Title: Tyndall target
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076230/00028
 Material Information
Title: Tyndall target
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 27-36 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)
Publisher: Public Relations Office, Air Corps Gunnery School
Place of Publication: Tyndall Field Fla
Publication Date: 1942-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City -- Tyndall Air Force Base
Coordinates: 30.078611 x -85.576389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 16, 1942)-
Issuing Body: Issues for May 9, 1942- published by Office of Public Relations, Army Air Forces Gunnery School.
General Note: Title from caption.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076230
Volume ID: VID00028
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24602432

Full Text













Vol. 1 No. T-Army Air Forces Gunnery School, Tyndall Field, Fla., August 8, 1942


161 GUNNERS GIVE


.












MEET THE POST WEATHER FORECASTERs
*Master Sergeant Sam Gacesa, of New
Brighton, Pa., came to Tyndall Field
Sn mid-February to set up the Post
Weather Station. At the time of the
genial weatherman's arrival here, he
possessed the rank of "buck" sergeant.
Today, five and one half months later,
Sam Gaoesa proudly wears his master
sergeant stripes. At the age of 24,
Sergeant Gacesa ranks among the young-
eat Master Sergeants on the Post, shar-
ing honors with M/Sgt. Dick Underwood
of the Finance Detachment.
TDOALL N HARMONIZE OVER WDLP
The mellow voices and native songs
of the ten student gunners of the Roy-
al Netherlands Flying School, who per-
formed over WDLP last night, were a
rare treat. According to Pvt. Char-
les Stepanion, program director, ar-
rangements are being made to have
these boys sing again very soon.


$1010 TO A.E.R.
Tyndall Field was honored last week,
honored by a group of men it had grad-
uated from its Gunnery School. It is
doubtful if Class #31, 1942, will ever
be forgotten here and it is quite pos-
sible that the men of this class will,
in the near future, give the world
good cause to remember it.
The members of '42-31 (men and boys)
quietly and without fanfare, contribu-
ted $101.00 towards the Army Emergency
Relief Fund on pay day. The fact that
these men were mature enough to re-
alize the risk of their chosen duty
in the service of their country and to
fully appreciate the responsibility
they owe to their wives, children and
parents, leads but to the conclusion
that these men will perform with the
same clear headed, accurate thinking
when they meet the enemy in the sky.
SEEET SHOOTERS "DOING GOOD JOB"
According to the latest telegram re-
ceived from Lt. G. D. Hubbard by Cap-
tain H. D. Avery, the Tyndall Skeet
Shooters are "doing a good job" in the
National Open Skeet Championship mat-
ches now being conducted at Syracuse,
N. Y.
In the first telegram, received on
Wednesday, it was learned that Lt. H.
B. Joy, Jr. was first in the Class "A"
410 Gauge event and Lt. Hubbard 3rd.
Lt. Hubbard placed 2nd in the Class
"A" 28 Gauge event, which the Army won.
Later information reveals that in the
12 Gauge event, the Army #1 team was
defeated by Navy, 491-493. However,
the Army #2 team downed the Navy 481-
478 in the same event.











GOD AND DEMOCRACY

"Is God necessary? Yest Without Him, there can be no real American demo-
cracy." That was the unanimous conclusion of a symposium of Catholic, Protestant
and Jewish law students. Their reasons follows
1- The founders of American democracy officially declared that the justifica-
tion for their work was to be found in the "Laws of nature and of nature's God."
2- The whole philosophy of American democracy is contained in this quotations
"We hold these truths to be self-evident; that all men are created equal; that
they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among
these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness; thatto secure these rights,
governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent
of the governed....."
3- Our rights, therefore, come from God and not from the government. Our
Federal and State Constitutions, Bills of Rights, and all laws, are not the
source of our rights but simply a recognition of and protection for rights that
God has given to each man.
4- The fact that our rights come from God rather than from the state or
government is the main reason that dictatorship is inconsistent with Americanism.
5- The fact that "all men are created equal", that is, equal in the sight of
God, is the reason why all persons, regardless of race, color, or condition, are
equals before the constitution and laws of the United States.
6- The American Declaration of Independence was an act of faith in God. Its
principles are acknowledged to be self-evident truths by men of all religious be-
liefs who fought to make America free and independent.
7- Because God is the Author of Liberty, faith in Him is an indispensable re-
quisite for the life of America and American democracy.

To do your own job is not enough, that is no virtue, democracy is not a gift,
it's a responsibility. ---Thomas Jefferson.

"Sorrow is one of the best educators. A man can see farther and sharper
through a tear than through a telescope. It all depends on how you apply what
you learn."





Chapel $rvIitts

AIUDAT TUESDAT
8:00 A.M. --Mass...Chaplain Tinnerty 7:00 P.M..............Tellowship Club
9:00 A.M. --Protestant Sunday School 6:30 P..............Instruction Class
10:00 A.M. --Morning Worship.... WEDNESDAY
Chaplain Wester 7:30 P.M............Bible Study Hour
11:15 A.M. --Mass...0haplain Tinnerty THURSDAY
SKRDAY EVZNING 6:30 P.M.......... Instruction Class
8:00 P.M. -U-vening Worship... FRIDAY
Chaplain Wester :00 P.M............. Jewish Services







S I npses Jacrk

The soldiers of Tyndall Field are indebted to the efficient work of Captain Ray
L. McCullough, Post Employment Officer, for the presence on the field.of so many
pretty and capable girls. The men believe he is doing a swell job, and hope that
he will be able to continue the good work until every lad has his lassie.
Captain McCullough's home is in Burling-
ton, Kansas, where he has lived all his
life except for the time he has served in
the Army. He enlisted in 1916 and was sta-
tioned for a year on the Mexican border,
near Eagle Pass, Texas. At that time the
United States had quite a large army on
the border as a protection against and in
pursuit of Villa. It was while at Eagle
Pass that the Captain took part in the
,. first motor convoy ever held by the Army.
It was an experimental trip from his sta-
tion to San Antonio.
: On August 5, 1917, "Bugler" McCullough's
outfit was called to duty and stationed at
Camp Doniphan, (Ft. Sill) Oklahoma, until
April, 1918, when he went overseas with
the 137th Inf., 35th Div., participating
in three major battlesof the War. In 1922
he joined the Kansas Nat'1 Guard as a 1st
Lt. in the Field Artillery. He was promo-
ted to Captain in Sept. 1940, and was cal-
led to active duty on Dec. 23, 1940, with
C the 1st Bn., 161st F.A. and stationed at
Camp Robinson, Arkansas.
Previous to his transfer to Tyndall on
Dec. 8, 1941, Captain McCullough served as
a F.A. Bn. Umpire during the summer maneuv-
ers in Tenn., Ark., La. and the Carolinas.


SSTAFF SERGEANT LEDBETTER
An outstanding record has been made by
Staff Sergeant Oral Ledbetter, chief of the Drafting Department at Tyndall Field
since he came to the Gunnery School on December 25, 1941, and established the de-
partment which is now recognized as one of the best on the Field. Evidence of his
ability will be found in the fact that during the past six months he has been pro-
moted, upon recommendationof the Department of Training, from private to his pre-
sent grade of staff sergeant.
Sergeant Ledbetter has received a number of commendations from his superiors.
On May 1, 1942, the Public Relations Division of the Army Air Forces described as
"noteworthy" a drawing by the Sergeant which was used on the front page of the
Panama City News-Herald on Army Day.. The letter, which was addressed to the com-
manding officer, recommended that Ledbetter be commended for an "outstandingjob".
A graduate of the American Academy of Art in Chicago, Sergeant Ledbetter was
connected with a commercial advertising firm in La Porte, Indiana, before he en-
listed in the Air Corps. His home is in Muskegon, Michigan. During the past few
weeks, the Sergeant has been working on illustrations to promote flying safety.







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Published every Saturday by the Public Relations Office, AAFOS, Tyndall Field, Pla.


PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICER
Captain Anmon McClellan

ASST'S TO P. R. OFFICER
Sgt. Jack H. Parks
Pfo. San Melson
Pfe. Bernard Pratt

ART WORK
8/Sgt. Oral Ledbetter
Sgt. Darrell Broten
Corp. Ernest Kenton
Pfo. Carl B. Lengerich


COMMANDING
Col. W. A. Maxwell

COLUMNIST
The Yardbird

REPRODUCTION STAFF
T/Sgt Woodrow W. Busby
Corp. John Webster
Corp. Miles Porter
Pfo. Francis Churchill
Pvt. Everett Taokett
Pvt. Price Terry


EDITOR
Corp. Arnold Milgaten

ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Pfo. Saul Samiof

PHOTOGRAPHIC OFFICER
Lt. Joseph A. Dickerman

PHOTOGRAPHIC STAFF
T/Sgt. Robert Thompson
Sgt. William Castle
Corp. John E. Mitchell


TYNDALL TOPICS


The effects of total war are being
felt at Tyndall even ip the Chaplain's
department as we note with regret the
transfer of Chaplain Chester R. McClel-
land duringthe past week. His service
here was characterized by his broad
smile and his general sest for life;
he has watched Tyndall Field change
from a mere stretch of sand to the
compact military unit thatit is today.
The "Flying Chaplain" will be missed
by the hundreds of friends he made
while stationed at this Post. However,
these friends will be consoled by the
presence of Chaplain Brooks Wester, a
new member of Tyndall's Chaplain staff.
Coming as he does, fresh from the
Chaplain's School at Ft. Benjamin Har-
rison, great things are expected of
the new Chaplain, especially since he
hails from "Deepin the Heartof Texas".
God speed and God's blessing to Chap-
lain MoClelland wherever his duties
call him, and to the work of Chaplain
Wester among us.

Eight musical numbers, ranging from
Sigmund Romberg's "Desert Song" to a
John Phillip Sousa arrangement of the
National Anthem, is the tune fare that
will be offered by the Tyndall Field
Band at Sunday afternoon's concert.
Tomorrow's performance by the Band


will mark its second appearance at the
USO Sunday musical interludes. The
concert, as usual, will begin at 5s00
P.M. and will last one hour.
These Sabbath P.M. concerts still
rate as one of the finest 60 minutes
of entertainment.

U.S.O. ACTIVITIES
SUNDAYs Open House- All Day. Band
Concert on Porch...5sOO P.M.
doughnuts and Coffee served
by Ladies of St. Dominion's Altar
Society..6sO00 P.M.
MONDAYs Free Movie- 8s00 P.M. Dane-
ing and Games afterwards.
TUESDAYt Danoe..with Panama City Vie-
torettes- 8s00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY Party Night.. .Viotorettes
-8800 P.M.
THURSDAYs Free Movie..."Top Sergeant
Mulligan" -Informal Danoing-8100 P.M.
FRIDAYs WDLP Broadcast.-Tyndall Band-
with T/Sgt. W. C. Coultrap in *Tyn-
dall Field in Review".
SATURDAYo Tea Dance...P. C. Victor-
ettes...Tyndall Field Band-6i30 P.M.
-EVERY DAYs Showers, Shaves, Checking,
Writing Room, Game Room, Club Roans,
Cress Country Hops, Information, eto.


THE USO IS YOUR BEST BETI


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RED CROSS

For our last meeting at the Yacht
Club not many knitters were present
but several new garments were turned
in. We're glad to know that knitting
goes on at home even though the ladies
can't get out to the Monday meetings.
Special attention for all knitters--
no more meetings at the Yacht Club.
Beginning next Monday, both sewing and
knitting groups will meet at the old
Red Cross headquarters, the bank build-
ing at the corner of First and Harri-
son. Please don't forget or get lost
next Monday, same hour, new place.
Again new yarn can be secured and
completed work turned in to Mrs. Al-
cott during the week.
Only three seamstresses were present
at the sewing group. All the night
shirts are finished and now women's
dresses are being turned out. These
are attractive and fun to work on.
A great deal of outside sewing work
is being done by volunteers under Mrs.
Alcott. This is to help fill the quota
S that must be turned in by September 1.


HOUSEHOLD HINTS
Never pull awnings up or leave them
up while wet. Rolled damp they will
mildew or rot.
.Be careful not to spill foods or
liquids on the kitchen radio. It may
start a fire.
Did you know that you can make sugar-
less tea by adding 3 or 4 oldfashioned
lemon drops to your hot or iced tea?
This is a handy picnic idea, too.
Did you know that you can avoid those
ugly white water marks if you slip a
piece of wax paper under your flower
vases?
Did you know that the juice left
from sweet or sour pickles, makes an
excellent.base for aspic, when combin-
ed with gelatin and tomato?
Did you know that pressing trousers
with a newspaper, rather than a damp
cloth, gives them a more lasting
crease?

If you have any household hints you
would like to share, call any one of
the editors.


COMMISSARY COOKING
c Magic Lemon Muringue Pie
S 1 can Eagle Brand Milk 2 eggs separated
1/2 cup lemon juice 2 tablespoons sugar (8 in.)
Grated rind of one lemon 1 graham cracker pie shell
Blend together milk, lemon juice, lemon rind, egg yolks.
Pour into pie shell. Cover with meringue made by beating egg whites un-
til stiff and adding sugar. Bake in moderate oven (3500 F) 10 minutes or
till brown. Chill.
STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL: To add to the signs on MacArthur have you seen this mail
box on Cove Road? You can't miss a certain Lieutenant's sign also
on Cove Road es- (u as specially at night when the spot light is turned
on it. Everyone MAILJ seemed to be having a fine time at the new Of-
ficer's Club last Saturday night. We're all glad to know that its
now in operation. Too bad Mrs. Bane had to start her home nursing on a Saturday
night. More Aircraft Observers are needed at the U.S.O. building. The work's
not hard nor the hours long. If you can help in this work call Mrs. Alcott or
Mrs. Wentworth. Mrs. Morton, a co-editor of this page is spending this week at
her home in Montgomery. What's happened to the welcoming committee? For tips
on trailer trends call Mrs. Wilson. An excellent motto seen on a Tyndall plane
"Take a tip button your lip."















SOMETHING TO SHOOT ATs Corp. Grout's
score for this quis was "88"

GENERALs (5 points each)
1. Who discovered why an apple falls
from a tree?
2. What was the maiden name of the
Duchess of Windsor?
3. What well known political figure
was assassinated in September, 1935?
4. What is the Arabic equivalent of
MCDXC11?

GEOdRAPHYs (5 points each)
1. What cities on the Mississippi
are known as the "Twin Cities"?
2. What is known as the Continental
Divide of the United States?
3. What is the capital of Kansas?
4. What is the largest river in
South America?


1.* Protractor is a
a. draftsman's instrument.
b. small tractor.
c. ventilating machine.


YARDBIRD'S 0 30
BUCK PRIVATE'S 30 60
NON-COM'S 60 90
OFFICER'S 90 99


SPORTS, (5 points each)
1. In what sport do the
pete for the Ryder Cup?
2. Who was Ty Cobb?
3. What sportsman calls
he wants others to get out
4. In collegiate sports,
leges are known as the Big


players com-


"track"
of his
what
Three?


when
way?
col-


ARMY: (5 points each)
1. Is a vanguard a truck for trans-
porting soldiers, atroop which marches
in front of an army, or a troop which
guards an objective once it has been
gained?
2. Who was recently appointed to
command the U.S. AAF in England?
3. What is the 1st General Order?


YOUR VOCABULARY
(4 points each)
2. Peat is a
a. soap.
b. fruit.
c. fuel.


3. Pancreas is a
a. gland.
b. cooking pot.
c. potted plant.


4. Polygon is a
a. tadpole.
b. person with several wives.
c. many sided figure.


5. Pagoda is a
a. temple.
b. pushcart.
c. incubator.


6. Pullet is a
a. clothes line.
b. young hen.
c. part of the mouth.


he Honor Roll


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,CL i"S of 1942 31 --
TYNDALL FIELD GUNNERY SCHOOL-

zCONTR iUTED-1IOI01 TO THE

A.E.R. FUND AUG.I 9 1942-.2


IEEEEEWE5.IL.- --- U t~~P


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Recognition at last..


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PLUS 50%


IONS!


SERGEANT & STAFF hRUEANT
RATING UPON ORADUIMION







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1 "BLUEBIRDS"
1 at$ off to Lts. Robert G. Freyer-
nuth and William F. Blaokwell, two
popular officers who are leaving us on
new assignments. We bid them a fond
farewell and wish them the best t luck
always. At the same time, we extend a
hearty welcometo our new C.O., Lt. Roy
L. Long.
The excitement in the outfit for the
past week as furnished by S/Sgt. Lewis
E. Waddell. Sgt. Waddell's wife gave
birth to an 8 lb. 2 oz. baby boy at
8s20 A.*. on Monday, and although the
mother is doing nicely, the father is
suffering from an over expanded chest.
Many thanks to Pvt. List for the im-
provements around the squadron.area.
We hope lst/Sgt. Rahm's pedal afflic-
tion won't necessitate a solicitation
of funds to buy him a wheel chair
Pfc. Albert J. Snead

T "ORANGEMEN"
he squadron welcomes 1st Lt. H. W.
Sellers, our new C.O., who hails from
New Orleans. We also send best wishes
to Lt. Nichols, who was transferred to
Sebring.
The day room is in full swing again.
The pool table has been repaired and a
few incidentals have.been added...1st
Sergeant Kelly is hopping around these
days, singing like a bird. Perhaps
the "bug" has bitten him...Forget the
weather for a moment- anyone interested
in playing football please contact Sgt.
Boyes or turn your name in to the or-
derly room...Sgt. Guidry and Pvt. Hud-
son are in training. -Sgt. R.J. Boyes

B FINANCE FANFARE
before anyone could say "Duke Uni-
versity", another of our men was as-
signed to O.C.S. there...Sgt. Tech.
John E. Blazak leaves soon.
When T/Sgt. Johnny Farr was reading
the comics Sunday, there happened to
be a pad and pencil handy- he absent-
mindedly began to figure out "Super-
mnan's'Flying Payl...We take pleasure
in announcing two new arrivals, Pvt.


Joe Cappiello and Pvt. Tor Astl.
were not brought v the st.
Southern Railroad did the trick
There was a young private nad *
Who'd take orders like none we
His wife and his sisters
Got hands fu'1 blisters .-
From writing out orders for ,..
i O Felix ol

C "BROWNIES"
congratulations to Sgt. Milford
Miller on his recent trip to the alta
Unfortunately for us, he was t e~-
red the day after. Lots of luck,
on your two new assignments.
Through the columns of the
we wish to say "h.lc to ld
Pfc. R.D. Frazier and
and Revers. You fellows ha&e bean
down in that hospital too
gang misses you and wihes you sI .
speedy recovery:
Cpls. Callahan and Powell L bit
dejected lat-l :...it couldn't b
cause those two ,f'.: 'ha
home?...Sgt. Daniel and his id
swell clearing job ',.., the ba'
Pvt. J,


Sther squadrons ay d i. i
goats for ma.s.*-;'. but we'll atia t
Pvt. Joseph Berberian,
Another wedding took p.;. .e 1
when Cpl. Galbreath the tr -
We wish Cpl. and Mrs. ,~~ ..ea't. .
best of luck.
Cpl. Carl P. ("P" stands for
Juneau will be leavi., soon. We wish him an enju-'.' tV
We're sure to have peace a.d quiet
while he's away, as we won't have t
listen to him and his drumming,
Pvt. Vincent Dt

0 '.". W. H. ,
ur C.O. has set a ia.
much as we feel ~tat we ha .. ;.
ough all the motions of the out
fits in two weeks time, i: '
day, inspections and. .








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"-./ Robert E. Cro---.r as acting
S''- ,, is speaking:, : but is
w. ielding the i,: stick.
here are a lot of vacant corners in
our barracks. They are silent, but
S p:in,. reminders that "something has
been removed". We miss you men and
here's wishing you "hal. ": landings "
Pvt. Re.-Vs> R. Very

T WN IRLING WINGERS"
hose prospective cadets that have
i*aE vacationing with us for the past
ktr months must have lost hope of go-
'to school in the near future. It
is a known fact that some .: these men
have written home for their 'winter

We're glad to have Lt. Turner back
with us after a leave of absence, and
a warm welcome to Sgt. Nogulich and
Pfo. Goderica, who have recently join-
ed our group.
Here's hoping that Sgt. W. T. Clark
can fix it with the "brass hats" so
that our outfit can get enough bed
sheets to go around...Pfc. Kinmon can
now mess with the non-coms- he has just
been promoted to corporal...A gentle
hint to the cadets in the outfit-- a
lit r.7,: less "hanger fly'. in the bar-
racks at night would be excited.
Cpl. N'-. 8. Kerico

."/ THE "CHAMPI I.,
'th the squadron :.-ers bat-
ti:-. out a 3-1 victory over the Lt.
*chr?:.-k'os 'Brownies", the s have now
eaapt.ur 'd the crowns of the two organ-
ised sports competitions- bowling and
softball Congratulations to the men
on the team for their .: ,-enssul ef-
forts'in bringing the softball champ-
icnship to the Quartermasters.
Cule it be love or the expected ap-
pointment to O.C.S. that is giving Pfc.
Rubin such a bad case of absent mind-
edness?...It must be quite a thrill
for Sgt. Ed Poaden to return to Camp
Lee, the site of his rookie days, as a
ianeidSi te for O.C.S. Good luck, Ed,
not that you'll need it, though
Pyt. H. N. McDonald, a native of


Pittsburgh, upon being asked when he
first saw the light of day, replied,
"In Philadelphia, on my vacation."
Cpl. Paul :;g t3i;A

W eT "CANARIES"
we're all glad to have Lt. Peter E.
Weis with us. Our C.0. has just re-
turned from a honeymoon trip.
Lt. Patrick J. Martin is away on D.
S. for an Engineering course...Cpl. R.
Stovall has switched from the person-
nel desk to the radio sets down on the
"line"...Sgt. Ragland's brief absence
cast a spell of loneliness over the
squadron...Sgt. Gentry, captain of the
boxing team, has been transferred and
we're still looking for someoneto take
his place...The mail situation should
be greatly improved now that Pvt. Jack
Blackwell has returned from furlough.
The outfit welcomes Pvt. Edward Miles,
-who has just arrived from Fort Logan.
Pfc. P. C. Hernandez

T ORDNANCE
HE HIGHLIGHT OF THE WEEK was the-
sudden enlargement of the outfit which
literally puts Ordnance on wheels,--
and we'll try to give the Field the
most efficient service possible.
Lt. Colonel Cain of Maxwell Field--
visited us last week, and we under-
stand that he complimented 1st Sgt.
Malkowski and the Ft. Myers detach-
ment for their drilling.
Congratulations from all the boys
go to Pfc. Jesse who was married on
August 2, and to Sgt. Richardson, who
also said "I do" on August 1. Best
of luck to both of them.
Tech. Kenneth L. Witham.

S "FOUR ACES"
school days are here again for Lts.
Maurice Rondelez and Magee Fuller,
who have left on D.S. to learn the my-
sterious machinations necessary to
manipulate those four engine "jobs".
We extend a hearty welcome to our
new C.O., 1st Lt. Ellis R. Ratchford.
In bringing old news up to date, we
observe that Thorwald Johnson is still






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"sweating" Glider Pilot Shool...Then
there's that new man in our ranks, Pvt.
Michael Franooni, who hails from Avon,
Conn...Reoent transfers have cost the
outfit three fine men, Sgt. Dan Early,
Sgt. James Edwards and Cpl. James Bal-
sam...Lt. Joseph Fargo will be absent
from the squadron for a while he D.Ss.
to study Pratt and Whbtn w: e~nines.
Sgt. 'l L. Wingarter

T "BLACKBIR7, "
he boys of our squa. ..,u :. ;:. .rt.ing
the A.E.R. fund in a v"<, encouraging
manner don't need the !e that is
due them, they know the cause to which
they are oontributiar!. .- i, and
are only indirectly ;. .-.vea.
A sincere welcome baCk is extended
to Lt J. Garland upon his return from
leave of absence...And a :. recov-
ery is the squadron's wish to Pvts.
D'Alonso and Naylor, wo are 'present
habitues of the hospital...A salute to
Sgts. Graham and Wa r' who keep
the outfit's records '..2-i,-t up at
Post Headquarters.
The significance of the ., "So
mething new has been s :...* can '. re-
alized by observing the work done
around the squadron rea ..: a few of
the boys. Nice wort., 11*~
Pv. ', ..:. T. Jordan

WT LT. W. C.
ell, our little I -: set-
tled once again and is hap-
py. The "stogies ha" i ~a 'i. freely since the flret t month
because of the usual re ons.
Pfc. Marvin Morris ..:ed
the double stripe, he, c i or-
derly, you know, a.' e' a-
bout it that' he now i a~. in
reems I
Even some of the fo ade"
corporal recently were by sr-
prise when the order as a"ns u-
cing promotions.
Those men promoted to res
Anders, Covington, Mill, ... .-
and Minton. Sgts I .- .ton,
were awarded their roke str .


Sergeant Covington left E!
this past week. We wish him
luck and we know we're going to
him. Sgt. J. E.

"A DICWOES"
A11 of the men are wearing 'osrt of
the month" faces, with an i .
shining all over them, wai+'.n he
rating list to be posted. A ft" -
gun-jumpers have already tp,.,-,' he
grapevine and are wearing th l *
"to be". The promotions o S/Sgt.
teher to T/Sgt. and Sgt. Steve E.
to staff, are the cream of the endeav
ors. /
Surgeon Major Brua, who has "ben
over the duties of Colonel PI", v.
won a salute from every man in
tachment when he recently --
that a policy of allowing te~ o
furlough at a time would be
ated...and that's ear-candy in r
soldier's language.
Among the men who are le.-,. us in
the near future (and we'll miss m'n)
areas S/Sgt. Kory, who leaves for '
and S/Sgt. Welch who is transfer"
to Mobile, Ala. Lots of luck, ',
According to inside information, tkh
recent fire near the hospital was sa
ted by sparks flying from nu- sf
pointed lst/Sgt. Dean.
Sgt. -

I- DEPARTMENT OF TRAINING TAL
Lave you noticed that you cen s
move aroundin the aircraft recogni on
room?...When Sgt. (U.S*.) l
means house, he does it in "
Congrats to Opl. F.H. CI. o ha*
been accepted for the Fi nca
If any more of our expert insrucr
leave, I suppose we'll have to
some of those "bucks" arn -
among the graduating ~uder
just won't seem right, t., a
man wearing "stripes" to be
classes.
jt. (Pretty Boy) Clark
left oh that three day pass -
ryl...And over-work wasn't t ,iffo








The Yardbird SEZ-






MECIANIC RUSTING PILOT... AIRSHIP BUSTING! FOOLISH FLYER BISTED TIRE LOFTY LYRE

The ole Ya;rit': '" kickin along purty frisky but i cant help but git the im-
preshun that i is bin sumwhat mistreeted on several okashuns. The man had me ot
running errinds the othur day & i wuz ovur 'ter the Air Core supplies & wuz twistin
up a bull durham an the gonna-be-induktee(Kute aint it?)sayed Cant you see that
no smoking sine, an i sayed Sho, but i aint a smoking an he sayed You got a sigar-
ette in yo o.L.> an i tole him rite back That don't meen nothing, i got shoes on
ma feet but i aint i- in. He sulled up konsiderabul buti got whut i wint aftur.
* Thim civilians ovur on the line aint bad fellers, tho.
Sunday i wuz in des, t need uv a cold brew, as a man is liable ter crave a brew
at times, 1p4"'h i.r on a Sundy mawnin rite aftur payday. I eased on down in a
slow hurry ter see '.'y aboot ma trubbles but the dore wuz looked. i figgered
he wuz sick. so i trucked back up ter Less's place but Less wuz sick too, an
that left only wun othur place but whin i managed ter git there the sine on the
dore sayed I -, until Mundy mawnin. Now i got ter figgerin. Everbody else is
wurkin 7 daze a weak torurd the war effart an thim folkes is holding up nashinul
defense by closing -....' Sad, aint it?. Well, i needed me a cold drink thin
jist like i nevur naeed befo an i eased sideways inter the drug sto an axed the
purty gurl at the counting whut all she had cold in the ice box an she sayed
kind uv flip---ice. i reckin i'd better be agoin-----The Yardbird (No. 1)


-. :- :':^ (..: -

: ". ; "


".s.
. -**^"
, :", ?


POW


THIS PLANE IS THE ONLY
STANDARD PLANE IN THE PLANE HAS A .37 MM.
WORLD WITH THE ENGINE CrUN IN NOSE,
INSTALLED IN THE CENTER
OF THE FUSELAGE.
9 IS TAILORED TO FIT
IAN NOT OVER FIVE FT, PILOT MAY RELEASE
INCHES TALL THE P-39 COTTER PINS HOLDING-
k SMALL PLANE. SIDE DOORS FOR QUICK
BAIL QUT. PILOT HAS A
) IS ONE OF THE FEW ARMY ELECTRICAL HEATED SUIT
IE WITHOUT RESTRICTIONS AND HAS OXYGEN FOR
ERED BY AN ALLISON ,, HIGH ALTITUDE FLYINC


G-INE.


EMPTY WEIGHT 4,955 LB.
&ROSS WEIGHT 6,662 LB.
FUEL CAPACITY IS 140 GAL.
NORMAL RANGE 1,560 MILES


V-1710 LIQUID COOLED EN
WIN& SPAN ......34'
LENCrTH ......29'9"


THIS EXPLODED VE OF THE P-39, WHICH IS REPRODUCED
FROM'AIRCAFT :, SHOWS THE LOCATION
OF THE ALLISON 1,150 ENGINE. THE EXTENSION
SHAFT IS 10 FT AND WEIGHS 40LB. IT TRANSMITS
THE DR; FRv M TE I. *-r TO THE GEAR BOX IN L
THE NOSE. SAFT IS SUPPORTED IN A CENTRAL *
BEARING F:l.... r C'-RIN(r IS ALMOST ENTIRELY
COWLING WHICH PROVIDES EASY ACCESS TO ENGINE-RADIO ETC.


i____ __ J---- f', _ _-_ _


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Q.M. ~F -LLERS
Flash .. .rm., : afield,
and be ,iad the t pitching of
Johnny Dtowe-,:, the ... Quartermaster
softballers .. Schrook's
Brownies last '" -- to capture the
Tyndall 1 3--t.::b' C o The defeat
was the .-;..-. in a suffered by
the Brownies at th4 inds of the Q.M.
team and h. h* h a the majority
of the two-out-thre series needed to
win the Post .i.I:. *
The 3-1 score y indicative
of the ,"v.-. : T v ,. of the two
teams with the difference
accounted ,..* *,. t he eight walks
allowed Brownie -tcher Hoth.
Downey, the ... was not
quite as '. ag in the first
tussle in which he waked none, for
three Bi a".' : base via this
route on ';.., h ver, Downey add-
ed ten more strike-ot victims to his
list.
The Br ie ball, but
not quite *. probably
could well hav used their -st string
pitcher .* catcher, and Belk,
who were on
An u1 c.. ab t the two games
in which .- -t ters have met is,
that neither the nor the Brown-
ies c.oitted an r in the 14 in-
nings of ..'


QUARTERiMA.. '.

Gregory 1B
Nolan CF I
Jones
Mitch'l 2B
Albr'en :;
Lenaeus RF
Lentlie S I
Maxwell LF
Buxton C
Downey P i

BRONIES
qUARTERRAf_.'


R 7

0 0o
S0

0 1

1 1
0 1
1 1
0 0


BROWNIES

S2B -1 'TT


3 0
S0
1 0
3 1
30
2 0
3 0
S0
20
H

68


)t C
1B
SS
o*r SB
Sli LF
'ck CF
Aeker'n RF
SF
P


R
000 10 T
020010 3


DOUBLESs Mit .-, kiia, Downey.
8.0. by Downm y-.0.: -.---


WIN POST PENNANT

M(OR 1 WOL OrWOVS LOS GLOS O o T0
POS 0. JON ITIU BY 800B2 OF 18-21
Last Sunday afternoon the Motor Pool
Clowns played the Port St. Joe diamond
men a return match. The Clowns had to
give way to better ball playing. The
final score wasa close squeeze, 18-21.
Believe you me, it was an exciting
game for everyone. Some very fancy
plays were made by both teams. Zgt.
Pruitt, manager of the Motor Pool boys
gave Port St. Joe something to remem-
ber him by when he hit two home runs.
Pvt. Glover pitched an exciting game
for six innings, at which time he was
relieved by Pvt. C. Davis, who hurled
them down the line with terrific speed.
He also connected with a smash that
sailed over the fence for a home run.
We're proud of our team for the gal-
lant showing they made. Their spirit
symbolizes the fighting spirit of our
boys in the armed forces of our United
States of America. --Wilson J. Bing

BOXING TO B12 SUWED ON THURSDAY
It was announced this week that Lt.
S. J. Kopach would succeed Lt. L. R.
Thompson, as Post A. & R. Officer. Lt.
Thompson has been transferred to Fort
Myers.
Boxing matches have been arranged
for this Thursday evening at 7g30 P.M.
Also, on Thursday afternoon at 4s00 P.
M. the Tyndall Tornadoes will meet the
Blountstown nine at the P.C. Ball Park.

ANS S0 *6" 9
GENERALs Sir Isaac Newton; Wallis
Warfield; Huey P. Long; 1492.
SPORTSs Golf; A great baseball player;
A skier; Princeton, Harvard and Yale.
GEOGRAPRYs Minneapolis and St. Paul;
The Rocky Mountains; Topeka; Amazon.
ARMYs A troop which marches in front
of an arn~ Major General Carl Spaatz;
To take charge of this Post and all
Government property in view.
YOUR VOCABULARYs Draftsman's instru-
menti Fuel; Gland' Many sided figure;
Temple; Young hen.


" ", L
., ,__ -
1 .- '
.


















? ; -- .....


"DO YOU SUPPOSE WE COULD INVITE OUR
CIVULAN EMPLOYEES TO THE SAFETY
MEETINGS?"

Maids "My boy friend has cold feet."
Master of the Houses "Shame on you,
young lady. In my day we didn't find
those things out until after we got
married."


"The producer is telling Mary he won't
be able to keep her after this week."
"Then he'll have to raise her salary."


Corps "Squad's right"
Vcioe(in rear rank)s "After
years he admits it."


all these


Sergeant "Heyt You can't go
there--that's the colonel's tentl"
Rookies "Then what have they I
"Private" over the entrance for?"


Shes
He
spot
Shet
Hes


JE:! J3011
"I wish I had my wife back."
"Where is she?"
"I sold her for a bottle of whiskey."
"So you found out you really love her?"
"No, I'm thirsty again"


A private was waiting outside the dis-
pensary for his turn at the iodine
swab. "Hello, and how is everything?"
he spoke to a corporal sitting next to
him. "Not so good. I'm aching from
neuritis," the corporal grunted. "Glad
to meet you", beamed the private, "I'm
Rosenberg from Cinnoinnati."


Pity the poor little Scotch laddie who
didn't know how old he was. His old
man would never tell him when his
birthday was.


Again we have one about a Scotchman
who was invited to a party and told
that each guest was to bring something.
He brought his relatives.


in "Is your roommate broadminded?"
"Say, that's all he thinks of."


"What became of your valet?"
"I discharged him for removing a
from my dress suit."
"Wasn't that part of his duty?"
"No, this was a ten spot"


Executioner(to man about to die)s "Is
there anything I can do for you before
I pull the switch?"
About to dies "Yeah--loosen the lace
on my left shoe; my corns are killing
met"


"ANOTHER THING, MALCOLM. ALWAYS CHECK
YOUR SAFETY BELT."





REGGIE .


. by Lent, AAF


SATURDAY, August 8
"Affairs of Martha"
Marsha Hunt Richard Carlsc
SUNDAY, MONDAY, August 9-10
"Flight Lieutenant"
Pat O'Brien Glenn Ford


Pn

)n


RITZ
SUNDAY, MONDAY, August 9-10
"Beyond the Blue Horizon"
Dorothy Lamour
TUESDAY, August 11
"The Magnificent Dope"
Henry Fonda Lynn Bari
WEDNESDAY, August 12
"Affairs of Martha"
Marsha Hunt Richard Carlson
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, August 13-i4
"Jackass Mail"
Wallace Beery
SATURDAY, August 15
"Home in Wyoming"
Gene Autrey Smiley Burnette



C c


)ST THEATRE
TUESDAY, August 11
"Sweater Girl"
Betty Jane Rhodes
WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY Augus
"Wings for the
Ann Sherid De
FRIDAY, August 14
"Jackass Mail"
Wallace Beer

SUNDAY, MOr)A'.'. Augs 9
"To Be Or Not To
Carole Lombard
TUESDAY, August 11
"Desert Trail"
John
WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, Au.uX i
"King's Row"
Ann Sheridan ot
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, August 14
"Down Texas .
Buck Jones Tim


OL


0


is Morgan






ack Benny




ert Cummings
Sb


I WE' .

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