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Title: Tyndall target
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076230/00053
 Material Information
Title: Tyndall target
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 27-36 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)
Publisher: Public Relations Office, Air Corps Gunnery School
Place of Publication: Tyndall Field Fla
Publication Date: 1942-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City -- Tyndall Air Force Base
Coordinates: 30.078611 x -85.576389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 16, 1942)-
Issuing Body: Issues for May 9, 1942- published by Office of Public Relations, Army Air Forces Gunnery School.
General Note: Title from caption.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076230
Volume ID: VID00053
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24602432

Table of Contents
    Cover
        page 1
    Main
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text
























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PUBLISHED SATURDAYS BY THE SPECIAL SERVICES SECTION FOR PERSON-
NEL OF THE AAF FLEXIBLE GUNNERY SCHOOL, TYNDALL FIELD, FLORIDA.

Special Service Officer: Commanding:
Capt. Owen O. Freeman Col. Leland S. Stranathan
Photographic Officer:
Lt. J.A. Dickerman Photograph and Reproduction:
Public Relations Officer: T/Sgt. W. Castle, S/Sgt. J.
Lt. W.B. Pratt Mitchell, Sgt. S. Upchurch,
Editorial Staff: Cpl. W. Grout, Cpl. G. Neitz-
Sgt. Arnold H. Milgaten, Sgt. ert, S/Sgt.
Saul Samiof, Pfc. Neil Pooser, R. Keough, Sgt. P. Terry, Sgt.
Pvt. P.M. Nickles J. Marsick, Cpl. E. Tackett,
Art Work: T/Sgt. O. Ledbetter Pfc. J. Ravenscroft, -Pt. W.
and Cpl. MarshlT Goodman. pJiaiels. Pvt. L. Shaw.S/Sgt. J.
Webster, S/Sgt. J. Montgomery
The Tyndall Target receives material supplied by Camp NeSs-
paper Service, War Dept., 205 E. 42nd St., N.Y.C. The credited
material may not be republished without permission rroa C.R.S.

THE PROFESSIONAL ATTITUDE
If you ever watched a surgeon preparing for an
operation you probably were amazed at the almost end-
less detail of his preparation. There was nothing,
absolutely nothing, left to chance.
The surgeon may be a hail-fellow-well-met on the
golf course, at a bar, or at the poker table, but
when he enters the ready room at the hospital he un-
dergoes a complete transformation. He may joke about
"cutting bellies" during off-hours but on the job he
is a professional. He is dead serious about his busi-
ness. He studies his patient. He studies the his-
tory of the disease or the injury involved. He exam-
ines his instruments. More than Likely he will re-
fresh himself from his books or the latest periodi-.
cals on this particular problem. He prepares the
patient carefully and outlines his contemplated pro-
cedure in advance to his assistants. Nothing that
can be anticipated and prepared for in advance is
left undone.
What has all this to do with flying? Just this.
Flying an airplane has been graduated from the cate-
gory of dare-deviltry or stunting. It has become a.
science -- a profession --to be learned from the bot-
tom up, backwards and forwards, inside and out. Each
mission requires the same careful planning, the same
analysis of all possible eventualities, the same cau-
tion that the surgeon exercises in preparation for a
major operation.
There are times in case of emergency when a sur-
geon must act boldly, almost recklessly. It is then
that his intensive training and his infinite atten-
tion to detail give him the skill and the daring to
proceed. These occasions arise in the profession of
flying, too. But the surgeon never takes a chance
just for the fun of it -- his professional standing
will not permit it. The flyer, by the same token,
cannot submit himself, his crew, or his airplane to
hazards which could have been foreseen.
Surgery has developed as a most honored profession
because its practitioners have set high standards for
themselves. They have adopted a businesslike, pains-
taking attitude toward their work. We call it a "pro-
fessional" attitude.
Aviation, too, will progress in exact ratio to the
degree to which its devotees adopt the "professional"
attitude.
OUR FRONT COVER
Heralding the formal summer open-
ing tomorrow of Tyndall's bathing
beach is this week's issue of the
Target.
Appropriately, we print on the
cover a bathing beauty picture, and
inside you'll find a full page of
beauties.
The cover girl is Miss Fay Wil-
liams, of the Department of Train-
ing. The photo is by Sgt. Si Up-
church.


Photos and Interviews by
SGT. SILAS UPCHURCH
THIS WEEK'S QUESTION (ASK-
ED OF GUNNERS): AFTER GRAD-
UATION WHERE WOULD YOU PRE-
FER TO FIGHT OUR ENEMIES?
THE ANSWERS:


PFC. RICHARD K. ELWELL: "Agazn-
st-the Japs in any theatre. I
had a brother and a friend on
Guadalcanal and recently saw
the friend at home. He had
both legs badly shot up by ma-
chine gun bullets."
erI= rips ku ri `ii V f.-sf


PFC. WALLACE W. DAVIS: "On the
Tunisian front. I have a bro-
ther who has been there seven
months and he writes of a need
for aeri gunners." (Davis
also has a brother somewhere
in the Southwest Pacific with
the Seabees.)


--- s -

PFC. AL De VRIES dislikes Ja-
treachery and wants to get in-
to action against the Nipponese
anywhere on the globe. He
feels the Yanks are superior
to their enemies and is anxious
to get out and prove it.










PFC. FRAKFORD G. DENTON wants
to see action against the en-
.emy on the Tunisian front. He
feels the loss of a boyhood
chum ho was killed while fight-
ing with the infantry there
and wants to have a hand in
whipping the Axis in Africa.


Pinney


Antes


By BILL PINNEY
deere yardbird No. one:
'scuse me for steelin' some
of yo thunder, but I ben aming
to write you congratulations
fur sum time and i wanted to
dooit in language u'd unner-
stan period i have been a ful-
lower of your fer many moonz
and regretz that you aint wi-
der In scope. I don mean that
therz something rong with your
fisique, but that you shud
reach out further wid your
stuff.
(It must be fun to be able
to write English the way it
should be written and then
turn around and murder the
stuff. Think of me. I can't
even write it as it should be
or murder it the way you do.
But I'm going to get this off
I my chest if it kills both of
us.)
U know, yardbird, uver sense
the army joined me i been won-
dering about guys lik us and
wunderin whut wood happen iff-
en we submittedstuff like this
here to propergandur minister
gubbles. they wood probly
shoot us at sunrize ever morn-
in for moren a month. and
thatz what i meen when i say u
shud be wider in skope. setch
stuff as you rite is as ameri-
can as them red suspenders
which put gene talmadge into
and then outta office in gaw-
gia. people nowdaze sit down
and reed things about this war
an they dunt pay enuf etensun
to storeys urging em to buy
bonds. they don't seem to re-
aliz that unles they buy bonds
they wont be able to rede
stories about bonds because thel
natzles don't pay nobudy so's
they ken by 'em they just work
em without pay.
yardbird, it just boils down
to: u better not wate til a
nazi or a jap is in yo front
yard and kumin up you front
steps befo you get mad because
its ben proved that when they
git that klose they aint one
of em they lots of em. look
at hong-kong and bataan. but
unless people by mor bonds you
better look at a distance.
We're bying all the bonds we
ken kaus we have a dog what
scares us uver timehebarques.
hes got intution, that dog.
hes so disappointed in the waA
people bys bonds and so scary
that uver time anybody kums
neer the house he cries out:
Yap, Yap, Yap. It aint nevur
no Jap, tho, but it lad be ef-
fen we don all pull together
to keep em from tering us a-
part.
looking forward to reading a
kable from admiral nimitz dat-
ed Yokahoma and redin: Every-
things Tokyokay unquote iyam
irs.
-Pvt. Willie








May 1,1943 TII4 L!VNPAT.T,* TAI--W.RT Pae


T/F Men Join Caterpillar Club

'


." ..': ... :. .. -
. .. -- -.*-*.
S'. "


Pfc. Kent and Lt. Lo


ng


"Subdue" a Parachute


Two Tyndall men, one of them an officer pilot and
the other the gunnery student aboard a training
plane, climbed out over the cockpit of their plane
last week to join the exclusive Caterpillar Club,
whose members are those whose lives have been saved by para-


chutes after they "bailed out"
of disabled planes.
The two new T/F members are
Gunner H.V. Kent and Lt. P.D.
Long. They were ordered to
abandon a disabled plane near
the field last week.
Pfc. Kent "hit the silk" on
orders from his pilot and the
officer later took to his par-
achute after setting the plane
on a course which caused it to
crash into the waters of Crook-
ed Sound.
Today they're both grateful
to the women of America who
(ave up silk stockings in or-
der that members of the Air
Forces may have parachutes.

4 NEW WARRANT OFFICERS NAMED
The appointment of four new
warrant officers was announced
by the Post Adjutant's Office
on Thursday. The four enlist-
ed men who were named to trade
their stripes for bars are
M/Sgt. Robert Houston, T/Sgts.
John Jones and Horace Bratcher
and S/Sgt. Fred labry.
W/O Houston, who was born in
Indihanapolis, Ind., works with
the Engineering and Operations
Office on the flight line.
W/O's Bratcher and Labry are
members of the Medical Detach-
ment. Bratcher is a native of
Pensacola, Fla., while Labry
hails from Hahnville, La.
W/O Jones is a veteran QM
man and comes frmn Morganfield,
Ky.


SUNDAY, MAY 9, Is

MOTHER'S DAY

DID You REMEMBER?


PX Girls Get War Stamps
For Ideas to Improve
Soda Fountain


Miss Erlene Webb, manager of
the Post Exchange Soda Fount-
ain Section, has gone and done
it again. Her latest innova-
tionto keep the PXettes inter-
ested in their work and on
their toes, is to award war
stamps each week to the girl
who submits, in writing, the,
most interesting and original
thoughts concerning the Ex-
change. It may be a poem, con-
structive criticism, or just a
short story.
This week's war stamps were
awarded to Miss Becky Bnanuel
for her poem, "Conversing."
It follows:
"Be back in a minute, going to
smoke.
Com'ere, girls, did'ja hear
this joke?
Can't make coffee, gotta do
this.
Sh-hh, see that boy? Wow, can
he kiss!!
Going to the dance tonight,
got a hot date,
Check our fountain, I can't be
late.
I'll quit this job before I'll
work with that gal,
She mopes around like a drunken
'Sal'.
Cleanthe mirrors, I ain't tall
enough,
Don't boss me around, I don't
like that stuff.
And so on it goes all through
the day,
Some do the werk, while others
play.
This place is G.I., and that
ain't all,
This can't go far, girls, get
on the ball!


BATHING BEACH TO BE


FORMALLY OPENED FOR


SUMMER TOMORROW
With free cokes as an added attraction for the op-
ening day, the Special Services Office tomorrow will
play host to Tyndall Field soldiers at the ultra-
super bathing beach which has been made out of a more or less
barren stretch of sand.
USO CAMP SHOW AT With such luxuries as beach
POST THEATRE umbrellas, dressing rooms and
showers for men and women, and
TONIGHT other such niceties, the beach
has been made into a fine bath-
Another USO camp show will spot which should be highly
appear at the Post Theatre to- popular this summer.
night. For the opening day, the SS
Two performances are sched- Office has arranged to bring
uled, one at 6:30 and the oth- a few busloads of Panana City
er at 8:30. girls out to the field tomor-
Fifteen performers are in row afternoon.
this week's show, including Lifeguards will be on duty
six chorus girls, a comedy to pull any over-ambitious
team, a puppet act, an acro- swimmers out of the Gulf.
batic team and a singer. Improvement of the beach has
Freddie Stritt, comedian, is been under the direction of
master of ceremonies. Lt. Ralph Hunn.
Provided have beek uch ath-
ALL MIAMI BEACH TRAINEES letic facilities as volley-
MUST TAKE GUNNERY COURSE ball, deck tennis, softball,
horseshoes, footballs, punch-
IF THEY PASS TESTS ing bags and others.
All Miami Beach AAF trainees Diving facilities are being
now are required to attend constructed to help make the
aerial gunnery school if they beach an all-around good spot
qualify physically and mental- to spend a lazy Sunday after-
Iv the Awmr Trimes T~ rt noon.


The men, if they pass their
flight physical with 20/20
vision and are otherwise qual-
ified, will attend airplane
mechanic or armorer school be-
fore attending gunnery school.
If they pass the physical
with 20/30, 20/40 vision and
have decent raBio test scores
they will attend radio opera-
tor-mechanic school before at-
tending gunnery school.
USO BUILDING FOR

NEGRO TROOPS IS
DEDICATED IN PC
An impressive program featur-
ing addresses by leading civic
and military figures marked
the opening on Sunday of the
new USO for colored troops in
this area.
The dedicatory exercises were
presided over by Prof. R.V.
Moore, principal of the Rosen-
wald High School. Majors C.M.
Miller and F.M. Fleming, Lt.
J.B. O'Donnell and Ist/Sgt. A.
Long, Jr., delivered brief ad-
dresses on behalf of the men
of Tyndall Field.

MAJOR HUNTER NEW CO
Major Henry H. Hunter last
week was appointed Comnanding
Officer of the 69th, succeed-
ing Major Harold M. Clarvoe,
transferred.

NEW POST ENGINEER
Major Earl K. Haag, formerly
of Minden, La., reported here
this week for duty as Post En-
gineer, succeeding Capt. Al-
bert L. DeTreville.


FORMER AIMTEUR GOLF
CHAMP REPORTS HERE
Major Harrison R. Johnson,
former national amateur golf
champion, has reported for duty
at Tyndall Field and has been
assigned to the Department of
Training. Major Johnson was
known to' the sports world as
Jimny Johnson. He came here
from Turner Field, Albany, Ga.,
where he was Special Services
Officer.
In Charge of Beach


LT. RALPH HUNN
In charge of the job of irm-
proving Tyndall Field's bath-
ing beach, which will be form-
ally opened tomorrow, is Lt.
Ralph Hunn, assistant Athletic
.Officer.


May 1, 1943


Paze 3


THM IrVNnAT.T. TARGET







Pap e 4 THE TYNDALL TARGET


Typical G.I. was.the reaction
of Tyndall men to the mess
halls' meal at noon on Tuesday
last. (Unfortunately, it was
"Saltless Tuesday"). Always
quick to gripe and criticize,
we discovered that many of us
can be just as quick at giving
credit when and where it's due.
The meal included everything
from roast beef to fruit salad
and met with the greatest pop-
ular acclaim ever given to any
person or object on this field.
Even S-2's pompous T/Sgt.
EARL TUInWELL confided to his
friends that the meal was one
of the finest he had ever had.
And getting a recommendation
like that from BOCTVELL is far
more difficult than getting an
excuse from P.T.!
Sgt. ('Call me Harry') BER-
NARD BACKER of the D.T. intends
to make use of the marriage
license that he has been carry-
ing around if his May fur-
lough is okayed.
Now that S/Sgt. GIIMORE is
back it will be a three-corner-
ed race between him, S/Sgt.
LIES and T/Sgt. STONE as to
who will take up most of BETTY
JOE TEMPLE's time. (The "snow-
ing" process will probably be
stepped up a bit in view of the
pending move by the Civilian
Employment Office to new quart-
ers at the gate).
And for immediate notoriety,
and comments we recommend one
of those 'repulsive' haircuts.

Bluebirds
Every squadron has its own
prize clown and cut-up. We
had one until last week. Cpl.
A.J. SNEAD, our Target report-
er and all-around good sport,
has been transferred to a new
command. We're going to miss
"Boots" because, despite his
pestering andnagging for 3-day
passes and such, hewas a great
guy to have around. We all
wish him the best of luck.
After viewing Sgt. CHOPE and


Lt. HAGAN th"E" flag twice
did win--and about his victor-
ies raised such a din. He
feared the publicity of Capt.
BRUNNER's prayer for rain made
his outfit's achievement appear
in vain. And to all who'll
listen he says, "I'll wager
that they're waiting for the
flag to be won by a major!
Lt. FOWLER, Apalach's Direc-
tor of Training is keeping
his gunners' aim from waning--
by a plan unusually wise. He
recommends PallMalls for hits,
KING size.
Major HUNTER of the Student
Group was given a chance to
fly the coop. To the 69th he
went as the C.O. and the new
position should keep him on
the go not tne least of his
worries being barracks neat -
and checking G.I.s who dodgr
retreat.
'Tis said that pilots who
seem to be in a fix from in-
ability to manage an AT-6 will
soon be issued stubs giving
them access to Piper Cubs!
Lt. JOHNSON and FAY MERCER
have been together much, of
late yet, on Sunday, Fay to
Gadsden, Alabama, went on a
date, while Lt. Johnson called
Pensacola several times and
he didn't deposit coins just
to hear the chimes. It seems
he knows a nurse in the naval
town who is good at lifting
spirits when they're down..
.Safety in numbers is good ad-
vice no doubt, but why bother
with numbers when you can date
the girl who gives them out?
(The Substitute Taler)


~~LI A I I ~ A L


SUB-DEPOT EMPLOYEE BUYS
22,000 WORTH OF BONDS
A War Bond campaign with a
1-A priority has just been com-
pleted by Tyndall's Sub-Depot
organization. The goal of the
campaign was 100% subscription
of AT LEAST 10% of each em-
ployee's earnings. While a
late check-up revealed that
75% of the personnel had sign-
ed up, applications are still
pouring in.
Top honors for the week go
to Paul C. Gilstrap who, in
addition to his regular pur-
chases of bonds by payroll de-
duction, bought $2,000 worth


of bonds for cash. Mr. Gil-
strap is employed in the wood-
shop of the engineering depart-
ment.

KAPPA SIGMA FRATERNITY
OFFICERS ASKED TO MEET
Lt. Charles F. Whitlock, Post
Automotive Officer, is inter-
ested in getting in touch with
Tyndall officers who are mem-
bers of the Kappa Sigma Frater-
nity.
The Lieutenant plans to form
a Kappa Sigma Clut and requests
that officers who are members
of the fraternity call him at
the B.O.Q. or at #3260.


I YN ALL UMMY.


THINK WE SHOULD GO
FOR THIS, JUP? IT COULD NAW,T'S NO
BE A TRICK,YOU KNOW TRICK. THOSE
WE CAN'T AFFORD TO TAKE RATS W)ULPN'T
A CHANCE NOW. WE'RE- BOTHER THIS
TOO CLOSE- MUCH TO GET
us, PAL.


the job he did at painting the
supply room walls, it is hard
to tell which got the most
paint, the walls or CHOPE.
M/Sgt. HARRELSON andhis crew
on the line rate a brisk sa-
lute for tAeir excellent per-
formance at last Saturday's
inspection. Who says that we
haven't got the best grease
monkeys on the field?
PERSONALITIES: S/Sgt. GEORGE
V. MICHAEL was born in the lit-
tle town of Mobile, Alabama,
on October 7, 1920. He en-
listed n July 22, 1941 and was
17 pounds overweight at the
time but the Army overlooked
it. He came into the squadron
at Maxwell Field in August,
1941 and has been with us ever
since. His present position
is that of a mechanic in the
maintenance hangar.
-Sgt. W.R. Dufrane


LEDBETTE


m


I


Page 4


THE TYNDAT, TARGET






Mayf 1. 194f


SGT.


THE TYNDALL TARGET


BREWER REMAINS uIcy BRWER,
LYND LEAVES the man "4o has
set more fem-
inine hearts aflutter than any-
one in Georgia, So. Carolina
and Alabama, says that it's a
gift with him. Before enlist-
ing he was known by many of
is followers as the "Cosmo-
politan lover."
Sgt. LYND the jovial little
lad from the Medics, leaves
soon for further learning in
laboratory work. We wonder if
LYND, before departing, could
mix the proper ingredients nec-
essary to restore AI-EN back
to normal?


CLOWNS The Ordnance Twins,
better known as "KILL-
INGSWOBTH and IANGE," would be
a smash hit in vaudeville.
It's worth the price of admis-
sion alone just to look at
than they are that comical.
RULER OF The latest form of
THE RING exercise to fill up
the time between fly-
ing missions was inaugurated
recently by F/Os MIHIFEID and
RIDENOUR. The game is none
other than that childhood de-
light -marbles! RIDENOUR dis-
played remarkable accuracy as
he made one direct hit after
another, knocking as many as
two marbles out of the ring
with a single shot.
PINION SAMMY PINION former-
DROPS BY ly of the 915th F.G.
T.S., passed through
the other day. He's now a
2nd Lieutenant, and will be
stationed at Fort Myers as di-
rector of physical training.
H.Q. BANTER Up around the mes-
sage center there
is a cage being constructed
to keep "Irish" O'CONNOR at
home. The boy must have some-
thin on the ball for Uncle
Sam to go to all that trouble
and expense.
A fugitive from a butcher's
fat can, Herr SCROEDER has been
called "a jolly little lad."
Could it be that the lady who
described him thuslyis in need
of a visit to the optometrist?
And after glancing over SCHROE-
DER'S physique, there can beno
doubt about Jt..
MESS ING Sgt. BAUSTIN, our mess
sergeant, has design-
ed a new system of feeding
which goes under the name of
"Cafeteria Style." The only
difference between our cafe-
teria and the one in town is
that we have no price tags or


Available from Commercial


ration points to deal with.
Also, if the boys are real
good, they are permitted to go
back for seconds without any
additional fee.
UTES BILLED F/O "The Shadow"
UTES was billed
$4.00 for one bag of cement
to repair the damage done to
the ramp where his pet, "Spade
Nose Gremlin was playing on
Friday, April 16th.

COURT SESSIONS The bankers
MOVE TO LINE league up at
headquarters
received a jolt this morning
when their ace group of squad-
ron duty men were assigned to
the line. The extended working
day has caused "J. P. Morgan"
BUDA to change the scene of
his court sessions from a bar-
racks to the line.
"AIR FORCE" On Tuesday, the
RE-ENACTED 13th, "Air Force"
was shown at F/O
RIIENOIR'S cinema and on Wed-
nesday the 14th, a re-enact-
ment of the picture took place
in Zone 1. Result: Four fast
AT 6's were shot downin flames
over the first channel and
four pilots were "shot up with
flames" by the squadron lead-
er. "We couldn't help it,
Boss, we were just preparing
for combat."


WEDDING BELLS The chimes will
AND RIPLEY ring like they
never rang be-
fore when Sgt. ROISTAD trucks
down the sacred aisle with a
local belle on the 8th.
That perfect specimen of
health, JOHNNIE SURATT, baf-
fled science when he passed
his examination for aviation
cadet training. Ripley should
hear about this one.
WILSON AND FA CHARLES WILSON,
MUMPS PART now fully recover-
ed from his recent
siege of mumps, is back in the
fold after an absence of ten
days. Just for curiosity, the
boys are asking which side he
had them on...M/Sgt. PASSWATERS
ties the bottom of his fatigue
suit around his ankles to keep
the draft out. Amazing are the
things that are being done
these days.
NO TECH A recent report from
ORDERS M/Sgt. RENO, one of
the able-bodied Post
Inspectors a T/F, read as fol-
lows: "...pools of water form-
ing due to the leakage of Coca
Cola machine." We're sorry,
Sarge, but this will have to
be taken up with the local coke
company, as there aren't any
tech orders on file dealing
with repairs of soft drink
coolers.


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rejISH" O'CONNOR
JAMES- ISH C0 1
Corresponden


--


A whiff of good news that
should lighten the heart of
many true Guardians is that
rating openings are scheduled
to make their appearance in
the very near future. There
hasn't been the slightest ves-
tige of a new stripe around
these parts for eight months.
To say that the lifting of the
drought will be more than wel-
cane is still an understate-
met.
BANTER T/St. PRICE, our
personnel clerk, is leaving on
furlough soon and he will be
missed'by the gals at Personnel.
Ass't clerk MASHBURN is will-
ingto take over, and it's O.K.
by PRICE except for "Gertie."
...Sgt. BEITEL is sweating out
O.O.S. and we're rootin' for
him...Pvts. MATCIEY and MUL-
LANEY are going Port St. Joe
crazy. They spend most of
their leisure time (?) there.
Pvts. SASSO and MOFBSCO are
driving their roommates insane
with their constant "Sta Mati-
na" talk...Pvt. MODIA is try-
ig to form a baseball team
d claims that when his team
is in shape it will be better
than the regular post nine.
The latest pair to indulge
in letters to the Lonely Hearts
Club is Pvts. FERGUSON and J.
GRAFFE...Pfc. J. Fox writes us
that he is getting along fine
at the A.M. school.
MAN OF TIE WEEK: This week
we are acknowledging the out-
standing ability of our squad-
ron clerk, Sgt. EMER MORRIS.
I.MER has been our "pencil
pusher" for almost a year and
a half and is classed as one
of the best clerks on the
field.
He's been under a nervous
strain for quite a while but
everything is dandy now that
his wife gave birth to a baby
girl. One well-known charact-
eristic of EMER'S is that he
will do you a favor if it is
at all possible. Incidentally,
MORRIS can name ball players,
their positions, batting aver-
ages, etc., of teams that were
playing when you wore short
pants. -Cpl. Sam Marotta
Domestic Soul: 'The way to a
man's heart is through his
stomach.'
Warm one: 'Yes, but when one
has sex appeal why bother to
make that detour?'






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May 1, 1943 THE TYNDAiL TARGET Page 7


Quarter matter


KUARTERMASTER KHAKI KHORUS DUTIES


CHIEF CLERK OF Q.9. OFFICE


Mrs. Hasel Thompson


CHIEF CLERK OF QM OFFICE
HAS LONG SERVICE RECORD
Right up front in the Quart-
ermaster Office sits a smiling,
efficient example of the wo-
's part in this man's Army.
s. Hazel H. Thompson, chief
erk of the M Office, is
able to boast a longer service
record than most of the men on
Tyndall Field.
Ever since the Fall of 1933,
when she was "inducted" at Fort
Oglethorpe, Georgia, she has
been a "Government Gal." Her
record reads like the history
of an adolescing army. At
Fort Oglethorpe she was initi-
ated into the headquarters of
the Sixth Cavalry and District
C" of the CCC which had 92
camps under its wing.
This meant that approximate-
ly 18,000 young men had to be
clothed, fed and housed. Mrs.
Thompson's part in this hercu-
lean task was played in the
role of Mail & Records Clerk
Assistant to the Chief Clerk
ad Secretary to the Quarter-
ter. It wasn't 'til Octo-
er, 1941, that she received
er shipping orders.
Anyone who has been fortu-
nate enough to see Camp Forrest,
Tennessee, in all its gracious
glory of 1943 would find it
hard to visualize that in 1941
it was nothing but acre upon
acre of wilderness and swamp
roots. That's how Mrs. Thomp-
son found it on her arrival.
From this mighty site, Mrs.
Thompson organized an office,
hired personnel, bought fur-
niture and office machines and
generally transformed a Nation-
al Guard tent camp into a mod-
ern, streamlined headquarters.
In all this long grind Hazel
has found only a few days for
vacations at her home in Chat-
tanooga. Her husband is in
foreign service with the En-
gineers.
Here at Tyndall, Mrs. Thomp-
son executes her duties with a
grace and ease that only serve
to heighten her efficiency as
the coordinator of all Quart-
ermaster units on the field.
Mrs. Th(opson was with Col.
Moore for six years at Ogle-
thorpe and has been with him
at Tyndall since Oct., 1942.
The past ten years have been
hectic ones for Mrs. Thompson
but like a true "Government
Gal" she has taken every hur-
dle in stride. We salute her
for being a real soldier.


FROM THE shades of gloom set-
SQADRO tied slowly over the
QUADON bastions of Bay #8
last week when Pfc. JOHN J.
BARRY of Jersey City, lost his
hill billy to the WAVES...But
the addition of Pfc. RED AITORD
to the bay's roster helped
somewhat in restoring peace.
Cpl. FRANCIS IAFAYEITE JONES,
well known man about St. Joe,
is earnestly fostering a whis-
pering campaign to make it
known that Sgt. JACK ATKINSON,
formerly of the Shipyard's nite
shift, is or should be basking
in the balmy rays of matri-
mony...Sgt. CIAIR HENIERSON is
becoming quite a Gulliver, what
with nightly trips to P.C. and
St. Joe.
Pfcs. GEORGE HAIL and GORDON
E. WEAVER sacrificed ole man
romance to Demon Rum last Sat-
urday night, involuntarily, of
course...Cpl. JUNIOR VARNELL
has been sorting his mail try-
ing to salvage a few choice
phrases here's a suggestion:
"About you Kacky, I am wacky,"
-no?...S/Sgt. POR ER, WAIDON,
no "E", should by this time be
joined by the rest of the Por-
ter clan if all has gone well
with the West Bay bridge.
With T/Sgt. ASHBY headed for
OCS, it is rumored that Pfc.
LEO DeDILF WOIFD is campaign-
ing for the position with the
slogan, "A chambermaid for ev-
ery bay."...Pfc. WEISS is mak-
ing full use of his franking
privilegeby composing an aver-
age f twelve letters per diem.
Pfc. EVERFITE EUGENE STARNES
has imposed a ten day self-re-
striction after attending the
movie-of-the-month at the Post
Theatre last Saturday....Now
that the latrine has been reno-
vated, rumors are the vogue,
especially those about a-new
TO...IfCpl. SAMMY ACKERMAN can
last through another chow line
he is destined for Rail Trans-
portation. The Bay Line can'
use a good station caller, -
and the QM can use a new name
caller the one they have
now is ALL, washed up.


SUNDAY, MONDAY, May 2-8 "Hit Parade of
TUESDAY, May 4 "He Hired the Boss"


WEDNESDAY, May 5 "Prid
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, May 6-7


RITZ
SUNDAY TUESDAY, May 2-4
"Keeper of the Flame"
Katherine Repburn S.


e of the Yankees
"The Moon Is


Tracy


WEDNESDAY, May 5
"Chetniks"
Philip Dorn Virginia Gilmore
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, May 6-7
"Two Weeks to Live"
Lum and Abner
SATURDAY, May 8
"Cheyenne Ronndup"
Johnny Mack Brown
LATE SHOW SATURDAY NIGHT
"Tennessee Johnson"
Van Heflin Ruth Hussey


1948"


John Carroll Susan Hayward


Stuart Brvin Evelyn Venable
" Gary Cooper Teresa Vright
Down" Sir Cedric Hardwicke


_ Ix


PANAMA
SUNDAY, MONDAY, May 2-3
"Lucky Jordan"
Alan Ladd Helen Walker
TUESDAY, May 4
"Scattergood Survives"
Guy Kibbee Margaret Hayes
WEDNESDAY, May 5
"Calling Dr. Gillespie"
Lionel Barrymore Philip Dora
THURSDAY, May 6
"Jackass Mail"
Wallace Beery Marjorie Mais
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, Mai 7-8
"Mysterious Rider
Buster Crabbe


MOVIES

FOR THIS WEEK

--POST THEATRE


May 1, 1943


Page 7


THE TYNDAiLL TARGET


"'" ~ ""*-""""- _--- --~ 11'.y r
SLast Friday night Tyndall Field's recreation hall was the
scene of a gala extravaganza presented by Col. Moore's 907th
Quartermaster Detachment in line with Special Service's dance-
entertainment program. In cooperating with Captain Freeman,
Special Service Officer, and the USO, the QM's staged a variety
show the like of which has seldom been seen west of Broadway.
Led by Cpl. Dave Savino as master of ceremonies, the men got
off to a rollicking start with a chorus of six hefty "chorines"
camouflaged as "The Quartermaster Burley Gurleys" who perform-
ed an intricate ballet number. In rapid-fire succession, a
barber shop trio -- The Three T's, T/5 Lefty Nolan, T/4th John
King, and T/3 Paul Hemsoth -- encored with a community sing
followed by Sgt. John MacBeth hamming Shakespeare as it has
never been hammed before. John King returned to the footlights
as something bordering on Vera Zorina, complete with high kicks
and graceful turns.
A dramatic presentation by the Quartermaster Art and Ale
Club had the large audience almost literally floating down
the aisle as it gave a premier performance of "Home at Its
Homliest," a tale of woe and whiskey. To ease the tension, a
quartette of singers drafted from the Motor Pool and the 30th
Aviation Squadron offered a group of spirituals.
Mr. Al Oromaner, judo expert extraordinary, climaxed the
show with an exhibition of Jiu-Jitsu using T/3 C.J. Mitchell
as assistant. In a grand finale, the entire cast ensembled
for a farewell parodied on "Thanks for the Memory."
Throughout the performance innumerable stooges lent madcap
mirth and merriment in the persons of Sgt. Don Calabrese, Cpls.
E.R. Smith and Sam Ackerman, Pfcs. Leo D. Wolford and George
Thornton. The entire production was directed by Lt. Jack Gold-
smith, Company Commander, and the costumes were by the girls
of the Quartermaster Office staff.


T. J







Page 8

CAPTAIN BRUNNER OFFERS
TO HELP START VICTORY
GARDENS FOR SQUADRONS

Will Clear Ground for
Organizations or
Individuals

The War Dept. in a recently
promulgated regulation has tak-
en official cognizance of vic-
tory gardens and used language
encouraging the cultivation of
crops solely for the use of
soldiers.
Captain Charles F. Brunner,
Tyndall Field engineering of-
ficer and "father" of its veg-
etable gardens, has interpret-
ed the War Dept. ruling to
mean that ground shall be made
available to any squadron or
individual on the field who
might wish to cultivate a plot.
"We have plenty of available
rich soil and we will clear it
and make it ready for any
group or any soldier or civil-
ian residing on the post who
wishes to till a small or a
large garden," Captain Brunner
said.
His telephone is 2118.


Zebras
The newly formed "Repulsive
Club" is a clear thing says
Cpl. GOODMAN. It keeps the
women of Panama City away in
droves. The only entrance re-
quirementis a super G.I. hair-
cut. Besides Cpl. GOODMAN,
the club's roster includes such
notables as Sgts. MYERS, MOR-
RISON, BERRY, and GRIBBLE.
Sgt. BERRY, the club's Ges-
tapo Chief, is casting an anx-
ious eye in the direction of
T/Sgt. MLEITER who has inti-
mated that he does not look
with favor upon his invitation
to join the club.
Sgt. B.G. BACKER, ("Call Me
Harry!"), has been carrying a
wedding license in his pocket
for some time now but he's
finally confided that he will
use it to good advantage on
May 10th, providing his fur-
lough comes through.
With all the packages coming
in lately, the boys have been
eating pretty good especially
the mail orderly.
-S/Sgt. Franklin
Chains can't keep anyone from
slipping in a parked car.


A PLYER'S PRAYER


Under the shadow of Thy wtngs,
Protect us, Lord,
Thou master of all flying things!
Extend Thy might
And guard us as we ply
The lon bleak stretches of the nltht,
Protagonists of lao
And immemorial right.

And from the hunter's snare
Deliver us!
The high-flung nets of light.
The shrapnel's u ly spite,
The lurking kite,
And peril instant everLwhere.

If, errand done,
With pinions maimed and crew forespent,
There rests
No hone to reach the kindly nests
Where blithely strns
The guardian seas about our home,
0 gather us yet closer, Lord,
Content,
Beneath the shadow of Thy saving wings.


c <~z~it\:
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i' ....~
:b
;.:i~
e~~ ~ ....i; ii


SUNDAY
8:00
9:00
10:00
10:00
11:00
11:15
7:00
TUESDAY
5:30
6:30
7:00


A.M...............Mass
A.M....Protestant Sun-
day School.
A.M....Gunners Mass at
Theatre.
A.M ....Protestant Wor-
ship Service.
A. M..Gunners Protest-
ant Service.
A.M...............Mass
P.M....Evening Worship
P.M ..............Mass
P.M..Instruction Class
P.M....Fellowship Club


43-17 DINED, ENTERTAINED
The newly graduated gunners
of Class 43-17 celebrated the
successful completion of their
course with a dinner at the
students' mess hall last Mon-
day evening.
Following the mess hall feast
the boys adjourned to the Rec-
reation Hall where they were
entertained by a 15 piece band
from Tyndall's musical organi-
zation.
The dinner and the "Rec"
Hall entertainment were made
possible through the coopera-


WEDNESDAY
12:15 P.M...Civilian Worship
Service.
5:30 P.M...............Mass
':00 P.M....Choir Rehearsal
THURSDAY
5:30 P.M .. ........... Mass
6:30 P.M.. Instruction Class
FRIDAY
5:30 P.M...............Mass
6:30 P.M.....Jewish Service
SATURDAY
5:30 P.M ..............Mass
7:00 P.M........Confessions


McCfELLAND PARTICIPATES
Chaplain Chester R. McClel-
land, of Dallas, Texas, read
the invocation at the Easter
sunrise services held in Lon-
don's Hyde Park last Sunday.
Chaplain McClelland was one
of the first Chaplains to be
assigned to Tyndall Field. He
left here for service with
troops abroad early last sum-
mer.
tion of Capt. Casey and Lt.
Gaines of the Mess Office and
Capt. Freeman, Special Service
Officer.


WOULD GIVE THREE YEARS'

PAY TO SERVICE MEN IF

WAR ENDS NEXT YEAR

Louisiana Congressman
Introduces "Victory
'Bonus" Bill

Introduced in the House last
week was a bill which would
give a bonus of three years'
pay to members of the armed
forces if they'll just hurry
up and beat the Axis on or be-
fore April 16, 1944.
If it takes two more years-
until April 16, 1945, Cong-
ressman Morrison of Louisiana,
who introduced the bill, pro-
posed that each serviceman get
two years' pay as a bonus,
the Army Times reported.
The Congressman figured that
carrying out his idea would
cost about $30 billion.


Brown Bombers
The new USO Club was formal-
ly dedicated on Easter Sunday
and about 90% of the squadron
was present for the ceremonies.
Major FLEMING hurried back fran
leave to be with us, after
having said goodbye to Lt. F.
M. FIEMING, Jr., of the Field
Artillery.
Construction on the "rec"
hall is progressing and the
boys are looking forward to
the prospect of additional rec-
reational facilities. Mean-
while, the new pool table is
getting a big play, and a sec-
ond one isunder consideration.
Speaking of pool, ERWIN RUD-
OLPH'S recent demonstration was
well enjoyed byall except Pvt.
WALTER J. MUDD, who was picked
as his opponent. MUDD broke,
and then carried the cue stick
in his hands for the rest of
the evening.
More than sixty men have
turned out for our post base-
ball team. Practice sessions
are held daily and uniforms
are expected to arrive soon.
Lt. S. J. DRONG(COWI stated
that a schedule will be re-
leased within the next few
weeks.
Cpl. CARTER has taken off on
another furlough and we've got
an idea that he was weighing
the advantages and dis-advan-
tages of matrimony...More pos-
itive was Pvt. ELTON BROWN who
took off with that specific
purpose in mind. We haven't
heard from him since.
-Pfc. H.H. Willis

BIRTHS
Rabren
Pvt. James M. Rabren, 69th,
and Mrs. Rabren, who lives in
Andalusia, Ala., are parents
of a nine pound son born in
Andalusia on April 15. Pvt.
Rabren works in the Post Ad-
ministrative Inspector's of-
fice.

They say that Daytona Beach,
where 10,000 Waacs are train-
ing. resembles Old MacDonald's
Farm: A Waac-Waac here, a
Waac-Waac -there, here a Waac,
there a Waac, everywhere a
Waac-Waac, etc.







M 1 T -L$J..Jt.atI 4 v -


ATTENDANCE OF GIRLS AT
REC HALL DANCES HAS
TRIPLED IN 60 DAYS

Victorettes, Band and
Squadrons Get Credit
For Better Parties

By THE SPECIAL SERVICES OFFICE
More than three times as many
girls have turned out for the
last two Friday night dances
han two months ago. A pro-
portionate increase has beer
observed in the number and en-
thusiasm of the men.
Three distinct groups de-
serve credit for this success.
First, the Victorettes and
their patronesses have res-
ponded in a splendid manner.
In the second place, the big
dance band has caught the new
spirit and, by offering really
excellent music, does more
than its share to add to the
fun. The last and by far the
most important factor has been
the fine work performed by the
various squadrons which have
served as hosts and sponsors.
I All the squadrons so far have
done a grand job in this role.
Obviously their efforts have
varied somewhat with the amount
of real talent on hand within
the organizations, but a grat-
ifying display of unselfish-
ness on the part of all groups
has made up for any dearth of
talent.
Whenever a winner is chosen,
some feelings may be hurt. At
the risk of such a disaster,
but prompted by a desire to
give all credit where it is
due, the crown for the best
performance to date goes to
the CM Company. Here is a per-
fect example of what a group
of men can do if they put their
minds to it. There is not one
bit of outstanding talent in
the outfit, but under the lead-
ership of Lt. Jack Goldsmith
they put on a show that had
their guests howling with joy
and screaming for more. Their
time for rehearsal was as lim-
ited as any other group on the
field, but by sheer effort and
enthusiasm they "gave out"
with the best show ever seen
in the Recreation Hall.
All this proves that it can
be done, and if we continue to
perform as well as all the
squadrons have done so far,
still greater improvement in
the parties is in store.


ND LEADER REPORTS
OR DUTY HERE
Warrant Officer (jg) John M.
Missal, a band leader, has re-
ported for duty with Tyndall's
AAF Band.
Mr. Missal formerly was con-
ductor of the Albuquerque, N.M.,'
Philharmonic Orchestra. He is
listed in "Who's Who of Ameri-
can Composers," is a concert
violinist. He was graduated
from the University of Roches-
ter as a BM and from the East-
man School of Music there with
a MM degree.


The Yardbird SEZ2
Great Day! The ole Yardbird has sho me ovur an thin they throwed me inter


bin used up this weak i sho has. I got
me a weak end pass an eesed inter town
ter have a littel fun,
an fur the furst fuw \
hours I sho did have fun. I
Thin jest whin i wuz
feeling rite gay I heers
that voise that i is be- -
ginning to no so well
say, hay, bud. Sho nuff,
there wuz that littel,
shawt, nise talking MP an
he tuk me around ter the
armury reel kwik like an they tuk ma
twu pints uv rum off'n me an ma pass, an


the jug.


I sho wished they hadn't dun


that on account uv it wuz all reddy
plum full uv drunk saylors an cummandos
an i believe there wuz a sick mareen in
the crowd, too. Thim peepul nevur kept


still all nite.


Whut with the saylors


singin Iff'n i had the wings uv an an-
gel, an the cummandos practisin their
tackticks on the mareen evur time he
got sick, an the big ole noncum whut
didn't try ter git along with nobudy I
spint'a mity rugged nite. An besides I
Swuz wurried aboot whut wuz happening ter


ma twu pints uv rum.


I'm still awund-


erin. Well, I reckon i'd better be a-


the feller frum the medikul core worked goin The Yardbird (No. 1)


We recently received the fol-
lowing letter, of which we are
justly proud, from Major Dodge
of the Civil Air Patrol:
"Dear Major Mitchell,
I wish to thank you for the
prompt and efficient action
rendered by yourself and the
officers under your command,
namely, Captain John r. Ward,
Lt. Leonard M. Glauser, Lt.
John W. Roberts, Sgt. Harry P.
Burnett and Sgt. Luther Ratley,
in removing an explosive from
one of our wrecked airplanes
at this base on Apr1i 3.
The promptness and efficiency
plus the skillful knowledge
shown by these men is worthy
of commendation, and I am using
this means to advise you that
besides the above attributes,,
these men were also placed in
a very dangerous position. Had
it not been for the fact that
they possessed previous inten-
sive training on this type of
work, disastrous consequences
might have resulted."
FROM THE Cpl. NICK (Papooski)
SQUADRON PAPPAS, the Ordnance'
Atlas, is back from
gunnery school, his chest spr-
outing silver wings. He also
brought back a healthy tan, a
Texas drawl and stories that
make strong men weak and weak
men faint. Counting Major S.
Mitchell, we now have two full
fledged gunners, and Sgt. HES-
TER NICK "is in the midst of
the same course.
Sgt. CAPPIELID, 'tis report-
ed, has seen the stork survey-
ing his house. Hope it's a
boy, CAPPY, if the Mrs. doesn't
mind a boy.
We just heard about the PX
Romeo who blushes so much when
talking to certain PXette that
they use his face to fry eggs
on. The fellows call him Sgt.
FRANK "Beets" STRAKAL....And
Sgt. WEISS likes this one:
customer 'And how s your ice-
cream today?'
Clerk 'As pure as the girl
of your dreams.'
Customer 'I'll take a pack
of Camels.'
(Sgts. Pnnzio and Witham)


ORDNOTES


T/3 Kartin Asony


T/3 Jack D. Grant


i/i


Pictured above are two of the chief men of the Ordnance Arm-
ament Shop whose job it is to see that the guns used in train-
ing aerial gunners at this station are kept in operation.
To one unfamiliar with the details of Ordnance maintenance,
this may not seem like a very difficult task, but it is un-
doubtedly one of the most important functions at any gunnery
school. Due to the extremely large amount of ammunition al-
lotted to each student, all candidates get plenty of opportun-
ity to strut their stuff behind a gun. And when a graduate
gunner leaves this field, firing a twin thirty or fifty has
become second nature.
This increased firing not only gives Uncle Sam a first rate
gunner, but also results in greater wear and tear on the guns.
This is where Sgts. Ansony and Grant step in, for they and the
capable men under them see to it that all guns are stripped
daily, oiled, cleaned and repairs made if necessary. When
this process is multiplied by several hundred guns, one begins
to get a small idea of MAINTENANCE.
These technician sergeants are only two of the Ordnance
Department's carefully schooled, highly trained men. There
are thousands like them scattered to every corner of the world,
not only maintaining equipment but also winning combat honors.
Sgt. Ansony is a native of New Jersey, is married and lives
in Cove Gardens with Mrs. Ansony and their pride and joy, Mar-
tin, Jr. Sgt. Grant hails from Indiana, is also married, but
has yet to celebrate his first wedding anniversary.


TO FORb DRAMATIC ORGANIZATION
A meeting to form a dramatic
and musical show organization
will be held at 5:30 P.M.,
Thursday, May 6, in the Spec-
ial Service Office.
Lt. Jack Goldsmith and W/O


J.M. Missal are to be direct-
ors.


'Hnmm, you're an apt lad.
your sister apt, too?'
'YesN, Sir, if she gets
chance.'


Page 9


Ma 1 1943


TH YN IL TARGET








gn~ IA T1YT TYNDALL TARGET


SHIPYARD TOMORROW


TYNDALL FIELD'S BASEBALL T

Scheduled for 2 P.M.


On Local Diamond


Another Sunday afternoon baseball game on the Tyn-
dall Field diamond in the rear of the PX is on the
Tyndall Tornadoes' schedule for tomorrow. Their op-
ponents will be the fast Wainwright Shipyard outfit. The game
is scheduled to start at 2 P.M. -
Last Sunday, the Tornadoes
bowed before a Coast Guard KEGLERS BOWL AT MARIANNA TODAY
team which staged a ninth-in- Tyndall's first ten-pin team
ning rally and pushed across left for Marianna today for
six runs to win by an 11 to 7 its initial match with the
score. air base team there.
Lt. Stanley J. Drongowskd, Representing Tyndall Field
post athletic officer and team will be Cpl. Johnny Hnylka,
coach, used three pitchers in acting captain; Pfc. Harry Mil-
a vain attempt to stem the CG ler, Sgt. Clair Henderson, Cpl.
sluggers. On the mound for Max Senkinc, Cpl. A.J. Kocur,
Tyndall were Flanlgan, Shea Sgt. Louis Kottke and S/Sgts.
and Southern. Didier was the Arnold Manning and Harry Van
catcher. Nocheck tossed the Kuren.
entire game for the sailors
with North behind the plate. PX-cerpts
The CG men got 12 hits, Tyn- A cordial wel e is extend
A cordial welcome is extend-
dall 9. Both teams made two ed to MRS. IN JESSE, MS.
errors. ETHEL IEVITT and Lt. JAMES
Thursday, the Coast Guard a- RICKMAN recent additions to
gain visited the field to de-- our office personel...We can
feat a team representing the all stop "sweating" now that
officers, 5 to 4. Capt. J.J. Pfc. SCHILLING got his double
Dangler, on the mound for the stripe.
officers, was tapped for eight to ur OHgan JARIS a newcomer
omcrs, was tape tor eigh to our organization gets the
hits while the officers got credit for the food purchases
but three from Nocheck's which have enabled the Soda
pitching. Lt. Drongowski was Fountain Section to enlarge
behind the plate for Tyndall their selection of foodstuffs
and North for the visitors, now being offered to Tyndall
This afternoon, the team was personnel.
scheduled to go to Marianna to Congratulations again go to
one of our girls, MISS OCIE
play the Air Base team there. GLASS, former MISS WEBB'S
C


EAM


OQ BOWLING QUINTET
WINS CHAMPIONSHIP
Paced by Cpl. George Usher
and team captain Johnny Hnylka,
last year's champion Quarter-
master bowling team clinched
top honors in the Target keg-
ling league as they swept their
three-game match from Ordnance
on the field alleys Thursday
night.
Besting in second place are
the Medic keglers with the Gun-
nermakers a scant two games
behind. Final runner-up and
third place honors depend on
the outcome of the last match,
scheduled to take place Monday
night at Tyndall's new bowling
palace.
How they stand: W L
QUARTERMASTER ....... 22 5
MEDICS.............. 18 9
GUNNERMAKERS ......... 16 11
69TH................. 10 17
FINANCE ............. 9 18
ORDNANCE............ 6 21


TYNDALL


SUMMER SOFTBALL SEASON

GETS UNDER WAY MAY 12
The summer softball season
at Tyndall is set tentatively
to get under way May 12 with
all squadrons on the field
participating In two round rob-
ins running through the latter
part of August.
A cup will go to the winner
of the first round and this
winning squadron team will
meet an all-star team and also
will play a team from the Pen-
sacola Naval Air Station.


1.LassisaLt. OUlC llhas teenI pro-
moted to manager of Branch #2.
Much improvement has already
been made due to her untiring
efforts. We all wish her con-
tinued success.
Yours truly might add that
we had a wonderful vacation in
California. We had a week of
very UNUSUAL weather while we
were out there the sunshine
was liquid. -Mary Stanley

Outraged wife: 'Couldn't you
think of anything better than
coming home in this drunken
condition?'
Erring husband: 'Yes, m'dear,
but she was out of town.'


Cpl. Si Moye of the Tyndall Band receives from Capt. 0.0.
Freeman, Special Services Officer, a trophy for his feat of
winning last Sunday's enlisted men's golf tournament at the
*Panama City Country Club.
Cpl. Moye defeated Pfc. B. Knepper, two up. There were four
flights of eight men each in the tourney.
Interest shown in the meet has resulted in assignment of a
truck to transport golfers to the course each Sunday. It will
leave from in front of Personnel at 8 A.M. Sunday and will
continue to do so as long as enough interest is shown to just-
ify such a service.


vs.


SPORTS
IN BRIEF
Maxie Schmeling, so the Par-
is radio says, has been cap-
tured by the Russians after
being seriously wounded...Den-
tists are thinking about pul-
ling all the teeth of Lynwood
"Schoolboy" Rowe, hoping to
bring back his old form...Ne-J
groes extended their domina-
tion over the national AAU
boxing competition by annexing
6 of the 8 titles...The famous
links of the Augusta National
Golf Club where the Masters
Tournament used to be held is
now a cow pasture.

Bill Corum's idea that the
Army send a planeload of sports
celebrities to Africa & other
spots off the continent where
Yanks are stationed is gaining
support in the War Dept...Sug-
gested to go have been such
servicemen as Lt. Comdr. Jack
Dempsey, Sgt. Joe Louis, Cpl.
Billy Conn, Lt. Benny Leonard,
Pvt. Joe DiMaggio and others.
*
Some people think the base-
ball season may wind up by Ju-
ly 4 due to the manpower shor-
tage...For instance, baseball
players are so scarce in the
Pacific Coast loop that Oak-
land signed two to play only
on Sunday when the team may
be in their respective home-
towns- Sacremento & Frisco...
Manufacturers promise they'll
come up with a suitable plas-
tic substitute for the rubber
golf ball.


Game


CPL. HOYE RECEIVES G. I. GOLF TROPHY


fl f f 2- ,^ '*^"


a rren 101


THE TYNDALL TARGET


-' ~



:^;_ -" ;^ : .. V S' *--- ^3 .t.i ";;'T ;^!-.


















































By S/Sgt. Ray Crow


THE TYNDALL TARGET


YANKWIZ


BOB HAWK Fr '
Quizmster

"THANKS
TO THE YANKS"

Saturday, C B S

1. You've heard the old say-
ing that every time you pull
out a gray hair, two grow back
in. Is it true that two hairs
can grow where one grew before?
2. Do orchids grow wild in
the United States?
3. I have a friend named
Wanda who wants to join the
WAVES. She is 35 years old.
Her husband is a Captain in
the Army and they have a little
girl of 9. Why isn't she eli-
gible?
4. In cookery, how many tea-
spoons are there in a standard
tablespoon?
5. If a clock is ruminng too
slowly, what change should you
make in the length of the pen-


Page 11
m0010-1


THIS WEEK'S X-WORD PUZZLE
A


1. The M-1 ...... is
a good Japanni-
hilator
6. An artillery
salute
11. Our boys in
Australia are
"down ......"
12. This Brigadier
General com-
manded the Red
Army in Tennes-
see maneuvers
13. Military Decora-
tions (abbr.) .
14. Symbol of the
U.S.A.
16. Short road
17. Officers Inspect
Uniforms (abbr.)
19. Something hard
to get: a ......
of tires
20. Same as 19-
Across. but
slightly mixed up
21. Yankee com-
umando
23. This Lieutenant
General com-
mands the Second
Army
D
1. It usually starts
in a shower room
and spreads like
mad
2. Where Gandhi
holds fast
3. First two initials
of your com-
mander-in-chief
4. Ranking General
of the Confed-
erate Army
5. Most valuable
thing about a
pencil these days


20. Military houses
22. Goldbricks ain't
Engineers
23. Axis weapon
25. What goldbricks
fear more than
serpents' venoms
is to have to don
their working
26. These kind of
eyes are smiling
on part of our
A.E.F.
27. What many boys
and girls like
to do together
28. Something about
a Lieutenant
29. Fruits of dicta-
torship: Musso-
lini thought he
had a peach of an


CROSS
24. The Jeep is a
popular one in
the Army
25. Battle sound
26. What 1-Down
usually is
28. Our farmers are
battling the Japa.
nese one
31. What you hear
with backwards
32. ...... Savitt's
orchestra
33. Soldiers are at-
tracted by the
fair one
34. Not out
35. Capital of former
European re-
public
37. Military Enei-
neers (abbr.)
38. U. S. citizens are
collecting lots of
...... metal
40. Officer who
wears a gold oak
leaf
42. Two of these are
better than one
43. The 32-Down
have the wrong
one on a lot of
things
tOWN
6. It's indispensable
to Army messes
7. Army Doctors
Excel (abbr.)
8. Lousy iacrima-
tors (abbr.)
9. This goes with
vice
10. To a guard it's
either general or
special
15. Germany is
minus many here
18. Sam is our favo-
rite one


army. but that
apple-of-his-eye
turned out to be
such a ........ at
throwing "pine-
apples" that it
brought him
nothing but
sour grapes.
30. We'll ..... every
effort until the
32-Down are
whipped
32. And they'll be
whipped, tool
35.'Whet memos are
kept on
36. What Sally is to
a pal
39. Regular Army
(abbr.)
41. What Hitler's
yes-men say


Reprinted from Ft. Wood (Mo.) News

ANSWERS TO QUIZ

1. No. Only one hair can
grow in each follicle.
2. Yes. There are many mem-
bers of the orchid family that
are native to the U.S.
3. Because she has a child
under 18.
4. Three.
5. You should shorten it.
6. The SPARs.
7. All three.
8. She could have been just
smelling it.
9. Beagle English hunting
dog.
bagel hard roll.
bugle horn.


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May 1, 1943


vNVMlUP. STiLE'





//


N"M 4OUK S Lt-
a-d'-
WU. CUT ITI


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dulum?
6. The Army has the WAACs,
the Navy has the WAVEs, what
does the Coast Ouard have?
7. Hens can lay eggs in how
many of these three colors-
white, brown and blue?
8. If a cow's milk is flavor-
ed with garlic, would that
necessarily mean that the cow
had been eating garlic, or
could she have been just smell-
ing it?
9. What is the difference
between a Beagle, a bagel and
a bugle?

S/I F LE E S A L V 0

U AJ & 4 P L FA D

0 / uv/S E T'T r 3 E
4 q A/4 '


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RA q v/ E X
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