• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Bibliography
 Electra
 Orestes
 Iphigeneia in Taurica
 Andromache
 Cyclops
 Back Cover














Group Title: Loeb classical library
Title: Euripides
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076214/00002
 Material Information
Title: Euripides
Series Title: The Loeb classical library
Uniform Title: Works
Physical Description: 4 v. : fronts. (v. 1-3) ; 17 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Euripides
Way, Arthur Sanders, 1847-1930 ( ed. and tr )
Publisher: W. Heinemann
G.P. Putnam's Sons
Place of Publication: London
New York
Publication Date: 1912-16 v. 1, '16
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Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Bibliography: v. 1, p. xv.
Statement of Responsibility: with an English translation, by Arthur S. Way ...
General Note: Vols. 1-2 are a reissue of the edition of 1912; v. 3-4 have imprint: London, W. Heinemann; New York, The Macmillan Co., 1912.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00076214
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lccn - ca 19000123

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
        Page vi
    Introduction
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
    Bibliography
        Page xv
    Electra
        Page 1
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Full Text



THE LOEB CLASSICAL LIBRARY
EDITED BY
E.OAPPS, PH.D., LL.D. T..E. PAGE, LiTT.D. W. H. D. ROUSE, LITr.D,









EURIPIDES

II








EURIPIDES

WITH AN ENGLISH TRANSLATION BY
ARTHUR S. WAY, D.Lrr.



IN FOUR VOLUMES
II


ELECTRA ORESTES
IPHIGENEIA IN TAURICA
ANDROMACHE CYCLOPS


LONDON :WILLIAM HEINEMANN
NEW YORK : G. P. PUTNAM'S SONS
MCMXIX












A '















First Printed, 1912.
Reprinted, 1916, 1919.























CONTENTS

PAGE
ELE TRA . . . . . 1

ORESTES ........ ............. 121 --

IPHIIENEIA IN TAURICA . . .... 279

ANDROMACHE . ... . ..... 411

CYCLOPS ....................... 515















INTRODUCTION

THE life of Euripides coincides with the most stren-
uous and most triumphant period of Athenian history,
strenuous and triumphant not only in action, but in
thought, a period of daring enterprise, alike in
material conquest and development, and in art,
poetry, and philosophic speculation. He was born in
480 B.c., the year of Thermopylae and Salamis.
Athens was at the height of her glory and power,
and was year by year becoming more and more the
City Beautiful, when his genius was in its first flush
of creation. He had been writing for more than
forty years before the tragedy of the Sicilian
Expedition was enacted; and, felix opportunitate
mortis, he was spared the knowledge of the shameful
sequel of Arginusae, the miserable disaster of
Aegospotami, the last lingering agony of famished
Athens. He died more than a year before these
calamities befell.







INTRODUCTION


His father was named Mnesarchides, his mother
Kleito. They must have been wealthy, for their son
possessed not only considerable property (he had at
least once to discharge a "liturgy," 1 and was
"proxenus," or consul, for Magnesia, costly duties
both), but also, what was especially rare then, a
valuable library. His family must have been well-
born, for it is on record that he took part as a boy in
certain festivals of Apollo, for which any one of
mean birth would have been ineligible.
He appeared in the dramatic arena at a time
when it was thronged with competitors, and when it
must have been most difficult for a new writer to
achieve a position. Aeschylus had just died,_after
being before the public for 45 years : Sophocles had
been for ten years in the front rank, and was to
write for fifty years longer, while there were others,
forgotten now, but good enough to wrest the victory
from these at half the annual dramatic competitions
at least. Moreover, the new poet was not content
to achieve excellence along the lines laid down by
his predecessors and already marked with the stamp
of public approval. His genius was original, and he

1 Perhaps the expense, or part-expense, of equipping a
war-ship.
viii







INTRODUCTION

followed it fearlessly, and so became an innovator in "*
his handling of the religious and ethical problems
presented by the old legends, in the literary setting
he gave to these, and even in the technicalities of
stage-presentation. As originality makes conquest
of the official judges of literature last, and as his
work ran counter to a host of prejudices, honest and
otherwise,1 it is hardly surprising that his plays
gained the first prize only five times in fifty years.
But the number of these official recognition is no
index of his real popularity, of his hold on the hearts,
not only of his countrymen, but of all who spoke his
mother-tongue. It is told how on two occasions the
bitterest enemies of Athens so far yielded to his
spell, that for his sake they spared to his conquered
countrymen, to captured Athens, the last horrors of
war, the last humiliation of the vanquished. After
death he became, and remained, so long" as Greek
was a living language, the most popular and the
most.-influential of the three great masters of the
drama. His nineteenth-century eclipse has been
followed by a reaction in which he is recognized as

I He was baited incessantly by a rabble of comic writers,
and of course by the great pack of the orthodox and the
vulgar."-MURRAY.






INTRODUCTION


presenting one of the most interesting studies in all
literature.
In his seventy-third year he left Athens and his
clamorous enemies, to be an honoured guest at the
court of the king of Macedon. There, unharassed
by the malicious vexations, the political unrest, and
the now imminent perils of Athens, he wrote with a
freedom, a rapidity, a depth and fervour of thought,
and a splendour of diction, which even he had
scarcely attained before.
He died in 406 B.C., and, in a revulsion of repent-
ant admiration and love, all Athens, following
Sophocles' example, put on mourning for him. Four
plays, which were part of the fruits of his
Macedonian leisure, were represented at Athens
shortly after his death, and were crowned by
acclamation with the first prize, in spite of the
attempt of Aristophanes, in his comedy of The Frogs,
a few months before, to belittle his genius.
His characteristics, as compared with those of his
two great brother-dramatists, may be concisely stated
thus:-
Aeschylus sets forth the operation of great principles,
especially of the certainty of divine retribution, and
of the persistence of sin as an ineradicable plague-






INTRODUCTION


taint. He believes and trembles. Sophocles depicts
great characters: he ignores the malevolence of
destiny and the persistent power of evil: to him
"man is man, and master of his fate." He believes
with unquestioning faith. Euripides propounds great;,
moral problems: he analyses human nature, its
instincts, its passions, its motives; he voices the cry
of the human soul against the tyranny of the super-
natural, the selfishness and cruelty, of man, the
crushing weight of environment. He questions:
"he will not make his judgment blind." \J
Of more than 90 plays which Euripides wrote,
the names of 81 have been preserved, of which
19 are extant-18 tragedies, and one satyric drama,
the Cyclops. His first play, The Daughters of Pelias
(lost),was represented in 455 B.c. The extant plays
may be arranged, according to the latest authorities,
in the following chronological order of representation,
the dates in brackets being conjectural: (1) Rhesus
(probably the earliest); (2) Cyclops; (3) Alcestis, 438;
(4) Medea, 431 ; (5) Children of Hercules, (429-427);
(6) Hippolytus, 428; (7) Andromache, (430-424);
(8) Hecuba, (425); (9) Suppliants, (421); (10) Mad-
ness of Hercules, (423-420); (11) Ion, (419-416);
(12) Daughters of Troy, 415; (13) Electra, (413);






INTRODUCTION


(14) Iphigeneia in Taurica, (414-412); (15) Helen, 412;
(16) Phoenician Maidens, (411-409); (17) Orestes, 408;
(18) Bacchanals, 405; (19) Iphigeneia in Aulis, 405.
In this edition the plays are arranged in three
main groups, based on their connexion with (1) the
Story of the Trojan War, (2) the Legends of Thebes,
(3) the Legends of Athens. The Alcestis is a story
of old Thessaly. The reader must, however, be
prepared to find that the Trojan War series does not
present a continuously connected story, nor, in some
details, a consistent one. These plays, produced at
times widely apart, and not in the order of the story,
sometimes present situations (as in Hecuba, Daughters
of Troy, and Helen) mutually exclusive, the poet not
having followed the same legend throughout the
series.
The Greek text of this edition may be called
eclectic, being based upon what appeared, after care-
ful consideration, to be the soundest conclusions of
previous editors and critics. In only a few instances,
and for special reasons, have foot-notes on readings
been admitted. Nauck's arrangement of the choruses
has been followed, with few exceptions.
The translation (first published 1894-1898) has
been revised throughout, with two especial aims,
xii






INTRODUCTION


closer fidelity to the original, and greater lucidity in
expression. It is hoped that the many hundreds of
corrections will be found to bring it nearer to the
attainment of these objects. The version of the
Cyclops, which was not included in the author's
translation of the Tragedies, has been made for this
edition. This play has been generally neglected by
English translators, the only existing renderings in
verse being those of Shelley (1819), and Wodhull
(1782).









BIBLIOGRAPHY.
I. Editiones principes:-
1. J. Lascaris (Florence, 1496); Med., Hipp.,
Alc., Andr. 2. M. Musurus (Aldus, Venice, 1503);
17 plays, all except Here. Fur. (added in supple-
mentary volume), and Electra. 3. P. Victorius;
Electra, from Florentine Codex (1545).
II. Latest Critical Editions :-
G. Murray (Clar. Press, 1902-09); Prinz-Wecklein
(Teubner, Leipzig, 1878-1902).
III. Latest Important Commentaries:-
Paley, all the plays, 3 v. (Whitaker and Bell,
1872-1880); H. Well, Sept Tragddies d'Euripide
(Paris, 1878).
IV. Recent Important Monographs on Euripides:-
Decharme's Euripides and the Spirit of his Dramas
(Paris, 1896), translated by James Loeb (Macmillan,
1906); Wilamowitz-Moellendorff, Herakles (Berlin,
1893) ; W. Nestle, Euripides der Dichter der griech-
ischen Aufklirung (Stuttgart, 1902); P. Masqneray,
Euripide et ses iddes (Paris, 1908) ; Verrall, Euripides
the Rationalist (1895), Four Plays of Eurspides
(1905); Tyrrell, The Bacchants of Euripides and
other Essays (1910) ; Thomson, Euripides and the
Attic Orators (1898); Jones, The Moral Standpoint
of Euripides (1906).
V. Editions of Single Plays:-
Bacchae, by J. E. Sandys (Cambridge Press,
1904), R. Y. Tyrrell (Macmillan, 1896); Electra,
C. H. Keene (Bell, 1893); Iph. at Aulis, E. B.
England (Macmillan, 1891); Iph. in Tauris, E. B.
England (Macmillan, 1883); Medea, by A. W.
Verrall (Macmillan, 1881-1883); Orestes, Wedd (Pitt
Press, 1895); Phoenissae, by A. C. Pearson (Pitt
Press, 1911), J. U. Powell (Constable, 1911);
Troades, R. Y. Tyrrell (Macmillan, 1897).



















ELECTRA


VOL. II.






ARGUMENT


WHEN Agamemnon returned home from the taking of
Troy, his adulterous wife Clytemnestra, with help of
her paramour Aegisthus, murdered him as he entered the
silver bath in his palace. They sought also to slay his
young son Orestes, that no avenger might be left alive;
but an old servant stole him away, and took him out of
the land, unto Phocis. There was he nurtured by king
Strophius, and Pylades the king's son loved him as a
brother. So Aegisthus dwelt with Clytemnestra, reigning
in Argos, where remained now of Agamemnon's seed
Electra his daughter only. And these twain marked how
Electra grew up in hate,and scorn of them, indignant for
her father's murder, and fain to avenge him. Wherefore,
lest she should wed a prince, and persuade husband or
son to accomplish her heart's desire, they bethought them
how they should forestall this peril. Aegisthus indeed
would have slain her, yet by the queen's counsel forbore,
and gave her in marriage to a poor yeoman, who dwelt
farfrom the city, as thinking that from peasant husband
and peasant children there should be nought to fear.
Howbeit this man, being full of loyalty to the mighty
dead and reverence for blood royal, behaved himself to
her as to a queen, so that she continued virgin in his I'
house all the days of her adversity. Now when Orestes
was grown to man, hejourneyed with Pylades his friend
to Argos, to seek out his sister, and to devise hom he
might avenge his father, since by the oracle of Apollo he
was commanded so to do.
And herein is told the story of his coming, and how
brother and sister were made known to each other, and
how they fulfilled the oracle in taking vengeance on tyrant
and adulteress.

























TA TOY APAMATOY IIPO:$QUA

ArTOTPrO4 MTKHNAIO2
HAEKTPA
OPEMTH
xoPo
nPEIBTI
ArrEAOa
KATTAIMNHZTPA
A1OlKOTPOI
















DRAMATIC PERSONAE

PEASANT, wedded in name t Electra.
ELECTRA,- daughter of Agamemnon.
ORESTES, son of Agamemnon.
PYLADES, son of Strophius, king of Phocis.
-CLYTEMNESTRA, murderess of'her husband Agamemnon.
OLD MAN, once servant of Agamemnon.
MESSENGER, servant of Orestes.
THE TWIN BRETHREN, Castor and Pollux,.Sons of Zeus.
CHORUS, consisting of Argive women.
Attendants of Orestes and Pylades; handmaids of Clytem-
nestra.
ScENS:-Before the Peasant's cottage on the borders of
Argolis.













HAEKTPA


ATTOTPros
'12 ry,7 raXatov "Apyo, 'Ivaxyov poal,
o0ev 7r0T' lpaF vavcri XtXats "Apl
el9 eyiv 'TrrXevoe TpcpaS' 'Aya~a vicw v avaa.
cKTelva9 8eo ov KpaTOvv' ) 'IXta 'Fovt
Iplayuov, XLzv Te AapSdvov ickewtrv ?r6hvy,
iKET er' e6.TS' "Apyo, f'njX]Sv 8' ErrL
vayov 'Te f6ce o-KdXa rXdeto-a fap/3dpwv.
icKacei f L ?v T;xlrv'Va ev 8e b 8Jlzao't
Ovyjo-Kc yvvat\uco 'irpob KXvratcJinV-rpaq 8oX6
10 Ical r70 Over'Tov raC 8 Alytc -ov Yept.
XYc uep 7raXata o-ic7rrpa TavTrXov Xrrwov
dwXoXev, A'yro'o e /38aao'tXete XOovo',
ao ov EIceivov Tvviapi&a Icdprv e'cov.
o 8 86o e oow t'v i', T7' e1, Tpoav e'rXet,
loaeevd 'Opeo-TTv 0IlX 7r' 'HXeKcrpa9 OdXog,
TroP eV vIwarpb9 yepatl eICKX 7fleTeL rpoB ewV
iXXovT 'OpE-Trhv Xepb\ "7r' Alyto-Oov Oavei ,
iTpolt19 &'E8c/ce (oK eloce 7v TpE' ewW
bf 8' v J86pot 'petev 'HXeicrpa v7rarpoe,
20 raVur'v dereCt8 OaXepob eIX rl ?9 Xvporo?,
p vYorqlpef9 ~rov 'EXXdSoS r'rp7rot XOovoF.














ELECTRA


Enter PEASANT from the cottage.
PEASANT
Hail, ancient Argos, streams of Inachus,
Whence, with a thousand galleys battle-bound,
To Troyland's shore King Agamemnon sailed,
And, having slain the lord of Ilian land,
Priam, and taken Dardanus' burg renowned,
Came to this Argos, and on her high fanes
Hung up unnumbered spoils barbarian.
In far lands prospered he ; but in his home
Died by his own wife Clytemnestra's guile,
And by Aegisthus' hand, Thyestes' son. 10
So, leaving Tantalus' ancient sceptre, he
Is gone, and o'er the realm Aegisthus reigns,
Having to wife that king's wife, Tyndareus'
child.
Of those whom Troyward-bound he left at home,
The boy Orestes, and the maid Electra,
His father's fosterer stole the son away,
' Orestes, doomed to die by Aegisthus' hand,
And Phocis-ward to Strophius sent, to rear:
But in her father's halls Electra stayed,
Till o'er her mantled womanhood's first flush, 20
And Hellas' princes wooing asked her hand.






HAEKTPA


Selaa? S8 /L T) ? ra&8' PaF porwv Te/cO0
'AyaleU/Vrovo rOtLovaTrop, elvev 0v 84oto
Ayio-Ooo, o08' 4pjLo0e vvjLUcp Twv.
erel 8 Ka' ToT rorv y 63ou wroXXoD 7rrXwv,
7 rj XaOpaiewP rcva yevvaLw re/coL,
Krcavelv Croe /ovevo-avrog wjio)dpwv tigws
pr4Tp vty vcea'waev Alrylo-ov Xep6o.
eIv tIkV yap aivSpa alifrtv eyt' oXwXora,
30 ral wv 8' Ceetc e Ip 80ovr0efly 6dvy.
ec rTov&S 8 r Totov' efnXav4c-aTo
A'7rto0. Ifev yfg amrfhXXdX077 -vya'
'Ayape/vovov rais, Xpvobov elZ' 8F av lcravy,
ipLv 8e 8'1 88wo-tv 'HXeKrpav 'Xet~y
84 apTa, 7rarTepwv IEyv Mvicyvatwv dlro
/yey jia-t oV 8 TOTO 7' eeXeyXoptat"
Xarrpol 7yp ely 'IvoT ye, XprltarTwv ye 4rv
revr'Te, 'evev yvyeveL arroXXvrat*
i aoe-vez 80o"v rofeev! Xcd/3ot 0f3ov.
40 ec ytp vr ea'o-v er O1 eX' v ravp,
580ovT' av eijyetpe bOY 'Ayau tvovov
~6vov, 81 i T v ?Xfev Alylo-C Torre.
iv oiW7o8' aivp 6'8e, o-vvotSe pot, Kvpt?,
'gXovvev ebvy" rrapuevo 8 r'7 dEti 84.
alro-XvvOp.a yap o Xwlv adv8pv re7'va
Xap9cwv v3pl'etv, obv ardwTato yeyc;y .
o-Trevow 8e To Xoyoto-C K~y8evovT' e/ot
SOXtov 'Opo-Tlv, ei' wro' ei' "Apyo / .ioXv
,yadovw d8eXj; 8vo-rUTvXcE da'6rerat.
50 o-~t 8& /p' elval' Pocrt tuopov, el Xa/3wv
veav 'q oticov; 7rap0evov /k7 Oe'yydavw,
ryvrortp; vrovr7povt Kavo~tv avapterpovIZfevo
TO o`cb pov I'aoT, Icavrboy av Trtovro'; aWy.







ELECTRA

Aegisthus then, in fear lest she should bear
To a prince a son, avenger of Agamemnon,
Kept her at home, betrothed her unto none.
But, since this too with haunting dread was
fraught,
Lest she should bear some noble a child of
stealth,
He would have slain her; yet, how cruel soe'er,
Her mother saved her from Aegisthus' hand;-
A plea she had for murder of her lord,
But feared to be abhorred for children's blood:-- SO
Wherefore Aegisthus found out this device:
On Agamemnon's son, who had fled the land,
He set a price, even gold to whoso slew;
But to me gives Electra, her to have
To wife,-from Mycenaean fathers sprung
Am I, herein I may not be contemned ,
Noble my blood is, but,in this world's goods
I am poor, whereby men'shigh descent is marred,-
To make his fear naught by this spouse of naught.
For, had she wed a man of high repute, 40
Agamemnon's slumbering blood-feud had he waked;
Then on Aegisthus vengeance might have fallen.
But never I-Cypris my witness is-
Have shamed her couch: a_.irgin is she yet.
Myself think shame t6 take a prince's child
And outrage-I, in birth unmeet for her!
Yea, and for him I sigh, in name my kin,
Hapless Orestes, if to Argos e'er
He come, and see his sister's wretched marriage.
If any name me fool, thai I should take" 0
A young maid to mine home, and touch her not,
Let him kn6riwthat he meteth chastity
By his own soul's base measure-base as he.






HAEKTPA


HAEKTPA
v5 v pe utXatva, Xpvo-e v ai acTpv poe) ,
,v Tob a7,yo TWO efiepevov capa,
de V 7d8' 9 yo, 7T08' d4e0pE6OoV Kepa
e'povcra 7ry )f 'rorapla pterI~peopaat,
ob 8' Tt xpeia; el Too-ovS' daf ryry,
aXX' 69 v/3ptv Sel' wlev Alryloa-ov Oeot,
yovou a tqjr' ai~p' el piyav rra-rp.
60 7a ycp arava;c Tvv8apl 4r.p Ei'7
44e8aXle 1 OI'IWV, Xyapta TLOe/1r) 7rorcet
Trecoova 8' aXXovu araF8aq A i rto-a rapa
ndpepv' y' Opi-'r2v Kauic roteLTaw S'oav.
ATTOTPFro
TI 'yap Td', & v0/7v', eprtv aoe aprtv
rrovov xoucrvoa, 7rpo5-ev e Te pa/leppvr7,
Kal ravr deo0 XeVOVT0r oUic C t'o-racat ;
HAEKTPA
eyca o' loov Geolo-v-w yov/ias /IXov"
ed o70t9 qotl yAp OVic evvi pto-aa KaotoA .
peydLrL SE Ovrroto iotpa oaUVOoptic KarcKf
70 larpov eupewt, ow iyw e Xat apava.
8ea 81j 1e6 IccEIXevao-Tv el'S o-ov o-8e'vw
SXOov '7rtKcov (bovo-av, c4 po aov ,ep ; ,
oavveiicopLl ew aol 'r'ovf -., a(? S' 6'yen
atai&ev epya" ray 8o/'ot? 8' q/ytav Xpcwv
fevrpetri'Lew. el-UourV 8' epydry
Ovpalev 8v6 rTavSov evplo-Kew KcaX5oq.
ATTOTPfrO
6t rot SolceE oot, co-relT Kxal yap ob 7rpo'fw
Iryaial jteXdOpWv TvS'). dyo 8' Ap' l7uLepa
/ovD, el dpovpa elo-/aXwv oanrepw yvava.
80 apyo?9 yAp os8eflq eov Xv E adva orTota
olov 8vvaTr' v t vXXeyeiv aveuv rrvov.







ELECTRA

Enter ELECTRA, with a wvater-jar upon her head.
ELECTRA
Hail, black-winged Night, nurse of the golden stars,
Wherein I bear this pitcher on mine head
Poised, as I fare to river-cradling springs,-
Not that I do this of pure need constrained,
But to show Heaven Aegisthus' tyranny,-
And wail to the broad welkin for my sire.
For mine own mother, Tyndareus' baleful child, 60
Thrust me from home, to pleasure this her spouse,
And, having borne Aegisthus other sons,
Thrusteth aside Orestes' rights and mine.
PEASANT
Why wilt thou toil, O hapless, for my sake,
Thus, nor refrain from labour,-thou of old
Royally nurtured,-though I bid thee so?
ELECTRA
Kind I account thee even as the Gods,'
Who in mine ills hast not insulted me.
High fortune this, when men for sore mischance
Find such physician as I find in thee. 70
I ought, as strength shall serve, yea, though forbid,
To ease thy toil, that lighter be thy load,
And share thy burdens. Work enow afield
Hast thou: beseems that I should keep the house
In order. When the toiler cometh home,
'Tis sweet to find the household fair-arrayed.
PEASANT
If such thy mind, pass on: in sooth not far
The springs are from yon cot. I at the dawn
Will drive my team afield and sow the glebe.
None idle-though his lips aye prate of Gods- 80
Can gather without toil a livelihood.
[Exeunt PEASANT and ELECTRA.






HAEKTPA


OPE2TH2
IIvuXa4, o-e yap 8 ivrpwrov avppwrrwv fy&w
7Lo-rT0v vozi( ical (t'Xov Evov r' epioi
6VO, 8' 'OpelT-rv row'v eMau'a4es cpiXwv
qrpdao-ov8' a rrpda--w 8ev' VTr AlytolBov 7raOc)v,
Sov I caT-eKc a .7rarTepa Xj 7ravaXoepo,;
t/ pJT. 4a0Eypat 8' ic OeoD Xpr~aorplOwv1
'ApyeTov oi8ae, obSevlb vvvet86Sro',
6vov Oove6io-t rarpb 'T AXXdfwov CuoD.
90 YVeTO? S86 77-roe vprpoh Tradov p1OXCv l raTpoF
Md/cpvdc T Sowica Kcalt ?Oftuf dripfdr7vp
yrvpa r e'a ao- alpa /, X1e'ov c6bvov,
Xalo)v rvpavvov; od Kcparov -t .Tro-e 7y.
ica' TCCeiOv IV derbVo ob BSalvw rro'a,
8vov 8' apitXXLav uvvrti8es a(tfc6rjv
rpb04 TeplpovaF ry7 To-8', 'iv' dcxdXw troS
a'DXX'v e'r alav, e fIe' rt9 yvoLy] o7orrwv,
r^rTov r' dSe Xj()v, (aci' y7p vwv ev ydltotg
levxelo-av olIcdv, obe w7rapOfvov pi'vew,
100 wo a-vyy-jev1oati Kal fo6vov -vvepyadrtv
Xap 3v ra'' eEt'o-W rEtXEI v acrab duadow.
vDv oiv, "Ewo 7tp Xevicov ot/L' dvaipera,

97 ,yap Tr aporTp 7 rtv oWIETt9 7uVV
aav4-eTrat v v, Ivrw o-ropTfo-olev
el Tovao8e valet ovyt7ovo0 To7rrov eIA/.
XX' eloopo .yap 7rjv8e rrpocrrod Xv rtvd,
7'r yaFov aw(Bo ev KceicapKpeLvp icpa
4e'povoaav" 110 SovAX] yvvatKov, bv ri 8EewjeoEO' eTro0
C 0' olo-7, IlvX'8d7, Trjv8' af&ipe0a x'dva.
1 Barnes: for MSS. iova-T piwv: "from Phoebus' mystic shrine,"
12






ELECTRA


Enter ORESTES and PYLADES.
ORESTES
Pylades, foremost thee of men I count
In loyalty, love, and friendship unto me.
Sole of Orestes' friends, thou hast honoured me
In this my plight, wronged foully by Aegisthus,
Who, with my utter-baneful mother, slew
My sire. At Phoebus' oracle-hest I come
To Argos' soil, none privy thereunto,
To pay my father's murderers murder-wage.
This night o'erpast to my sire's tomb I went; 90
There tears I gave and offerings of shorn hair,
And a slain sheep's blood poured upon the grave
Unmarked of despot-rulers of this land.
And now I set not foot within their walls,
But blending two assays in one I come
To this land's border,-that to another soil
Forth I may flee, if any watch and know me;
To seek withal my sister,-for she dwells
In wedlock yoked, men say, nor bides a maid,-
To meet her, for the vengeance win her help, 100
And that which passeth in the city learn.
Now-for the Dawn uplifteth eyelids white-
Step we a little from this path aside.
Haply shall some hind or some bondwoman
Appear to us, of whom we shall inquire
If in some spot hereby my sister dwell.
Lo, yonder I discern a serving-maid -
Who on shorn head her burden from the spring
Bears : crouch we low, then of this bondmaid ask,
If tidings haply we may win of that 110
For which we came to this land, Pylades.
[ORESTES and PYLADES retire to rear.






HAEKTPA


HAEKTPA
o'vvTeIv, wpa, 7roo, 8op9jdpv Crrp. a
'pA/3a '/3i a KcaraKicalova-a.

e'yevo6Iav 'Ayacvjwovov
icovpa, IKat /t e'Kce KXvr-ativo-TLpa,
o'Trvy/v Tvv8dpea Kopa"
KtKXI c-rKovO t S' 1' ad9XIav
'HX'/crpav rroXtcTrat.
120 e6D T~ d O-i o rXr7-1V rvopwv
cat orvwyepta 46aq.
o rda7ep, ov 8' dv 'A'Sa
Keto-at, oa-& alXdXov c- ayai
Al'YLolov 7', 'Ayadeuzvov.
't T'v ao'v e 'yecpe y7ov, peot 8.
avaye 7roXv8aKpvv aSovdv.

o-vvUrew, Opa, 'roS4b op/tav advr. a
SfEa ",)3a KaTaicXaiova-a.
Ito LOL /.OLt.
130 viva 7r6dXv, rtva 8' oticov, o
TXa/~ov cryyove, XaTpev et
olicrpav v aX6ai'ot Xtrow
rarpwot d7rl r uavbopaFi
aXyiWTratctv &XeiXdv ;
A'PXoC TCoVre 7Trd(OV 4w2ol
rt M LXEa XvTrp,
c Ze3 Ze~, 7rarpL 9' alicuwov
eXOlo'r-v derlcovpo;, "Ap-
ye o-raXoa 7ro'' Xa'rav.
140 OF 7668 TieOXo 4siT ja'ro- icparm &- aTp. /'






ELECTRA


Re-enter ELECTRA.
ELECTRA
Bestir thou, for time presses, thy foot's speed ; (Str. 1)
Haste onward weeping bitterly.
I am his child, am Agamemnon's seed,-
Alas for me, for me !-
And I the daughter Clytemnestra bore,
Tyndareus' child, abhorred of all;
And me the city-dwellers evermore
Hapless Electra call.
Woe and alas for this my lot of sighing, 120
My life from consolation banned !
O father Agamemnon, thou art lying
In Hades, thou whose wife devised thy dying--
Her heart, Aegisthus' hand.
(Mesode)
On, wake once more the selfsame note of grieving:
Upraise the dirge of tears that bring relieving.

Bestir thou, for time presses, thy foot's speed; (Ant. 1)
Haste onward weeping bitterly.
Ah me, what city sees thee in thy need,
Brother ?-alas for thee 130
In what proud house hast thou a bondman's place,
Leaving thy woeful sister lone
Here in the halls ancestral of our race
In sore distress to moan ?
Come, a Redeemer from this anguish, heeding
My desolation and my pain:
Come Zeus, come Zeus, the champion of a bleeding
Father most foully killed-to Argos leading
The wanderer's feet again.
(Str. 2)
Set down this pitcher from thine head: 140






HAEKTPA


Xovo"', 'va rvarp y6owv vvX~ov;
eropOpevo-w,
laxav IEXov 'At8aa,
'Atia, 'drep,
-ol tcara ya9 E'vvI rr yoovq,
o4 ael TO KcaT' aap
8t7ro/tat, KcaTr Uev iitXav
ovvxt reavoleva 8epav,
Xp4a 8e c patr E7rl KovPtiLo
TtOe/leva Oavdri) aO.
150 6 ', 8pvire iccpa Lteao-8.
ola 84 rTv icCKVOicS 0 hea;
rora/jotv wrapa Xevuao-tv
'rrarEpa IX TOrarov ayaXet,
oXo6evov 8oXtot0 /3poxwv
picK eo-, w )A ToVE y ao Iov
7rar-p' deyu KcaraKXataloat,
XovTph a\ravva7ra8' v8pavI pevov Xpot, avT. 3'
icoba ev oLiTpoWTTra ~avaTrov.
tOw pot fpo
160 7rucpa9 tev TreXe~l iceV roLat
ta9,, r tep, -cpa 8'
dic Tpota d6lov 3ovX d.
ov fUrpat o yvvl o-e
84Ear' o68' 7lt aTOreCvoV.
tIoEtC 8' Ap /tOtpUoiV Xvypav
AIytoOov iwS3av Oeze'va
6hXtov 'oXev aKol~av.
XOPOZ
'Aya,/elrvovov C Icopa, 07p. 7y
uXvoov, 'HXeb'cpa, rOT o-Av a'yp'rretpav av dv.






ELECTRA


Let me prevent the morn
With wailings for a father dead,
Shrieks down to Hades borne,
Through the grave's gloom, 0 father, ringing:
Through Hades' hall to thee I call,
Day after day my cries outflinging;
And aye my cheeks are furrowed red
With blood by rending fingers shed.
Mine hands on mine head smiting fall-
Mine head for thy death shorn.
(Mesode),
Rend the hair grief-defiled !
As swan's note, ringing wild
Where some broad stream still-stealetl,
O'er its dear sire outpealeth,
Mid guileful nets who lies
Dead-so o'er thee the cries
Wail, father, of thy child,

Thee, on that piteous death-bed laid (Ant. 2)
When that last bath was o'er !
Woe for the bitter axe-edge swayed,
Father, adrip with gore !
Woe for the dread resolve, prevailing
From Ilion to draw thee'on
To her that waited thee--not hailing
With chaplets !-nor with wreaths arrayed
Wast thou; but with the falchion's blade
She made thee Aegisthus' sport, and won
That treacherous paramour.
Enter CHORUS.
CHORUS
Atreides' child, Electra, I have come (Sir. 3)
Unto thy rustic home.


VOL. II.






HAEKTPA

eooXe Ttq epoXe yaXaxToiro'Ta av p
170 Mvloxvaiog opetdS'ra's
dyyleXXet oTI vwv 7TpTai-
av Icapvacovao-v Ovalav
'Apyedot, Erwai'at 6 rap' "H-
pay peXovu-tv 7rapOevtaal a-relXev.
HAEKTPA
OVtc V' ayXatats, OtXac,
Ov/ILb ou8 e7rT Xpvo-eoo0
opplowt-tv *renazat
rdXaw', oV8' laC-Tta Xopova
'Apyelatw 6ua vvbtdpai
180 eiXt'llI Kpo ow) 7r6' uo'v.
&aKpvtn vvXe&o, Sacplvov Se pot /iXet
8eXata TO Kar' apap.
a-lce#a pov 'irtvapav xKoav
Kal T7pVX'O 7r8' eS/Jv 1r71reov,
el rperovT' 'Ayaseovoyog
Kovpa ra aao-Xeta
Tpoia 0, &a rov pov raT'epoT
pep.v raT 7roO' 6Xooa-a.
XOP02
190o /'yaXa OeYo'" oXX' (, oVT. 7
Kal trap' dpov Xplo-as 7roXlv7r va Odcpea S8vat,
ypvicea re X aptct rpoaO 'j/ar' 4dyXaia~.
8OKcei rToZoFt to-oi 8acpvoTv,
fpM TtieLoo-a 0eotv, iepa'rt-
a-eiv d-XOpv ; o06roL orovaXats,
LX' evyXaZict eobv a'efi-
yovo' ~fet eagieplav, w wrai.







ELECTRA


One from Mycenae sped this day is here,
A milk-fed mountaineer. 170
Argos proclaims, saith he, a festival
The third day hence to fall;
And unto Hera's fane must every maid
Pass, in long pomp arrayed.
ELECTRA
Friends, not for thought of festal tide,
Nor carcanet's gold-gleaming pride
The pulses of my breast are leaping;
Nor with the brides of Argos keeping
The measure of the dance, my feet
The wreathed maze's time shall beat: 180
Nay, but with tears the night I greet,
And wear the woeful day with weeping.
Look on mine hair, its glory shorn,
The disarray of mine attire :
Say, if a princess this beseemeth,
Daughter tw Agamemnon born,
Or Troy, that, smitten by my sire,
Of him in nightmare memories dreameth ?
CHORUS
Great is the Goddess:1 borrow then of me (Ant. 3) 190
Robes woven cunningly,
And jewels whereby shall beauty fairer shine.
Dost think these tears of thine,
If thou give honour not to Gods, shall bring
Thy foes low ?-reverencing
The Gods with prayers, not groans, shalt thou
obtain
Clear shining after rain.

1 Therefore her festival is not lightly to be neglected.
19
c2







HAEKTPA


HAEKTPA
o beiq Oearv evo'ra KcXuet
7ra 8uo Sv-atlovov, ob raXat-
200 7v wraTpov cr0 ay-tacro-v.
oatot Too KIcara bat1Ovov
700 re ~(vrTOo aXaTa,
0g 7rov Ywv aXXav icaTr'Xe
/pXeo? AXatwov TroT Oao-aav e'orav,
TroD KIeivoD w7raTrpb icfdn.
avTri 8' jv XCepvir-t Sp0os
vatl, '*vXtv raicofEva
8wotarwy v'rarpciwv vyd4,
210 oupetag av eporvag.
Adrflp S' IV XMCrpocIf (govto'
iaXXp o-vyyalo oixce.
XOPO2
7roXXov KaK vv"'EXXyia avi'av e'Xe
o-,a prpPOF 'ESevy o-vTyyovo 86Pots e eo*o'.
HAEKTPA
olpst, eyPauce3, ie'/lv Opv/1dT feIvo rti'V 7rap' olcov oi'8' fecaTlovs
edvA eXovU-re eavioQ-avtas XoXov"
Ov7y1i, rv eJv tearT otlpo, el &/LOV 8' ycd,
OPE2THS
220o W, TrdXatva* /.0 'poe'a-y' 4'v X',pa.
HAEKTPA
& GoF) "A'woXXov, 7rporo-ir&vrc oe upi Oavedv.
OPE2TH2
,XXkovv Icrdvoiu ptaXXov E 'Oovv oa-eev
HAEKTPA
dre0 e, pAr va' 'v cre ( *favetv xpewv.
O20


--Z-7







ELECTRA


ELECTRA
No God regards a wretch's cries,
Nor heeds old flames of sacrifice
Once on my father's altars burning. 200
Woe for the dead, the unreturning !
Woe for the living, homeless now,
In alien laid constrained, I trow
To serfdom's board in grief to bow-
That hero's son afar sojourning !
In a poor hovel I abide,
An exile from my father's door,
Wasting my soul with tears outwelling,
Mid scaurs of yon wild mountain-side :- 210
My mother with her paramour
In murder-bond the while is dwelling !
CHORUS
Of many an ill to Hellas and thine house
SWas Helen, sister of thy mother, cause.
l ORESTES and PYLADES approach.
ELECTRA,
Woe's me, friends !-needs must I break off my moan !
Lo, yonder, strangers ambushed nigh the house
Out of their hiding-place are rising up !
With flying feet-thou down the path, and I
Into the house,-flee we from evil men !
ORESTES (intercepting her)
Tarry, thou hapless one: fear not mine hand. 220
ELECTRA
Phoebus, I pray thee that I be not slain !
ORESTES (extending his hand to hers)
God grant I slay some more my foes than thee !
ELECTRA
Hence !-touch not whom beseems thee not to touch!
91







HAEKTPA

OPE:TH2
oK etoi STrV Olyo"C' av vSticK0Trepov.
HAEKTPA
ical Wr&S !ttlpjp19 7Wpo9 S61Ioz XotS ? o9pol;
OPE2TH2
ielvac' aKova-ov, Ical iX' o a\icXXw e'pei,.
HAEKTPA
eor-Tca r7ravuCv 8' el'tL ao- Kpeio-ow yap el.
OPE2THI
Ic() fpwov o-o ao-oD Kaao-tyv rov X0ov9.
HAEKTPA
w 1TX7ar', apa @vTOr q' Te0vcKro,'70 ;
OPE2TH2
230 "j 7rpwrTa 'ycp oo TrryadO' arylyeXXXerv 04w.
HAEKTPA
Ed8at1.oroly7, ao-Obv 1S7lo- wv Xoywv.
OPE2TH2
Iolv 8180wtOL ToDro V)v auOpoiv '@eEtV.
HAEKTPA
trof yi), 6 TXIjlloWV T7rXj'ova,; vya e'eov ;
OPE2TH2
oYx va voj4ltwv 0edpeTrat 'roXe)w vbofov.
HAEKTPA
oi trov U raviV 70tcaO0' ~ (pav /3'ov ;
OPE2TH2
o)et pe'v, dAo-0ev? 8& 8< ev7wv dvijp.
HAEKTPA
X6yov 8 82 r7iv e' 5eO E c H ceivov ppaiv ;
OPE2TH2
el k s, o'7TW Te @oo-'a o-vpiopa 6'XeL,.








ELECTRA

ORESTES
None is there whom with better right I touch.
ELECTRA
Why sword in hand waylay me by mine house?
ORESTES
Tarry and hear: my words shall soon be thine.
ELECTRA
I stand, as in thy power ;-the stronger thou.
ORESTES
I come to bring thee tidings of thy brother.
ELECTRA
Friend-friend!-and eth e, or is he dead? *
ORESTES
He liv~trgh st-theood news would I tell. 230
ELECTRA
Blessings on thee, thy meed for words most sweet!
--~ ORESTES
This blessing to us twain I give to share.
ELECTRA
What land hath he for weary exile's home ?
ORESTES
Outcast, he claims no city's citizenship.
ELECTRA
Not-surely not in straits for daily bread?
ORESTES
That hath he: yet the exile helpless is.
ELECTRA
And what the message thou hast brought from him ?
ORESTES
Liv'st thou?-he asks; and, living, what thy state ?
23







HAEKTPA

HAEKTPA
o;KcoUVV opa, IoUv 'rpCioov in ppbov 8e1a ;
OPE2TH2
240 uvra( ye o-vvTerTcK6o, wore 1e 6r evew.
HAEKTPA
cal icpa7ra 7'rXd~ad/iv T' ado'l Otvlo'vov SvpO.
OPESTHI
8acves o-' SeXfb' re Oav'w t o-wr' ara p.
HAEKTPA
otC/o1, rT yap Jot TCwv86 l eo'Tt71 iXTepov ;
OPE2THI
feD ceO 7ri 8' a a ou a-t icao-tyvrTy SoiceK ;
HAEKTPA
a7r('v A6cetvoq, oV; rapw'Zv qf'uv q)LXo'.
OPE5TH2
dec 0oD S8 valet JvOa8' dares eIcai ;
HAEKTPA
e'yripea1j', o feive, Oavdao-.ov yatov.
OPE:TH2
~jio' a SeXcv o-'v. Muvrovaiwv ~vL ;
HAEKTPA
ovy T 7-ar-ijp P 7'qX7rtev KicoS0Eew oTTe.
OPE2THS
250 6e4', &0/acoov-av q Kaortiyv7'T) Xe'o.
HAEKTPA
Ev Too-8' Eiceivov T"Xopb< vatlw 86to0(.
OPE2TH2
a-Kcafev 7Tt F /3ovc0opP/3s aito, 804V0m.
HAEKTPA
TremVp &v?)p yevvato' el' 7T' i' eBce3OjT.
OPE2TH2
S8'- eOetae Ts' v'pove0Q T o rdo-et ;







ELECTRA

ELECTRA
Seest thou not how wasted is my form ?-
ORESTES
So sorrow-broken that myself could sigh. 240
ELECTRA
Mine head withal-my tresses closely shorn.
ORESTES
Heart-wrung by a brother's fate, a father's death?
ELECTRA
Ah me, what is to me than these more dear?
ORESTES
Alas! art thou not to thy brother dear?
ELECTRA
Far off he stays, nor comes to prove his love.
ORESTES ,
Why dost thou dwell here, from the city far?
ELECTRA
I am wedded, stranger-as in bonds of death.
ORESTES
A Mycenaean lord? Alas thy brother I
ELECTRA
Not one to whom my sire once hoped to wed me.
ORESTES
Tell me, that hearing I may tell thy brother. 250
ELECTRA
In this his house from Argos far I live.
ORESTES
Delver or neatherd should but match such house!
ELECTRA
Poor, yet well-born, and reverencing me.
ORESTES
Now what this reverence rendered of thy spouse ?







HAEKTPA

HAEKTPA
ovbr(aror' eCVVf i 7/ T J ^? &Y r O~Irelv.
OPEXTH2
a rvev9'^ 4o rw Oeov T o-' drao ;
HAEKTPA
yovia& v3pierv ew V70a e ou? o'rc ilov.
OPE5TH2
2cal 7r& ydlCov rowtLoov obX 0 c'O-E XhaTv ;
HAEKTPA
ov Kvpiov raov 80vra i' /reraf, reve.
OPEZTH2



OPE:STH:
260 vViK' 'Oplo-riTy '] TroT' eic7ay 8l'rcv.
HAEKTPA
TO7T' avTb Tapi3wv, irpOf Se' Ial a-ipcov v duv.
OPEXTHI

,evvaFov a vp' eXefa e re 8pao-crrfv.
HAEKTPA
el 8 h 7ro0' est 7' fl? oprovw 6' vpv awt.
OPE2TH2
Ciirjp U4 1) TeKoc-a TraOr' rvCove'op ;
HAEKTPA
yvvaitceT dv8p&v, & fiv', ob rai' ov Oiha.
OPE2TH2
Tivo. 84 o- e' eve' Oipto A'Iabo-OoT radSe;
HAEKTPA
receive pt' 6odveT' dOrevCjV, T0o86e Sov*.
OPE2TH2
0,; W8je 7ra?8ag plJ2 r7ficoif 7rQtOdTopa ;







ELECTRA

ELECTRA
Never hath he presumed to.touch my couch.
ORESTES
A vow of chastity, or scorn of thee ?
ELECTRA
He took not on him to insult my sires.
ORESTES
How ? did he not exult to win such bride ?
ELECTRA
He deems that who betrothed me had not right.
ORESTES
I understand:-and feared Orestes' vengeance? 260
ELECTRA
Yea, this: yet virtuous is he therewithal.
ORESTES
A noble soul this, worthy of reward!
ELECTRA
Yea, if the absent to his home return.
ORESTES
But did the mother who bare thee suffer this?
ELECTRA ,
Wives be their husbands', not their children's

ORESTES
Why did Aegisthus this despite to thee ?
ELECTRA
That weaklings1 of weak sire my sons might prove.
ORESTES
Ay, lest thou bear sons to avenge the wrong ?
1 i.e. Politically and socially.







HAEKTPA

HAEKTPA
Totav' epovlevo'* wv lltol 8o' 8;!cv.
OPE2TH2
270 oZlev 84 o' oav 7rapOevov flyTrpo 7roa ;
HAEKTPA
OVic otSe' aty7 ToDo' v/axpovlueo-0a vtv.
OPE2TH5
atS' ov ~ha o-ot 70-"a a-' "Kco ova-tv X6yov' ;
HAEKTPA
W(Ore aTe7Yeti ye Trda/a ica a' eT KaXak.
OPE2TH2
TI ~8F 'OpTo-T1; 7rp\? Trd', "Apyog 'v dXX17 ;
HAEKTPA
"pov 7T8'; aloa-pdv 7' el tra o yap vDv /cjI;
OPE2TH2
NeOXw \ 8 8 wa \ fove'a &v ,idvoCt 7arpO';
HAEKTPA
roX-,auv ~wr e'XOpv ol' EroX/jO' 7qraTp.
OPE2TH2
2I xcal pIe abIrov pLJT 7r' v TXaI2' icaveF ;
HAEKTPA
'avr' ye reXCKcet 7y 7ra'rip d7raXeTO.
OPE2TH2
280 X 7o rd' a aiv'T, ,cal 3e'/3ata Ta'ro" ao ;
HAEKTPA
Odvoclu pijrpw al1' .Erw.a- e'?ao .
OPE2TH2

ef0' v 'Opo-T7r l r'hXo-lov cL KXd rdSe.
HAEKTPA
tAXX', & fIv', ov yrvo'lv av elo-aiooa-d vwv,







ELECTRA

ELECTRA
So schemed he-God grant I requite him yet!
ORESTES
Knows he, thy mother's spouse, thou art maiden still ? 270
ELECTRA
Nay, for by silence this we hide from him.
ORESTES
Friends, then, are these which hearken these thy
words ?
ELECTRA
Yea, true to keep thy counsel close and mine.
ORESTES
What help, if Argos-ward Orestes came ?
ELECTRA
Thou ask !-out on thee !-is it not full time ?
ORESTES
How slay his father's murderers, if he came ?
ELECTRA
Daring what foes against his father dared.
ORESTES
And with him wouldst thou, couldst thou, slay thy
mother ?
ELECTRA
Ay !-with that axe whereby my father died I
ORESTES
This shall I tell him for thy firm resolve ? 280
ELECTRA
My mother's blood for his-then welcome death!
ORESTES
Ah, were Orestes nigh to hear that word!
ELECTRA
But, stranger, though I saw, I should not know him.
29






HAEKTPA
OPE2TH2
via yap, ovSev Oav^', "dreeV)04] vlov.
HAEKTPA
elZ av po'OVo vtv T7ev e v yvoij oly 4iv.
OPE2THS
ap' ov X4yovo-v aV'rv eicKXdAat 06vov;
HAEKTPA
rarpdo ye 7raayoSaywy apxat yeo pwov.
OPE5THS
6 Kcar=avcv 8' o-O? 7raT)p TrVi'3ov icUpet;
HAEKTPA
cvpa-ev Wch eCvpo-ev, eK/3'290ed 860/'mOV.
OPE2TH2
290 o'ctot, T7O' o.ov e lra" al'~kro-tg yap obv
ickIc erv OvpalcV 7TrlcTa Sw icve /3poTrodv.
Xe'ov 8', 'v' el8(; cr Kao Yi cr'ry c/epw
X6'yovq a1rprreptre, aXX' vayxcaov icKXvewv.
'vo-ET S' oliCTO9', apfaOa pev ov8apoD,
ootozo-t 8' 8vv8pvi Ical yap o06' afipLov
yv)u1lwjv weveva TOt -ro(oh9 ?iav ao-0fv.
XOPO0
KayC ToY aur7v T6r'8 ppov *'X)v9f kXW.
Tpoo-w yap ao-TEw) ovoba TaVr 7roX het ca
ovi olia, vvv 8 o 86Xoyvoat Ictyl ('opaOetv.
HAEKTPA
300 Xyotl av, el Xp Xp 7 rpo? 'Xov XVye w
TuvaV /3apela9 T7a Ear KaIcJiOV wrarpoF.
eire 8c icwetEq ti00Gov, icerev'w, Vve,
ayyeXX' 'Ope'ary 7Td ical icei vov Kaad,
7rpjwrov UV pe 0 o Co f ', TrrXov9 abXioo/ua,1
1 So MSS. Weil reads abaivopam, "wastes my life away."
Tucker suggests &-yAjopar (ironical): "I am fair-arrayed."
30






ELECTRA


ORESTES
No marvel-a child parted from a child.
ELECTRA
One only of my friends would know him now,-
ORESTES
Who stole him out of murder's clutch, men say ?
ELECTRA
That old man, once the child-ward of my sire.
ORESTES
And thy dead father-hath he found a tomb?
ELECTRA
Such tomb as he hath found, flung forth his halls !
ORESTES
Ah me, what tale is this !-Yea, sympathy 290
Even for strangers' pain wrings human hearts.
Tell on, that, knowing, to thy brother I
May bear the joyless tale that must be heard.
Yea, pity dwells, albeit ne'er in churls,
Yet in the wise :-this is the penalty
Laid on the wise for souls too finely wrought.
CHORUS
His heart's desire, the same is also mine:
For, from the town far dwelling, naught know I
The city's sins: now fain would I too hear.
ELECTRA
Tell will I-if I may. Sure I may tell 300
A friend my grievous fortune and my sire's.
Since thou dost wake the tale, I pray thee, stranger,
Report to Orestes all mine ills and his.
Tell in what raiment I am hovel-housed,






HAEKTPA


irivy 0' oo") //ptO', mr'o orTeyat-l re
oaio't valco pacOltXtciv 'ec Sowdrrwv,
auvra /AV d~icpox ovDoa icepxcla.w wriXovw,
j ryvpvov 4fw a-w6ia cal aorepjao-opat,
ab-' 8' 7,yayh wroraldovq Oopov~fevy.
310 aveopTro lepwv Kal Xopwv TjrriTfcev7,
avalvoizat yvvaltav, ova-a IrapOevo?,
avaivotat Se8 KaoTop', o), Irptv elv Oeobg
e0eOv e, '' ..v.j.7.revov, o-crav e7yevr1.
/r.jLnp 8' e4f pvt'ylotav ev a'vvXeaca-t
Opovt KIc Jrale -rpbo 8' 8paso-v 'Ao-Se9
S/wai aToaTltovo', ay eirepa- eg/oT 7-aTrp,
'I8ata tdpyS Xpvcraatv Yewvy/eUval
7ropara-wtv. aliza 8' e'Tt waTaTpo ara o-Tryac
pheav o-do 8 rrev 88' e.vov eicravev,
320 ei raTar 8alvwv appLa' edco0sn warpi,
Kal aKxrTp' Iv ok "EXXyio'tv ~orpaarrXeti
itatcfvoota-t Xepc-' yavpov-rat Xap/v.
'A/ate'povov 8S 7-Tf43ov, qctfao-pvoz
ov6cr Xod; roT' oTi68 ,XKiva pvpaoivrl
"Xaf3e, 7rvpa Se8 XEpaog AyXaia-fdrw.v.
t40p' & /3pe0lX v Tfiv9 4ij1 tt Prrpo? rOdatq
SXXe flw', e 'X\VovU -w, evfppoa-ceI 7rTdp
irTposv fe ,XevEL p1vwpa \Xdvov 7rarpov,
ical Troro roX/vi Toibrog eiv juli Xe'iyet
330 7rou vrat Opar-T ; ; ;pa crot rvp 6 W KaXie,
rapdwv apvvew ; ravY tr arw v1ptpecraL.
.AXX', o Wv', iTcere(w a-', arrd7yyetXov rd.8e
wroXXol 8' 7rtTTlXXovo-tv, eppnjvevi 8' yc6),
at X'tper, 4 'Y)ro- I' j -aXalbrwopo e 7- pc v
Icapa T' e'orv uvp7ici 0" 7 e Vceov rtcKv.
atiaPoV 'yap, e wIraTp pev tcieev pvvavs,






ELECTRA


Under what squalor I am crushed, and dwell
Under what roof, after a palace home;
How mine own shuttle weaves with pain my robes,-
Else must I want, all vestureless my frame;-
How from the stream myself the water bear;
Banned from the festal rite, denied the dance, 310
No part have I with wives, who am a maid,
No part in Castor, though they plig1ited me
To him, my kinsman, ere to heaven he passed.
Mid Phrygian spoils upon a throne the while
Sitteth my mother: at her footstool stand
Bondmaids of Asia, captives of my sire,
Their robes Idaean with the brooches clasped
Of gold:-and yet my sire's blood neathh the
roofs, .-..
A dark clot, festers He that murdered him
Mounteth his very car, rides forth in state; 320
The sceptre that he marshalled Greeks withal
Flaunting he graspeth in his blood-stained hand.
And Agamemnon's tomb is set at naught :
Drink-offerings never yet nor myrtle-spray
Had it, a grave all bare of ornament.
Yea, with wine drunken, he, my mother's spouse-
Named of men "glorious !-leaps upon the gac,
And pelts with stones my father's monument;
And against us he dares to speak this taunt:
"Where is thy son Orestes ?-bravely nigh 330
To shield thy tomb! So is the absent mocked.
But, stranger, I beseech thee, tell him this:
Many are summoning him,-their mouthpiece I,-
These hands, this tongue, this stricken heart of
mine,
My shorn head, his own father therewithal.
Shame, that the sire destroyed all Phrygia's race,


VOL. IT.






SH HAEKTPA

6 8' av8p' a v eLvs wv ov Svvio-erat crTavetv
vo 7'reT( XOPOZ
Kal /iv W80opKca Tvbe, oov XE'eyo roa-tv,
340 X4javra yiodXOov 7rpm; d/tov9 c)pjpu 'vov.
ATTOTPrOi
'ea* rtvap~ 7ro Ev 7rdXaLq opW e'Vov ;
Trvo, 8' e'/caT Ta'r8' dTr' apavXov; vruXa,
repoao-lXov ; ov 'pLO Se6/evot ; yvvatKi Tot
ata-Xpov pter' av8p c to-Travat veavtov.
HAEKTPA
SO NXraTr, e? fvrow'a phoXy TOy ovTa 8' e~t' pOov" oi'e yap evot
icovr' 'Ope'ro)v rpo, p0 e IKcjpvKice X6ywv.
aX',~ f'vot, vo-vyyvwre roTs etprphevotv.
ATTOTPro2
7I Oactv ; av7p eaTt KIca Xeacros cdo9 ;
HAEKTPA
350 or7tv Xo'dy yoDv cOa 8' oc adro-r' epot.
ATTOTPrO4
Scatal T 7TrarTpo Ot-rv re ,pvrj'rat KaKcv ;
HAEKTPA
Ev ElATrElav rair'" AoOev7 ceevryav av4p.
ATTOTPrO3
ov X 'Opv r'Opa v aTopevovreV Xo6yov ;
HAEKTPA
cO'K0rov TO7re/eo TOV'-8e V ELP cwv Karcav.
ATTOTPrOS
ovioov Ta pIv evo-Ycovet, rT & 0v rov Xyet' ;
HAEKTPA
oaa-tv, obI8v TrOv' i8 XOVUW Ev8ee.







ELECTRA

And the son singly cannot slay one man,
Young though he be, and of a nobler sire I
CHORUS
But lo, yon man-thy spouse it is I name-
Hath ceased from toil, and homeward hasteneth. 340
Enter PEASANT.
PEASANT
How now ? What strangers these about my doors?
For what cause unto these my rustic gates
Come they ?-or seek they me? BeseTmeth not
That with young men a wife should stand in talk.
ELECTRA
O kindest heart, do not suspect me thou,
And thou shalt hear the truth. These strangers come \
Heralds to me of tidings of Orestes.
And, O ye strangers, pardon these his words.
PEASANT
What say they ? Liveth he, and seeth light?
ELECTRA
Yea, by their tale-and I mistrust it not. 350
PEASANT
Ha !-and remembereth thy sire's wrongs and thine ?
ELECTRA
Hope is as yet all: weak the exile is.
PEASANT
And what word from Orestes have they brought ?
ELECTRA
These hath he sent, his spies, to mark my wrongs.
PEASANT
They see but part: thou haply tell'st the rest?
ELECTRA
They know: hereof nought lacketh unto them.

35
D2






HAEKTPA
ATTOTPrOx
oVKbVov rdaXat xypv To-Eo' ve"jnvTOal 7rvXa9.
X(petT 67 OicKOv' avr, yap XPPr'TWv o'6yv
eCvcov Kvp4r-eO', o' epL. Kcedle 86/o 09.
360 afpeo-O', o'raSot, TWv6' e'o-o TeVUXr 8O .OWV
ical I.LSirv dvTreTrr7T, 7raph jhtXov 0(iXot
PLoXovTCr av3pdp'- cal yap el 7'evreZ7 evv,
oVro 'ro y' "o0 SU 8ryevo e prap:o/,at.
OPE2TH2
Wrpio 0ecv, 08' d Tvp 8S o-vvecKKXc7rreW ydflov
rov a-oiv, 'Opea-Trv ov KCaato-xvvew 0tv o ;eov
HAEKTPA
ooV09 Kice/lic aL 7ro-d /.oe~? 7T? a0 ia?.
OPEYTH2

obic e6or' ancpt/e ob8VEv el evavSplav"
'Xovo-' yap rapay/tbv al c-vOret fpor&v.
7i8 yap EZSov 'raFa revvatov wrapo9
370 -' ~jL&v 'ovra, Vpo7c'a 8' dc cKaic v Tnecva,
X/la6v 7' ed av8pov n'-XovoClov cpovi~4part,
y7vgrWv 8' afe/yd'Xrlv v rrY'rTvT 0 a-cpart.
,r6, o'v r7s aTa' S&aXap/3v op09 Icptvet ;
rXo6irco ; rvovripwo rpa XP o-e'Tae cptTr',
ij 70T',; ouo- fJ8ev ; aXX' e'eP voP-ov
revia, S&8do-Ice 8' CavSpa Ty X^pefa Ka.KOV.
&XX' e61 oTX' 'Xlco; rtl U 7rpo? Xo'YrV /XE'7rov
tLppTrv9 yEvow' av oa007 d6'orv atya0o ;
Kcpairarov elicyK ravT' eav aCIet aa.
380 ov'ro yap avrjp our 'v 'ApyeIoCot /,ya?
oVi' a86 80ocro-e 8NI, ) Sw rwv (iyc(ero'V,
v 70T O & 7roXXoF, &v, aptoro? r7vpe0pr.
ob c' aippovjac', d oi KCVeV 8oaai.cTrwv







ELECTRA


PEASANT
Then should our doors ere this have been flung
wide.
Pass ye within: for your fair tidings' sake
Receive such guest-cheer as mine house contains.
Ye henchmen, take their gear these doors within. 360
Say me not nay-friends are ye from a friend
Which come to me: for, what though I be poor,
Yet will I nowise show a low-born s6ul. [Goes to rear.
ORESTES
'Fore heaven, is this the man who keepeth close
Thy wedlock-secret, not to shame Orestes ?
ELECTRA
Even he, named spouse of me the hapless one.
ORESTES
there is no sure test for manhood's worth:
For mortal natures are confusion-fraught.
I have seen ere now a noble father's son
Proved nothing-worth, seen good sons of ill sires, 370
Starved leanness in a rich man's very soul,
Ad in a poor man's body a great heart.
How then shall one discern twixtt these and
judge ?
By wealth ?-a sorry test were this to use.
Or by the lack of all ?-nay, poverty
Is plague-struck, schooling men to sin through need.
To prowess shall I turn me ?-who, that looks
On spears, can swear which spearman's heart is
brave ?
Leave Fortune's gifts to fall out as they will!
Lo, this man is not among Argives great, 380
Nor by a noble house's name exalted,
But one of the many-proved a king of men I
Learn wisdom, ye which wander aimless, swoln






HAEKTPA

7rX4pEt6 ?rXavaa-9e, Try 8' opXta f3porov;
IcptveT7e ical TrotL jOecLw 6oVs eVyevel ;
ot yhp Totoite TS 7r XetL olVicotLw ev
Kcal 8 wpa9', at Se cdrapce atl cevai Ofpev6ov
Ay7dX/aTr' ayopa? elotv. ov '/8 yp 86pv
maXXov 3paXwv a-Oevapobs dao-evoq ke6ver
390 "r d0.o-et TOTO ar ev ua.
aXX' ato9 yap o re irapwv o r oUv rapaiv
'Agyap/e/rovoo 7Tati, oinrep etvex fjicolev,
8e,eOL' ot'rcav caTaaXvo-et" XwpetL XpeOV,
8(Me9s, 86 Wov T6wv' jvVT-o. 6( e&oir0 v7rf
e'il ipOvyodvi 7rXovo-l ov XXov 4voo.
atvow IFE, ov ToF70 avpo4 elo-SoXa\ 86~oawv
E4povXO.uLyv 8' a, e icaaulyjvroy pLe o-Oq
ei? evTVXOvvTaq fryev eTrvyl 8roV/ovq.
'o"WB 8' ayv k'XAo Aofiov yiap gtwre8ot
400 XpIo-o toi, 83porP'v 86 /aVTt1iv Xalpevw eo.
SXOPO
viv irrdpotOev /iaXXov, 'HXe/I pa, xapa
Oep/aIavo/eo-Oa Kcap8av- to-(9 c ap ai
lt6Xt9 7rpoiat'vova-' TV7rxi aorairj aX@^v.
HAEKTPA
j TXijpov, Celv Sw0/8rC t pmw XPElav cre'ev
r7 7-oT-8' E8e'4W /ueidova9 oravroi e'vovT ;
ATTOTPrOZ
T I 8'; etrep elo-iA ( 80;oDoa-tv ebyevetF,
ovic ev Te IictpoLF v re oUr povo-' o' f? ;
HAEKTPA
Ed rWl vvv EjfLapT ev a-Luoicpolo-tw v,
SXO' tu 7raXatov rpoooV detoiv liXov *raTpo's
410 8 a po wroTa/ljv Tavao~ 'Apyetav opovs
Tre/vovTa yala9 7riapTtadn8o0 qe r e







ELECTRA


With vain imaginings: by converse judge
Men, even the noble by their daily walk.
For such be they which govern states aright
And homes: but fleshly bulks devoid of wit
Are statues in the market-place. Nor bides
The strong arm staunchlier than the weak in fight;
But this of nature's inborn courage springs. 390
But-seeing worthy is Agamemnon's son,
Present or absent, for whose sake we come,-
Accept we shelter of this roof. Ho, thralls,
Enter this house. For me the host whose heart
Leaps out in welcome, rather than the rich !
Thanks for the welcome into this man's house;
Yet fain would I it were thy brother now
That prospering led me into prosperous halls.
Yet may he come ; for Loxias' oracles
Fail not. Of men's soothsaying will I none. 400
", [ORESTES and PYLADES enter cottage.
CHORUS
Now, more than heretofore, Electra, glows
Mine heart with joy. Thy fortune now, though late
Advancing, haply shall be established fair.
ELECTRA
Poor man, thou know'st thine house's poverty.
Wherefore receive these guests too great for thee ?
PEASANT
How ?-an they be of high birth, as they seem,
Will they content them not with little or much ?
ELECTRA
Since then thou so hast erred, and thou so poor,
Go to the ancient fosterer of my sire,
Who on the banks of Tanaiis, which parts 410
The Argive marches from the Spartan land,






HAEKTPA


vroilwatv o/apTet 7roXeo? e'c/9e/3X'q1ekvo.
IceKeve 8' avrov ctl 80p/ovf avy/~ervov
cdXOe ,~(Evv ely Saira 'ropoavval rva.
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.VT' ecEaaKOvro-av raF8' ov eKcotet 7roT'e.
ob yap 7rarTpwv cK ~Ec o wv ty pLTpo' rapa
Adpotpev av TV m7rtlcpa 8' Ay'7yXatertv av,
el ~(&vr' 'Ope'o-v i 'akcv' a"o-' g're
C Iwv T' 'Opea'Tlv 7] Ta"Xatv aiaOoti' eT.
ATTOTYPrO
420 dXX' el 8oKice aot,7 roV'o-' dtrayyeX&o Xoyou'
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py)ova-' av evpot 8atTit 7rpoca'opijara.
eoa'Tv 8E 8, Too'aDTa 7 ev O0[tot9 eTt,
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ev 7ro TrotovroaV 8' I~vl' av yvir r1-ecrcy,
a-corr TaO X p4ua' o4 e~esxt lteya a Evor,
flvo e 0 aSoval 0~o-La 7' eF voa-ov reo-ov
Sarrdvatoa-t o-6orat 7Ts- 8' e'' ijdpav p3opad
430 e69 pictpopv 7icer 7rag 'yap e,7rXjo-a0ec9 avlp
6 7rXovo-to9 e X; re'vyi ''o-ov bPpet.
XOPO0
icXeva' vaev, at7ro-r' e/43aTe Tpotav o7Tp. a
TroL9 auTerp lToit e erpIots
7re1v 'rovo-at Xopouv /Lera Nrpy~wov,
v o' ~ hXavXo e'raXXe SeX-
b4p 'rp9pati' cvavepl/3oXo
elXt -L-oervo,
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coiopov &Xafa vroSv 'AXtX
440 (brt 'Aya/i.dvovt Tpcot"a
ei' SItItovVTrl8as acrTS.







ELECTRA

An outcast from our city, tends his flocks.
Bid him to wend home straightway, and to come
And furnish somewhat for the strangers' meat.
He shall rejoice, yea, render thanks to heaven,
To hear how lives the child whom once he saved.
For of my mother from my father's halls
Nought should we gain: our tidings should we rue
If that wretch heard that yet Orestes lives.
PEASANT
If thus thou wilt, thy message will I bear 420
To yon grey sire : but pass thou in with speed,
And there make ready. Woman's will can find
Many a thing shall eke the feasting out.
Yea, and within the house is store enough
STo satisfy for one day these with meat.
In such things, when my thoughts turn thitherward,
- mark what mighty vantage is in wealth,
To give to guests, to medicine the body
In sickness; but for needs of daily food
Not far it reacheth. Each man, rich and poor; 430
Can be but filled, when hunger is appeased.
"- [Exit PEASANT. ELECTRA enters the cottage.
CHORUS
O galleys renowned by your myriad-sweeping (Str. 1)
Oars hurled high on the Trojan strand,
Whom the Sea-maids followed, with dances
surrounding [ing
Your dusky prows, when the dolphin was bound-
Around them, bewitched by your music, and leaping
In sinuous rapture on every hand,
Escorting Achilles, the fleetfoot son
Of Thetis, with King Agamemnon on
Unto where broad Simois, seaward-creeping 440
Rippled and glittered o'er Trojan sand-.,






HAEKTPA

Nqpj^Se 8' Ego8oa ( acTaq hXt7roDvat ap ,r. a
'HTalo-rov Xpvo' ev a&'covwv
/lOXovv aoTrto-rTa c epov revXw,
avad re HIIXtov avad e repv-
pva9 "O-cre-a lepA vdirac,
Nv.uatalav co red,
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mIrorlrTa 6 Cpbev 'EXXd'8 (f&,
450 etwo0s elvdaXow /6vov,
TaX ~topov Tro S 'ATpet8at.

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ev E L pfca) caTeXa/are o-aice fae'Owv Jvr. i3
KVKcXO, beloto
mI7rot a/p 9rrepoco-o-Cat
aocrTp-v 7' aliOptot Xopot,
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b'/.pLfa rpo7rator
470 E'T8 8 Xpv oorvtrW Kpavet
t lyyeq bovvtjV doiSLpOV
A f







ELECTRA


And the Sea-maids fleeted by shores Euboean (Ant. 1)
From the depths where the golden anvils are
Of the Fire-god, a hero's harness bearing-
Over Pelion, over the wild spurs faring
Of Ossa, over the glens Nymphaean;
From the watchtower-crags outgazing afar
They sought where his father, the chariot-lord,
Fostered for Thetis a sea-born ward,
A light for Hellas, a victory-paean, 450
The fleetfoot helpto the Atreids' war.

Of a farer from Ilium heard I the story, (Str. 2)
Who had stepped to the strand in the Nauplian
haven,
Heard, O Thetis' son, of thy buckler of glory,
Of the blazonry midst of the round of it graven
Whose god-fashioned tokens of terror made craven
The hearts of the Trojans in battle adread,-
How gleamed on the border that compassed its
splendour
Perseus, on sandals swift-winged as he fled 460
Bearing throat-severed the Gorgon-fiend's head,
While Maia's son, Prince of the Fields, for defender, )'
Herald of Zeus, at his side ever sped.
(Ant. 2)
And flamed in the midst of the buckler outblazing
The orb of the Sun-god, his heaven-track riding
On the car after coursers wing-wafted on-racing.
And therein were the stars in their sky-dance
gliding,
The Pleiads and Hyades, evil-betiding
To Hector, for death in his eyes did they fling. [ing
On the golden-forged helmet were Sphinxes, bear- 470
In their talons the victim that minstrels sing.






HAEKTPA
a'ypav Olpovo-atv rept'rXevpV
SB KVTe 7TtVpprVooo fo7rev-
Se Spoi) Xeaawa XaXaFs
IletpvaZtov opwo-a 7r&Xov. d .
oopt S' cv ojovcl1 Trerpaf3dfaove 't7rrot 'raXov,
ceXatva 8' alli vO' f'tero icwvT.
TOt&v8' avacKTa Sopt7TOwvv
480 cavexa dv8p&av, Tvv8apt,
'a Xe'Xea, iaK xodpwv Iopc.
Trotyap a-e vor ovpaviSat
ire'dtovaov OavaTroes 49' oav
AT eT d6wov rwo 8epav
fopaatL alpaa uXs 4

7rov nroD ve&vtv; roTrv eel'7i S'c-rovad re,
'yaapfvovo9 vra1<, o8v TroTr '0pe'O cyw;
L, ~rp~crf3aaov Tv8' pOla ocptav ocw e'Et
490 voa-w lypoovT 79Se wrpoa-f3lvas ro81.
OLF 8Ne vrpo' 7ye TObv; OIXovv efe\XKTeov
8v7rXv icavcav Ialt 7raXtppo7rov ryovv.
A Ovyarep, a&prt yap a-e rpo, 86po(; dpO,
17KW (bepvOV O-01 T vP ,L4otV OaTC-?pdTvOV
roltpvm veooyvov Opepp' btrocrrdoa oSe,
aored6vov Te 7rev~e 7X'V deX;ov 7vpevufara,
,raXatuv Te O7aoavlptcpla Atovvroov roSe
oaofi KIarTpe', I'icpov, !aXX' dTrea-3a\elv
18 v o'cfVov Tro0' a-Oeveo-rTepw 7rro,).
500 'T-o ip pav Tr T'ot e'votL's r8d' el &o/~ov-
'yt S1 rpiXe6 7~p ef'p& v 7re7rXWV Kocpaq
Sacpvourat T rdly'y E'op6paao-at Oe'Xo.
1 Iartung: for dv 81 84pt of MSS.






ELECTRA


On the corslet his bosom encompassing
The fire-breathing lioness rushed, up-glaring
At the winged steed trapped by Peirene's spring.1
(Epode.)
And battle-steeds pranced on his falchion of slaughter;
O'er their, shoulders was floating the dark dust-
cloud:-
And thou slewest the chieftain,O Tyndareus' daughter, 480
That captained such heroes, so godlike and proud t
Thine adultery slew him, 0 thou false-hearted !
Therefore the Dwellers in Heaven shall repay
Death unto thee in the on-coming day.
I shall seeit-shall seewhen thelife-blood hath started
From thyneck at the kiss of the steel that shall slay I
Enter OLD MAN.
OLD MAN
Where shall the princess, my young mistress, be,
Child of the great king fostered once of me ?
How steep ascent hath she to this her home
For mine eld-wrinkled feet to attain thereto 490
Howbeit to those I love must I drag on
Mine age-cramped spine, must drag my bowing knees.
Enter ELECTRA.
Daughter,-fbr now I see thee at thy door,-
Lo, I am come : I bring thee from my flocks
A suckling lamb, yea, taken from the ewe,
Garlands, and cheeses from the presses drawn,i
And this old treasure-drop of the Wine-god's boon,
Rich-odoured-little enow; yet weaker draughts
Are turned to nectar, blent with a cup of this.
Let one bear these unto thy guests within. 500
Lo, with this tattered vesture am I fain
To wipe away the tears that dim mine eyes.
1 Bellerophon, mounted on Pegasus, attacking the Chimaera.
45






HAEKTPA


HAEKTPA
i 8', 7 yepate', 8dP3poov 7T-O' 8'L' 'eX, ;
u6ov 7r-At St XpOvov a' Avetivraoev caica;
1\ T' 'Op7o-rov TrX5/iovas vya v a-TrveEL
iat 7al Trepa 7tV e/dOV, ov ~r07'r Eo polv E'Xy
avovGlr Ape\f'rd o-oi re ica ToFt coir? cXotv ;
nPESBTY
avomno'' o'l t 8' oVv TO7TO 7 OV;K veo-X.dyv.
,X0ov yap aTroD -rpo0 Tdaov rdpepf j 6oov,
510 Ka 7rpooreo-wov e cXav-', epiyfJia9 rvXwv,
arTrovdY re, X-oas dacrKov Op 4ppo e'vvocs,
ea7reto-ra, Tv/L/3 8' d/Ite'078cKa /vpot-vas.
'Ivpaq S' 7Tr' aV'Tr olv IUeXdXI/YiXto 7rdoKW
'crpayov edo- 6ov alp/d 7 o0v 7rdXat Xvv
avOr,? re XaT7 alry poorpvXovv icecappIEvovw.
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aXx' qxO' I'o-on zrov o-4s tcao'i vrpo Xd0pa,
oX(Aov 8' eav'aoa' at Xtov TIvUOv Tora7-poq.
520 o ce'~at, 8~ xa'rv 7rpoorttleto-a af7 KcL,,
el Xpwo/ja 'avTov Iovpit eo-Tra T7Prptx
tXheF ydp, al/a raT'rov oi9 /\v 7rra-rpo'
rTA ToTlX oitota o(wpjaro 7reicpcfKvat.
HAEKTPA
obic dli' avWp&m, 5) yepOV, oo(00o Xe'ye(,
el cKprrov e 'y7v &7)' V' av A7ylto-Oov &o/5p
8oKceL9 a86 eXdo\b TOrV e' Oy evOapo-r poXeiv.
\ eTrea XarTrl^9 Tro acvvolo-eraet 7TrXco,
\ 6 ev raXatno-pas cdvMpbi ebyevov9 rpafel~,
o\ 68 KTrcevLoipO1 OXv ; (XX' cdipi'avov.
530 \lro6.ho, 8' a& efvpoet f8oo-rpvXov9 oo0TrrTepovw
46






ELECTRA


ELECTRA
Whence to thine eyes, grey sire, this sorrow-rain?
Have mine ills wakened memories long asleep ?
Or for Orestes' exile groanest thou,
And for my sire, whom in thine arms of old
Thou fosteredst ?-all in vain for thee and thine
OLD MAN
In vain Yet this despair could I not brook.
I turned, in coming, to his tomb aside,
There kneeling, for its desolation wept, 510
Poured a drink-offering from the skin I bare
Thy guests, and crowned the tomb with myrtle-
sprays.
But-on the grave a black-fleeced ewe I saw
New-slain, and blood but short time since out-
poured,
And severed locks thereby of golden hair !
I marvelled, daughter, who of men had dared
Draw nigh the tomb : o Argive he, I wot.
Haply thy brother hath in secret come,
And honoured so his father's grave forlorn.
Look on the tress; yea, lay it to thine hair; 520
Mark if the shorn lock's colour be the same :
For they which share one father's blood shall oft
By many a bodily likeness kinship show.
ELECTRA
Not worthy a wise man, ancient, be thy words-
To think mine aweless brother would have come,
Fearing Aegisthuthushithesecretly.
Then, how should trei be matched with tress of
hair-
That, a young no 's trained in athlete-strife,
This, womanlike comb-sleeked? It cannot be.
Sooth, many shouldst thou find of hair like-hued, 530






HAEKTPA

ical 1l7 /ye&'wcrw a'laTo TaavroD, ye'pov.
a4X' r TsV avrTov T'raov E7roKrcTeLpav (vovs
eKeipaTr, 1 7 rjaq- So7oTros XasOc v X0ovos.
IIPEBTI
o0 8' e' I'vo 8&aa-' ap3vW~'q oKErat flad'cv,
el avpeTj, po o0- roSi 7 YrO yOo-erat, 'ecrov.
HAEKTPA
7r&i) 8' Arv ye'voit' Av ev icpaTraLX 7r8B
'yalav wooSv '~aeKta7pov; el 8' oeTLv ro e,
8voZv aSeOoWv 7ro v av ov IyvoTr' i'oo
av8po' re Kal yvvaucK'd, aX' iapa~-v KpaTel.
nPEUBTI
540 ovc WC-Tv, el cal ryv cao-ty7rTOr9 oXot,
Kep8clSo0 S5TO) 7yvoly av Cil4arrjsa oC97,
ev ( 7ro9 aivrov e'e/cXehJa ^ 9avelv ;
HAEKTPA
obI o0-0', 'OpBEa-rsT7 vtic' 6:rriT4e X)ovs,
veayv I' C' ovoav ; el Se IcKaKpefcov re7rXovq,
TCOq' &v dTO' Wov raTL 7rava vvv E'X o pt apj,
el p77 vvafotvO ol wrervXol 7Tj a-paT ;
nPE2BT2
ol S e'vo 'rroD ; /odvXopat yap elao-Sv
avTrov peo-Oat oa-oD Kcaro-tyYrTov 7r-pt.
HAEKTPA
oEfS' SOC/ov f3aivvoo- Xati 7pp vroSi.
nPE2BT2
550 aXX' ebyeveLw9, y, Ev 6e8 K/lp84lX r To-S
roXXol y Ap 'vTE de yevdet elo-tv IaKcol.
8o~op Xatpetv T rov4 evov9 ?rpoOaevvETrw.
1 This line and the next are transferred by Paley from
their old place after 544.
48







ELECTRA

Though of t same blood, ancient, never born.
Nay, pityin his tomb, some stranger shore it,
Or Argive fri d, my brother's secret spy.
OLD MAN
A sandal's print is there : go, look thereon,
Child; mark if that foot's contour match with thine.
ELECTRA
How on a stony plain should there be made
Impress of feet ? Yea, if such print be there,
Brother's and sister's foot should never match-
A man's and woman's: greater is the male.
OLD MAN
Is there no weft of thine own loom-whereby 540
To know thy brother, if he should return-
Wherein I stole him, years agone, from death ?
ELECTRA
Know'st thou not, when Orestes fled the land,
I was a child? Yea, had I woven vests,
How should that lad the same cloak wear to-day,
Except, as waxed the body, vestures grew?
OLD MAN
Where be the strangers? I would fain behold
And of thine absent brother question them.
ELECTRA
Lo, here with light foot step they forth the house.
Re-enter ORESTES and PYLADES.
OLD MAN (aside)
High-born of mien :-yet false the coin may be; 550
For many nobly born be knaves in grain.
Yet-(aloud) to the strangers greeting fair I give.



49
VOL. II. ,







HAEKTPA

OPE2TH2
xatp', A yepate. rob 7'or', 'HXiCrpa, TdSe
'raX.ato avSposq Xel*avov dlXwv Kvpe ;
HAEKTPA
ovro' TWv atov Iarep 50petev, & five.
OPE2THS
71 jjqns; 08' 08 abv eXfice ta ruyovnov;
HAEKTPA
08' oa' o owaa leietvov, d'Trep Ei' er't.
OPE2TH5
ea-
.t el a- 8opicev o-Trep A pyvpov otcorrov
Xalwrpov xapaKcrip'; P 7r'poorelKale Ie r T ;
HAEKTPA
560 CoaTW 'Ope'ao-rov 7 X' 78e'frat fl 3Xwv.
OPESTH2
OiXov ye OrA)or. 7i 8e KvICei wptE 7ro8a;
HAEKTPA
icabrqr 7rT elo-opooca Oavpadw, dve.
nPEsBTZ
Sro'rtv', e vXov, 0Ovyarep 'HXkE'cpa, Oeo'v-
HAEKTPA
Ti TOV 7) 7 ai70rovTw T7 l OST.V O r wept
IPEZBTZ
Xa/pfv Oiiov 7?rlavpov, v dai0vet Bed.
HAEKTPA
I8od, xcaX ) eo '. j '-i 8~ Xgyet, y/pov ;
nPEsBT5
Xeoifrov vvv elts TOvS, TriKVOV, TOv XTraTov.
HAEKTPA
'rdXa Se6'Soica, pvy o-v y' oi'ce'' e54 povjys.







ELECTRA

ORESTES
Greeting, grey sire Electra, of thy friends
Who hath this time-worn wreck of man to thrall ?
ELECTRA
This, stranger, was my father's f6sterer.
ORESTES
How say'st thou ?-this, who stole thy brother
hence?
ELECTRA
Even he who saved him, if he liveth yet.
ORESTES
Why looks he on me, as who eyes the stamp
On silver ?-likening me to any man?
ELECTRA
Joying perchance to see Orestes' friend. 560
ORESTES
Yea, dear he is :-yet wherefore pace me round?
ELECTRA
I also marvel, stranger, seeing this.
OLD MAN
Daughter Electra-princess !-pray the Gods-
ELECTRA
For what-of things that are or are not ours ?
OLD MAN
To win the precious treasure God reveals'
ELECTRA
Lo, I invoke them. What dost mean, old sire?
OLD MAN
Look on him now, child,-on thy best-.beloved .
ELECTRA
Long have I dreaded lest thy wits be crazed.

5I
E 2







HAEKTPA

HPEIBT-
otIc eS cpovP 'y, o' v KcaayivrTOV r XE'rovv ;
HAEKTPA
570 rWq etra;, o 7yepaC, avve'rov Xdyov ;
nPE2BTS
opav 'Opeoa-rrv Trdve -ov 'Aya/iL/tvovo:;
HAEKTPA
,iroiov Xapac"rp' e-t8cr&v, w 7relopat;
HPEIBTS
obXXv 7rap' Zop'v, ijv roT' ev 7ra rpb' 8StLotg
vep/pbv St'wicw ov coFe ?' 'pXd'y 0Trecwv.
HAEKTPA
7rTc9 fjn ; dpa LIv 7r7T-4aTog reKficptjpeov.
nPEIBTS
e'reLTa pLXXetq 7ipoo-irrveTv TOX? rTdToa'TV;
HAEKTPA
aXX' ovcKT, (o ryepatv o-avifjoxoo-t yAp
70T0? o' ot T etTeto-La OvBit0V. W Xp6ov) oavei',
XO) 0' deXVTrm
OPE2TH2
ca E/J0o ')' eXet Xpovq.
HAEKTPA
ov&CroTe 80ao'.
OPE:TH.
580 ob8' dy&T yap Xij'ro-a.
HAEKTPA
dIceivo? el (V;
OPE2TH2
ov/laXoaL, yr 0o0t I-o vov,
?v eKo-raw'd tal a y v pferepopaot 3o ov.
-rreTrotla 8'- l Xp pi Fc' 'eIjyeo8ait eovo,
el alSiKc' Trat T?) Slcyi' vireprepa.







ELECTRA

OLD MAN
I, crazed !-who look upon thy brother,-there !
ELECTRA
What mean'st thou, ancient, by a word past hope ? 570
OLD MAN
I see Orestes, Agamemnon's son.
ELECTRA
What token hast thou marked, that I may trust?
OLD MAN
A scar along -Ighrow : in his father's halls
hasinigwithl thee a fawn, he fell and gashed it.
ELECTRA
How say'st thou? Yea, I see the mark thereof!
OLD MAN
Now, art thou slow to embrace thy best-beloved?
ELECTRA
No, ancient, no! By all thy signs convinced
Mine heart is. Thou who hast at last appeared,
Unhoped I clasp thee !
ORESTES
Clasped at last of me !
ELECTRA
Never I looked for this !
ORESTES
Nor dared I hope. 580
ELECTRA
And art thou he ?
ORESTES
Yea, thy one champion I,-
If I draw in the net-cast that I seek:
And sure I shall! We must believe no more
In Gods, if wrong shall triumph over right.






HAEKTPA


XOPoP
ejoXke, (/hpoXe, & Xpovto~ a4ipa,
icaTe'XapJar, g'Meav /p avi
7rXdes rvpcaov, 8 aXatai Ovya
'arTpLiv a1o ScoW a vrW Ta7ciL
aXatvav ,83a. Oeo ab 0eos
590 aieriEpav Tvt alye
vicav, O niXa.
avexe xpav, avexe
Xovyov, let X~tTb el TOIV Oeov;,
T6Xqa OpOL 7**
Tv o-oo Tva
IcKaoLbyvTolv e/aTevrDo-at r6Xv.
OPE2TH2
elevY iXaq /eV i SovA dT'o-rao-p'tr
e)o, Xpov"Y 8 icav'O aura 8daofpev.
av 8'', i yepad, Icalptov yap fiXv&e;,
Xe'ov, TI 8poV av povea tao-a/l v 7rarpo'
600 iur-Epa Te T~v Iovwcvov' avoa-rcov yapowv ;
CartV ri IJot icar "'Apyo? ediLevZs cWXov ;
l 7-avpir aveTc-Keviro-e9', Svo)ep at TvXat;
7T( o-vryycvpaL ; vvItos q IcaO' rjgepav;
7rolav o68v Tparo 'eO' efl ecXpo; 4cpov ;
SnIPE:BTS
7 r-iKVOV, OvESel, voTVOvVTt 0ur O-ot fIP.
eipr?7pa yAp To' Xp)Ipa ybyverat 7ro'e,
Ic a y IEa E 'rP Oo ta0b, i-ov KaKOV.
/co.7 pfeTaao-ewv rayaov cal K v icatcov.
8'v S', b/c 8ci0pcv yap a7sri avyjpcraa kltXoac
oiS' eXXeXotrav Av71i8', it'ao /ov IcXVv,
610 Ev yeTpl 7 ) o1- raiv7' yete KIcaU 7-^ Tv1X
7raTrpov orKOv Kral 'wroXv Xa/e8ev areOev.
OPE2THA
T7b 87T SpJoYreg ToVW' aVy 4eiolxeOa ;







ELECTRA


CHORUS
Thou hast come, thou hast come, dawn long delayed !
Thou hast flashed from the sky, thou hast lifted
on high
O'er the land as a beacon the exile that strayed
From his father's halls, while the years dragged by
In misery.
Victory! God unto us is bringing 590
Victory, O my friend !
Lift up thine hands and thy voice upringing
In prayers to the Gods, that, with Fortune flinging
Her shield round about him, thy brother through
Argos' gates may wend !
ORESTES
Hold-the sweet bliss of greeting I receive
Of thee, hereafter must I render back.
But, ancient-for in season hast thou come,-
Say, how shall I requite my father's slayer,
And her that shares his guilty couch, my mother? 600
Have I in Argos any loyal friend,
Or, like my fortunes, am I bankrupt all ?
With whom to league me ?-best were night, or
day?
What path shall I essay to assault my foes ?
OLD MAN
Ah son, no friend hast thou in thy misfortune.
Nay, but this thing as treasure-trove is rare,
That one should share thine evil as thy good.
Since thou art wholly, as touching friends, bereft,--
Art even hope-forlorn,-be assured of me,
In thine own hand and fortune is thine all 610
For winning father's house and city again.
ORESTES
What shall I do then, to attain thereto?







HAEKTPA

IIPE2BTY
KcTavov OveoTo' ira0a a-jv re tiJrT~pa.
OPE2TH:
flco 'Mt Trvme a-reiavov AXXa 7rU d,3w ,
nPE2BY
TeXoEWv pEv eXOo)v EVTOn' oR8' av el 0eXoev.
OPESTH:
OpovpatF iceica-rat SetaaK Te 8opvcdpwv ;
nPEsBT:
eyvo)- o/3eiTrat 'yap o-e icov; e8et uraai;s.
OPE2THI
etev" o'b 81 ov've 8e 3poxevo'ov, 'epov.
IIPE2BT2
IKapLo 7' CIaovoov aprt yap 4' eco-?7oe T7.
OPE5TH2
620 eOa-06v 7-p T vv'a-eta, aloaOolyjv 8' e'yc.
nPE2BT2
Al'ywaov elsov, idvi'v elp'rov evOd8e,
OPE2THI
7rpoayriKacviv TTO pirjev. Ev TTOitO TO76Trt;
IIPE2BTY
TypCov wreXa Tcov8' ir'ro op/3iwv 'rt.
OPE2TH2
Ti 8pov9O ; odpo Pyap eX7iS8' ie AurJdwV.
nPE2BT2
N'uypac E' idpo-vv' p epOTtV, (0c 'o6 pot.
OPE2TH2
7pofeia 7ratsov, q 7rpob p XovTro. rTKcov ;
IIPE2BT2
oilc ol8a 7vTXrv v" /8ovo'-a-yev wrdrXTero.
OPE2TH2
i'roov -W/%' T WSpow ; nj ~oy'o 8c I'oV JLpera ;







ELECTRA

OLD MAN
Thyestes' son and thine own mother slay. I
ORESTES
To win this prize I come. How shall I grasp it?
OLD MAN
Through yon gates, never, how good soe'er thy will.
ORESTES
With guards beset is he, and spearmen's hands ?
OLD MAN
Thou sayest: he fears thee, that he cannot sleep.
ORESTES
Ay so :-what followeth, ancient, counsel thou.
OLD MAN
Hear me-even now a thought hath come to me.
ORESTES
Be thy device good, keen to follow I 620
OLD MAN
Aegisthus saw I, hither as I toiled,-
ORESTES
Now welcome be theword! Thou saw'st him-where ?
OLD MAN
Nigh to these fields, by pastures of his steeds.
ORESTES
What doth he? From despair I look on hope !
OLD MAN
A feast would he prepare the Nymphs, meseemed.
ORESTES
For nursing-dues of babes, or birth at hand ?
OLD MAN
Nought know I, save his purposed sacrifice.
ORESTES
With guards how many ?--or alone with thralls?







HAEKTPA

HPE2BT2
oUSe vrrapiv 'Apyeito, olicela ac Xelp.
OPE2TH2
630 oV 'ov rt' Cort 7 'vcyptel i' I Sv, r'ypo' ;
IPE2BTY
Sjae, 6It elo-, o' O' 7' oViC eZt8O 7roTe.
OPE2TH2
p.L av cEav LE, el IpaTrolY~v, ev6erev ;
HPE2BT2
SouXwv yap Stov 'roGro, o-ot 8' c- opov.
OPEZTH2
W,?r ov av avr a r wrXao-'aoe'Ojv 7rorT ;
IIPE2BT2
aTewPv o80ev 0-e 83ov0T6vAv dEdOe-rTc.
OPE:TH2
o ov wap' av-rjv, (;C 6eoic', a'pov' e"'E.
nPE2BT2
80ev 7' 1 Sv cre SatT I cotvwovv caXet.
OPEXTH2
rrscpov ye o-vvOolvawop', 2 v OeB, OXy.
nPE2BTX
ro.vvevSe rrpoF rib rITov avro9 EIvoeL.
OPE2TH2
S640 KiaXh e'Xea. 17 TEK oo-a 8' Er'-i roD ;
nPE2BT2
"Apyet 7rape'-rat 8' Ev ra-Xet Ool[vv 7rs.
OPE2TH2
Ti 'S oX la/' e 6:wppTar 7 ei Tpri'rp rroo-er ;
HPE2BTY
*6ryov T7peovaa artor&Tv edXerero.
OPE2TH2
v vT' roror7To ovo-a Yivcrxce 7roXet.







ELECTRA

OLD MAN
They only of his household ; Argives none.
ORESTES
None, ancient, who might look on me, and know? 630
OLD MAN
Thralls are they who looked never on thy face.
ORESTES
Haply my partisans, if I prevail?
OLD MAN
The bondman's wont, by happy chance for thee.
ORESTES
How then shall I make shift to approach to him ?
OLD MAN
Pass full in view at hour of sacrifice.
ORESTES
Hard by the highway be his lands, I trow.
OLD MAN
Thence shall he see, and bid thee to the feast.
ORESTES
A bitter fellow-feaster, heaven to help !
SOLD MAN
Thereafter thou take thought, as fortune falls.
ORESTES
Well hast thou said. My mother-where is she? 640
OLD MAN
In Argos, yet shall soon attend the feast.
ORESTES
Why went not forth my mother with her lord ?
OLD MAN
Fearing the people's taunts there tarried she.
ORESTES
Yea--knowing how men look askance on her.







HAEKTPA

nPEIBTI
TotavTra" Iuwoe ra yap avocrto9 yvv4.
OPE5TH2
7rcov ovv icev dve T ev Tav'rT IcTevC ;
HAEKTPA
Eryw ciovov ye t/rpo eiGapTvot-jat.
OPE2TH2
Kcal pv celeva 7y' 17 Tr?? Or'IcreL KaX6)T.
HAEKTPA
v7rlpeTrevT) Itev 8voFv o'vrov, 08e.
IPE2BT2
650 'o-Tae TaS' e p plicKe't S jL)rrpl TT~~ q ovov;
HAEKTPA
Xe'y, w yepalt, -8e KXvTrat u jro-Tpa /ioX.v"
XeXc / d' Arad eXX' oVO-av apo-evo9 'OKcov.
nPEIBT2
.roTepa 7redXat Tecoo-av vewarOT Sn';
HAEKTPA
sX,' fdovi, ev ol-wv rYvevet Xexch.
IPE2BTY
KaL 8 Tb1 ToDTO /LW7Tpl 7rpo-/3XXeet ovov ;
HAEKTPA
7eE icKvovo-a XoXt' eC/o voo-arjraa.
nPEBT's
ror8ev ; T7 8' aT a-oD UE'XEIv SoKICeT, TeKcov;
HAEKTPA
val ica Saicp pva-e 7' &i(io' 6wOv cTOKWV.
nPEsBT2
t'o-~r- rdXtv TOt 1fTDov el iKcapiTr;lv dye.
HAEKTPA
oo60 edOor-a /ph e t or &Xov 's aTrXiXvrat,







ELECTRA

OLD MAN
Even so; a woman for her crimes abhorred.
ORESTES
How shall I slay together him and her ?
ELECTRA -
Even I my mother's slaying will prepare.
ORESTES
Good sooth, for his shall Fortune smooth the path.
ELECTRA
Herein shall twain be served of this one man.
OLD MAN
Yea. How wilt thou contrive thy mother's death ? 650
ELECTRA
Go, ancient, say to Clytemnestra this-
Report me mother of a child, a male.
OLD MAN
Long since delivered, or but as of late ?
ELECTRA
Within these ten days-purifying's space.
OLD MAN
Yet-to thy mother how doth this bring death?
ELECTRA
At tidings of my travail will she come.
OLD MAN
How ?-deem'st thou, child, she careth aught for thee?
ELECTRA
Yea-even to weeping for my babes' high birth!
OLD MAN
Haply: yet toward thy goal turn thou thy speech.
ELECTRA
Let her but come, and surely is she dead. 660







HAEKTPA

IPESBTS
Kal /i7v E7' avrdaF ly elcT(A) So/OV 7 rnA aq.
HAEKTPA
ovKIovv Tparno'O at o-ircpov fiel "AtSov roBSe;
nPE2BT2
el yap Odvote 7rov T 180wv ,yo 7roTe.
HAEKTPA
Trpriao-ra /ev vvv 7T8' b ly'roat, 'yepov.
nPESBTZ
Atfyao-o0s va vv Ovrwrokehe Beoti ;
HAEKTPA
e7retr' arra7avTorwv /TpL TiT7' efOV pdcrov.
nPE2BTY
(w)T avra 7' eC o-oD aTo.jaro elp.o-Oat 8o0cewv.
HAEKTPA
o0y ep'yov 71*)' 7rpoa'oev dkXya, ovov.
OPE:TH2
oTelXOtI4 ap, ed To' re7ep&4 7f/lyVlO' 680U.
nPEsBTX
670 /cal p eyv yto 7reri'roipL' av obvi diovoIco'.
OPESTH2
(5 Ze) wTarp, e ial 'rpoTra' dEXOpJPv ewEov,
HAEKTPA
olKT epe 0' iga?, olcpaL Tap 7re7rovga/ev,
IPE2BTY
oiCretepe 87ra o-o'V ye cfuvvTac &ecyo6ovv.
HAEKTPA
"Hpa re, 3w 'Irwv ) MvKvaitwv KpareL,
OPE2THS
vtiKrv So irv, el 8itcaL alTrovzeOa.
I Lines 671-682 have been variously arranged and assigned.
Murray's arrangement is here adopted, as most dramatic.
62







ELECTRAA

OLD MAN
Nay then, to the very house-door let her come.
ELECTRA
Is not the bypath thence to Hades' short ?
OLD MAN
Oh but to see this hour, then welcome death!
ELECTRA
First, ancient, then, be guide unto this man.
OLD MAN
To where Aegisthus doeth sacrifice?
ELECTRA
Then seek my mother, and my message tell.
OLD MAN
Yea, it shall seem the utterance of thy lips.
ELECTRA (to Orestes)
Now to thy work. Thou drewest first blood-lot.
ORESTES
I will set forth if any guide appear.
OLD MAN
Even I will speed thee thither nothing loth. 670
ORESTES
My fathers' God, Zeus, smiter of my foes,
ELECTRA
Pity us: pitiful our wrongs have been.
OLD MAN
Yea, pity those whose lineage is of thee !
ELECTRA
Queen of Mycenae's altars, Hera, help!
ORESTES
Grant to us victory, if we claim the right.






HAEKTPA


UPE2BT2
86, 8&7ja vrarpoh ToFo-6e Trplwpov i'/crv.
HAEKTPA
& FPa' ivacr-aa, xelpa ; 821S'' eWycE,
OPE2TH:
-V T', IcTrwKao e advoo-o olic&v 7raTep,
nPE2BT2
al.tv a/ivve roZa-e X CTaTOr roev TeVOV.
OPEITHS
680 viv 7rrv'a vercpov XOB a-~ owlaXov Xaj3wv,
HAEKTPA
OL7rep 6ye ca'v a0ol Jpvya,; aviXwacrav 8opi,
nPE2BT2
Xfo-ot 0r-vyova-iv avoolovF ptda-rTopav
OPE2TH2
lkcovo-ap W SeMv' 4y 4;9 477Tjrpoy 7vralOv;
HAEKTPA
rd'vT, o28', /coVel rdTS8e raTrjp' a-relXYew t' d/cij.
cai aoat 7rpoao/vr vrpog 7rS' Ai'ytLwov 0avezv-
ac), el raXato-r0et rrwreoa 0avdaritov oreo-r,
TovrKica Kcaywc, /L)8e' /Le oa-av Xe'ye.
vraoiaw yap '7rap 1 ropthov aititxcet 4et.
86Lwv S' E'O 3ac' evrpe7Tre' roti'o/Lat,
690 0(., r)v L~V EX06 eTva I krv' 0ev,
hoXXfeTrat 7ratv MjOae O'ovyIcOVToo S o-oD
TtivavrC oTO-Ta TOv8e' TaDrd cao-t X4y).
OPE2TH2
7ravT otZa.
HAEKTPA
7rpo Td6' av8pa ylyvea-fal oe a pr.
vpei 8ac Gtot, yvvaicer e rrVrpaoevere
1 Geel: for Kdpa ydp of MS-







ELECTRA


OLD MAN
Grant for their father vengeance unto these I
ELECTRA
0 Earth, O Queen, on whom I lay mine hands,
ORESTES
Father, by foul wrong dweller neathh the earth,
OLD MAN
Help, help them, these thy children best-beloved.
SORESTES
Come bring all those thy battle-helpers slain, 680
ELECTRA
All them whose spears with thee laid Phrygians low,
OLD MAN
Yea, all which hate defilers impious!
ORESTES
Hear'st thou, O foully-entreated of my mother ?
ELECTRA
Our sire hears all, I know :-but time bids forth.
Therefore I warn thee, Aegisthus needs must die.
If thou, o'ermastered, fall a deadly fall,
I die too; count me then no more alive:
For I with sword twin-edged will pierce mine heart.
Now pass I in, to set in order all,
For, if there come fair tidings touching thee, 690
The house shall shout its joy; but, if thou die,
Far other shall betide. Thus charge I thee.
ORESTES
All know I.
ELECTRA
Wherefore must thou play the man.
And ye, girls, beacon-like raise signal cry


65
VOL. II. P






HAEKTPA


Kpavy~)v ywvo TrovS0e. cpovp'o-C 8' 'yco
rpoXetpov e'YXO, Xetpi p/ao-Tarovo-' ou .
ov yapp 7roT' eXpol TO 70 e'/t Io? vICKW/eevrl
8iKcrv bfiew Co ai-t' e i cv KaOv3pltaat.
XOPO2
ATaXai vrro pa7-po9 orp. a
700 'ApyeLtw ope'wv r worI KIcS')V
ev 7roXtat-c pEIveL (Pipa
evappoa-Trot v E caXaliot
IIava oiovoav 6i8iOpoov
7rveovr', aypwv "railav,
Xpvaeav apva cKadXlroWcov rropeD-aat
vrerplvov 7eTo-Tar
IcFpv! taxerv 3d0potgs
adyopav iyopdv, Mvlcva7ot,
710 a-reiT~ee u/aicaplov orlfJoevo rvpavvoov
da'fo-arTa,t 8eltara.
Xopot 8' 'ATpetSav tedypatpovt Oicov; 1'

Ovpeaat 8' Erirw'avrro avr. a
Xppvao-4aTot, oeXa/yedo 8' Av' &a-r
vrvp errop3 tov 'Ap'yewov
(0orbo 8 (b6odyov c KeXdei

SThe text of 11. 711, 712 is corrupt, and scholars are not
agreed as to the sense.







ELECTRA


Of this strife's issue. I will keep good watch,
Holding the sword aye ready in my grasp:
For never, overmastered, to my foes
Will I for vengeance-outrage yield me up.
[Retires within cottage. Exeunt on., PYL.. aid o. M.
CHORUS
In ancient song is the tale yet told (Str. 1)
How Pan, the Master of forest and mead, 700
Unearthly sweet while the melody rolled
From his pipes of cunningly-linked reed,
Did of yore from the mountains of Argos lead,
From the midst of the tender ewes of the fold,
A lamb bright-fleeced with the splendour of gold.
From the steps of marble the herald then
Cried all the folk to the market-place-
"To the gathering away, O Argive men !
On the awesome portent press to gaze 710
Of the lords of the heaven-favoured race !"
And with blithe acclaim the dancers came, and with
songs of praise.
(Ant. 1.)
And the gold-laid pavements in glorious wise
Were tapestry-spread: through street on street
Flashed flames of the Argives' sacrifice;
And the voices were ringing of flutes most sweet,
Which render the Muses service meet:
When Atreus and Thyestcs both claimed the throne, it
was decided that whichever of them should display a divine
portent should be king. A lamb with golden fleece
appeared amongst the flocks of Atreus; but Aerope, his
wife, conveyed it to her paramour Thyestes. Atreus, in
revenge, threw Aerope into the sea, murdered Thyestes'
sons, and served their flesh up at a feast to their father.
Euripides omits the details of this vengeance, and passes on
directly to its consequences in the judgment of Heaven.






HAEKTPA

icdXtO-rov, Mov-av Oepd7rov
poXhral 8' ~ifoovT dparat
XpvOa3 apv6s, k e.rl XadXoe OvIueov*
720 Ipvlat, 'yap evvai,
7reo-as akXoXov bihav
'Arp4ow, -Tpaf EJKcopLget 7rpbJ
wbpara' veoiievo, 8' elS abyopov, avrJTe
rav cepeo-acav e-
Xetv Xpvob.LaXXov Kcara' SlaLa 7roqavav.
Tore 8TOT) re aevva' arp. /'
a'O-rpov 6TerJao-' d8obv
ZeCV' al eyyo aeOXlov
730 XeuvKcv Te rpeo-Brrov aovf,
Tr 8' f-'erpa vOT' Xavvet
Oepp cPfoyl Geo7rp(Io,
vefeXat 8' 'vv8pot 7rpos' apXTov,
4rlpal T' AJuWvISeF E8pat
40tvova' lAretpO8pocrot,
KaXX0Toprv op3powv AtoLev c7TpepFoat.

XE'yera, Ta8e 8 7rrTto7v avr. /3
crappav 7rap' fLOty' 'XeL,
o-Trpeiat Oepfhv e'Xtov
'740 ypvaorbw'v e8pav adXXdav-
ra STrvu~ca tgpOTE P
OvaTaF 6eVelCV biKa9.
fo/3epo2 8C SporoTo-Ft 4i000L
cepoo' vrp OfewIPv OepaTrela'.
cov oib ovao-Oe -a 7roea v
icVrevef, ickXtV v a-vyyev'retp' dJ'8AO. v.
1 Paley: for (corrupt) irlio'yot of MSS.






ELECTRA


But with triumph-swell did a strange chant rise-
" Lo, the Golden Lamb is Thyestes' prize !"
For the nets of a love with dark guile fraught
O'er the soul of Atreus' bride did he fling ; 720
And the marvel so to his halls hath he brought,
And hath sped to the thronged folk, publishing
How his palace had gotten that strange horned
thing, [they hailed him king.
The golden-fleeced :-and the strife so ceased, and

Then, then, in his anger arose Zeus, turning (Str. 2)
The stars' feet back on the fire-fretted way;
Yea, and the Sun's car splendour-burning,
And the misty eyes of the morning grey. 730
And with flash of his chariot-wheels back-flying
Flushed crimson the face of the fading day:
To the north fled the clouds with their burden
sighing;
And for rains withheld, and for dews fast-drying
The dwellings of Ammon in faintness were yearning,
For sweet showers crying to heavens denying.
(Ant. 2)
It is told of the singers-scant credence such story,
Touching secrets of Gods, of my spirit hath won--
That the Sun from that vision turned backward the
glory
Of the gold of the face of his flaming throne, [ing
With the scourge of his wrath in affliction repay- 740
Mortals for deeds in their mad feuds done.
Yet it may be the tale liveth, soul-affraying,
To bow us to Godward in lowly obeying.
O mother of princes, it rose not before thee [slaying'
Mid thy lord's moan, staying thine hand from the,







HAEKTPA


11 u
ea ea'
(ihat, /Soi? fKova-ar', 7 SOic icevd7
v7rrOe9' p', oSare veprTpa SpovT Ato? ;
180', rdS' ObK iacr lya 7rvev/aT alpeTrat
750 8Eo-7rotv, aplett'ov &Sw~ar', 'HXeIcrpa, Trde.
HAEKTPA
ihXat, T7 Xpcaa ; vr9 c dyC)vo3 iiJKOfLev;
XOPO0
obK ol8a -rXV wV dev6ntov o l.wyjYv cXivao.
HAEKTPA
lKcovaa icKyw, Trlx6oev pfev, aX' b'o0pO.
XOPO
patcKpv yapp ep7rel y pveJ, epcJav'q ye lr7',.
HAEKTPA
'ApyeTo? 6 oa'revay b 4 PXow ditv j ;
XOPOZ
obc ol8a 7rtav yap plyrvvTat pAiXo /3ogi.
HAEKTPA
aeaydav AvrTei 7TjV7e PLO* 7l peILXopev ;
XOPO0
xoPos
erito-xe, 7pavan c~k p fd r, xa, 0cre'Ofv.
HAEKTPA
OVK eT'ort victeola-ca" 70rOo y7p ayyeXoa ;
XOPO0
760 fj ovor'v ovroi f3ao',\ea ia5Xov Kcraveiv.
ArrEAOI
& KcaXXwivKcot rapO0vot MvAcylvSe?,
vtcov7r 'Opacryjv -ra-ctv d1y eXXoi ctXou,
'Ayaf.ep.vpovo 8' ovIea iceI/evov 7re)
A'7t'yoa-ov dXXh eola'ov Ev Xco-at X'pev.







ELECTRA


Ha, friends!
Heard ye a great voice-or am I beguiled
Of fancy ?-like earth-muffled thunder of Zeus ?
Lo there, the gale is swelling all too plain !
Princess, come forth thine house!-Electra, come! 750
Enter ELECTRA.
ELECTRA
Friends, what befalls ? How doth our conflict speed?
CHORUS
I know but this, I hear a cry of death.
ELECTRA
I also hear-far off-yet oh, I hear!
CHORUS
Faint from the distance stole the cry, yet clear.
ELECTRA
A shriek of Argives ?-or of them I love?
CHORUS
I know not: all confused rang out the strain.
SELECTRA
Th'ine answer is my death!-why linger I?
CHORUS
Stay, till in certainty thou learn thy fate.
ELECTRA
No-vanquished !-where be they, his messengers ?
CHORUS
They yet shall come; not lightly slain are kings. 760
Enter MESSENGER.
MESSENGER
Victory victory, Mycenaean maids !
To all friends, tidings of Orestes' triumph I
Low lieth Agamemnon's murderer
Aegisthus: render thanks unto the Gods.






HAEKTPA
HAEKTPA
T71 S' el O- ; MTT /Po C to-T r cTrjalvten rdSe;
ArrEAO2
OVic oo-O' SeeX bov f' eioopoJra 7rpooTroXov ;
HAEKTPA
1 b(IXrTar', Cc Trot SeEI'aTo 8ovyvwo-'lav
eXOV7 Trpoo-wtrov" vvv e y7yvcaaOce o-e 84.
nT d'of ; r7TOv?7E 7raTpo po etov arvryo Oove; ;
ArrEAOS
770 Tef'rvq1ce' 8 a-ot0 raiO', a 7' orv /3ovxe, Xedw.
HAEKTPA
) eol, AlbCi Te 7rav' p a', X\04, rore.
7ol Tp7crW 8e tcal rivt pv9Ij)i (Oovov
ICTe vet veoei'ov 'ratFa, /ov'Xopta, ptaOev.
ArrEAOZ
e7re pXE\aOpov TrovS' rAvpatev -roda,
elo-TPdvTr 8tlcpoTov el' A aferTo'v,
v' fO v o KEeLIvo9 Twv MvKivaitov avab.
KVpe 86 Kc7rOL( EV KcaappVTroL 3e/3w ,

ow 7' avreT' XatpT, ( !E'vo* Trive;
780 'rTOOEv 7ropeveo-0'; 'o-Ce EK rrolan Xovov4;
S8' eZTT 'Opeo'-T r Oeoa-aaXo l' rpo, 'AXebv
vOa-ovTe epyXOueO' 'OXvyprw Atd.
IcKXVv 8c TraDi' A'yto-o0 evve7reb rdSe'
vvv p6v 7rap' LJptv Xp aovvec 7ov' dfoL
tolvy yeve'Oar TIXivw 8o /3ovvTiwv
NvfdJ atv s'o ot 8' eavaacrdvTre X4X(ov9
el raTvrv 'ijET. aXX' ioL/ev 8e' 6UovU-
ical rav d~p' opeve 'cal Xcpo, Xaa/3v
rap^yev *lpa,--o8 darrapvetiaat Xpecov.
790 rwe~ v o'Kcot jtev, evverrve rdae







ELECTRA


ELECTRA
Who art thou ?-what attests thy tidings' truth ?
MESSENGER
Look,-dost thou know me not,-thy brother's )
henchman? /
ELECTRA
O friend, I knew not, out of very fear,
Thy face; but now in very sooth I know.
How say'st thou ?-is my sire's foul murderer dead ?
MESSENGER
Dead. Twice I say it, since thou will'st it so. 770
ELECTRA
Gods All-seeing Justice, thou hast come at last I
In what wise, and by what device of death,
Slew he Thyestes' son? I fain would know.
MESSENGER
Soon as our feet from thine abode had passed,
The highway chariot-rutted entered we:
There was this Mycenaean king renowned.
Into his watered garden had he turned,
Plucking soft myrtle-sprays to bind his brows.
He saw, and cried, Hail strangers, who be ye?
Whence journeying, and children of what land ?" 780
"1Thessa1i s we," Orestes spake, "who seek
Alpheus, to sacrifice to Olympian Zeus."
Now when Aegisthus heard this, answered he :
" Nay, at this altar-feast ye needs must be
My guests: I sacrifice unto the Nymphs.
With morning shall ye rise from sleep, and speed
No less. Come, let us go into the house,"-
So speaking, did he take us by the hand,
And led us in,-" ye may not say me nay."
And, when we stood within his doors, he spake: 790






HAEKTPA


XovTp 9 TaXio'Ta ToE 'vov7 Tv; alpc-co,
;9 ap.oi 8co/3wov ro-T5t( Xepvi/3wv re'Xaq.
aXX' els' 'Opea-Tr?7 prTico; 'yv'G/IEOa
XovrpoFoT-c caOapoti 7roarakowv Pe lOpv c&ro.
el Se !evov aao-rol'-T ocvvOiLet Xpewv,
Ay'lyot', erocLot icobtc 2arapvotueao-O', 6vae.
ToVroV tev olv oai eleav i l'c /zOCaV ov o'o ov"
XoAdya SE 8 'vrev Sero-rr ov Stoe 7rpo pyov 7rvTe 'eoav Xepa,.
800 oi' /pe ayetov bepov, ol 8' 9pov Kavra,
daXXot Se rvp cavfrTOv (fcctl, T' eao-Xapav
X'4,3raT Wpvovv' rrao-a 8' e/cirvre a-cre/.
Xapf3wv Se rrpovrav fzrl7pbov e6vvErT a- cev
e'3aXXe p3uovI, 'roid8' e'vve'7rWOv 7ry
Nv/yat 'erepatat, 7roXXaLt; /t.e 83ov7vreLv
Kcal Trv icar' oi/cov Tvv8apita 8&aapr' e'ziv
7rpdca-ovra; oJa vvv, Tov' 8' ecobv yXOpovs
KaicKs
Xeycwv 'Opeo-ryjv Kcal ae. 8eo-'rorr? 8' lyo
TavavTr yivxer, ov yeyoJwVLicO-Kw XAov,
810 Xalpev vra'rpa 8c/ 8 ar'. eic lKavoV S' EXOv
A'ityo-0o olppOv ofayia8a, ,poo-xyeav Tplxa
repcv, ef4' yvov 'rvp OrKice 8eaci,
Kac a'r E'7r' c twv /payoXov po 'jpav Xepow
8co&e?, XeA'e 8e a-r Kicao-yvrj'Tr Ta'Se'
dc TV KrcwaXv Kopvo0Tat r o ri Oaeo--aXoFa
elva Tor68', ora-'Ta9 ravpov ApTrauei KaXt;
t'rroav' T' oxayet. Xap/3 ao-'ipov, w five,
eFiov 're '1u5vp e&rvzov a/j.ctp Oe-aaXa v.
o 8' eivKpc6-rov Aowp'8' ap'rao-a Xepolv,
820 p~las ar' IlvXdSv pv e'Xer' v 'ro'vro v~ rnper]Iv,






ELECTRA


" Let one with speed bring water for the guests,
That they may compass with cleansed hands the
altar."
But spake Orestes, In pure river-streams
It was but now we purified ourselves.
If strangers may with citizens sacrifice,
Ready we are, nor say thee nay, O King."
Such words they spake in hearing of us all.
Then, laying down their spears, the tyrant's guards,
His thralls, all set their hands unto the work.
Some brought the bowl of slaughter, some the
maunds: 800
The fire some kindled, and the caldrons set
Over the hearths: with tumult rang the roofs.
Then took thy mother's paramour the meal,
And thus spake, on the altars casting it:
"Nymphs of the Rocks, vouchsafe me oft, with her,
Mine home-mate Tyndareus' child, to sacrifice,
As now, blest, and my foes in like ill case."
Thee apd Orestes meant he; but my lord
Reversed the prayer, low-murmuring, even to win
Ancestral halls. Aegisthus from the maund 810
Took the straight blade, the calf's hair shore there-
with,
And on the pure flame with his right hand cast;
Then, when his thralls heaved shoulder-high the calf,
Severed the throat, and to thy brother spake:
"Herein, men boast, Thessalians take their pride,
In deftly quartering the slaughtered bull,
And taming steeds. Take thou the steel, O guest,
And prove the fame of the Thessalians true."
He grasped a fair-wrought Dorian blade in hand,
And from his shoulder cast his graceful cloak, 820
Took Pylades for helper in his task,






HAEKTPA
SLal; 8' Vi)Oelt' Kcal hXap3v /too-xov ro58a,
XevK~cs a yjTLvov oa-pKcaq ecTewvowv xepa"
O8aacov 8~ 3pvpoav eeaeSpev 7 8pojiev'
&So-ov' 8taov ovs rtrovq 8tijvvo-e,
KCavet r XaTyova. lepa 8' elp Xetpa9 Xa/3v
A'ylyto-oq ?OpeC. icaK hop/3o aerv ob 7rpoO-jv
o-rdXyroet, 7 ab Se' icalt &0al %XoXs 7reXaq
icaa/c; eatvov oiaorrovvr-t 7rpoo-3oXa~d.
830 Xc( /LEv alcv9p4eEt, 8ea7ro-6T'r7 8' av-vwrope7'
rt Xpjp' aOv1/etl, w !e'v'; oppw8@i Trva
o'Xov Ovpaaov. eor-T 8' 'to-rov 3poTrv
'Acya/lvovo9v 'ralg oroX4i6ov T' epotv, 8o60o't.
o 8 eZtre* (vy4So9 87ra Setp.alvet SoXov,
roXheo avao-a-wv ; ov), orWq 7rraorT'jpta
Ootva-o' beoa'a, Otad' 'IvrT Acopuc
o'o-et T(9 ritv (cort8'; dropp4 ro dXAvv.

SOpet Staspwv- 70T S vevoVrTOF ICaE
8 ov0 vxav r' alupovw o-ra? KIao-LyiqnoT oa-eev
eIl ao-ov8vXovF 7ratoe, vorlata 8e
EpprEev apOpa 7rrav SE O/ avr' w OT) T
crnwaypev, ea-4ctSae Svao-OvKcov 'ovcp.
/8cMee 8' 186vTEIete vB' pav el, 8o6pv,
7roXXoo luki eo-OaC vrpo\ 8u'v avpelas 8' Vrro
o7o-TJo-av avTrrpopa o-eovTre9 13EXr
HlvXc~ 9 'Opeo-TP S T' elre 8', oUix Sv 8vOLvriv'
Ifjc 7ToXet 7-T5' oNS' e'jto-i wrdoact,
oovea 8e rrarpob dvTeT'77twpr)po-a'7v
850 o TrXnWov 'Op4o-T7y' aXXa s ,l t p Kalvee,
r=aTpo, 7rakhatol S6~ue ol 8', erwe Xoayo






ELECTRA

And put the thralls back; seized the calf's foot
then,
Bared the white flesh, with free sweep of his arm,
And quicker flayed the hide than runner's feet
Twice round the turnings of the horse-course speed:
So opened it. Aegisthus grasped the inwards,
And gazed thereon. No lobe the.liver had:
The gate-vein, the gall-bladder nigh thereto,
Portended perilous scathe to him that looked.
Scowling he stared; but straight my master asks: 830
"Why cast down, O mine host?" "A stranger's
guile
I dread. Of all men hatefullest to me,
And foe to mine, is Agamemnon's son."
But he, Go to: thou fear an exile's, guile-
The King! That we on flesh of sacrifice
May feast, let one for this of Doris bring
A Phthian knife : the breast-bone let me cleave."
So took, and cleft. Aegisthus grasped the inwards,
Parted, and gazed. Even as he bowed his head,
Thy brother strained' himself full height, and smote 840
Down on his spine, and through his backbone's joints
Crashed. Shuddered all his frame from head to foot,
Convulsed in throes of agony dying hard.
Straightway the thralls beholding sprang to arms,-
A host to fight with two,-but unafraid
Pylades and Orestes, brandishing
Their weapons, faced them: Not a foe," he cried,
" To Argos, nor my servants, am I come!
I have avenged me on my father's slayer,-
Orestes I, the hapless! Slay me not, 850
My father's ancient thralls !" They, when they heard
SA heavy cleaver, better adapted both for his ostensible
and for his real purpose.







HAEKTPA
Kcovcav, ~X-ov IKacaKag" eyv;ro-7r 8' V'7r
'yepovro; ev so oto-tv apXaov rTvov.
rTdiovu-t 8' evOv voVD Kao-tv'r7ov icapa
Xaipovro aXaXadobvTre. 'pXeraPl a ooi
icapa '7rt8elSf oV X1 rop'yovo cfe'pwv,
d4X' 8v oTrvyeZ Aieyto-ov* alpta 8' a'iaa7vo
irtcpbo Saveta rbo' ie rf OavovTt vvv.
XOPOZ
.804 el; Nopov, w cha, UXvo-, C'rp.
860 cb, veppo' ovpavtov
I8fs7ia Kovl'bova-a o-v'v cyXatq'
vtcei a-recfavacoplav
o'av 7rap 'AX4etov peeOpos~ TeXeo-as
Kaa-yv7rTO; Ore'ev' OXX' ebr'dele
KaXXLvticov wSav e/y Xop,.
HAEKTPA
w eyo, & rOpTErov i'Xliov aeLXa,
5O yaa xal vb fIv C6epkoirl7v 'ruapoq,
vvv ob'La TroIvLov almwrvXaL Tr',deAe0epot,
Trel 7ra'rp4 e'~rwn-Tr ev Afytao-9o Ooveuv.
870 0p', ola r] XO al o t8eOL K6eova-i fov
KOft/l4 ajXL aTr ejevY7/cwt at, plXat,
a-7rdw r' 48ekOo0 icpa7a To7 vrLX7 dopov.
XOPOS
xoPo ,
aCv pev vvv a'cydXtar' ictpe avr.
KpaTf T 8' a~pdTEpov
XOpr7o-eTat Movo-ator- Xopevl.a iXov.
vV otl 7rWpoV apldTepot
yaLag rvpavvevcovaot iXot /ao~atXj,
Sucalrs Troto-' uSiov KicaOeXovreS.
dcXX' irw d vvavXog 3oa Xapa.






ELECTRA


His words, stayed spear; and recognized was he
Of an old servant, long time of the house.
Straightway a wreath upon thy brother's brow
They set, with shouts rejoicing. And he comes
To show the head to thee-no Gorgon's this,
But whom thou hat'st, Aegisthus. Blood for
blood,
Bitter repayment, to the slain hath come. /
CHORUS
Forth to the dance, O beloved, with feet (Sir.)
That rapture is winging 860
Bounding from earth, as a fawn's, let them fleet!
Lo, thy brother comes bringing
Victory-garlands more fair than they gain
By Alpheus' flow! As I dance, be thy strain
Of triumph outringing!
ELECTRA
O light, O splendour of the Sun-god's steeds,
O Earth, and Night that filled my gaze till now,
Free are mine eyes now: dawn's wings open
free !
My father's slayer Aegisthus is laid low!
Come, such things as I have, my dwelling's store, 870
Let me bring forth to grace his hair, O friends,
To crown my conquering brother's head withal.
CHORUS
Crown him, the conqueror !-garlands praise, (Ant.)
Thy thanksgiving-oblation!
To the dance that the Muses love forth will we pace.
Now shall rule o'er our nation
Her kings well-beloved whom of old she hath
known;
For the right is triumphant, the tyrant o'erthrown.
Ring, joy's exultation!






HAEKTPA


HAEKTPA
880 & icaXXvwlce, 7rarpwo eCe vtlcrJopov
'yeycd, 'Opeara, Tj9 vr' 'IX T ph~ X,
8al K'c;rf o-a i oa-TpXcov nav8jpara.
ceEL? yap obic AXpetov icTrXeOpov Spaylov
ay&v e; ot/cov, aXXA ) 'rwol.tLov Krav vo
A'iyIaOov, o a-o 7-rarepa xcapov eoXcae.
al T, (d rapaaria', av~po, eao-e3ear-7Tov
.r'aievf/a, -Iv'Xd8, oar'TEavov e' ei~ Xepbo
8'XOov peL 'yAtp cal ab T7O8' t'rOV ipo;
aywvovo a e 8' edTVuXe bavotoca- pmo.
OPEITH2
890 6eov; pev ~ryo00 rprovov, H'IcXrpa, TvXi;
apXiXyTaT 7 T-S, evra IcaK' eTralveo-ov
Tro rWv Oev re H ); 7Xr7? bri'pE'rq7v.
lcKOo 'yap ob Xodoto-tv aXX' epyovt KIavcov
AtfytrOov" c' 9e Tw ed o elSvat ra8e
rpopi.ev, avrov ro w avo'vra ot opepo,
ov, etTe Xp, el, Oi]paov ap'rajajV prpoOes,
So-KtcXov owovowaiv ale'po} rbKcvoV;
rrw4eaa epetoaov axohXo7r- cros vyap eot viv
8ovDXos, 7rdpotie 8eo-TrorTnE icecXk9yjvo.
HAEKTPA
900 alo-Xcr opa4 Ljev, g3oXopau 8' l"relv poftw,
OPE TH2
7r1 ppaa; Xeorv, 4, 0f63ov 7' Cwlfev el.
HAEKrPA
veicpov9 /Bpliew, AFe <. T7l 4e0'ovy fUy.
OPE2TH2
obic 8olr o&be l o- /. a tv 4iPateTo' ire.







ELECTRA A

Lnter ORESTES and PYLADES, with attendants bearing
Aegisthus' body.
ELECTRA
Hail, glorious conqueror, Orestes sprung 880
Of father triumph-crowned in Ilium's war !
Receive this wreath to bind thy clustering hair.
Thou hast come home, who hast run no profitless
course
In athlete-race, but who hast slain thy foe
Aegisthus, murderer of thy sire and mine.
And thou, his battle-helper, Pylades,
A good man's nursling, from mine hand accept
A wreath; for in this conflict was thy part
As his: in my sight ever prosper ye!
ORESTES
The Gods account thou first, Electra, authors 890
Of this day's fortune: praise thereafter me,
Whom am but minister of heaven and fate.
I come, who not in word, but deed, have slain
Aegisthus, and for proof for whoso will
To know, the dead man's self I bring to thee;
Whom, if thou wilt, for ravin of beasts cast forth,
Or for the children of the air to rend
Impale him on a stake: thy bondman now
Is he, who heretofore was called thy lord.
ELECTRA
I take shame-none the less I fain would speak- 900
ORESTES
What is it ? Speak: thou hast left fear's prison-house.
ELECTRA
To mock the dead, lest ill-will light on me.
ORESTES
There is no man can blame thee for such cause.


VOL. II.






HAEKTPA


HAEKTPA
Sva-dpe-ro9 ipL&v IcaKl OLXdoyo t ro7rl.
OPE2TH2
Xey', eL Tt XPfpe9, o-VyovV* -7rdovSotUo-tL '/p
vo/jLOtwtv eL pav ry e a-v8 Se/ix7Kajtev.
HAEKTPA
elev TL'v apXv rp crod Ee'ifta KicaKOcv;
7rotaf 'EXevTaVd; Tiva peoov rdTao 6'dyov;
Kat pj v st' 6'pOpwa 7' o7r-oT defXll/Iravov
910 OpvXovoC a elr/ el ijEXov Icar' o'Lpza a-oy,
el 8'E yevotLyJv SefjaTdrov eXevOpa
Twv 7rpo-0ae vV oVII eC/JevP (ro&ow-) 86' o-o1
icev a a e f^WVT' IOexov ealac KaKad.
aroXso-daF /Jfe K cpoav'v p'Xoov 'ra-rpov
Ical Tov' '9]7Ka;c, ov8\v 8tKcI)/cr4Vo9,
Ka7paWi alcypwo /iriTep' lv8pa 7' Kcrave;
o-TpaT7'XaTrofv' "EXX o-v, ovic ed''ov dpvyag.
ei roiTO 8' 7XOev Ap/alaav c5TT' rXw7rtcra9
c, eq o-e /JL 8ev r7 ip7-p ovX ei Kaicv
920 y4p/lta, ePoU 8e ria7rpo? I8t6cKt Xr.
I'CTO S', o"Trav aTt 8coXeoa' 8a/JapTa Tro
KpV7rrTaia-v evvai; eT' avaytcaao-O; a/3etv,
8Tvarrvod dEGTrr, el 80oce TO owCpoveEv
edcel Lv avr'lv oi K 'Xetv, rap' ol S' 'xew.
aXytco-ra 8' OKIcetq, ob 8OKcV) OIK KaicacoW
p8?ja-OBa yap 8ij7 dJvo-cov q71(a9 rydatov,
/I4Tr7p 8e dvSpa 8vao-e/3r KeicTrr7,iE'7.
At~ip o 'omvp 8' 'VTr' atpefo-ov TvdXV,
KeiW rTE 2rv T2 v Kal a-V ToUKELcrpi ica ov.
930 aiwcyt 8' ev 'Apyelooi'w ?Kcove9 Ta8e-
o T Tyvpauio'l, o'YlI Trv8po ], yvv .
KaioL TO8' alo-(pov, 7rpoa-raTCei 76 SWd0Ia






ELECTRA


ELECTRA
Our folk be ill to please, and censure-prone.
ORESTES
Speak, sister, what thou wilt. No terms of truce
Be in the feud betwixt us and this man.
ELECTRA (to the corpse)
So be it. Where shall my reproach begin?
Where end? Where shall the arraignment find its
midst ?
Yet, morn by morn, I never wont to cease
Conning what I would tell thee to thy face, 910
If ever from past terrors disenthralled
I stood. Now am I; and I pay the debt
Of taunts I fain had hurled at thee alive.
Thou wast my ruin, of a sire beloved
Didst orphan me and him, who wronged thee nev2r,
Didst foully wed my mother, slew'st her lord,
Hellas' war-chief,-thou who ne'er sawest Troy !
uch was thy folly's depth that thou didst dream
hou hadst wedded in my mother a true wife,
Vith whom thou didst defile my father's couch! 920
et whoso draggeth down his neighbour's wife
o folly, and then must take her for his own,
now himself dupe, who deemeth that to him
e shall be true, who to her lord was false.
Wretched thy' life was, which thou thoughtest
blest:
Thou knewest thine a marriage impious,
And she, that she had ta'en for lord a villain.
Transgressors both, each other's lot ye took;
She took thy baseness, thou didst take her curse.
And through all Argos this was still thy name- 9
"That woman's husband": none said "That man's wife."
Yet shame is this, when foremost in the home
83






HAEKTPA


yvvatica, p/ 7-rv dav8pa- icaicelvovw crvy(o
rov; 7rat8a9, ocr'T Trov p v apaevo9 'rarpoq
oVic w6ouaoa-ra, r7q S6 /& ,rpoq ev rrdXets.
eirlo-7pa fyap yijiavrT Ial /peuf1 Xe
brvSpb f ev ovbf8l, Tr&v & OeXetCSov Xdov.
8 8' p7ra ra a-e 'rXec-rTo ovlc cdyvwicoa,
rXct,; rt-v evat roa- C Xep4jaa-t a-evowv
940 Ta 8' obtev elr /] /3paXvv 6tUX ai-a Xp6ovv.
yap dctrt I3c13awoq, ov Ta Xp4iara.
j zv yAp ael 'rapalievovao apcet icapa'
0 8' 6'X/3o9 a&i8co Ka~l jpera ao-atfjrv vvwv
EeirvarT OKicow, o-pLK p avOto-a Xpo'vov.
a 8' el' yrvatlca, vrapOevo 7iap ob iaXobv
Xb'yetv, -caroo, yvopitwon 8' awivlo at.
ii3p(6, c8\ 8 /3actlicov\ eo wv O 86/ov-
IcaXXE T' apapwo. aXX' e"LoLy eLy 1 roct?
Sz' 7rapOevw7rro, aXXa Tav8peov Tpo'rov.
950 ra 7ap Trecv avrwv "Apeo, tIcEpefU vvvUat,
TA 8' e'vrperr K6O co'-o ev Xopos~ pv6vov,
epp', o0VS6 el ( v Lf~f wv vpefEl XPopdV
8I1criv 8E'S8ica", SSU Tq KarKovpyo &')v.
pi pLOt, o- rrpWTov 3 )f' Jav 8pdil7 KaX&w,
vpicav CESoicetro Tryv SLcv, 'rpv av 7rpaq
,ypaptifj, 'icrj Tat tal ireXo, icKdry fSov.
XOPO0
'rpage 8etva, Setva 8' avre'w/ce col
Kal 7T8' e yi Yap ALic /C'ya a-cOvo.
OPESTH2
eLev K01if'v rov8e o0-p el'-co Xpe1v
960 Ko-rco re 8ovvat, Sp6iee, wo orav /oXp
prwrp, a :ayf trdporte p7\kt elaid8 vecpOv.
Tyrwhitt: for KaKc(, "maketh end of ills."







ELECTRA


Is wife, not husband. Out upon the sons
That not the man's, their father's, sons are called,
Nay, but the mother's, all the city through !
For, when the ignoble weddeth high-born bride,
Noneitake account-ofhim, but-all-of her; .--p.- .- -
This was thy strong delusion, blind of heart, ', r "
Through pride of wealth to boast thee some great
one!
Nought wealth is, save for fleeting fellowship. 940
'Tis character abideth, not possessions :
"This, ever-staying, lifteth up the head;
But wealth by vanity gotten, held'of fools,.
Takes to it wings; as a flower it fadeth soon.
For those thy sins of the flesh-for maid unmeet
To name-I speak them not: suffice the hint!
Thou waxedst wanton, with thy royal halls,
Thy pride of goodlihead Be mine a spouse
Not girl-faced, but a man in mien and port.
The sons of these to warrior-prowess cleave; 950
Those, the fair-seeming, but in dances shine.
Perish, O blind to all for which at last,
Felon convict, thou'rt punished, caitifff thou!
Let none dream, though at starting he run well,
That he outrunneth Justice, ere he touch
The very goal and reach the bourn of life.
CHORUS
Dread were his deeds; dread payment hath he made
To thee and this man. Great is Justice' might.
ORESTES
Enough: now must ye bear his corpse within,
And hide in shadow, thralls, that, when she comes, 960
My mother ere she die see not the dead.




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