Title: Tyndall target
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076230/00027
 Material Information
Title: Tyndall target
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 27-36 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)
Publisher: Public Relations Office, Air Corps Gunnery School
Place of Publication: Tyndall Field Fla
Publication Date: 1942-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City -- Tyndall Air Force Base
Coordinates: 30.078611 x -85.576389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 16, 1942)-
Issuing Body: Issues for May 9, 1942- published by Office of Public Relations, Army Air Forces Gunnery School.
General Note: Title from caption.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076230
Volume ID: VID00027
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 24602432

Full Text















Vol. 1 No. "26 Army Air Forces Gunnery


TYNDALL MEN ON A.A.F. SKEET TEAMS


Colonel Maxwell presents trophies to
the members of the Tyndall Skeet Teams
(L. to R.) Lt. G.D. Hubbard, Lt. H.B.
Joy, Cpl. C.J. MoClung, Pwt. B.J. Lee
and Pfo. R. Henderson.


Jimr Mattern, famous globe-ciroling
pilot, is greeted by l/Sgt. Liddon on
the toeer's recent visit to Tyadall.


Six men of the twelve man team that
will represent the entire Army Air
Forces at the National Skeet Champion-
ships at Syracuse, N.Y., next week,
will be from Tyndall Field.
A five man officers' team and a five
man enlisted men's team will shoot for
the AAF with one alternate on each
squad. Records hung up by the Tyndall
Skeeters resulted in their selection
by Washington officials of the Air
Forces.
First Lieutenants Henry B. Joy, Jr.
and Graydon D. Hubbard are the two of-
ficers going along with Sgt. Columbus
J. Powell, Jr., Cpl. Charles J. Mc-
Clung, Pfc. Robert G. Henderson and
Pvt. Edward J. Lee. These six Tyndall
men left here on Wednesday by train
and after a several day stop-over at
New York City they will reach Syracuse,
N.Y. by next Wednesday. The matches
will begin on Thursday at the Onondaga
Skeet Club.
The Tyndall Skeeters have already
won the Nat'l. Service Teams Champion-
ship and the Southeastern Tourney.

POST THBATtR PRICU8 LWERU D
Post Theatre Officer, Lt.W. H. Wise-
man announced yesterday that effective
Saturday, August 8, 1942, the price
for admission to the Post Theatre will
be reduced to 15% cash at the window
and the price of theatre books will be
$1.20. All books now in the hands of
enlisted men will have to be. used up
by or before Friday night, August 7.
The new books will be placed on sale
after August 1st, but will not be used
until August 8.


.eld, Fla., August 1, 1942


1
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.I-.
....,
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6.





WAR D-': .' ..,'T',~S LIST OF
SAFETY s J..' *^ lS FMO PILOTS
Fifteen of the most frequent causes
of flying accidents have been released
by Colonel Samuel R..Harris, AAF Direc-
tor of Flying Safety, following a stu-
dy of accident reports over the past
several years,.
It is significant that all of these
causes are directly attributable 'to
Pilot Error, whichin itself is respon-
sible for '. of all accidents.
The most frequent causes outlined
areas
I. Inattention in landing, allowing
airplane to get out of control.
2. Over-shooting a field because of
coming in high or too fast.
3. Stre .'.. f a glide, resulting in
loss oz fi, speed and probable
spinal :,p
4. Taking .-" duwnwind.
5. Taking off before the engine is
properly warmed up.
6. Making steep turns close to the
ground.
7. Per'.-- : acrobatics at too l.I
an a.lt iKude
8. Runruiii completely out of *;as
on c~a .' witn t.:.' e ad. e ~
gine at- --e -
9. Getting) 1oat because of improp-
er pri tl ot for We
iap -, '' ';..' ..-
10. Runm .:'i acL e s due to
low f-
11 Getti t beccse fe failure
to can a:ts ib k .itiont,
12. Level, ~ '.. in :' ., "r --
resu.l ,. ,;.enera.l]y, in stal-
ling -.id J.'a&'ling woff a*-* a wing..
13. Failn:',., to. around +,n whena
over-shoo *
14. T"i ir 't ot 'h r '1 .. -:1 etc.
due xt. iari. eeis.
15. Runni 'th ad o a^t ir, du
to faiL1 JLr to ';: the weather
closely bfof'e tnse 'f t .,
To combat such carelessness wide-
spread car- : A- of education is in
progress u.r,'- Air F.r'', personnel to
emphasize flvinzg a. -
Such slor'-s as -Accoifnts Aid the
Azis" and ** Brave -e oern it Counts"'
will soon -" .'" o c 'asters at all
fields and a.i'r bagea.
Tyndall "i s" afty record ranks
among the ,f,.;st in tihe nA.tlr. with
only one aIcjient resultit.- in two fa-
talities to m-ar its nigh-perfect mark.


RADIO R'..- 'iRULR S OF TER 8Yr
Bas8 '-.r'AID FRPEORA CeB
One of the rarest phenomena of radio,
a repeat performance, was the tribute
paid to the Tyndall Field radio produo-
tion entitled "Rulers of the Sky".
This scenariowas originally present-
ed over Station WDLP on Wednesday, July
22, at which time it scored a direct
hit with the audience, So compelling
and so realistic was this initial per-
formance, that Colonel Maxwell,who was
listening to the program, wrote a let-
ter of commendation to the Public Rela-
tions Office under whose sponsorship
the program was released. In addition,
Colonel Maxwell believed that the pro-
gram should be repeated for the benefit
of those persons who failed to hear it,
and also so that a recording could be
made and sent to the War Department in
Washington.
The "ocaand" performance met with
the same enthusiastic reception as its
original and a great deal of credit
must be extended to those persons on
the Field who were responsible for
portraying the story of the aerial
gunner.
The i, '" r of the Sky" was scripted
and directed by Pvt. Charles Stepanian
under the supervision of Lt. Walter J.
.. :'ey. In addition, the following
perso ma.dc up the cast, Major T. B.
Cersu ,- Jr., Miss Lillian Berg, Cpl.
Robert U- ,,. P. f, Saul Samiof, and
Pvts. ".':r,' Calkins, William Taylor,
and ;' ? .

: E:'S INa TIM DUBtas
All thess players interested in the
royal game cf chess are formally in-
vited and politely urged to cooperate
in the formtion of a Tyndall Field
Team. Preliminary steps have already
been taken towards this .end in the re-
speot that ?en fairly strong ohess
players have banded together and in or-
der to try out for the team you nnst
defeat oe of thea~ men.
The foll--.n, nme represent the nu-
claus of the budding clubs Sgts. Parks
and Cla'k, lat/Sgt. Stltt, Pyts. Nar-
butas, 'ul`.in, Geiger, Carver, Cash,
Grombacher and F .
These men a.re spoiling for action
and are willing to challenge the entire
field at one iime and guarantee to win
more g:.:.' thin they lose. See the A*
& R. Officer or contact the "Target".













TAKE IT OR LEAVE IT

Balance these reasons I Every respectable man should swear just as often and as
hard as he cant
1. Because it is such an elegant way of expressing one's thoughts.
2. Because it is such a conclusive proof of good taste and breeding.
5. Becau it is such a sure way of making one agreeable to his friends.
4. Because it is a positive evidence of acquaintance with good literature.
5. Because it furnishes such a good example for training boys.
6. Because it is just what a man's mother enjoys having him do.
7. Because it looks so nice in print.
8. Because it is such a good way of increasing one's self respect.
9. Because it is such a help to manhood and virtue in many ways.
10. Because it is such an infallible way of improving one's chances in the
hereafter.
But on the other hand it is written "THOU SHALT NOT TAKE THE NAME OF THE LORD IN
VAIN."
Recently in Washington, ,the famous General Order deprecating swearing and
cursing which was originally issued to the Continental Army by George Washington
in 1776, was reprinted and sent to all recruiting offices and camps of the United
States Army. Among other things we find the Father of his Country sayings "I
hope that the officers will by word and example endeavor to check any cursing or
swearing, and that everyone in the Army will realize that we can have little hope
of the blessing of heaven on our arms if we insult it by our impiety and folly.
AAAA + n this. it is a vice so low and mean, without a temptation, that every man
of sense and character detests it."

A TRIBUTE TO THE AMERICAN SOLDIER
"About the finest human specimen on the top of the earth is the American
soldier, rough and ready, grumbling, never giving up, always able to laugh, even
at his own plight; a holy terror in a fight; ruthless to an enemy capable of a
resistance; generousto a fault to a beaten foe; hating nobody, fearing none; with
courage enough to storm Hades and the gentleness to win a child."
That is the standard that has been set for us.





SUNDAY TUESDAY
800 A.M. --Mass...Chaplain Finnerty 7t00 P.M.............Fellowship Club
9:00 A.M. --Protestant Sunday School
1000 A.M. --Morning Worship.. WEDNESDAY
Chaplain McClelland :s30 P.M............Bible Study Hour
1115 A.M. --Mass...Chaplain Finnerty
8:00 P.M. --Evening Worship.. FRIDAY
Chaplain McClelland 600 P.M .............Jewish Services







TYI~


Published every Saturday by


PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICER
Captain Amon McCIsllan
ASST'S TO P R. OICER
Sgt. Jack H. Parks
Pit. Sam Melson
Pvt. Bernard Pratt


Sgt.
Sgt.
Pro.
Pvt.


ART WORK
Oral Ledbett"er
Darrell > .--
Ernest Keaton
Carl B. Lengerich


SQUADRON REPORTED;
Corp. N. Kerico
Pro. Sam Marotta
Pfc, I. Weiss
Prt. Felix Leon


the Public Relations Office, AAFGS, Tyndall Field, Fla.


COMMANDING
Col. W. A. Maxwell
COLUMNIST
The Yardbird
REPRODUCTION STAFF
T/Sgt. Woodrow W. Busby
Corp. John Webster
Corp. Miles Porter
Pfc. Francis Churchill
Pvt. Everett Taokett
Prt. Price Terry

SEC'Y TO P. R. OFFICER
Mrs. Adelyn Stokes


EDITOR
Corp. Arnold Milgaten
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Pfo. Saul Samiof
PHOTOORAPHIC OFFICER
Lt. Joseph A. Dickerman
PHOTOGRAPHIC STAFF
T/Sgt. Robert Thompson
Corp. John E. Mitohell


SQUADRON REPORTERS
Corp. Paul Hemsoth
Prt. Samuel Schun
Prt. James T. Jordan
Pvt. William J. Bing


DAL_ TARG-ET







The Aerial Gunner


The most important news of the
week for the majority of the men at
Tyndall Field was the announcement
released by Colonel Maxwell's of-
fice that, effective immediately,
all graduates a the gunnery schools
of the nation would be promoted to
the rank of sergeant or staff ser-
geant, depending on their previous
technical schooling.
This announcement,which came from
Washington via Ft. Worth, Texas,
headquarters of the Southeast Fly-
ing Training Command, is an impor-
tant step toward giving the aerial
gunners their just and due recogni-
S tion. It is only recently that the
true importance of the gunners'
role in modern sky warfare has been
recognized.
For the past several weeks all
graduating gunners were given the
rank of corporal, however, this la-
test announcement means an addition-
al stripe and the money that goes
with it, plus a new chest insignia
known as an aviation badge.

A LETTER FROM A "PAL"

(The following letter was received
by a soldier on this post from one
of his buddies.)

"Dear Flanagan,
As to the $10 you claim I owe
you, I can't seem to recall that I
owe you anything whatsoever.
But if you have an I.O.U. sl l 'd
by me stating that I do, I would
gladly oblige you. Of course the
C.O. could hardly recognize your
statement unless you did produce an
I.O.U.
Sorry your not feeling well. I
can well understand what punishment
a rear gunner does absorb.
So Tough Luck "ole boy,"
As Ever
Gus
P.S. I'm flat busted Martin, would
you please send me $5 if it's with-
in your means. I know you can help
me and I will gladly give you an
I.O.U. until next payday."


The Marines, they have a poet, and
would have us know it,
That they're hot stuff, and sometimes--
even rough--
More power to those tough lads-- dressed
in their pretty blue doodads-
But say, -by the way--did you hear--
what the Japs most fear?

It's not the Marines, straight shooters
that they are,
It's the aerial gunners, that the Japs
in this war,
Hate and fear-- beyond all reason--
because it's just the season,
For gunners, trained in shooting straight,
to take on about eight
Of the yellow Japs and shoot them down--
in just about one half a round.

The Pilot drives the plane along--
floating high o'er Hong Kong,
His chauffeur role, he, too plays well,
but actually the guy
Who knocks the hell from the slant-eyed
snakes-- those Nipponese,
Is the gunner lad, with surprising ease.
He's trained and taught,
During tedious weeks, that a straight
shooting gunner really speaks
A language the Japs can understand,
as a bullet hits them in the pan,
Down their ship goes-- and :he Devil,
he spits,
For he doesn't even want those
yellow-bellied chits.

So why do writers so rarely extol
the important role
The Gunner plays these war filled days?
Let us stop and ponder-- 'sposin 'twas you
up yonder?
Wouldn't you think that a straight-shooting
gunner--
Was a damn sight more important than
_ \- the airplane runner?
/ Pvt. S.D.M.
< Public Relations Office


^--

--
B -----












S FINANCE FANFARE
ix years ago, Master Sergeant Lu-
ther R. Underwood's parents wanted him
to complete his education at Duke
University. Dick said that he would
rather join the Arny. He did, This
week Dick received notice that he was
to go to 0.C.S. this fall-- at Duke
University!
Since Technician 7th Grade Francis
Leonard has been assigned to Tyndall
Field, he's a b,~-.n.d wgn. He has
even changed his brand of cigarettes..
We can't mention the name, but it is
them things which are on either sideat
a bird.
Add similess As patient as Corp.
Technician Joe Hanik aweath,: out a
temporary transfer to Maxwell Field.
"The reason for those early morning-
exercises," says Sc':."- G.9:s.tian. is
that when the os: T. e Dept moves down
near the .*. a 1,i''.. we Fin-
ance men a~ io hv to carry
+ht Ouildi do- *F .L.


T r. '. A. SMITH
0o start tl.- A ball .117.., congratu-
lations to l.:, :ui.th and the ground
keepers of V' t.'; t r the wonder-
ful' appearii. e the '>..rr -& area.
With the .-y .. grass ad the
new board ak k P ra& anka i.;&'ag
the neatcat oa et a
Well, aiotibr h~ beei n -r' into
a straight. t ." ." rl,-A
ly let a ga;l ; him do~ '.' s of
luck to you S3... ,; Slier's noe
middle name is -., .. "' ?.
is still J.~it' out that, third '
ron, and it's rmored that wh n the
blessed event course, h%:. put in
for a class "A" g.a. and all that goes
with it. -L.8.

T LT. F. D. SLOUGH
the squadron lost its C. 0., Lt. F.
D. Slough, this week. He is on a
twelve day leave now, and upon his
return, he'll report to Hendricks
Field, Fla., for duty there.


2nd Lt. Peter E. Weis isto take over
the C 0O.'s position when he returns
from his wedding trip. Meanwhile, Lt
Vaohon, Squadron Adjutant, is doing a
good job of filling in as chief exeo-
utive.
8/Igt. F1shbaugh took on a wife hle
hone on furlough ..The squadron is sad
ever the news that M/Sgt. Passwater is
to be transferred...we wonder who is
going to take his place as line chief?
SWe all miss the salesmanship of Bill
Iurray; r..;.atIl seat to cadet school
at lKelly V1Il :.. -J.W.T.

S QUARTEMASTER
4eas that weddings are becoming mare
and nore p'-1-,l Pfc. Wheeler is
taking the 'Ig step this week-end, and
we manderstand that Sgt. John King is
planning things for October.
We're pretty proud of our softball
team and we wish them the best of luck
in the playoff .
A siaht. t. L.iild was Cpl. Curran and
PT-. Downey cutting grass on Sunday to
the tne '' .. don't we do this more
often.'^ -P<>H

S < .' 1 JOHN WILKINS
A .lt a rei.,.a r to be back
is tb n. .. does *ii..;Fr; aL
"'*. .. the m ~re back from
Sa. ar -*--y A'vtlticng their
n tooss a well krswKn -"iadist.or.e.
-.'- .... o i- ,- Tony Scanio ,
hs' gon oe3 to .-:.- L*y squadron.
' ?- e I to let ou hair r-- w in the
'-. B-, ..' tyl fra now on.
;' Qiaafe The resemblunoe
o" Ur to well known
stor, tr u-i.- ...wedenbeorg
".. hia. about the girl he
;I"'; b.hid.. hat an :-it'.iiei nt First
Sg 0 1 ia maing..,Pfc. Wa. Kirk
has ,v,,,t;'. no l~ea than 30 lbs. since
his c aslr ifn the armed forces. -1

LT. ( f. C. BILL
vervyrvwv in the squadron, is aiade-s3y
awaiting the return of Sgt. Gillen so











that he oan confirm the rumor about
his trip to the altar while on fur-
lough.
A "Goodbye and Good Luck" to Pvta.
Roberts, West, Thompson and Zurakowski
who are leaving us for parts south. A
warm welcome to Pvt. Mixon who joined
our squadron last week after a course
at Fort Logan.
let Sgt. Taylor has brought Sotarday
inspections up to the peak of perfec-
tion, and he himself didn't do so bad-
ly in bowling out a 277 game --J.T.J.

s 846th QUARTERMASTER COMPANY
gt. Pruitt, Manager of the Motor
Pool "Giants" is negotiating with the
Eglin Field boys for a game this Sun-
day. Every afternoon you will find
the motor pool men out on their ball
diamond practicing very diligently.
Pvts. Glover and Willinghma, the ace-
pitchers, are ready and spoiling for
action. Pvt. John E. Walker is back
from furlough and is all set to once
more patrol the outfield where he pulls
down those long ones with the greatest
of ease. Here's hoping that the "GI"
ants are successful with their game.
It is rumored that Prts. Miles and
* Stephan, E.M., will soon pass down the
aisle of matrimony. Could this account
for that sparkle in their eyes. Good
luck, fellows, you have the blessings
of all the boys in the company WJB.

O LT. DON V. BOOTY
ur C.O., Lt. Turner, is enjoying a
well earned leave of absence. Lt. D.
V. Booty is now finding himself quite
occupied with duties. In addition 't
acting as our C.O., he is also adju-
tant,.statistioal, gas and supply of-
ficer of the squadron. Of course in
his spare time he makes inspections
and periodical bed checks.
The outfit is well represented on
the Post baseball team. Sgt. "Red"
Laughlin manages the team and he has
also signed up two semi-pros, Pvts.
LeRoy Brown and Fred Cooksey.


Cpl. White is leaving us soon for 0.
C.8...Sgt. Laughlin just lost a bet to
1st Sgt. Landes. Mary Louise Landes
was four months old on July 19, and
Laughlin bet Landes that he couldn't
get this item printed in the paper...
Here's hoping that 6gt. Young reveals
his secret of his pass-getting ability,
and incidentally, Young, in his 25years
in the army, he hasn't had a single dQ
of bad time to make upt..Cpl. Kraker's
car is on its last set o tires, it can
now be started only by the ingemoaus
use of two flashlight batteries and a
prayer --N.K.

O ORDNANCE
One of the companies on the Field has
an eagle for a mascot and Ordnance,
not to be outdone, now has a goat, and
that ought to get everybody's goats
Sgt. Rabas is considered by many to
be one of the finest comedians at Tyn-
dall Field.....his impersonations of
some of our men are priceless. --I.W.

A LT. J. L. MOORES
A hearty "Welcome Back" to J. Ritchie,
Kloor, Ipsaro, Bertrand, W. Johnson
and all others reoentl; returned from
furlough. Our Flying Sergeants Crites,
Phillips, Swathel, Laird and Nagdemon
are anxiously awaiting their new de-
signations as "Flight Officers".
Our day room is going full blast and
many new additions such as a juke box
and a miniature bowling alley are ex-
peoted...0.J. Hatch's mounting corres-
pondence with the "weaker sex" rates
him high on the squadron "Glamour Boy"
list...Babb and Rogers showered the
outfit with cigars after their recent
promotion....A salute to our squadron
officers for their understanding and
general popularity....We're very proud
of the little girl who represents our
outfit at Post Headquarters, she's by
far the prettiest....We've nick-named
our pool table "Adolph" because it's
taking such a terrible .beating...Good
luck to the men going on furlought


b
O~u~t olU~S;3'16Un a,













RED 4 CROSS
Again we wish to remind you what
procedure to follow in regard to Red
Cross work in the event you are trans-
ferred. Laave any unfinished knitting
or sewing with Mrs. Maxwell or Mrs.
Alcott (knitting) and Mrs. Moore or
Mrs. Hyndman (sewing) to be finished
by this chapter. This will relieve
you of any worry in the hurly-burly of
moving.
Further information has come to us
regarding your credit hours. If you
are transferred you should write back
to your old chapter and have your
credit hours transferred to tihe new
chapter. Be sure and do this as just
a card will get this done for you.

COMMISSARY COOKING

Onion Soup \
2 tablespoons butter
2 cups onion tlu.aly sliced
1 can campbell's consomme'
1 can water
Cheese croutons for garnish
Cook the onions in butteruntil brmwn.
Add consomme' and water and heat 20
minutes. Serve in soup dishes or oven
earthware bowls. A quick and very
easy recipe for a really good soup.


In "The Trained Nurse & Hospital Re-
view" we saw answers given to an AIR
RAID WARDEN'S EXAM -- which we think
might amuse those who took first-aid.

---SYMPTOMS OF SCHOCKs
Blood count fast & weak
Eyes are glassy, weak
Calmy pulse, cold respiration, chills
The heart beat is rapid then slow.
This is caused by the walls of
abdomen giving way causing all the
blood to be congested. This caused
the heart to work that much harder.
Blue nales, sort of broth.

---TREATMENT OF SHOCKs
Lay patient flat on back, proping
up so as to hold heat.
Keep head lowered, if not a basal
fracture is found.
Loosen clothing, oollor, tie,
belt, corsets, Oh, my.
Keep still
The important points to be remember-
ed i -tifical respiration is ne-

Keen head low if on him
'oc lafR Light & Lower Co. should
have been sent for.
.ay face down, head on right arm
Push down & up under first rib.


0


It looks as though every one on MacArthur is trying to outdo his nextdoor
neighbor judging from the signs in front. Can you tell who lives behind theses





r. "


Cr LT.COc.
^* '- W V \


"'
c~
dp.
'9






intimate Glimpses- r==JOckParks=

Major Walter D. NTewman, Director of Ground Training at Tyndall Field, has more
than twenty years of public service to his credit. Upon graduation from Howard
College, Birmingham, Ala., in 1920, the Major spent most of the following two de-
oades as a school teacher at various points throughout Alabama.
A native of Opelika, Ala., Major Newman
has made his home in Guntersville, Ala.,
for the past fourteen years, during most
of which time he was principal of the high
E school in that city. In addition to his
Educational activities, the Director of
S Ground Training served from January, 1939
until November, 1940 in the Alabama Legis-
lature.
Major Newman was called to active dutyon
j Nov. 25, 1940. He was sent to Camp Bland-
ing, Fla., as commanding officerof Company
A E, 167th Infantry. He reported for duty
S at Tyndall Field on Dec. 8, 1941.
s f '"At Tyndall Field, Major Newman has been
| instrumental in designing a number of in-
genious devices for the training of gunners.
These devices have been praised very highly
by his superiors.
Major Newman takes great pride in his
three children, all of whom are either al-
ready in the service or soon will be. One
son has completed his second year at West
Point, another is in the Navy, and a dau-
ghter is in training to become a nurse.


MASTER SERGEANT BETTHAUME
The oldest enlisted man in point of ser-
vice at Tyndall Field is Master Sergeant
SMaurice Berthaume, non-commissioned officer
in charge of the Post Communications Office.
S Sergeant Berthaume enlisted in the Avia-
tion Section of the Signal Corps in January,
S1916, and was stationed at Ft. Wood, N. Y.
It was while he was at Ft. Wood that the Black Tom incident occurred. Boats load-
ed with ammunition for Europe were sabotaged and exploded as they passed in the
vicinity of the Fort. Windows at the Fort were broken, debris was hurled into the
post, and for a time it was feared that the Statue of Liberty might fall.
Soon after the above event, the Sergeant was transferred to the Ft. Omaha, Neb.
balloon school and was made Post Electrician. Pioneering in his field, Sergeant
Berthauae opened the first telephone system on the post, gave the radio station at
Omaha two transmitting tubes when they first began to operate, and installed one
of the first radio receiving sets in the balloons.
Sergeant Berthaume once narrowly escaped death during a record breaking balloon
flight from Fort Omaha to Ida Grove, Iowa. The distance of 113 miles was covered
in 104 minutes, and the trip was uneventful until the pilot attempted to land
with the wind velocity between 45 and 50 miles per hour. Upon nearing the ground,
it was seen that the speed of the balloon would make landing extremely dangerous.
The balloon hit the ground, bounced about 75 feet twice, and crashed through two
fences before finally coming to rest, with the men miraculously unhurt.
















SCOGTBING TO SHOOT ATs Capt. Powler's
score for this quis was "90".

GENERALs (5 points each)
1. Is the'Panama Canals 25 1/2 mi les
long, 50 1/2 miles long, or 75-1/2
miles long?
2. Who is said to have started th.b-
fashion for bobbed hair?
3. Venison is the meat of what anim.8l?
4. Was Peru once ruled bys At It.a,
Mayans, or Incas?

GEOGRAPHYs (5 points each)
1. What is the capital of Idaho"
2. What canal joins the Mediterranean
to the Red Sea? '
S. Is it true that the Hudson River
empties into the Hudson Bay?
4. Salem, where America's wit hes
were burned, is in what state?


Af D iTRD'8
RUCK YPR'lTt'S
NON-COUM S
OFFICER'S


0 80
30 60
60 90
90 99


3SPORTaS (6 point each)
I. Match thz- name of the champion in
the i hSad -"i... with its identi-
-" :..nae, in the right hand column.
S: 'ty Yacht




(6 bpo-ints each)
"I. 7hich has'. r.; officially adopted
by :- ted States Army and Iavys
t .._*.. o fr Aeroplane?
2 What iLa the 't.h General Order?
3. Is the :ira'-e of the Amerioan-
u.nknRown soldier in Washington, D. C.,
in Ar' *-,-. Virginia, or at West
F it, :.* Yorkl


1. Octagon is a
a. eight sided figure.
b. six
c. four *

4. Oboe is a
a. river in Africa.
b. musical instrument.
c. wild animal.


(4 points eg ;h)
02 Ogee isa
a. command to a ors a ,
b. giant.
c. iB. ldfii;. i

5 wimbre l a 9
a. card 4. ,

bc. t 1+..'


Okra in a
a. vegetable.
b. coffee.
n. ore.

S Ode is a
a. ,;-*, god.
bp poem.
, island.


*BUT,SIR( I ANSWERED THE
SIXTY FOUR DOLLAR QUE r- "
S., ,-


,.:,. ,- ,
r | i'


1 1i
/' i 'J
iji 0







The Yardbird SEZ

Oooh, the ole Yardbird is in receet uv a mity teerifik hangovur rite now on
account uv i is dun made Nu Awleens on that three day pass i wuz menchunin last
weak. i sho wants to say that the ole town is ever bit there, she aint changed a
bit. whut with aboot 18 hours uv gittin ma arm twisted by the local citisins i
emurged inter the high klass society district aunwhat o than a littel inebriated,
an the nex thing i knowed a ole lady an hur maid wuz a wakin me up off'n hur
frunt porch an i started in ter poligizin an excusin ma self, an i wuz sweating em
both ot ter call the civilian M P's. Now, that wudnt nevur do on account uv me
bein too fur frum home, an i wuz sweatin jest aboot as hard as a bootlegger at a
church bizarre. The ole lady fooled me. She started eatin me ot fur not coming
on inter the house in the furst place, an the maid wuz axin me iff'n i had cawt
cold, an then the butler showed up with a mity nice drink an aboot that time they
had me in bed in the nicest littel room i evur slep in. Nex mawnin she fed me an
jest smiled whin i tried excusin ma self fur bein in the shape i wuz an oayed
that wuz alright, that she understood. Thin she showed me a pitcher uv a mity
nice looking young shavetail an she kind uv smiled sad like and showed me a li. .
Gold Star. Well, I reckin i'd better be agoin-- -The Yardbird (No. 1)

(Editors Notes The Yardbird wishes to emphasize the fact that the above itncd,..
actually ocoured and wishes to use this mediunai express hiz :-'.
oere thanks for the hospitality extended to him by the popl'-'
New Orleans in general, and thS lovely lady in particular.)

U I ~ll~ra~~srrige IR*BIE


Plane Talk




MESSED SCHmITT

M ED T11HE JAGUAR


FICAHTER.AND SOMETIMES D
USED AS A NIGHT BOMBER. c110

PLANE TO BRyNP
THE SISTER-oHIP Of THE ME* 11001bBOMB
110 15 CALLED THE JAGUAR
AND DIFFERS FROM THE ME-110 ET NAFC
IN SPEED AND DESIGN. THE r4.'~' ni e[rFTLE
JArUER HAS A TRANSPARENT
NOSE AND SHORTER CABIN. .A -


THIS PLANE IS POWERED BY TWO
1,150 HP DAIMLEK- BENZ LIQUID
COOLED ENGINES WITH THREE
",i CONSTANT-SPEED PROPS.
PhI;-: I? ALL METAL CONSTRUCTION
AND i1 HEAVILY ARMORED.
-'; -: 15 AROUND 1700 MILES
S vi-,.UM SPEED IS 365 .R.
. .52IENCTH 40&

RADO V OPLmoomw k


4 PIYED
'MAKIA


-'


U


se~upa~












DOWNEY PITCHES 1
Behind the superb moundwork of Pvt.
John T. Downey the "pennant" hungry
Quartermaster softball team took the
first game of a series of three to de-
oide the Field Championship. Their
opponents, Lt. Schrook's men, also had
good pitching, but the three hits that
pitcher Johnny Stephans allowed were
good for three runs to give the Q. M.
boys a 3-0 victory.
Downey, while striking out six men,
gave out but two hits and walked none.
Both and Mankin were the two Schrock
men to connect safely, with Mankin
slamming a double for the only extra
basehit off Downey.
Stephans, was nicked for only three
hits but his four walks were too costly
for his team as two of the three hits
he gave up came with men on base.
The Q. M. nine scored one run in the
second and two in the third when short-
stop Jones sent a screaming double to
i-.'+ --*tr with two mates aboard.
Tuesday evening has been set as the
date for the second and possibly de-
ciding game of the series.
An unfortunate aspectof last Wednes-
day's game for Lt. Sohrook's men is
that there can be no alibi for them
..the two umpires were Lt. Schrock and
S/Sgt. Wilson and the scorekeeper was
Pvt. Salvat, all of the loser's squad-
ronl


LT. SCHROCK
Gafford 3 l
Hoth SS
Mankin SF
West 1B
Belk C
Manoinelli LF
Aokerman CF
Alexander 2B
Stephans P
Cafmeyer RF


QUARTERMASTER
Gregory 1B


Nolan
Jones
Mitohel
Lenttie
Albritter
Maxwell
Henderson
Buxton
Downey


RI
QUARTERMASTER 0 1 2 0 00 I
LT. 8CHOCK 0000000 0
Batteries Downey and Buxton for
Stephans and Belk for Lt. Schrock.


CF
SS
2B
SF
3B
LF
RF
C
P
3 E

2 0
Q.X.


iWO HIT BALL FOR Q.M.

BOXING BOUTS DRAW CROWD
Tyndall's boxing hopefuls finally
caught up with fair weather last Tues-
day evening and treated some five hun-
dred fans to seven fairly sorappy
bouts.
It was a draw between Pvts. Martin
Tobolsky and James West of the 160 lb.
class- both men giving and taking.
The crowd applauded Pvt. John Flan-
agan's decision over Pvt. E.R. Goh-
sales- it was Flanagan's first ring
appearance and in taking a three round
award from Gonzales, he bettered a
fighter who is reigning featherweight
champion of the Southwestern States,
A.A.U.
Al Young, the 110 lb. Panama City
flying cadet added another to his list
of victories when he took a three
round scrap from Pvt. R.B. Truitt by
the T.K.O. route.
Other results were Pvt. Joseph Smith
won a 3 round decision from Pvt. K.T.
Whitt; Pvt. Fearnley downed Pvt. F.M.
Bowling with a T.K.O.j Pvt. W.J. Arter
was awarded a T.K.O. over Pvt. J.R.
Carson; and Pvt. A.M. Vaughn similarly
disposed of Pvt. R.L. Bombard.
A bit of comedy was worked into the
card when Pvts. Robert Smith and A.I.
Baaba put on their version f a profes-
sional wrestling match. It lookedrough
but no one was hurt.

ANSWERS TO ???
GENERAL 50 1/2 miles long; Irene
Castle; Deer; Incas.
SPORTSs Brevity Horse
Wall Jockey
Salica Boxer
Ranger Yacht
GEOGRAPHYs Boise; Sues Canal; No, it
is false; Massachusetts.
ARMYs Airplane; To call the corporal
of the guard in any case not covered
by instructions; Arlington, Virginia.
YOUR VOCABULARYi Bight sided figure;
Moulding; Vegetable; Musical Instru-
ment; Card game; Poem.









JESlJOKIN
"A man", raid the camp philosopher to
the army cook, "is supposed to be what
he eats. And what kind of soldiers do
you think w~ll have if all your food
tastes lika ~hoe leather?"
"An army", aaid the cook in the same
philosophical sing-song voice, I un-
derstand, it's supposed to travel on
its stomach. So naturally I try to
make the food as much like sboe leather
as possible."

KEEP 'EM TRYING


Pvts "Fifty years ago the girls never
thought of doing the things they do
today."
Corp: "That's why they didn't do
them."

The Rookies had a mascot goat,
And it was always buttin',
On Monday a Colonel got in the way---
On Tuesday we had mutton.


Sons "Pop, I got a liokin' in school
today and it's your fault."
Pops "How's that, son?"
Sons "Remember when I asked you how
much a million dollars was?"
Pops "Yus, I remember."
Sons "Well, 'helluva lot" ain't the
answer.*


Wifes "What's this game Hari-Kari the
japs are always playing?"
Hubbys "Get me a knife and I'll show
you how they do itl"


First Boxers "Ah sho feels sorry for
you. Ah was bohn with boxin gloves on."
Second Boxers "Maybe you was, dark boy,
'cause ah reckon you'll die the same
way."


The moon was yellow,
The lane was bright.
As she turned up to me
In the springtime night;
And every gesture
And every glanoe
Gave a hint
That she craved romance.
I stammared and stuttered,
And time went by----
The moon was yellow--
And so was It

A.






U.S.O. ACTIVITIES
The Panama City USO announces the
following activities for the coming
week:

SUNDAY Band Concert on the porch by
the Bay County High School Band at
5:00 P.M.
MONDAY: Free Movie- Date Night- Danc-
ing & Games...8s00 P.M.
TUESDAY: Danoe-P.C. Victorettes, music
by Roy Wood & Orchestra...8s00 P.M.
WEDNESDAYT Party Night, P.C. Victor-
ettes...8:00 P.M.
THURSDAYs Free Movie-- "The Mark of
Zorro"- Dancing afterwards. 8:00 P
FRIDAY: WDLP Broadcast Featuring the
Tyndall Field Band...8s00 P.M.
SATURDAYt Tea Dance- Panama City Vico
torettes, with music by the Tyndall
Field Band...5s00 P.M.

THE USO IS YOUR BEST BETI



yrC0T~


SATURDAY, August 1
"Dr. Broadway"
Jean Phillips
SUNDAY, MONDAY, August 2-3
"Tarsan's lsr York Adventure"
Johnny Weisamuller


--


RITZ
SNDAY, MONDAY, iugat 2-3
"Wings for the Eagle"
Ann Sheridan Dennia s i,
TUESDAY, August 4
"Moontide"
Jean Gabin Ida Lupino
WEDESDAY, August 6
"There's One Born every Minutea
Hugh Herbert Peggy Moran
THBRSDAT, FRIDAY, August 6-7
"Juke Girl"
Ann Sheridan Ronald Rl gar
SATURDAY, August 8
"Sons of the Pioneers"
Roy Rogers
*Grand Coetral Murder"
Van leflin Ceoilia Parker
LATE SHOW SATURDAY IIHT
Jaokass Mail"
Wallace Beery Marjorie Maiu






U
-. 7,
:.


YND^AoPICS
;-. of the more pleasant innovations
the past few weeks is that of having
c, T;-,iadall Field Band and the Bay Co-
i High School Band give a one hour
,,'.ert on alternating Sunday -after-
,onS at the USO porch.
.. breeze off the Bay plus the lei-
~es~t atmosphere of the city on Sunday
r., naoons blend with the music for a
'.o haort hour of relaxation.

A;l> that payday is once more with us,
a9: not forget the Army fEergenoy
_ lf Fund-- the example has been set
us..,Back in May, when the local
a,. raa were soliciting contributions
;.,u the audiences for the A.E.R., one
Sthe usherettes reported that when
S *.v collection plate was passed
a a aisle where six privates were
the plate came back contain-
1. one-dollar bills


*':j-i '.' August 4
"~ight in Ner Orleans"
Preston Foster
,iNSaDAY, THURSDAY, August 5-&
"Take a Letter Darling"
Rosalind Russe 1
..I- August 7


m &ale Animal"
Hanry Fonda
PAIAMA
S MONADA, Agust 2-S
,"eatesr Girl"
Jmne Preisser
^ vir August 4
"1illy the Ki's smoking GOuas
BDster Crabbe
", August 5
'-o i Mn who oam to Dinner"
PBtte Davis Ann Sheridan
SMui August 6

Gen Tierney Bruce Cabot
,aRIT, SATURDAY, August 7-8
"Affairs of Jimy Valentinae
Dennis O'Keete
"Fniltive Valley"
Range Busters


4




S


...z








.5~~/
C Z




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