to Schofield Barracks, Honolu-
lu.
After a three-year hitch on
the Pacific Island post, Ashby
returned to the "States" for
an assignment with the Air
Corps at Barksdale Field, Ia.
He was with the Air Corps two
years before transferring to
the Quartermaster Corps on the
same field, and has been a QM
man ever since. Pe arrived at
Tyndall in January, 1942.
In the discharge of his du-
ties as first sergeant of his
detachment here, Sgt. Ashby was
able to draw on his vast store
of experiences, and they have
stood him in good stead upon
many occasions. He has the
rare ability of reaching his
men without compromise using
discipline only when absolute-


O.C.S. BOUND




I 4.




il '* *^


T/Sgt. Nolan T. Ashby

ly necessary.
So well did he understand
his men, and so capable was
his appeal to them, that a
search of the records fail to
reveal a single courts martial
case under his administration.
We believe, along with the
board of officers who made his
appointment to O.C.S. possible,
that Sgt. Ashby will make a
fine officer. We wish him all
the good fortune in his future
assignments.


"QM CORPS STILL MAKING
"UNWRITTEN HISTORY"
When the valiant defenders
of Corregidor fell back from
the mainland to that island
fortification to write a glor-
ious chapter in American his-
tory, another chapter had al-
ready been written in a fig-
urative sense, a chapter that
will never find its way into


matter

history.
That unprinted and forgotten
chapter was written by the
Quartermaster Corps of the U.S.
Army. And today the QM Corps
is still making "history that
will never be printed."
When Gen. MacArthur and his
defenders of the Philippines
fell back to Corregidor they
found a fortification cocmlete
with all the equipment and
property essential to a rro-
longed siege. Their defense
of the island was made possible
by what they found.
But let's look into the story
of why they found what was
necessary for their valiant
defense of "the rock."
It'sthe same old story. The
GM Corps had been to Corregidor
long before MacArthur and his
men. And they found no haven.
They found only an island. It
was their duty to stock the
island with equipment necessary
for the defense that made his-
tory.
Just to give you an idea what
the QM personnel does, they
take care of 2,066 different
items. Believe it or not, they
carry 224 different sizes of
shoes. Other items include:
Enough clothing and bedding to
clothe and bed a city of 8,0K0)
population and large stores of
issue of kitchen equipment.
The smallest and cheapest
item on the QM list is a 1"
needle, costing a total of
1/3 of one cent. The largest
item is a 104 ft. boat costing
more than $100,000.
And the records on that need-
le are just as much trouble as
the records on that boat.


a4-
SATURDAY. May 8 'I Escaped from the Gestano' Dean Jagger kary Brian
SUNDAY, MONDAY, May 9-10 'White Savage' Karia Nontez Jon Hall
TUESDAY, May 11 'Springtime in the Rockies' Betty Grable John Fayo ne
WEDNESDAY, May 12 'Rhythm of the Islands' Allan ones Jane Frazee
'Air Raid Warden' Laurel and Hardy
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, May 13-14 'Edge of Darkness' Errol Flynn Ann Sheerian

RITZ PANAMA
i~-+

SUNDAY, MONDAY, May 9-10 SUNDAY, MONDAY. May 9-10
'The Desperadoes' 'Who Done It'
Randolph Scott Glenn Ford Abbott and Costello
TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, May 11-12 TUESDAY, May 11 4
'Tennessee Johnson 'The Falcon's Brother'
Van Heflin Ruth Hussey George Sanders Ton Conwav
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, May 13-14 WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, May 12-13
'Aerial Gunner' 'Crossroads'
Chester Morris Richard Arlen il lia F owe Il edy Lararr
SATURDAY, May 15 FRIDAY, SATURDAY, May 14-15
'Hopoy Serves A Writ' 'Masked Rider'
William Boyd Andy Clyde Johnny Mack Brown



MOVIES

FOR THIS WEEK


---POST THEATRE -


Mlay 8, 19412


Page 7


THE TYNDAIL TARGET


i/ r








NOVEL CRAFT HELPS TO PROTECT OUR HEN









ill\ \\ I ~ wp


'SWAMP GLIDERS,' BORROWED FROM EVERGLADES

FROG HUNTERS, USED TO SAVE FLIERS

FORCED DOWN IN SHALLOW WATER

From frog hunters of the Florida Everglades and
the swamp country of Louisiana, the Army Air Forces
got an idea which has and will in the future save
the lives of fliers forced down in shallow water and in swampy
places.
The Air Forces at Tyndall Field maintain a small "navy" and
the oddest craft in the "fleet"
are the "swamp gliders," frail
looking craft which skim over Canaries
the surface and can operate in Of course we've all been
as little as two inches of told otherwise, but this army
water. life differs but little from
"Swamp Gliders" were first that which existed years before
put into use by frog hunters bany of us donned khao l
We still have our golfers,
and were later used by oil ball players, sun bathers, and
prospectors in the swampy re- even a group of playboys com-
gions along the Texas and Lou- posed ofS/Sgts. Bradbury, Pal-
isiana coasts. The Army adopt- mer, Rothschild, Dieterich and
ed them for use in reaching Smith, Sgt. Pearson and a few
planes forced down in swampy others.
areas and shallow water. They These gay fellows insist on
staying out at the hangar all
can go where no other boat can night, and then come home and
and even reach places whereman lounge comfortably about the
cannot travel afoot. air-cooled barracks until the
Though frail-looking in ap- afternoon. After their loung-
pearance, the Army's "Swamp ing period they all get excited
Gliders" are sturdy craft, con- about a gamecalled "Calisthen-
Gliders are sturdy craft, con- ics," whatever that is. Boy'
structed of plywood around What a life
strong oak frames. They are Someone just butted in to
wide enough to allow freedom say that the boys have to work
of movement aboard and can when they go up to the hangar.
0 But what difference does that
safely carry more than half a make?
dozen men. They are powered Even though our ball diamond
by 65 horsepower lycoming air- project has folded up there is
plane engines which drive pro- no need for toomuch dejection.
pellors from the rear, pushing We have our newly completed
the glider along the surface volley ball and tennis courts,
te a top speed of 40 mles and you fellows certainly ought
at a top speed of 40 miles an to take advantage of these
hour. facilities whenever possible.
The gliders make up part of -Cpl. Joe (Peppy) Mastroeni


a fleet of boats which is main-
tained for the rescue of fliers
who may be forced down in the
waters surrounding Tyndall.
The craft range in size from
the gliders to sea-going con-
verted yachts up to 100 feet
in length.
The rescue boat company here
is operated under the direc-
tion of the Quartermaster, yith
Capt. Herman Gundlach, Jr., as
Company Commander and is comn-
posed of experienced seamen
and mechanics. Technical Ser-
geant R.L. Mills is first ser-
geart of the company, which
has boat houses, barracks and
docks on St. Andrews Bay near
the west gate.


Sub-Depot
The second War Savings Bond
drive within the Sub-Depot is
continuing with more applica-
tions coming in daily for pay-
roll deductions. Two $1,000
bonds were purchased for cash
by Edwin L. Goodhue of the Sup-
ply Dept., in addition to those
issued by payroll deductions.
Let's all buy more bonds. One
'of the best ways to beat the
Axis is to put this policy in-
to practice.
Robert D. Worthington has
been appointed foreman of Aero
Repair to replace John L. Merk-
ling who has been transferred
to the Sub-Depot at Gulfport,
.Miss.


--/- CO LUMUM N-
A THOUGHT OF MOTHER

Mother's Day has come again, and we pause to drop
a white flower on her grave if she is dead, or wear
a red flower if she be living. While this day is on-
ly about a quarter of a century old, it has captured
the imagination of the world.
Mother's Day is an expression of a great sentiment,
which sentiment is born of the love which men and
women have for their mothers. This sentiment is ex-
pressed in a letter from a daughter to her mother in
these words:

I like to think of Mother as an Alpine guide, a leader who
is looking up,
Around whose waist is tied a rope to help her children up a
rocky mountain side.
The rope is made of twisted cords of dreams and prayers and
tears;
It stronger grows because you see it's lasted years and
years;
Each child connects with one below and none must slip or
fall
Because if one should stumble it might crush or injure all;
But Mother stands above them there and bears a staff in
hand,
A staff called love which holds her fast wherever she might
stand.
Her.steps shall never falter, though her hair be pearly
gray,
For this staff will bear the burden and the rope shall not
give way.
Wearily will her soul find comfort, on to glory she will
go,
But her spirit will scale mountains with her children here
be low.
Up and up she'll lead them always with Mother's Battle Cry:
"Climb on and on, my children, mountain climbers never die.'"




Jrm., ferrvorcirM

LT. RAYMOND I. PIPAL
April, 1943


SUNDAY
8:00
9:00
10:00
10:00
11:00
11:15
7:00
TUESDAY
5:30
6:30
7:00


A.M...............Mass
.M ....Protestant Sun-
day School.
A.M....Gunners Mass at
Theatre.
A.M .... Protestant Wor-
ship Service.
A.M...Gunners Protest-
ant Service.
A.M ............... Mass
P.M....Evening Worship
P.M ..............Mass
P.M..Instruction Class
P.M....Fellowship Club


WEDNESDAY
12:15 P.M...Civilian Worship
Service.
5:30 P.M............... Mass
7:00 P.M .... Choir Rehearsal
THURSDAY
5:30 P.M................Mass
6:30 P.M..Instruction Class
FRIDAY
5:30 P.M................Mass
6:30 P.M ....Jewish Service
SATURDAY
5:30 P.M..............'.Mass
7:00 P.M........Confessions






e1Th YNDAIL TARM 8


ACTING CAPTAIN OF TYNDALL NINE


S/Sgt. Paul A. Brown of the
Gunnermakers was named by Lt.
S.J. Drongowski to lead the
Tyndall Tornadoes when they
take the field tomorrow against
the Carabelle Commandos.
Time: 2:10 P.M.

TYNDALL TORNADOES FACE
CARABELLE COMMANDOS
HERE TOMORROW


Cross-Country Run,
iusic and Awards
Also on Program


Band


After a week of intensive
practice Tyndall's high-flying
baseball squad have their guns
primed and sights set for a
direct hit against the Cara-
belle Commandos whom they meet
tomorrow on the Tyndall Field
diamond.
The fray will be the sixth
on the schedule of the Tornadoes
and they will be seeking their
fourth victory of the young
season.
Tomorrow's game will mark
the official opening of Tyn-
dall's mammoth athletic field
and as part of the ceremonies,
Major William P. Kevan will
throw out the first ball. The
Post Band will play.
Also on the program is the
much heralded -cross-country
run, and the presentation of
various athletic awards to the
winning squadrons.
Lt. Stanley J. Drongowski,
coach of the Tornadoes, has an-
nounced the following line-up
for Sunday's game:
S/Sgt. Metonic, CF
S/Sgt. Brown, 2B
S/Sgt. Laughlin, C
Sgt. Hines, SS
S/Sgt. Anderson 3B
Pfc. Sedmak, 1B
Sgt. Jackeral, IF
Sgt. Landry, BF
Cpl. Flanagan, P
Alternates: Sgt, Didier, C;
Cpl. Tarr, 3B; Pfc. Balliet,
IB; Sgt. Davis, RF; Pfc. South-
ard, P; S/Sgt. Mullins, P; Sgt.
Cofer, P.

POST COLORED TEAM PLAYS
Tyndall's colored baseball
team will officially open its
season tomorrow in a game with
the Mariamna Air Base at that
team's field.
Pvt. Baskett is slated to
take the mound for the Tyndall
men with Pvt. Dawkins as his
battery mate. S/Sgt. Daniel
and Dawkins are the coaches.


CPLS. HNYLKA AND KOCUR HONORED BY TARGET LEAGUE KELERS


Last year's champion Quartermaster keglers proved conclusively
their right to wear the crown as they emerged the victors in
both the first and second halves of the Tyndall Target Bowling
League.
-Pictured above are a number of the league bowlers who
voted Cpl. Johnny Hnylka (left, kneeling) honorary captain of
the All-League Team, and Cpl. Al Kocur (right, kneeling) who
was selected as t;e most valuable man to his team. Hnylka is
the captain of the Quartermaster bowlers while Kocur did yeo-
man work for the second place winners, the Medics.


ALL-LEAGUE SELECTIONS


Ist team
Cpl. Johnny Hnylka -QM
Cpl. Al Kocur Medics
Sgt. Louis Kottke GM
Cpl. George Usher .- QM
T/Sgt. R. Costigan Fin.

FINAL
W
QUARTERMASTERS......... 24
MEDICS................. 21
GUNNERMAKERS........... 17


Band Box
Will the "E" inspection flag
be properly cared for? That's
what the AAF band 'wants to
know. Each evening after for-
mal retreat, a group of strong
Democrats from the South, (N.
Carolina, to be exact) would
play "Dixie" as the much cov-
eted flag was lowered and put
away for the night. Truthful-
ly, can any other organization
show such affection toward the
flag? (Inspecting officers,
please note.)
Jinay- Coniff, the pianist,
seems to be having trouble
with some compose-s, but not
with Shubert. In fact here he
practically rings the Belle.
(We can supply her address up-
on three hours' notice.)...
Cpl. William Moye, known form-
erly for his fine renditions
of "I'll Get By" and "The
Saints," is a real hero now.
His winning of the golf tourn-
ament last week is something
*hat happens once in a life-
time. (The Band is proudly
displaying the pawn ticket for
the trophy on the bulletin
board between the hours of 8
and 5)...Last week the dance
band really haa a full sched-
ule: Monday night for the stu-
dents at the Rec Hall, Tuesday
at the USO, Thursday at Port
Saint Joe where the Bond rally
they played for sold over
$5,200, Friday at the Rec Hall,
Saturday a doubleheader, first
at the two USO shows at the
theater, then to the Officers
Club.

POEM
To buy more Bonds, we all
-should yearn,
And put more Jap ashes in an
urn.
-Cpl. Sam Marotta


2nd team
S/Sgt. Harry Van Kuren -GM
Cpl. Dom Lentlie QM
Pfc. Gus Bianco 69th
S/Sgt. F. Cappiello Ord.
Pfc. Harry Miller QM

LEAGUE STANDIiGS
L W
6 69TH................. 13 I
9 FINANCE............. 9 2
13 ORDNANCE............ 6 2


NEW BOWLING LEAGUE TO BE
FORMED AT MEETING MONDAY
All squadrons desiring to
enter teams in the proposed
bowling league are requested
to send representatives to the
league meeting that will be
held on Monday night at the
field bowling alleys.
Schedules and rules will be
discussed at the meeting. It
will begin at 6:00 P.M.


SQUAD tx.D.R5'


CROis-CON TRY RUN ENTRY


*S/Sgt. Mike Gonzales will rep-
resent the Gunnermakers in
their bid for the track trophy
which will be awarded to the
winning squadron of the cross-
country run being staged to-
morrow.
At least twenty entries from
seven squadrons will compete
in the mile and a half race.
The Special Service Office
has announced that the start
and finish of the race will
take place at the home plate
of the new athleticc field.
Time: 2:.0 P.M.

OFFICERS WIN OVER SHIPYARD
BASEBALL TEAM BY 4 TO 3

With Captain Dangler the
pitching and batting star, the
Officers' baseball team won a
4 to 3 victory over the first
shift team from the Wainwright
Shipyard at Pelican Park Tues-
day night.

FAVOR BASEBALL CONTINUING.
Fifty-nine percent of the
American people think that war-
time baseball should be con-
tinued, as contrasted with 28
percent who thought it should
be stopped, while 13 percent
were undecided, according to a
recent Gallup poll in the 48
states.


DASTIL X:L MJ


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oIfrk riLuS I IREDS WO



NOW YOU, TOO, MAY OBTAIN BLESSED RELIEF THIS
PLEASANT. EASY WAY./

-v / H


.HAW
(A




R n/ I/ O ) V-1 rXp






k-ORPORALS' KADNCe- KOUNTERl !
COUNTS UP TO FOUR OVER AND OVER AGAIN
NEVGR BECOMES HOARSE CANNOT SPEED UP CADENCEC
CL Omi comPL ET" oITH FOar rT H C! AI i ed NeT

--Froa the Robins Field News


May 8, 1943 -


Paee 10


'17~E 1YP~D~LI, T~K~I'







\iay 8, 1943 THE TYNDATI, TARCW~ Pane 9
Y


ORDNOTES
Medicwoes FROM THE We are pleased to ---.
SUADRN note that three of _
The first oneour men won honors
The first one to return from in the recent G.I. golf tourna-
furlough gets all the gravy as ment. Ist/Sgt. Ridulph took
far as rumors are concerned, nth lst/Sgt. Pduipt took
but before s the uicoiest are the prize in the first flight,
offered he is asked: Did you with Hoefs as runner-up and
get...?", "How was the weath- Knepper was nosed out for the
er?" "Does she still...?", Silver Cup.
and then the well-known "Have The contestants in the inter-
you heard?" Ah Civilization! squadron competitions c;q also .-
Why do others keep score on take a bow for their triumphs 7 '" t.
your passes and furloughs? in all events. The only thing 'a
ust who was the first to re- lacking now is a little con-
turn? Aren't passes a fascin- centration on our bowling for
ating hobby? the new tournament scheduled
S/Sgt. Gehring was odds on to begin shortly. It's out of 1
favorite for staying to see the cellar or bust!
the Derby, but returned to the
home grounds under the wire The men in barracks #3 have
and the best he could do was been moving somuch that anokey
to listen to the Count Fleet Stanley s thinking of equip-en the rogue's gallery
victory over the radio. ping his bed with wheels while The men in the rogue's gallery
victory over o a another to the other men are getting mus- personnel of the Post Ordnance
disapl. Volk was another to cle-bound fran heaving foot to right are Pfc. Alfred Strege
on time, too! Vof .culd have lockers about. Sgt. Weiss is stock record clerk. Next is F
used a few t+ta. days working on a plan whereas all times goes wild keeping his me
These cleanup competitions one will have to do is ring aight.
really bring out the hidden for room service or, Shangri To Snodgrass' left is Pfc. Ph
talents. Capt. Gastonis quite Ia ala G.I. Transportation stock record cle
a housekeeper. from Alabama, chief clerk of Pr
Sgt. Smith, "Little Dawson," BEACH With Yannantuono and father of a five months old gir
has been sweating out the ar- BANTER Schaefer leading the is T/3 William Ponzio, who hai
rival of his spouse, much to parade, half the anmi-
the discomfortof barracks 620. nition section went to the is assistant to the chief cle
"Dear Mrs. Smith, please, come beach for the grand opening to tickets and requisitions. Las
quickly, Smitty is keeping us gape at the assorted bathing Witham of Vermont, sergeant-ma
awake!" beauties. Schaefer comes from ment authorities.
Sgt. Mullins says that this the frozen north where it's Seated are S/Sgt. Frank Park
bit isn't news but history. It too cold to use swimming at- of Motor Transportation, and 1
happened while returning from tire. In fact,, when he took charge of local purchases of
furlough...Quite a correspond- his annual bath last week he charge of local purchases of
ence has since been directed found a pair of G.I. pants he for the operation of the Ordnar
toward Cocoa Beach, Fla., and had given up for lost. For The men of this office all
the results must be good be- Schaefer's comment on the Tyn- property and administrative rec
cause Mullins is three-day-pas- dallettes in their abbreviated ceiving the many varied proper
sing there soon, but in the togs, consult the Taler column, department and to operate ar
company of discourage Cpl. Then there's the story of Ordnance equipment used on the
Maxwell. the worm who wantedto join the the records of guns, vehicles,
Capt. Gaston's current ques- army so he could be in the ap-
tion: "Are you getting mar- ple core. Rotten joke, eh! tion used in training the aerial
ried soon?" He says that this Well anyway, it's seedy. (Pfcs. Waller and Towle, not
is the season when men start (Sgts. Witham and Ponzio) ian employees complete the press
thinking about what the girls
have been thinking of all
year.
A new detail was seen march-
ing in a formation directed
toward "that".show at the Post
Theatre. Sgt. Smith served as
platoon leader with Cpl. Max-
well as right guide. Their TYN DALL TOM MY......
eyes had a strained look when
they returned a couple of THE BOMBER COMPLETES ITS MISSION AND 'HERE IT IS MORNING.i
hours later. Next time, boys, THE GERMAN BASE IS LEFT IN SMOLDERING ALL'S LEFT TO DO NOW
get in the front row! RUINS-ANOTHER AFRICAN OBSTACLE HURDLED- IS SIT AND SWEAT IT OUTYEA, THE OLD
Famous "romance" words: "You ON A STOMACH THAT'S AS STOMACH IS AS
Love Me, but you won't admit EMPTY AS A 0.5 WALLT BARE AS A TIN CUP
it!" ON THF 29TH ON THE WASHING
Who was that well-known fruitN ON
salesman at one of the local T.r TN TURNPIKE
night spots. We wonder if he
disposed of all those grape-
fruit. -Sgt. C.S. aubly _-


Zebras
Now that S/Sgt. Ritter's
broken finger is well on the
way to recovery, the sqft ball
team should really go to town.
(Someone commented that Rit-
ter's pool playing has improv-
ed in spite of or because of
his fractured digit -and we're
inclined to agree.)
Charles Reinares, that Jam
handy man, is still sweating
out that third stripe -and now
that he expects the Mrs. down,
the sweating has become more
profuse. We're rootin' for
you, Charley.
Once in a very, very great
while, the IMPOSSIBLE happens.
It happened only a few days
ago, when the Zebras beat the
unbeatable Gunnermaker ping-
pong team! -S/Sgt. Franklin


y picture above ,are the G.I.
Office. Beginning from left
of Wisconsin,. mail clerk and
fc. James Snodgrass, who some-
morandum receipt accounts str-

illip Brown of Arizona, Hotor
rk. Next is M/Sgt. John Ratley
operty Office, married and the
rl. Standing alongside Ratley
Is from Long Island, N.Y. He
rk, and handles the shipping
it in line is Ist/Sgt. Kenneth
>jor and in charge of procure-

er, an Alabamian, chief clerk
/3 Louis Weiss of Indiana, in
parts and equipment necessary
Ice Garage.
have a vital-job in keeping
:ords in order; issuing and re-
*ties necessary to operate the
id maintain the vast amount of
post. Through this office go
parts of vehicles, and ammuni-
Il gunners.
pictured above, and four civil-
,ent office force.)



BONDS!


LEDBETTER


Niay 8, 1843


Page 9


THE TYNDATJ, TARGET






May 8, 1943


THIS WEEK'S X-WORD PUZZLE


IL TARGET


THE TYNDA


' 3









*I





*3


Across
1. Discontinue 40. Of it
5. Young branch 41. Mariners
10. Wings 43. Gushing fow
14. Assam silk 44. A beseeching
worm 45. Slipped up
5. Is sullen 46. Age
6. Wander 47. Verse collec-
17. Healthy tively: poetic
18. Main artery 48. Commissioner
19. Scold 50. Conveyance
20. Bird 51. Unexpected
22. Commissions good luck
24. Worm 54. Rummage
25. Malicious 58. The. bad in us
burning 59. Misleads
26. Braids 61. Ireland
29. Duplicate 62. Glacial snow
30. Yawning 63. Delete
34. Delivers a blow 64. Location
35. Passing fashion 65. Parrot-like
36. Amphitheaters birds
37. Busy insect 66. Slight depres-
38. Deposit sions
39. Of the man 67. Killed


Dow
1. Plies the needle
2. Migrate
cross-country
3. Greasy
4. Beds
5. Boxes
6. Dress fastener
7. Possessive
pronoun
8. Aquatic mam-
mals
9. Russian rulers
10. Adjust
11. Give use of
36. Islet
38. Shelf
39. Fowl
42. Child's disease
43. Tittle
. Own
. Tolerate
.Play on words
* Came to a close


12. Desirous
13. Fish
21. Silly fool
23. Bellows
25. Help
26. Aspect
27. Steamship
28. Rose oil
29. Cove
31. Feeble-minded
32. Head tops
33. Composition


35. Enth
50. Foun
51. Chee
52. Done
53. Prim
54. Rema
55. Seed
56. Quote
57. Was
60. Cook


Reprinted from The Kelly Field (T


ANSWERS TO QUIZ
1. Soup, apples, cak
2. Photography.
3. Virginia Dale,
Reynolds, Paulette
Rita Hayworth, Eleanor
Joan Fontaine, Joan Cr
4. Harlan Stone.
5. Unlimited author
6. Male turkey.
S7. It means that he
of respect.
8. Miss Mildred McAf(
Connander.
34 years.
More glib.


Zoo Visitor: 'Where
monkeys?'
Keeper: 'They're in
making love.'
Visitor: 'Would they
for peanuts?' .
Keeper: 'Would you?'



He: 'There's a certain
why I love you.'
SShe: 'My goodness:'
He: 'Don't be absurd.


TYNOALL'* "LAUNDRY


DERBY


DAY I


......................................................................................................


Il I I I I ii l Il 1 II I i' )
SUPP lU PARA-MUUPM L
OUA wVO PLACE SHOW

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:~2 RTHURS.


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StRE OFF'! cK ou wsg it

THEREE OFF PICK *fOUR WINNER


usiast II I li I II 11 11 1 1 1 1 1 111li
nations G.I. LAUNDRY. PARAAMUMTAL
k: Zoology "42."
with: ZooloyY WIN PLACE SHOW
a Donna MON3 CTUES SAT.
protector \ /
e
aware of I
ing dish (11 tTf4
ex.) Weekly .



S.A


Marjorie
Goddard,
Powell,
awford.

ty. -
PLACE OUR BETS -"AS TIME GOES BY"
s worthy. IvuJ. ....' .. .. .. .. ,
ai D.AunDRY PARA-MUTuAL
ee Lt. ACE SOW





are the '

the back .

come out





n reason' -

A CASE OF DO OR. DIE-" 0 ITIS STILL THE SAME OLD STOR !


YANKWIZ
By
BOB HAWK
Quizmster
"THANKS
TO THE YANKS"
Saturday, CS 5

1. If you were on a diet of
Vichysoisse, Northern Spies
and Lady Fingers, what would
you be eating?
2. In which of these fields
is the most silver used --
dentistry, jewelry or photo-
graphy?
3. Name two other dancing
partners that Fred Astaire has
had in the movies besides Gin-
ger Rogers?
4. Who is the Chief Justice
of the Supreme Ccurt?
5. If I gave you carte blan-
che, what would I be giving
you?
6. A rooster is a male chick-
en; what is a "Tan"?


11


Page 11
7. If I tell you that sane-
body is redoutable, does that
mean that he is filled with
doubts, that he is not to be
trusted, or that he is worthy
of respect?
8. Who is the Commanding Of-
ficer of the WAVEs?
9. Give within three years
the, average age of all movie
actresses?
10. If someone kissed the Bl-
arney Stone, Is he supposed to
become luckier, more glib or
richer?


eSTO P 4 o S o Sv



L 4 7 Isis A 4
7 7Fr q I 7> 0 q





E VIL DL.' P S ERIN
r-VE E SR AI S7
AR T S E /I1TS L-







FOR YOUR PROTECTION


a Pro


BUY NATIONAL SERVICE
LIFE INSURANCE




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