Title: Tyndall target
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076230/00036
 Material Information
Title: Tyndall target
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 27-36 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)
Publisher: Public Relations Office, Air Corps Gunnery School
Place of Publication: Tyndall Field Fla
Publication Date: 1942-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City -- Tyndall Air Force Base
Coordinates: 30.078611 x -85.576389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 16, 1942)-
Issuing Body: Issues for May 9, 1942- published by Office of Public Relations, Army Air Forces Gunnery School.
General Note: Title from caption.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076230
Volume ID: VID00036
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24602432

Full Text
















Vol. 1 No. 36 Army Air Forces Gunnery School, Tyndall Field, Fla., Oct. 3, 1942

CLASS 42-40 AWAITS GRADUATION CEREMONIES


Class Officers of '42-40: (L-R) Lt. F.'
A. Jeffries, Lt. D.G. Williams, Capt.
Ammon McClellan and Lt. H.F. West, Pro-
visional Company Commanders; Capt. L.
R. Blackhurst, Class Commander and Lt.
W.R. Koob, Adjutant. Pvt. Gene Gallag-
her, Pres., and A/C James Hackett,
Sec'y.. were not available for photo.


Newly commissioned 2nd Lts. Dick Mahon
and Tom Niolon, ex-Tyndall sergeants
grin broadly as they pose with Mr. Dan
Howell on their recent visit here.


WDLP AND COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM
TO CARRY TOMORROW'S PROGRAM AT 5:30 PM
At 4:15 P.M.,tomorrow, some two hun-
dred and seventy-seven officers and
enlisted men will line up at the Arm-
ory in Panama City in preparation for
their march to the U.S.O. Building.
These men, members of Class '42-40
of Tyndall Field's Gunnery School, will
be wearing silver wings, proud emblems
which distinguish them as full fledged
gunners. Their class is the first to
be presented with the new wings here
at Tyndall Field, and, theirs is the
first gunnery class in the nation to
have their graduation exercises broad-
cast not only throughout the country,
but also to foreign shores via short
wave to the men they will soon join in
knocking the enemy from the skies.
Their radio program, being carried
over C.B.S. networks as a part of the
"Gene Autry" show, will feature a short
address by Colonel Maxwell,. a few words
from Mrs. Dannit Mays, grandmother of
heroic Collin Kelly, a rendition of "He
Wears a Pair of Silver Wings" by the
young lady who first introduced the
song, Mrs. Lulie Jean Price, wife ofLt.
Norman Price of this Field, and Music
by the Tyndall Field Band.

TWO MOBILE RECRUITING UNITS LEAVE HERE
WEDNESDAY FOR TOUR OF NEARBY STATES
As a part of a nation-wide plan to
obtain for the Army Air Forces much
needed technicians and specialists,
Tyndall Field will send out two recruit-
ing units on Wednesday of this week.
The motor caravans will thoroughly
tour the states of Georgia, Alabama and'
Florida, and will probably be on the
road for four weeks.











NO ATHEISTS IN FOX HOLES


Did you read that unforgettable story of Bataan's last days by Lieut. Col.
Warren J. Clear, U.S.A.? He'sthe man who, by federal order, rescued Corregidor's
most secret archives and stacks of gold, fleeing by night in a submarine at the
risk of his own life leaving behind him doomed men without hope, yet keep-
ing the faith even as death neared by the minute.


It's both gallant and horrible beyond all imagining, that story.
they do it? What sustained those starved, wracked bodies, many of them
they waited? Yet there they stayed, disdaining all chance of escape,
laughing as they waited.


How did
dying as
actually


There's one paragraph in Lieut. Col. Warren Clear's recital that seems to
explain it all. He said, and we make the excerpt from the Reader's Digests
"In this fighting, many a soldier came to realize that self-confidence alone
was not enough to sustain the human spirit. I remember jumping into a hole during
a particularly heavy bombing attack. A sergeant crouched lower to make room for
me. Then all hell broke loose and I wasn't surprised to find myself praying out
loud. I heard the sergeant praying, too. When the attack was over, I said
"Sergeant, I noticed you were praying."
"Yes sir," he answered, without batting an eye, "there are no atheists in
fox holes .
"No atheists in fox holes." Sometimes, these days, sneering letters come,
asking me why I believed there is something greater than human greed and cruelty
in this conflict, something that will emerge victoriously in the end, no matter
what price we pay in suffering or sacrifice. Well, there's the answer.
"There are no atheists in fox holesI"
---Elsie Robinsor


Chapel $ service


SfmffAI
8:00
9:00
10:00


11:15 A. M.


--Mass...Chaplain Finnerty
--Protestant Sunday School
--Morning Worship....
Chaplain Wester
--Mass...Chaplain Finnerty


3WD0DA BVENING
8:00 P. M. --Evening Worship...
Chaplain Wester


TUESDAY
7:00 P.M..............Fellowship Club
6:30 P.M...........Instruction Class
WEDNESDAY
6:30 P.M...........October Devotions
7:30 P.M.............Bible Study Hour
THURSDAY
6:30 P.M...........Instruction Class
6:30 P.M.............Jewish Services
6:30 P.M.............Jewish Services


0


;;~5~~












Via V-Mail from England we hear that
2nd Lt. Joseph W. Timberlake, the first
Editor of the Tyndall Target, is now a
Squadron Adjutant, with a flying Major
as Commanding Officer. Lt. Timberlake
left here as a buck sergeant with the
first group to leave this field for
Miami. We believe we are right when
we say he is the first Tyndall Field
enlisted man to arrive overseas as an
officer. He writes that the "sunshine"
in England is only two inches more per
year than Florida's.... Promotions re-
ached Major proportions this week,
with gold leaves falling to Ex-Captains
Fox, Keeny and Wilson. Lt. LeForce,
upped to Captain, now wears twice as
much silver and Panama City's own Cas-
per Harris made 1st Lt., and went off
the gold standard....Captain Ammon Mc-
Clellan, had expected to leave for a
course in fighter control upon his gr-
aduation from the Gunnery School, but
now it looks as though he will he pil-
oting a jeep in the coming recruiting
campaign....The latest rumor that is
awaiting verification from Captain Mi-
tchell is that the Ordnance has on
hand two white enameled Thompson sub-
machine guns for use at Military Wed-
dings....The Editor of the Tyndall
Target wishes to announce to all Squad-
ron Commanders that they may relax now
that their checks to the "SEAAFTC NEWS"
have finally been sent off to Maxwell
Field....SOCIETY NOTEs Lt. Youngberg
came up from Little Siberia (Student
Detachment) to spend a few days in civ-
ilization (Polt Headquarters)....Lt.
Shields keeps a photo of a certain
blonde Tyndallette under his glass pa-
perweight. It seems that gentlemen
still prefer them, and so do Lts....We
hear from down Ft. Meyers way that Lt.
L. R. Thompson has been promoted to
Captain....All Tyndallettes will be
invited to the Bachelor Officer's dance
next Sat. Nite. The theme will be
"May Heaven Protect Our Working Girls."


Wedding bells had hardly time to chime
last Th'-d? v when Staff Sergeant Bob
Fry, of the Service Group, entered in-
to the holy state of matrimony with
personnel's "Jo" Bennetto It culmin-
ated a seventeen-day "snow job" which
in the last few days reached proportions
of a blizzard The BROWNIES extend
congratulations and regrets ..T/Sgte
Johnny Kimbrell is enjoying a vacation
from town this week (he had curfew
trouble). However, he was consoled by
a certain Pt. St. Joe lass who rendez-
voused him every evening at the gate..
We hear that furloughs are ?..i being
allowed, so i s, before pl&.-.'-g your
itinerary for an A.W.O.Lo,.consult your
commanding officer, who might make it
officiall...M/Sgt. Luther Underwood,
the Finance Wizard, spends his lunch
hour over at Post HEo personnel going
over the figures...T/Sgt. Clyde McKey,
(Custodian supply) is being manicured
by his sac ': .. There nothing r F-
starting fru scratcho..An item that
almost escaped us in the recent Tyndall
Field Poll of Special Talents, was the
fact that one f our Weather "prophets",
Pvt. Fred Farr, has studied for the
ballet, and on the slightest provoca-
tion, he will pirouette and bound over
the floors like a wounded gazelle. In-
cidentally, he was anArthur Murray in-
structor for six and one half yeareo
Vance Edwards, the original femniine
heart flutterer of Post Eq. is back a-
gain after a lapse of several months
and his technique has certainly not
suffered during the interim. He seems
to have the message center well under
control.,oSergeant Ralph Boyes, whose
picture appears in this issue, has just
entered the hospital to have a leg ail-
ment mended OGwynne "Sunshine" Spence
is await-i: the dreaded knock of the
"F.Bol" at her door- her story ill be
"speedometer trouble".. Hamburgers took
their toll last week- and those in the
know, know what we meant I fc% b&


DON'T MAKE ANY SLIPS --- Z' ). U L UPS







ALL TARGET


Published every Saturday by the Special Service Section, AAFGS, Tyndall Field, Fla.


SPECIAL SERVICE OFFICER
Captain W. H. Wiseman

ASST'S TO S. S. OFFICER
Pfc. Sam D. Melson
Pfc. William B. Pratt
Pvt. Neil M. Pooser

REPRODUCTION STAFF
M/Sgt. Woodrow W. Busby
Pfc. Francis Churchill
Corp. John Webster
Pfc. Price Terry
Pvt. Everett Tackett


COMMANDING
Col. W. A. Maxwell


COLUMNISTS
The Yardbird
and
The Taler


ART WORK
S/Sgt. Oral Ledbetter
Pvt. Marshall Goodman


EDITOR
Corp. Arnold Milgaten

ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Corp. Saul Samiof


PHOTOGRAPHIC OFFICER
Lt. Joseph A. Dickerman


PHOTOGRAPHIC STAFF
Sgt. William Castle
Pfc. Silas G. Upchurch


TYNDALL TOPICS


Perhaps it isn't quite proper for us to
go about praising a "competitor", but
"YANK", the new Army Newspaper, is just tops
in "G.I." reading entertainment. It has
everything any soldier could ask for- cov-
erage, style and humor, with a capital "H"l
The latest feature of this swell tale
teller is a department called "Post Exchan-
ge." "YANK" wants material from Joe Yard-
bird. "Post Exchange"will publish a smat-
tering of everything- humor, art, poetry,
photographs, news. Anything goes whichthe
editor, Ffc. Byron B. Evans, fancies, ma-
terial from camp newspapers included.
To get his name in "YANK", a soldier need
not be famous. Editor Evans says it's the
idea that counts. Totop it off, something
new in rejection slips will be offered by
"Post Exchange". As the editor puts it,
"If no spot can be found for a soldier's
contribution, he wins anyway. In the first
mail, he'll receive the most handsome re-
jection slip ever sent out byany heartless
publication, suitable for pasting up be-
side that picture of Jane Russell."
Contributions should be addressed to
"Post Exchange," c/o "YANK", 205 E. 42nd
St., New York City, N.Y. "YANK's" is one
PX which never closes for inventory
Of course there is a motive behind our
request that everybody get busy and send
"Post Exchange" some of your stuff, -you
see, we've got a nice blank space next to
our picture of Jane Russell and we'll glad-
ly make a trade with the first Tyndall man
who receives one of those handsome rejec-
tion slips- his picture gets in the "TAR-
GET" if he gives us his "slip"I


We were kind of raked over the coals by
Captain Hinchman, Post Mess Officer, this
week. The Captain claimed that some of our
recent remarks concerning the mess halls
and the food were unjust and uncalled for.
Whatever these remarks were, they were
in no way intended to be personal, and we
hope that the Captain did not take them as
such. However, we decided to look into
the mess situation from a yardbird's point
of view and find out whether or not our
allusions were justified.
Of the fifty soldiers that we questioned,,
half said that the quality of the food had
improved. All fifty agreed that there was
100% improvement in the cleanliness and
service. Upon the invitation of Lt. A. C.
Miller, we inspected Mess Hall No. 1 behind
the scenes. We left there convinced that
every possible effort was being made to
keep the trays, silverware, dishes, floors
and mess hall in general, spotlessly clean.
As for the quality of the food, if it
seems to fall below par occasionally, we've
got to realize that the mess officers can
not be held to blame, as foodstuffs and
their transportation present a serious
problem in this section of the country.
When told about complaints bylate comers
of finding substitutes for the original
fare, Lt. Miller admitted that sudden chang-
es in personnel and the failure of the men
to eat in their assigned mess halls made it
difficult to judge closely and correctly.
So, gripe if you want to, men, but remem-
ber that the mess officers are doing their
best at a thankless task, and keep in mind
that thousands of our boys are wishing they
had a mess hall to gripe about












THE RUGGED "69TH"

Song To Tyndall Field


Oh, Tyndall Field, so vast and great,
You are our home in this grand old State.
I love your buildings, noble, sublime,
That stand the weather and wear of time.
I love to live beside the sea
And have the breezes bring to me
A message from the great unknown-
Where Crusoe dwelt on his isle, alone.
I love to lie among the pines
And dream of peace in other times.
I love to know that all around
Contentment, joy and happiness abound.
This is the Field of which the Poets sing,
Their praises through the years will ring.
And like the queen of this noble land,
Tyndall Field by the sea will stand--
And to this Field from far and near,
Each passing day, and month, and year,
Men will swiftly rushing come
To make this spot their happy home
Where man may work, dream or play--
Warmed by the sun's most genial ray,
And lay him down at night to sleep,
Cooled by the breezes of the deep.
Oh happy, golden, Tyndall Land,
Stretch out thy cheerful hand--
From far and near draw to thee
All airmen who would happy be--
That here may dwell, by God's own grace,
The stalwart men of freedom's race.
Lt. T.J. Mills
(I Can Dream, Can't I?)

I t is about time we were represented in
the "TARGET". First of all, we wish to
welcome and boast about our new acting
top-kick, Sgt. William H. Newsome. He is
the only 1st Sergeant we know of on the
Field who saw action "over there".
With hearts bursting with joy, we who
work on the line welcome from the bottom
of our hearts the new K.P. material.
Ask Supply Sgt. John Colleran to tell
you some of his famous anecdotes. He's
got millions of 'eml...Who was that staff
sergeant that gave the boys a lecture on
cleanliness and then got giggedd" himself?
Can it be that Lt. Eadie is "sweating out"
a furlough, too?
We wish to-~Tank Major Clarvoe for the
extra special interest he has taken in
seeing to it that our squadron becomes the
possessors of one of the best day rooms


on the Field.
A job we wouldn't care for is that of
Day Room Orderly. It is rumored that Pvt.
Jesse Eicher hears "rack 'em upl" in his
sleep...Fellows, we have a defender for
the boxing tournament None other than
Kid Starwich, the one hundred and twenty-
eight and a quarter pound wonder!
Look men, if you have any news concern-
ing yourself or your friends, drop it in
the mail-box and we'll be only too glad to
take care of it for you. -Pfc. M. Gould

A.A.F. BAND
Shis Sunday the Band will participate in
the Gunners' Graduation Exercises which
will be broadcast overthe Columbia Broad-
casting System. The Tyndall Field "Rhythm
Pilots" will present that music you all
like so well.
The Band finally got a water cooler; now
if they could only make the water taste
like water, everything will be swell.
Bob Vun Kannon tied the knot last week-
end over in Pensacola; we wish you and the
little lady, all the luck in the world,
Bob.
Let's hope that the furloughs will break
through in time for Steve Whetzel to get
to Baltimore before November 8, or I hear
there will be one less Sax man in the AAF.
-Cpl. Wm. Higbee

W 965TH PLATOONEERS
WWe are seeking the talents of those who
can sing, dance, speak, recite, etc. It
is our intention to create a second front
in our Army life, an Entertainment Front,
and we aim to make it as enjoyable as pos-
sible. Any of you men who have any such
talents are urgently requested to leave
your name at the orderly room. A complete
entertainment program is the determined
aim of those men in charge, and it is
hoped that your talent will contribute
towards the achievementof that goal. Mr.
Ward, who is at the headof our local USO,
will supervise these activities.
-Pfo. Gaylord

T FINANCE FANFARE
The State of Florida, and the County of
Bay, will lose one of its best square
dancers when Cpl. Al Lowe leaves for his
new post in the Ozarks.
Cpl. Milt Levy, that hard-boiled mileage
manipulator, is heading for them thar













Ozarks mountings, too. He claims he is
going to show Li'l Abner how Fearless Fos-
dick could have come down quicker, and
with a savings of $2.03. (Official Mileage
Tables).
Pvt. Truman Payne's eyes sparkled when
he heard that he was going along. "Non
compos Memphis", he said, grinning from
ear to ear...It's school days again for
S/Sgts. Johnny Blazak and Herb Anderson.
They're both attending slt Sgt. classes.
Johnny Blazak is now acting 1st Sgt. (Cpl.
Paquin please note)
No, that's not the chant of the tobacco
auctioneer. It's only Cpl. Francis Leon-
ard telling his joke of the mythical mu-
sician named Shapiro.
Cheer up, men, only 27 more days to pay-
dayI -Pfc. Felix Leon

I ORDNOTES
t takes a red-head to get Sgts. Tiggle-
man, MacDonald and Pvt. Strackle to Mill-
ville...Pvt. Moore is thinking of leaving
his bed where he found it Monday night
(in the shower room)...It is understood
that Pvt. Pace's wife agreed to buy him
a coke when she received her allotment
recently.
Those who knew T/4th Gr. Joe Schwartz,
will be glad tohear that he has been com-
missioned a 2nd Lieutenant and is station-
ed at West Palm Beach, Fla,
This week brought comforters, blankets,
payday, O.D's. and all were welcomed. All
we need now is a few WAAC's.
-S/Sgt. Ken Witham

T w"GREENIES"
he squadron is expanding daily with the
influx of new instructors, and we give a
ten-gun salute to the ten new sergeants
who have recently arrived.
Thanks to Sgts. Griffin and Arborio for
the new foot-bridge. At least now we
won't have to worry about falling into the
creek every time we cross over.
A hearty welcome back to Cpl. Mehlmauer
who has finally left his hospital cot.
And at the same time, we bid farewell to
Ed Farrior, who has left us for 0CS.
These early morning roll calls are bring-
ing the boys out in overcoats...Is there
anyone on the Field who is not "sweating"
out a furlough?...Pvt. James Ritchie will
settle for a 3-day pass in order to say
"I Do" with the one that matters. He has


been referred to the Post Chaplain...And
Pvt. Seldin has been casting lover's darts
at a beautiful heart at the Line PX.
Pvt. Reinares was showing his Spanish
talent for riding a bucking bronco on a
bucking bicycle and finished up on the
pavement. He now walks a la sailor- peg
leg. -Pvt. Maurice Baker

THE RAINMAKERS
Much as it grieved the rest of us to
have him go, newly Corporalized Bill Lav-
erty didn't seem to be too unhappy when
he left last Friday for Chemical Warfare
Officer's Candidate School in Aberdeen,
Md. None of us us very clear on just what
a Chemical Warfare 0/C learns--nor was
Bill--but it's pretty clear that whatever
is involved in Bill's new branch of the
Service, he'll do well there.
The same is true for the incorrigibly
cheerful Lee Gaither, who, turned Corpor-
al at this writing, will be "Deep in the
Heart of Texas" when this byline is prin-
ted--starting in as an 0/C in the Medical
Administrative Corps.
Other than this, life continues unchang-
ed in this outfit, with Pvt. Mark Riffey
and Pfc. Elliott Wahlstrand capably hand-
ling the society angle in P.C.
-Pvt. Morris Lasker

"RED BIRDS"
ur C.O., Lt. Keim, says that his wife
swears to this: The 9-3/4 lb. bouncing
baby boy which arrived on Sept. 24/42,
quiets down whenever he hears a plane fly-
ing near the hospital. Lt. Keim predicts
that Francis the 4th will step off on his
left foot when he commences walking. He
is family member number one.
The busy stork also made a stop at S/Sgt.
Baber's home and left a smiling baby boy.
Congratulations, Sgt. and the sameto Mrs.
Baber. What's all this talk about "oil
changes", Sgt.?
Pool players are advised to beware of
two of the greatest coke-pool sharks that
ever hit the South. Just in cast you
don't already know them, they are Pvts.
Kern and Gelormine.
We would all like to know why 1st Sgt.
Heidema is now so anxious to run a few
errands to Post Hq. instead of allowing
our runner to go?
Our sincerest apologies for having neg-
lected to mention last week our regrets


0












over the loss of Pvt. W7ialter Grombacher,
Tyndall's number one chess enthusiast,who
was transferred to another outfit.
Pvt. Abbey, formerly of this squadron,
expects the stork to visit his home most
any day now. This reporter wishes Pvt.
and Mrs. Abbey all the luck in the world
and that as far as passing out cigars are
concerned, this reporter won't mind going
S smokeless because he never smokes cigars.
-Pvt. Vincent Del Ponte

T "BLACKBIRDS"
he squadron party given last Friday
night for the former members of this out-
fit was a tremendous success. The only
* thing lacking was a few members who could
not be there. A fitting tribute to any
squadron is that the men who were in the
original "BLACKBIRDS"will always remember
it as it was.
If you think that perhaps you have re-
ceived some mail, you can always find our
,mail orderly propped up on a PX counter
giving one of the female soda jerkers a
sick-calf look. Anyway, he gets service.
-Ist/Sgt. Lloyd Taylor


If you don't recognize him, you should.
He's SERGEANT RALPH J. BOYES, chief inst-
ructor of Aircraft Recognition with the
Department of Training. He was among the
first group that arrived onthis Field and
he was one of the first men to go through
the Gunnery course. If there is one man
on the Field who isin love with his work,
it's Sergeant Boyes. He lives and breath-
es "Aircraft Recognition". In fact, if
you ever want to talk to him about any-


thing, you can be sure that the conversa-
tion is going to end up with Ralph tel-
ling you about the relative merits of the
Jap Zero and the Republic's new P-47. If
Ralph could have his way,he would probab-
ly line the ceilings of all the barracks
on the Field with silhouettes of Allied
and enemy aircraft.

BROWNIES' REPORTER GREETS NEW RECRUITS
WITH ADVICE WHICH ALL SHOULD FOLLOW
To you new men we say "'Welcome1" You
have finally arrived at your "permanent"
station, your new home. Most of you fel-
lows wonder why you were sent here, and
now that you're here, what you are going
to do.
By now you have no doubt learned that
Tyndall Field is a Gunnery School. Each
squadron on the Field has a definite duty
to perform to keep the school running as
smoothly as possible.
This squadron has been assigned ten pl-
anes and it is our primary function to see
that these planes are constantly serviced
and kept in the best condition possible.
Along with this work there is the very
important task of keeping the machine-guns
on these planes in perfect order.
Keeping these planes flying is a big
job, and this squadron has a swell record
in this category. It is up to you new
men to help us maintain this record. In
time most of you fellows will be given an
opportunity to work on the "line", either
as a mechanic or as an armorer. This in
itself is a break, for there are thousands
of fellows who would give plenty to have
such an opportunity, so don't muff it.
All we ask is that you pitch in and do
a good job, and we'll help you along
wherever we can. There is one thing that
doesn't go in the Army Air Forces, and
that is a "mistake". When dealing with
planes, we are dealing the lives of men
who will fly in those planes, and there
is only one way of doing things- the
right wayl Working around planes is
darn interesting. Give it everything
you've got, and you can't help doing a
good job.
As for our squadron, were one big hap-
py family, and we want you to feel as tho
you're one of us. Just remember that we
are all working for one cause and that
the better we work together, the better
job we're going to do. -Pfc. J. Freeman















SOMETHING TO SHOOT AT: Pvt. Sasson's
score for this quiz was "75".

GENERAL: (5 points each)
1. Did Napoleon die at Elba or St.
Helena Island?
2. Who introduced antiseptic methods
in surgery?
3. Where is the Hall of Fame of Great
Americans?
4. For what is the town of Edam, in
North Holland famous?

GEOGRAPHY, (5 points each)
1. Which is largest in areas Brazil,
The United States, or Australia?
2. What sea lies between Italy and
Jugo-Slavia?
3. What is the capitalof Connecticut?
4. Where is the Dead Sea?


BUCK PRIVATE'S 30 60
NON-COM'S 60 90
OFFICER'S 90 99


SPORTSs (5 points each)
1. With what sport do you associate
Frank Sinkwich?
2. What movie star portrayed Knute
Rockne on the screen?
3. A "ringer" isa term in Billiards,
Horseshoes, or Polo?
4. What team captured third place in
the National League race?

ARMYs (5 points each)
1. What was the first tokic gas that
was used successfully in the last war?
2. Why do the Cadets at West Point
wear gray uniforms?
3. What do the red stripes on the
trousers of the marines commemorate?


1. Xylophone is a
a. mineral.
b. musical instrument.
c. type of glass.

4. Zinnia is a
a. flower.
b. short jacket.
c. tanned leather.



By Cpl. "Chuck" Lindsley


YOUR VOCABULARY
(4 points each)
2. Yew is a
a. heavy cord.
b. tree.
c. blow torch.

5. Yam is a
a. sweet potato.
b. overshoe.
c. Hindu Priest.



Across
I7. feature of the
"TARGET" missing
this past month.
7. Musical instrument
8. What the filly
said to the mare
10. The cause of most
troubles
12. Charlie Chaplin was
the best one
13. The brew of all
evil
14. Watering place
15. Left step (abbr)
16. Conjunction
18. New York's contri-
bution to the scrap
metal drive
19. Do you have one that
jingle, jangles?
21. THE MAN at the stu-
dent detachment


3. Yawl is a
a. turban.
b. sailing vessel.
c. tie pin.

4. Zircon is a
a. gem.
b. wild animal.
c. padlock.



Down
T. World War Ace
born near Fort
Pierce,, Fla.
(Hang your head
in shame if you
don't get it.)
2. C.G. of SEAAFTC
3. Our chief Ally (abbr)
4. Engineering and
Operations
5. Examines
6. Precious stone
9. What ---- you?
11. An eternal springer
in the human breast
16. AR 850-150 lists
"Operations" thusly
17. What we're always in
19. An ennless sun
20. Civilian term for
Military correspon-
dence's "Subject"


IARBDBIRA D' S


0 30








The Yardbird SE62



The ole Yardbird is sho feeling mity rugged rite now. Mostly on account uv
these hear folkes is takin a speshul intrust in making me snap ot uv ma ole stuff.
The way they treats me yall wud think i is the hole cause uv this mileetary Ball
Game.
Things is mity rugged hear as i sayed befo, but the 2 peepul whut reely puts
terrir in ma hart is ma fust sgt. an my fiscal instrukter. Evertime i looks at
em i wondurs iff'n the Lawd is reely prowd uv his handywurk. The fiscal man
sayed ter us the fust day it wudnt be long befo he seperatid the men frum the
boys an he wuz looking awful anticipated like at me whin he sayed it. He wuz jest
aboot rite-----i is almost seperatid. He dun dubble timed us aboot 3 miles the
othur day an whin we cum ter a big open field i figgered we wuz gonna stretch ot
fur a nisse long rest an thin ketch a airplane bak ter the camp. but that feller
dun throwed us inter attenshun and sayed lippy like. I reckin yall is limbured
up enuff ter take a fuw stiff ecksersizes. He wuz plum rite. i wuz the limberest
man in Alybamuh.
Rite now the fust sgt. is hollerin at me like iff'n I wuznt so slow the dad-
burned war wud be ovur tomorrow. So I reckin i'd better be agoin FAST
---The Yardbird (No. 1)

DID YOU KNOW THAT-- The difference be- DID YOU KNOW THAT-- Frozen or even-
tween "cover" and "concealment" in mil- chilled dynamite is dangerously uncer-
itary usage is that "concealment" means tain material to monkey with? Frozen
hidden from view, but not necessarily dynamite should be thawed out by some-
protected from enemy fire, while "cover" one who knows his business. Directions
means that you are both concealed and for thawing in a "double boiler" G.I.
protected from enemy fire? cans are given in FM 5-25.

TYNDALL TOMMY....... LEDBETTER









BEAUTIES 'N 0 .AN6E
IM TOMMY; TYNDALL TOMMY
NOW I K.ECKON,'CAUSE I COME
DOWN TO BE A FLEXIBLE AERIAL,
AND MAKE SER&EANT-YA KNOW,
A GUNNER SERGEANT, THE RE-
CRUITIN' MAN SED WOULDD HELP.
UP MY MORAL.'&UESS MEBBE 'RECKON i MISSED THE
I'LL LIKE THIS HERE FIELD; FER PARIM TREES. NO MISSION' '
BACK IN THE HILLS WE AIN'T THIS HERE SAND THOUGH.
&OT MUCH OF THAT THEIR 60SH;'DON'T SEE THAT
THIN& CALLED MODERNISM ETC. SCHOOL HOUSE 'ROUND i
I'M WONDERNIN' THOUGH HERE NEITHER........
WHEN I'LL GET THEM THAR
THREE STRIPES? YA R.ECIKON
RIGHT AWAY? SEE YA NEXT
WEEK E ....14












WEEKLY BOXING CARD TOPPED
BY TWIN BROTHER TUSSLE
(By Pvt. Neil Pooser)
A pair of twin brothers from West
Virginia, Emory and Ernest Leeson,
stole the show last Thursday night in
one of the best of the weekly fight
cards to be presented at Tyndall Field
by the A. & R. Office.
They were both willing fighters and
in addition they scrapped with a comic
seal which had the crowd in stitches.
Emory, who weighed 130 lbs., took a
judges' decision over his brother, who
tipped the scales at 145.
Other results were Pvt. Earl Fieb-
elkon of Wisconsin, 160 lbs. vs. Sgt.
Sam Oakley, 162 lbs., of Tennessee. A
well-earned decision was awarded Pvt.
Fiebelkon.
Earl Fynum of New Jersey and Edward
Kovalohik of Pennsylvania, both 145
pounders, slugged it out in fine fashion
until the middle of the second round.
Then Fynum suffered a nose injury and
the referee gave the fight to the
blonde Pennsylvanian on a T.K.0.
Arthur Kerber, of Ohio, who had the
advantage of both reach and seven lbs.
of weight, jabbed out an easy decision
over Royal Dutch Navy Representative
Douwesdekker of Holland, who weighed
130 lbs.
Tommy Seaman of Java, 137 lbs., and
Frank Granese, New York, 145 lbs.,
fought a dull draw. Two PX boys, Hous-
ton Parrish 110 lbs., and Robert Stev-
ens, 150 lbs., asked to don the gloves.
Stevens won by a T.K.O. in the first.
Will Rogers, 160 lb. negro from New
York, scored a T.K.O.with little diff-
iculty, over Ardis Tyler, 150 lbs.,
another negro, from Detroit.


TTMDALL TALENT TYPHOON SUCCE8PIUL
Residents of Panama City and soldiers
combined their talents last Tuesday
night to present the first of a series
of entertainment programs at the Tyn-
dall Field Recreation Building.
A sizeable group of soldiers-watched
the show,. arranged by the athletic and
recreation office.
Miss Evelyn Canfield and Miss Jan
Morgan, Panama City dancers; Miss Fran-
oes Clifton, pianist; Mrs. Swift, reo-
reation building hostess and pianist;
Staff Sergeant Meyers, baritone; and
Cpl. Gehrke, pianist, took part in the
program. Sgt. Brown of the Student
Detachment acted as Master of Ceremon-
ies and also played piano solos and
gave two monologues.

ANSWERS TO LAST WEEX'S "X" WORD PUZZLE


GENERALs St. Helena Island; Sir Joseph
Lister; New York University, N.Y.C.;
Edam cheese.
SPORTS: Football; Pat O'Brien; Horse-
shoes; New York Giants.
GEOGRAPHYs Brazil; Adriatic Sea; Hart-
ford; Palestine.
ARMYs Chlorine; In commemoration of
the men who fought heroically during
the War of 1812 under General Scott,
(they had to purchase their own gray
uniforms); Service of the Marine Corps
in the Mexican War.
YOUR VOCABULARYs Musical instrument;
Tree; Sailing vessel; Flower; Sweet
potato; Gem.























/ SEE YA LATER JOE
'I GOT AN EARLY DATE I
Conductor: "I'll have to charge full
fare for your little brother----he's
wearing pants."
Young Brothers "Gosh, Sis, you ride
free."


Pvt: "I can read you like a book."
Girl Friend: "That's all right, as
long as you don't use the Braille Sys-
tem."


Corp: "Girls don't interest me. I
prefer the company of boys."
Yardbird: "Yes, I know. I'm broke
too."


SA diamond is the hardest mineral there
is-----to get.


1st Pup: "Is this a poplar tree?"
2nd Pups "Naw, they seem to prefer
the lamp-post on the corner."


Civilian: "How many kinds of wood are
used in making a match?"
Soldier: "Two kinds, he would and she
would."


Reporter: (To visiting Frenchman) "And
why do you visit this country, Count?"
Count: "I weesh to veesit the famous
Mrs. Beach, who had so many sons in
France during the last war."


1st MP: "What do you think they are
doing over there in that car?"
2nd MPs "I think he's trying to get
herto join the C.I.O. I heard him say,
Let's get organized%"


RATIONED TO DEATH
When I die, please bury me
'Neath a ton of sugar under
A rubber tree,
Lay me to rest, in a new
Auto machine.
And cover my grave with
Good gasoline.


GO TO FATHER
When I asked her to wed,
"Go to father," she said,
For she knew that I knew
That her father was dead,
And she knew that I knew
What a life he had led,
And she knew that I knew
What she meant when she said,
"Go to father."
Author Unknown





"THRILL PACKED" FILMS SCHEDULED FOR
SHOWING AT THE POST THEATRE THIS WEEK
...It's a headline bombshell when Dana
Andrews as an American news ace-
evades hitler agents until he falls
for an alluring blonde (Virginia Gil-
more) who delivers him to the gestapo
...He lives through a nightmare in a
e1centration camp where they plot his
murder to keep him from talking...How
American newsmen outwit the hitlerites
is told in "Berlin Correspondent" a
picture packed with thrills, romance
horror and suspense at the Post The-
atre, Sat. only, Oct. 3...You won't
want to miss the jap-slappin' story
sensation "Across the Pacific", star-
ring Humphrey Bogart, Mary Astor and
Sydney Greenstreet ("The Maltese Falcon"
Cast) on Sun. & Mon., Oct. 4-5....It's
bigger than Bogart's biggest and better
than anybody's best...Sir Arthur Conan
Doyle's "Sherlock Holmes and the Voice
of Terror" comes to the screen, Fri.,
Oct. 9.


SATURDAY, October 3
"Berlin Correspondent"
Dana Andrews Virginia Gilmore
SUNDAY, MONDAY, October 4-5
"Across the Pacific"
Humphrey Bogart Mary Astor


TYNDALL'S NEW PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH
GROUP IS STAFFED WITH PSYCHH" EXPERTS
Composed strictly of Psychology ex-
perts, the "TARGET" herewith presents
some pertinent information about the
Field's newest detachment:
Captain Nicholas Hobbs is the head
of the detachment and he is assisted by
Lt. Glen Heathers. Captain Hobbs is
a graduate of The Citadel at Charles-
ton, South Carolina, where he later
taught "Coast Artillery Military Scien-
ce" until called into the Service in
April, 1941. Previously, the Captain
had done graduate work in psychology
at Ohio State University.
Lt. Heathers is a University of Wash-
ington graduate and until entering the
Army, the Lieutenant was teaching Psy-
chology at Amherst.
Staff Sergeant George J. Wischner is
the ranking Non-Com of the outfit which
includes Sgt. Frank Harris, Sgt. Edgar
George, Pfc. John Gleason, Pvt. Walter
Ismeal and Pvt. Gerald Blum.


TUESDAY, October 6
"They Died with their Boots On"
Errol Flynn Olivia de Havilland
WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, October 7-8
"Eagle Squadron"
Diana Barrymore Robert Stack


FRIDAY, October 9
"Sherlock Holmes and the Voice of Terror"
Basil Rathbone Nigel Bruce


SUNDAY, MONDAY, Oct. 4-5
"My Sister Eileen
Rosalind Russell Brian Aherne
TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, Oct. 6-7
"Invisible Agent"
Ilona Massey Jon Hall
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, Oct. 8-9
"Between Us Girls"
Diana Barrymore Robert Cunainge
SATURDAY, Oct. 10
"Vengeance of the West"
Bill Elliott Tex Ritter
LATE SHOW SATURDAY NIGHT
"Give Out Sisters"
Andrew Sisters Grace MoDonald


SUNDAY, MONDAY, Oct. 4-5
"The Gold Rush"
Charlie Chaplin
TUESDAY, Oct. 6
"The Man Who Wouldn't Die"
Lloyd Nolan Marjorie Weaver
WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, Oct. 7-8
"Honky Tonk"
Clark Gable Lana Turner
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, Oct. 9-10
"South of Santa Fe"
Roy Rogers George (Gabby) Hayes


*


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