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VOLUME 15 SPRING 2011 Alumni Provide Hands-on Learning at Suwannee High SchoolUSDA Award Recipients Dedicated to Teaching Excellence CALS Professor Brings Science and Learning to Bahamian Youth

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LETTER FROM THE DEANIn the last ten years, faculty within CALS have received more than 40 awards from the North American Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture. Furthermore, CALS faculty have won 12 United States Department of Agriculture Excellence in Teaching Awards, which is more than any college of agriculture and related sciences in the nation. Teaching excellenceIll bet you remember your favorite high school or college teachers. I would also bet that the reason you remember them is not necessarily what they taught but the way they taught. Maybe it was their sense of humor, colorful anecdotes that brought clarity or good old-fashioned enthusiasm for the subject. Whatever the case, you remember your favorite teachers and how they inspired you to learn. We are fortunate to have many of these educators in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, and this issue of CALS Connection highlights just some of our outstanding teaching faculty. In the last 10 years, faculty within CALS have received more than 40 awards from the North American Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture. Furthermore, CALS faculty have won 12 United States Department of Agriculture Excellence in Teaching Awards since this program started in the early 1990s, which is more than any college of agriculture and related sciences in the nation. We highlight the two most recent recipients of national awards in this issue Dr. Ricky Telg and Dr. Grady Roberts. I have no doubt that many will follow in their footsteps. We are extremely proud of the excellence in teaching that our faculty bring to the classroom, but even more proud that this translates into excellence in our students. Last fall semester, an astounding 828 students, or about 20 percent of our under graduate student body, made the Deans list. About 80 of those students were on the Presidents Honor Roll, earning a perfect 4.0 grade point average while carrying a 15-credit load. Clearly, we have much to be proud of, and I hope you will enjoy reading more about the talented people who have continued the tradition of teaching excellence and help make CALS one of the best colleges in the nation. Dr. Mark Rieger Interim Dean

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4 Graduate Connects People with T heir F ood 5 C ALS E lectives Broaden H orizons 5 U F and AB A C Sign A rticulation Agreement 6 Professor Brings Science and Learning to Bahamian Youth 7 A lumni Provide H ands-on Learning at Suwannee H igh School 8 A lumna Provides F oundation for Students Success 9 E nvironmental H orticulture Professor T eaches Students with T heir Senses 10 USD A A ward R ecipients Dedicated to T eaching E xcellence 11 A lumni R ecognized at T ailG ATORTABL E OF C ONTENT SEditor: Laura K. Kubitz Adviser: Cathy Carr, Director, Alumni and Career Services Designer: Raghu Consbruck, IFAS Information and Communication Services Cover photo: istockphoto.com 6 8 10

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4CALS CONNECTION Spring 2011 The Lapinskis are providing diversity to local agriculture and connecting with the community at their 2.5-acre farm in Jacksonville, Fla. In 2007, Brian Lapinski, a College of Agricultural and Life Sciences graduate, and Kristin, his wife, started Down To Earth Farm. Reading about some of the pitfalls of modern agriculture got us into doing it ourselves, Brian said. The Lapinskis use methods such as crop rotation, cover crops, composted animal manure for fertilizer and non-synthetic pesticides. The couple decided to start the farm after learning about these methods from other farms around the country. We wanted to bring a sustainable way of growing food to Jacksonville, Kristin said. Farming sustainably is a challenge. Bugs and disease are harder to control, and you can lose more crops than conventional farming, Brian said. Still, the reward is the ability to eat food straight off the vine. We are eating the food too, Brian Lapinski said. We are very condent with eating right out of the elds. Although the crops grown on the farm are not certied organic, Down to Earth Farm does offer consumers the opportunity to visit the place where their food is grown. The farm supplies a 24-member Community Supported Agriculture group with fruits and vegetables seasonally. A CSA group consists of members of the general public who purchase shares of a farm from the owner. As a result, the shareholder receives bags of fresh produce weekly throughout the farming season. Some of the members of the CSA volunteer their time to work on the farm. We are really proud and excited to have the CSA, especially the connections we have been able to make with the members, Kristin said. Down to Earth Farm also serves local farmers markets weekly, including Beaches Green Markets at Jarboe Park and Riverside Arts Market. Brian, who has a masters degree from the department of family, youth and community sciences, was able to learn valuable lessons from his graduate studies. Brian wanted to play an important role in a community and that is where our department helped him, said Mickie Swisher, associate professor and graduate coordinator for family, youth and community sciences. Throughout his masters program, Brian focused on the community and social aspects of owning and maintaining a community-based organization. Brian is not just focusing on providing food; instead, his focus is on building and being a part of the Jacksonville community, Swisher said. After three years of providing locally grown produce for the community and their family, Brian and Kristin still love the thrill of watching hand-planted seeds grow into thriving, abundant crops. It never gets old, Brian said. Every time I harvest something I get excited. Graduate Connects People with Their FoodAfter three years of providing locally grown produce for the community and their family, Brian and Kristin Lapinski still love the thrill of watching hand-planted seeds grow into thriving, abundant crops.BY KA T E TYLER Cabbage, one of several crops grown on the Down to Earth Farm, is almost ready to be picked and enjoyed. Brian Lapinski, a College of Agricultural and Life Sciences graduate, picks vegetables on an overcast day in Jacksonville, Fla.

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5Spring 2011 CALS CONNECTION University of Florida students have the opportunity to take a variety of electives within the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. The electives can fulll general education requirements, but students can also take the courses to learn a new skill or about an industry they are unfamiliar with. The Meat We Eat is a three-credit course designed to turn UF students into educated consumers of animal muscle products and to help them appreciate the steps involved in muscle food production. We want to show students how we work to feed a growing world population, said Chad Carr, assistant professor in animal sciences. The course is the only one of its kind offered in Florida, and it covers all the details of animal meat production, including processing, retailing and the role of meat in a balanced diet. Carr teaches his students about the proper selection of meats and how to properly cook and store animal protein products. Biological sciences courses are designed to introduce students to basic concepts in science, such as the scientic method, and to help students become aware of the impact of scientic developments on the environment and society. The Meat We Eat accomplishes that by requiring students to formulate hypotheses relative to the animal, meat and food science industry, Carr said. When the class is done, we want students to understand that meat is good, and it is good for them, he said. The course is offered in the fall and spring and is open to all UF students. We want everybody to take this class, enjoy it and learn, Carr said. Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College and the University of Florida are teaming up to help students who begin their academic career at ABAC to nish their degrees in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at UF. ABAC, located in Tifton, Ga., signed an articulation agreement with UF to ensure a smooth transition for students who come from ABAC to UF. This agreement will make it easy for students to nish their degrees in Florida. This is a good thing for UF and ABAC, said David Bridges, ABAC president. Our Florida numbers are up considerably, and this agreement will provide a charted course. CALS interim dean, Mark Rieger, said the intent of the agreement is to provide more opportunities for higher education to traditional and non-traditional students in the elds of agriculture and natural resources. I want to recruit the best and brightest kids in Florida to come to ABAC, said Tim Marshall, dean of ABACs School of Agriculture and Natural Resources. The joint institutional agreement is between the ABAC School of Agriculture and Natural Resources and CALS. The partnership will focus on majors in forest resources and conservation, agricultural education and communication, animal sciences, and food and resource economics, Marshall said. It shows there is a very positive relationship between ABAC and Florida, Rieger said. For Florida kids to come to this environment, we know they will come back to the university well prepared. For more information, call the CALS Deans Ofce at 352-392-1963. BY E DWARD TOP OLE SK I BY L AURA KU B I T ZCALS E lectives Broaden Horizons UF and ABAC Sign Articulation Agreement Examples of CALS ElectivesAOM 2520 Global Sustainable Energy: Past, Present and Future A GR 2612 Seeds of Change ENY 1001 Bugs and People ORH 1030 Plants, Gardening and Y ou AEB 2014 Economic Issues, Food and Y ou FOS 2001 Mans Food FOR 2662 Forests for the Future FRC 1010 Growing Fruit for Fun and Prot PCB 1051 Exploring Y our Genome P L P 2000 Plants, Plagues and People SWS 2007 The W orld of W ater WIS 2040 Wildlife Issues in a Changing W orldRepresentatives from the University of Florida and Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College were present for the articulation agreement signing ceremony. Pictured from left to right, Paul Willis, Tim Marshall, Elaine Turner, David Bridges, Frankie Hall, Mark Rieger and Niles Reddick.

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6CALS CONNECTION Spring 2011 Underneath the clear, emerald waters of Excuma Cay, Bahamas, are ancient organisms that can only be found in the Bahamas and Australia. The Bahamians who call the string of islands home often do not understand the signicance of their environment. Jamie Foster, an assistant professor in microbiology and cell science in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, set out to help the local community of Little Darby Island, Bahamas, preserve their unique environment by organizing a camp to teach local children about what is in their backyard. Stromatolites are microbial communities that form rocks by taking carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and releasing it out as calcium carbonate. The big, gray rocks formed by stromatolites can look more like stepping stones instead of ancient fossils. Some of the stromatolites found in the Bahamas date back 3.8 billion years. In collaboration with CALS, the Young Bahamian Marine Scientists, the Bahamas Marine EcoCentre, the University of Miami and NASA, Foster organized a Science and Stromatolite Summer Camp for eight middleand high school-aged Bahamian children. The camp was a mixture of classroom lecture and hands-on activities meant to teach the children about the scientic method using stromatolites. It was just a great way to connect to kids that you might never have talked to before, Foster said. The Bahamian kids can put up a wall, but this was a great way to interact and reach out to them. Alina Chester, an anthropology and political science junior at UF, helped as a teaching assistant during the camp. Having spent part of her childhood on the island, she used the camp as an opportunity to get to know the locals and learn while giving back to the island. In the morning, the campers listened to a short lecture and then got to perform hands-on activities to help reinforce the lessons. During the camp, the children launched rockets, designed their own experiments, created underwater maps of the stromatolites, isolated DNA and created news broadcasts about an issue they learned about at camp. For almost all of the kids, this was the most high-tech science they have gotten to be a part of, Chester said. To help connect with the children, Foster teamed up with Nikita ShielsRolle, who works with the Young Bahamian Marine Scientists, to translate the information in a way the campers would understand. We wanted Bahamians teaching Bahamians, Foster said. We provided the supplies and structured the lessons, but we wanted the kids to see a familiar face when translating this information. Nikita served as our Bahamian educator. She was an essential part of the team. By interacting and teaching middleand high school-aged children in the Bahamas, Foster said she has a better understanding of the diversity of people who walk through her classroom doors at UF. The camp was a pilot program to help establish proper methods and procedures for running a summer Professor Brings Science and Learning to Bahamian YouthBY L AURA KU B I T Z A student explores the stromatolites he learned about in the Science and Stromatolite Summer Camp held by Jamie Foster, an assistant professor in microbiology and cell science, in August 2010 in Little Darby Island, Bahamas. (photo by Jamie Foster)continued on page 11The students and teachers enjoy a break from the heat by relaxing in the clear, crisp waters of Little Darby Island, Bahamas, during an outdoor lecture at the Science and Stromatolite Summer Camp. (photo by Jamie Foster)

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7Spring 2011 CALS CONNECTION Two College of Agricultural and Life Sciences alumni are bringing their diverse academic backgrounds to the classrooms of Suwannee High School in Live Oak, Fla. By incorporating their backgrounds in plant science and environmental horticulture, De Broughton and Travis Tuten are helping students gain hands-on experience in a variety of agricultural sectors. Their efforts are evident in their students successes through the Suwannee High School Land Lab. The land lab, or farm, serves as an outdoor classroom for the Suwannee High School Agriculture Department. The teachers use the knowledge gained in their respective programs through the University of Floridas CALS, leading not only to their success as educators, but also to the success of the Suwannee FFA Chapter, the Suwannee High School Land Lab and, most importantly, their students. This outdoor learning environment is common in agriculture departments at many schools. The Suwannee High School Land Lab is a thriving agricultural operation and a working farm producing numerous agricultural commodities, Broughton said. As a plant science major, I took many classes that had labs with a production emphasis, Broughton said. I have used these things to provide unique experiences for students beyond the traditional classroom. The students are currently growing sugarcane and a variety of winter greens including mustards, turnips and collards, broccoli, squash, and acre peas. They also have a small fruit orchard with blueberries, blackberries and fruit trees. The crops grown at the land lab are harvested by students and then sold to raise money for the agriculture department and the Suwannee FFA Chapter. One of the largest fundraisers is the chapters cane syrup production and sales. Using the sugarcane grown on the farm, students and Suwannee FFA members help grind the cane and make it into cane syrup. After processing and bottling the syrup, it is sold in the community to support the FFA chapter. Broughton and Tuten are continuing to expand the opportunities students have at the farm. From managing a herd of cattle, propagating plants in a new greenhouse, and raising catsh and freshwater shrimp, students are exposed to the vastness of the agricultural industry. We cover a wide range of topics in the classroom, but the students always relate it back to the farm, Broughton said. It gives them good experience to apply what they learn in class in a hands-on setting. Broughton and Tuten said that the majority of their students do not come from an agricultural background, and the ones who are familiar with agriculture may not necessarily be familiar with production agriculture. Tuten said these programs allow students to see potential career opportunities that they might not have learned about other wise. He also said students greatly benet from applying what they learn at the land lab. As a student in agriculture education and an FFA member, Mr. Tuten and Mrs. Broughton have encouraged me to pursue a career in agriculture, said Leslie Goolsby, a freshman at Suwannee High School. I am planning to further my education and go to vet school. A lumni Provide Hands-on L earning at Suwannee High SchoolBY A DRIE NN E BOYE TT E Travis Tuten, Suwannee High School agricultural education teacher, assists students in cooking cane syrup. Suwannee High School students strip the sugarcane of its dead shucks, or outer leaves, to ensure a clean harvest of the crop. Travis Tuten, B.S. 06 interdisciplinary studies, (left) and De Broughton, B.S. 06 plant science, (right).

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8 CALS CONNECTION Spring 2011After attending an out-of-state university for two years, Brian Frank was left unsatised. He longed for a greater college experience and a personal relationship with his professors. Frank was soon introduced to a UF food science and human nutrition graduate who not only became his mentor but also inspired his work. After returning to his hometown of Miami, Frank volunteered his time at the Miami Veterans Affairs Hospital. There, he met Michelle Weiner, who was completing her medical residency at the University of Miami. Over time, the two developed a bond which led to Franks position as Weiners research assistant. Being an undergrad, Brian was very impressive, Weiner said. He was openminded with a huge drive to learn, so I felt comfortable asking him to be my assistant. Through the beginning of their research, Weiner was aware of Franks urge for a greater college experience. She began explaining her personal experience at UF, as well as the great opportunities she found within the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. Taking her advice, Frank applied for and was accepted to complete a degree in biology, beginning his journey in CALS. With continued guidance from Weiner, Frank has become satised with his college experience at UF. The best thing about CALS is the oneon-one relationships you build with your professors, Frank said. While completing his undergraduate degree, Frank continued collaborating with Weiner in the development of an innovative research project. The two pursued creating a device that would alleviate pain associated with lumbar spinal stenosis, which occurs when the space around the spinal cord narrows and puts pressure on the spinal cord and the spinal nerve roots. The purpose of the device is to remove compression of the nerve roots. This eliminates pain, numbness and weakness. Weiner served as the primary investigator and Frank helped with the hands-on creation of the device. Brian was a total blessing, Weiner said. The device would not work the way it does if it was not for him, Weiner said. The creation of the device brought phenomenal testing results. The product relieved pressure, allowing individuals to experience less pain. With such dramatic results, the duo has aspirations to get their work published. Frank aspires to attend medical school at the University of Miami, which can be attributed to the foundation Weiner provided. She has been a true mentor, Frank said. Words enough cannot describe how lucky I got. Alumna Provides Foundation for Students SuccessBY C H RI S D U G O SHThe best thing about CALS is the one-on-one relationships you build with your professors. Brian Frank Michelle Weiner, a 2003 food science and human nutrition alumna, acted as a mentor for Brian Frank, who transferred into the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and hopes to attend medical school after graduation. (photo provided by Michelle Weiner)With their research, Brian Frank and Michelle Weiner aim to help alleviate pain associated with lumbar spinal stenosis. (photo provided by Michelle Weiner)Brian Frank assisted Michelle Weiner in creating a device to help alleviate pain caused by lumbar spinal stenosis, and the duo hopes to get their work published. (photo by Laura Kubitz)

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9Spring 2011 CALS CONNECTION A UF professor uses a centuries-old Chinese proverb to teach and inspire students who are mostly under a quarter century of age. Hector Prez, assistant professor of environmental horticulture, uses an ancient philosophy as the basis of his teaching strategy. Teach me and I forget, show me and I remember, involve me and I understand. Prez teaches his undergraduate plant identication and plant propagation courses by incorporating the Chinese proverb and a hands-on approach in the eld. In Prezs class, students are encour aged not only to look, but also to touch, to sense and to feel the more than 200 plants they learn about in a semester. We try to create more of a sensory approach to learning the plant material, he said. The proverb captures exactly what Im trying to achieve. This approach is benecial to students from outside the depart ment who want to take his classes as an elective, or because they are interested in gaining more knowledge about the often overlooked plant life around them. I have students from all over campus, he said. Some have zero plant experience. Others have a lot. The students work on on-campus projects that try to incorporate more sustainability for the area. Prez describes their research is as green as it gets, and would like to see more valuable teaching resources, such as a wildower teaching meadow and a botanical garden at UF. The departments efforts help to prepare students for different careers and professions, he said. Many graduating students are recruited by major national and international landscape companies for middle management or curator positions in nurseries and botanical gardens, Prez said. Environmental Horticulture Professor Teaches Students with Their SensesBY JOS E PH L AZZARO Hector Prez, assistant professor of environmental horticulture, uses an ancient philosophy as the basis of his teaching strategy. He incorporates a hands-on approach inspired by the Chinese proverb: Teach me and I forget, show me and I remember, involve me and I understand.Hector Prez, assistant professor in environmental horticulture, uses an old philosophy to teach and inspire his students. (photo provided by Hector Prez)Students use sandpaper to etch their way through seeds that are water impermeable in Hector Prezs plant propagation classes. (photo provided by Hector Prez)Kara Monroe is a former student of Prez. Monroe took both the plant identication and propagation classes. He has a hands-on approach to teaching, and Ive always liked that, she said. One thing that stood out compared to other classes is how he stressed scientic writing. The company Monroe works for breeds annual and perennial plants, and wholesales them nationally. In order to have a $2 plant grow cor rectly, you have to dig a $10 hole, Prez said. There is a lot more to these jobs than you think. Students also gain career and hands-on experience with department-sponsored trips to the Pacic Northwest, Costa Rica, the British Isles and more. There are plenty of opportunities for internships around the nation as well, he said. Prez and the department take pride in being able to help students as thinkers, environmentalists and professionals. The thing that really drives me and makes me feel like Ive been successful is when I can see, hear or feel the students learning, Prez said. To me, thats the greatest thing in the world.

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10CALS CONNECTION Spring 2011 U S DA A ward R ecipients D edicated to Teaching E xcellenceThe University of Florida now leads all institutions in the number of faculty recognized by the U.S. Depart ment of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture Excellence in College and University Teaching Awards with 12. The number of awards is a reection of the dedication to teaching excellence held up by College of Agricultural and Life Sciences faculty members. Two faculty members within UFs Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences received awards for teaching excellence at the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities annual meeting in November 2010. Ricky Telg, a professor in agricultural education and communication, won a National Teaching Award. Grady Roberts, an associate professor in the same department, received the New Teacher Award, given to faculty with no more than seven years of teaching experience in higher education. The College of Agricultural and Life Sciences has a long history of promoting excellence in teaching among its faculty, said Elaine Turner, CALS associate dean, who won the USDA Teaching Award in 2006. Teaching excellence enhances student learning, which, in turn, helps our students reach their goals and thats what CALS is all about. Gail Kauwell, a professor in the food science and human nutrition department, received an Excellence in Teaching Award in 2000. When she received the letter informing her she had won, Kauwell had to read it a couple of times before it sunk in. Hands shaking, I gathered my mail and my food and went back to my ofce to read the letter again and to make sure I had read it correctly, Kauwell said. She believes teaching begins with helping students to learn how to use what they know when presented with problems and case scenarios and to develop skills that will assist them in achieving their goals. It means taking the time to mentor, encourage and empower students as well as nding ways to facilitate learning and personal growth. I nd great pleasure in catching glimpses of the ah-hah moment, Kauwell said. Michael Kane, a professor in environmental horticulture, received the Excellence in Teaching Award in 2009. The professors he had in his undergraduate and graduate years took the time to be mentors, build his condence and nurture his curiosity for the plant sciences. These experiences are the root of his teaching philosophy, he said. Kane strives to provide students with positive but challenging learning experiences; enforce accountability; provide current and professional-looking class handouts; develop laboratory exercises that are organized and exciting; and to be an exceptional mentor for his graduate students. When my wife and I attended the awards ceremony in Washington, D.C., we had the opportunity to meet the other teaching award winners, Kane said. I quickly realized that we all shared a common trait a deep and sustained desire to work closely with our students and colleagues and be innovative in our quest to become more effective teachers. BY L AURA KU B I T Z Ricky Telg (left) and Grady Roberts (right), faculty members in the agricultural education and communication department, are recipients of the USDA/NIFA Excellence in Teaching Awards, boosting the University of Florida to having the most awards of any other college of agriculture or related sciences in the nation. (photo by Laura Kubitz)The University of Florida now leads all institutions in the number of faculty recognized by the USDA Excellence in College and University Teaching Awards.

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11Spring 2011 CALS CONNECTION Alumni R ecognized at TailG AT ORJ AC K VOGEL B.S. 69 in forestry. In his quiet way, Jack and the talented and diverse group of professionals he employs have reached all cor ners of the state, helping to keep Floridas forests well managed and a green and growing asset for all. George Blakeslee, associate director of the School of Forest Resources and Conservation G I LLI A N FO L KE S DAG A N B.S. 00, Ph.D 04 in food science and human nutrition. Gillian is one of the most respected young food scientists in the U.S. She is excel ling in her career, is a clear leader in our profession, and remains very committed to helping our department and UF. Charles Sims, professor and interim chair in the food science and human nutrition department PAUL WI LLI S B.S. 79 in agricultural and extension education. Mr. Willis is the kind of man that leaves an impression wherever he goes. The extent to which he cares for students is extraordinary; he goes above and beyond for people. Micah Scanga, Alpha Gamma Rho brother and CALS graduate student FR A NKIE HALL B.S. 79 in agricultural and extension education. Frankie Hall is, and has always been, a person of infectious enthusiasm. His can do attitude and high level of energy contribute to his ability to get things done. If there is a project he believes in, he will see it to completion. Saundra TenBroeck, associate professor in the department of animal sciences BRI D GE T C A R LI SLE B.S. 95 in animal sciences, M.Ag. 05 in agricultural education and communication. Bridget has the respect and appreciation of the commercial livestock industry in Polk County. She has a strong client-centered attitude and focus. She is genuinely interested in keeping the business of cattle ranching a viable one for years to come in Polk County. I hope she intends to serve the rest of her extension career right here! Nicole Walker, director of the Polk County Extension Service For more information on these outstanding alumni, visit www.cals.u.edu/tailgator Bahamascontinued from page 6 science camp. Many of the activities were improvised, but the camp was a success, Foster said. Based upon assessments completed by Foster at the beginning and end of the camp, students were inspired to pursue more education. Foster is even trying to help one of the campers obtain an internship at UF or NASA. For Juwan Rolle, 11, the camp gave him a glimpse of what his future could be like. Since the camp ended, Juwan friended Chester on Facebook and has been asking what college is like. He is a scientist at heart, Chester said. He was ready to jump into every challenge. I think the camp opened his eyes to possibilities he may not have known were an option for him. SAVE THE D ATE 15th Annual TailGATORSATUR DAY SEPTEMBER 17, 2011www.cals.u.edu

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NONPROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE PAID GAINESVILLE FL PERMIT NO. 94 PO Box 110270 Gainesville, Florida 32611-0270For more information on CALS visit our website at cals.u.edu B U G S AS G R UB Bugs are no longer a treat for just sh and birds. In February, students in the class The Insects, got the chance to dine on the insects they are studying in an entomology and nematology course. Rebecca Baldwin, assistant professor, used the lesson to teach her students the benets and destructive impacts of insects on humans. The class learned they likely eat insect fragments on a daily basis, and many cultures depend on insects as a protein source. Insects are used as coatings for candies, vitamins and medicine, and insect dyes are used to color juice and cosmetics. Learning about insects as food provides a cultural education, but also opens a window into how our food is grown, processed and stored. Pictured from top left to bottom right: students from The Insects, Michelle Williams and Rebecca Baldwin. (Photos by Christy Chiarelli)


CALS connection
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LETTER FROM THE DEAN






Teaching excellence
S'll bet you remember your favorite high school or college
teachers. I would also bet that the reason you remember
them is not necessarily what they taught but the way they
taught. Maybe it was their sense of humor, colorful anecdotes
i that brought clarity or good old-fashioned enthusiasm for the
subject. Whatever the case, you remember your favorite teach-
ers and how they inspired you to learn.
We are fortunate to have many of these educators in the
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, and this issue of CALS
Connection highlights just some of our outstanding teaching
Faculty. In the last io years, faculty within CALS have received
more than 40 awards from the North American Colleges and
Teachers of Agriculture. Furthermore, CALS faculty have won
12 United States Department of Agriculture Excellence in
Teaching Awards since this program started in the early 1990s,
which is more than any college of agriculture and related
sciences in the nation. We highlight the two most recent
recipients of national awards in this issue Dr. Ricky Telg and
Dr. Grady Roberts. I have no doubt that many will follow in
their footsteps.
We are extremely proud of the excellence in teaching that our
faculty bring to the classroom, but even more proud that this

In the last ten years, faculty within CALS have received

more than 40 awards from the North American Colleges

and Teachers of Agriculture. Furthermore, CALS faculty

have won 12 United States Department of Agriculture

Excellence in Teaching Awards, which is more than any

college of agriculture and related sciences in the nation.

translates into excellence in our students. Last fall semester,
an astounding 828 students, or about 20 percent of our under-
graduate student body, made the Dean's list. About 80 of those
students were on the President's Honor Roll, earning a perfect
4.0 grade point average while carrying a 15-credit load.
Clearly, we have much to be proud of, and I hope you will en-
joy reading more about the talented people who have continued
the tradition of teaching excellence and help make CALS one of
the best colleges in the nation.




Dr. Mark Rieger
Interim Dean













TABLE OF CONTENTS












4 Graduate Connects People with Their Food

5 CALS Electives Broaden Horizons

5 UF and ABAC Sign Articulation Agreement

6 Professor Brings Science and Learning to Bahamian Youth

7 Alumni Provide Hands-on Learning at Suwannee High School

8 Alumna Provides Foundation for Student's Success

9 Environmental Horticulture Professor Teaches Students with Their Senses

10 USDA Award Recipients Dedicated to Teaching Excellence

11 Alumni Recognized at TailGATOR












Editor: Laura K. Kubitz
Adviser: Cathy Carr, Director, Alumni and Career Services
Designer: Raghu Consbruck, IFAS Information and Communication Services
Cover photo: istockphoto.com









Graduate Connects People with


Their Food

BY KATE TYLER


he Lapinskis are providing diversity
to local agriculture and connecting
with the community at their 2.5-acre
farm in Jacksonville, Fla.
In 2007, Brian Lapinski, a College of
Agricultural and Life Sciences graduate,
and Kristin, his wife, started Down To
Earth Farm.
"Reading about some of the pitfalls of
modern agriculture got us into doing it
ourselves," Brian said.
The Lapinskis use methods such as crop
rotation, cover crops, composted animal
manure for fertilizer and non-synthetic
pesticides. The couple decided to start the


can lose more crops than conventional
farming, Brian said.
Still, the reward is the ability to eat food
straight off the vine.
"We are eating the food too," Brian
Lapinski said. "We are very confident with
eating right out of the fields."
Although the crops grown on the farm
are not certified organic, Down to Earth
Farm does offer consumers the opportunity
to visit the place where their food is grown.
The farm supplies a 24-member Com-
munity Supported Agriculture group with
fruits and vegetables seasonally.
A CSA group consists of members of


After three years of providing locally grown produce for

the community and their family, Brian and Kristin Lapinski

still love the thrill of watching hand-planted seeds grow

into thriving, abundant crops.


farm after learning about these methods
from other farms around the country.
"We wanted to bring a sustainable way of
growing food to Jacksonville," Kristin said.
Farming sustainably is a challenge. Bugs
and disease are harder to control, and you


a



Cabbage, one of several crops grown on the
Down to Earth Farm, is almost ready to be
picked and enjoyed.


the general public who purchase shares
of a farm from the owner. As a result, the
shareholder receives bags of fresh produce
weekly throughout the farming season.
Some of the members of the CSA volunteer
their time to work on the farm.
"We are really proud and excited to have
the CSA, especially the connections we
have been able to make with the members,"
Kristin said.
Down to Earth Farm also serves local
farmers markets weekly, including Beaches
Green Markets at Jarboe Park and Riverside
Arts Market.
Brian, who has a master's degree from
the department of family, youth and com-
munity sciences, was able to learn valuable
lessons from his graduate studies.
"Brian wanted to play an important
role in a community and that is where
our department helped him;' said Mickie
Swisher, associate professor and graduate


Brian Lapinski, a College of Agricultural and
Life Sciences graduate, picks vegetables on an
overcast day in Jacksonville, Fla.

coordinator for family, youth and commu-
nity sciences.
Throughout his master's program, Brian
focused on the community and social
aspects of owning and maintaining a
community-based organization.
"Brian is notjust focusing on providing
food; instead, his focus is on building and
being a part of the Jacksonville community,"
Swisher said.
After three years of providing locally
grown produce for the community and
their family, Brian and Kristin still love the
thrill of watching hand-planted seeds grow
into thriving, abundant crops.
"It never gets old," Brian said. "Every time
I harvest something I get excited." 0


4 CALS CONNECTION Spring 2011









CALS Electives Broaden Horizons

BY EDWARD TOPOLESKI


University of Florida students have
the opportunity to take a variety of
electives within the College of Agri-
cultural and Life Sciences. The electives can
fulfill general education requirements, but
students can also take the courses to learn
a new skill or about an industry they are
unfamiliar with.
The Meat We Eat is a three-credit course
designed to turn UF students into educated
consumers of animal muscle products and
to help them appreciate the steps involved
in muscle food production.
"We want to show students how we work
to feed a growing world population," said
Chad Carr, assistant professor in animal
sciences.
The course is the only one of its kind of-
fered in Florida, and it covers all the details
of animal meat production, including
processing, retailing and the role of meat in
a balanced diet.


Carr teaches his students about the
proper selection of meats and how to
properly cook and store animal protein
products.
Biological sciences courses are designed
to introduce students to basic concepts
in science, such as the scientific method,
and to help students become aware of the
impact of scientific developments on the
environment and society.
The Meat We Eat accomplishes that by
requiring students to formulate hypotheses
relative to the animal, meat and food sci-
ence industry, Carr said.
"When the class is done, we want
students to understand that meat is good,
and it is good for them," he said.
The course is offered in the fall and
spring and is open to all UF students.
"We want everybody to take this class,
enjoy it and learn," Carr said. 0


UF and ABAC Sign Articulation Agreement

BY LAURA KUBITZ


Abraham Baldwin Agricultural Col-
lege and the University of Florida
are teaming up to help students
who begin their academic career at ABAC
to finish their degrees in the College of
Agricultural and Life Sciences at UF
ABAC, located in Tifton, Ga., signed an
articulation agreement with UF to ensure
a smooth transition for students who come


from ABAC to UE This agreement will
make it easy for students to finish their
degrees in Florida.
"This is a good thing for UF and ABAC,"
said David Bridges, ABAC president. "Our
Florida numbers are up considerably,
and this agreement will provide a charted
course.
CALS interim dean, Mark Rieger, said
the intent of the agree
ment is to provide
more opportunities
for higher educa-
tion to traditional
and non-traditional
students in the fields
of agriculture and
natural resources.
"I want to recruit


the best and brightest kids in Florida to
come to ABAC," said Tim Marshall, dean of
ABAC's School of Agriculture and Natural
Resources.
The joint institutional agreement is
between the ABAC School of Agriculture
and Natural Resources and CALS. The
partnership will focus on majors in forest
resources and conservation, agricultural
education and communication, animal
sciences, and food and resource economics,
Marshall said.
"It shows there is a very positive relation-
ship between ABAC and Florida," Rieger
said. "For Florida kids to come to this
environment, we know they will come back
to the university well prepared."
For more information, call the CALS
Dean's Office at 352-392-1963. 0


Representatives from the University of Florida and Abraham Baldwin
Agricultural College were present for the articulation agreement
signing ceremony. Pictured from left to right, Paul Willis, Tim Marshall,
Elaine Turner, David Bridges, Frankie Hall, Mark Rieger and Niles
Reddick.


Spring 2011 CALS CONNECTION 5


Examples of CALS Electives
AOM 2520 Global Sustainable Energy:
Past, Present and Future
AGR 2612 Seeds of Change
ENY 1001 Bugs and People
ORH 1030 Plants, Gardening and You
AEB 2014 Economic Issues, Food and You
FOS 2001 Man's Food
FOR 2662 Forests for the Future
FRC 1010 Growing Fruit for Fun and Profit
PCB 1051 Exploring Your Genome
PLP 2000 Plants, Plagues and People
SWS 2007 The World of Water
WIS 2040 Wildlife Issues in a Changing
World































A student explores the stromatolites he learned about in the Science and Stromatolite Summer Camp held by Jamie Foster, an assistant
professor in microbiology and cell science, in August 2010 in Little Darby Island, Bahamas. (photo byJamie Foster)


underneath the clear, emerald waters
of Excuma Cay, Bahamas, are
ancient organisms that can only be
found in the Bahamas and Australia. The
Bahamians who call the string of islands
home often do not understand the signifi-
cance of their environment.
Jamie Foster, an assistant professor in
microbiology and cell science in the College
of Agricultural and Life Sciences, set out to
help the local community of Little Darby
Island, Bahamas, preserve their unique
environment by organizing a camp to
teach local children about what is in
their backyard.
Stromatolites are microbial commu-
nities that form rocks by taking carbon
dioxide from the atmosphere and re-
leasing it out as calcium carbonate. The I
big, gray rocks formed by stromatolites
can look more like stepping stones
instead of ancient fossils. Some of the
stromatolites found in the Bahamas
date back 3.8 billion years.
In collaboration with CALS, the
Young Bahamian Marine Scientists,
the Bahamas Marine EcoCentre, the
University of Miami and NASA, Foster
organized a Science and Stromatolite
Summer Camp for eight middle- and
high school-aged Bahamian children.
The camp was a mixture of classroom
lecture and hands-on activities meant Th
to teach the children about the scien- by
Is[
tific method using stromatolites. Sc
"It wasjust a great way to connect Ja,


6 CALS CONNECTION Spring 2011


to kids that you might never have talked to
before," Foster said. "The Bahamian kids
can put up a wall, but this was a great way
to interact and reach out to them."
Alina Chester, an anthropology and
political sciencejunior at UF, helped as a
teaching assistant during the camp. Having
spent part of her childhood on the island,
she used the camp as an opportunity to get
to know the locals and learn while giving
back to the island.


........... .... ...... .. .... i :::.f:


: ..-... .

ie students and teachers enjoy a break from the h
relaxing in the clear, crisp waters of Little Darby
and, Bahamas, during an outdoor lecture at the
ience and Stromatolite Summer Camp. (photo by
mie Foster)


In the morning, the campers listened
to a short lecture and then got to perform
hands-on activities to help reinforce the
lessons. During the camp, the children
launched rockets, designed their own
experiments, created underwater maps
of the stromatolites, isolated DNA and
created news broadcasts about an issue they
learned about at camp.
"For almost all of the kids, this was the
most high-tech science they have gotten to
be a part of," Chester said.
To help connect with the children,
Foster teamed up with Nikita Shiels-
Rolle, who works with the Young Baha-
mian Marine Scientists, to translate
the information in a way the campers
would understand.
"We wanted Bahamians teaching
Bahamians," Foster said. "We provided
the supplies and structured the lessons,
but we wanted the kids to see a familiar
face when translating this informa-
tion. Nikita served as our Bahamian
educator. She was an essential part of
the team."
By interacting and teaching middle-
and high school-aged children in the
Bahamas, Foster said she has a better
understanding of the diversity of
people who walk through her class-
room doors at UF.
eat The camp was a pilot program to
help establish proper methods and
procedures for running a summer
continued on page 11









Alumni Provide Hands-on Learning at


Suwannee High School


BY ADRIENNE BOYETTE

wo College of Agricultural and Life

Sciences alumni are bringing their
diverse academic backgrounds to the
classrooms of Suwannee High School in
Live Oak, Fla.
By incorporating their backgrounds in
plant science and environmental horticul-
ture, De Broughton and Travis Tuten are
helping students gain hands-on experience
in a variety of agricultural sectors.
Their efforts are evident in their stu-
dents' successes through the Suwannee
High School Land Lab. The land lab, or
farm, serves as an outdoor classroom for
the Suwannee High School Agriculture
Department.
The teachers use the knowledge gained in
their respective programs through the Uni-
versity of Florida's CALS, leading not only
to their success as educators, but also to
the success of the Suwannee FFA Chapter,
the Suwannee High School Land Lab and,
most importantly, their students.
This outdoor learning environment
is common in agriculture departments
at many schools. The Suwannee High
School Land Lab is a thriving agricultural
operation and a working farm produc-
ing numerous agricultural commodities,
Broughton said.
"As a plant science major, I took many
classes that had labs with a production em-
phasis," Broughton said. "I have used these
things to provide unique experiences for

Travis Tuten, B.S. '06 interdisciplinary
studies, (left) and De Broughton, B.S. '06
plant science, (right).


Travis Tuten, Suwannee High School agricultural
education teacher, assists students in cooking
cane syrup.


students beyond the traditional classroom."
The students are currently growing
sugarcane and a variety of winter greens
including mustards, turnips and collards,
broccoli, squash, and acre peas. They also
have a small fruit orchard with blueberries,
blackberries and fruit trees.
The crops grown at the land lab are
harvested by students and then sold to raise
money for the agriculture department and
the Suwannee FFA Chapter. One of the
largest fundraisers is the chapter's cane
syrup production and sales.
Using the sugarcane grown on the farm,
students and Suwannee FFA members help
grind the cane and make it into cane syrup.
After processing and bottling the syrup, it is
sold in the community to support the FFA
chapter.
Broughton and Tuten are continuing to
expand the opportunities students have at
the farm. From managing a herd of cattle,
propagating plants in a new greenhouse,
and raising catfish and freshwater shrimp,
students are exposed to the vastness of the


Suwannee High School students strip the
sugarcane of its dead shucks, or outer
leaves, to ensure a clean harvest of the crop.


agricultural industry.
"We cover a wide range of topics in the
classroom, but the students always relate it
back to the farm," Broughton said. "It gives
them good experience to apply what they
learn in class in a hands-on setting."
Broughton and Tuten said that the
majority of their students do not come from
an agricultural background, and the ones
who are familiar with agriculture may not
necessarily be familiar with production
agriculture.
Tuten said these programs allow students
to see potential career opportunities that
they might not have learned about other-
wise. He also said students greatly benefit
from applying what they learn at the land
lab.
"As a student in agriculture education
and an FFA member, Mr. Tuten and Mrs.
Broughton have encouraged me to pursue a
career in agriculture," said Leslie Goolsby, a
freshman at Suwannee High School. "I am
planning to further my education and go to
vet school." 0



Spring 2011 CALS CONNECTION 7









Alumna Provides Foundation for


Student's Success

BY CHRIS DUGOSH


After attending an out-of-state
university for two years, Brian Frank
was left unsatisfied. He longed for
a greater college experience and a personal
relationship with his professors.
Frank was soon introduced to a UF food
science and human nutrition graduate
who not only became his mentor but also
inspired his work.
After returning to his hometown of
Miami, Frank volunteered his time at the
Miami Veterans Affairs Hospital. There, he
met Michelle Weiner, who was completing
her medical residency at the University
of Miami. Over time, the two developed
a bond which led to Frank's position as
Weiner's research assistant.
"Being an undergrad, Brian was very
impressive," Weiner said. "He was open-
minded with a huge drive to learn, so I felt
comfortable asking him to be my assistant."
Through the beginning of their research,
Weiner was aware of Frank's urge for a
greater college experience. She began
explaining her personal experience at UF,
as well as the great opportunities she found


within the College of Agricultural and Life
Sciences.
Taking her advice, Frank applied for
and was accepted to complete a degree in
biology, beginning his journey in CALS.
With continued guidance from Weiner,
Frank has become satisfied with his college
experience at UF.
"The best thing about CALS is the one-
on-one relationships you build with your
professors," Frank said.
While completing his undergraduate
degree, Frank continued collaborating with
Weiner in the development of an innova-
tive research project. The two pursued
creating a device that would alleviate pain
associated with lumbar spinal stenosis,
which occurs when the space around the
spinal cord narrows and puts pressure on
the spinal cord and the spinal nerve roots.
The purpose of the device is to remove
compression of the nerve roots. This


eliminates pain, numbness and weakness.
Weiner served as the primary investiga-
tor and Frank helped with the hands-on
creation of the device.
"Brian was a total blessing," Weiner said.
"The device would not work the way it does
if it was not for him;' Weiner said.
The creation of the device brought
phenomenal testing results. The product
relieved pressure, allowing individuals to
experience less pain. With such dramatic
results, the duo has aspirations to get their
work published.
Frank aspires to attend medical school
at the University of Miami, which can
be attributed to the foundation Weiner
provided.
"She has been a true mentor," Frank said.
"Words enough cannot describe how lucky
I got." 0


"The best thing about CALS is the one-on-one relationships

you build with your professors." Brian Frank


With their research, Brian Frank and Michelle Weiner, a 2003 food science
Michelle Weiner aim to help alleviate and human nutrition alumna, acted as a
pain associated with lumbar spinal mentor for Brian Frank, who transferred
stenosis. (photo provided by Michelle into the College of Agricultural and Life
Weiner) Sciences and hopes to attend medical
school after graduation. (photo provided
by Michelle Weiner)


Brian Frank assisted Michelle Weiner in creating a device
to help alleviate pain caused by lumbar spinal stenosis,
and the duo hopes to get their work published. (photo by
Laura Kubitz)


8 CALS CONNECTION Spring 2011









Environmental Horticulture Professor

Teaches Students with Their Senses


BY JOSEPH LAZZARO


AUF professor uses a centuries-old
Chinese proverb to teach and
inspire students who are mostly
under a quarter century of age.
Hector Perez, assistant professor of
environmental horticulture, uses an
ancient philosophy as the basis of his
teaching strategy. "Teach me and I forget,
show me and I remember, involve me and I
understand."
Perez teaches his undergraduate plant


identification and plant propagation
courses by incorporating the Chinese
proverb and a hands-on approach in the
field. In P6rez's class, students are encour-
aged not only to look, but also to touch, to
sense and to feel the more than 200 plants
they learn about in a semester.


Hector Perez, assistant professor in environment
uses an old philosophy to teach and inspire his s
provided by Hector Perez)


plant life around them. "I have students
from all over campus," he said. "Some have
zero plant experience. Others have a lot."
The students work on on-campus proj-
ects that try to incorporate more sustain-
ability for the area. Perez describes their
research is "as green as it gets," and would
like to see more valuable
teaching resources, such
as a wildflower teaching
meadow and a botanical
garden at UE.
The department's
i L efforts help to prepare
students for different
careers and profes-
sions, he said. Many
graduating students are
recruited by major na-
tional and international
landscape companies
for middle management
or curator positions in
nurseries and botanical
ital horticulture,
students. (photo gardens, Perez said.


"We try to create more of a sen-
sory approach to learning the plant
material," he said. "The proverb
captures exactly what I'm trying to
achieve."
This approach is beneficial to
students from outside the depart-
ment who want to take his classes
as an elective, or because they are
interested in gaining more knowl-
edge about the often overlooked


nts use sandpaper to etch their way through seeds
re water impermeable in Hector Perez's plant
gation classes. (photo provided by Hector Perez)


Kara Monroe is a former student of
Perez. Monroe took both the plant identifi-
cation and propagation classes.
"He has a hands-on approach to teach-
ing, and I've always liked that," she said.
"One thing that stood out compared to
other classes is how he stressed scientific
writing."
The company Monroe works for breeds
annual and perennial plants, and whole-
sales them nationally.
"In order to have a $2 plant grow cor-
rectly, you have to dig a $10 hole," Perez
said. "There is a lot more to these jobs than
you think."
Students also gain career and hands-on
experience with department-sponsored
trips to the Pacific Northwest, Costa Rica,
the British Isles and more. "There are
plenty of opportunities for internships
around the nation as well," he said.
Perez and the department take pride in
being able to help students as thinkers,
environmentalists and professionals.
"The thing that really drives me and
makes me feel like I've been successful is
when I can see, hear or feel the students
learning," Perez said. "To me, that's the
greatest thing in the world." 0


Spring 2011 CALS CONNECTION 9


Hector Perez, assistant professor of environmental

horticulture, uses an ancient philosophy as the basis

of his teaching strategy. He incorporates a hands-on

approach inspired by the Chinese proverb: "Teach

me and I forget, show me and I remember, involve

me and I understand."









USDA Award Recipients Dedicated to


Teaching Excellence

BY LAURA KUBITZ


he University of Florida now leads
all institutions in the number of fac-
ulty recognized by the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture National Institute of
Food and Agriculture Excellence in College
and University Teaching Awards with 12.
The number of awards is a reflection
of the dedication to teaching excellence
held up by College of Agricultural and Life
Sciences faculty members.
Two faculty members within UF's
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
received awards for teaching excellence at
the Association of Public and Land-grant
Universities' annual meeting in November
2010.
Ricky Telg, a professor in agricultural
education and communication, won a Na-
tional Teaching Award. Grady Roberts, an
associate professor in the same department,
received the New Teacher Award, given to
faculty with no more than seven years of
teaching experience in higher education.
"The College of Agricultural and Life
Sciences has a long history of promoting
excellence in teaching among its faculty,"
said Elaine Turner, CALS associate dean,
who won the USDA Teaching Award in
2006. "Teaching excellence enhances
student learning, which, in turn, helps our
students reach their goals and that's what
CALS is all about."
Gail Kauwell, a professor in the food
science and human nutrition department,
received an Excellence in Teaching Award
in 2000. When she received the letter
informing her she had won, Kauwell had to
read it a couple of times before it sunk in.
"Hands shaking, I gathered my mail and
my food and went back to my office to read
the letter again and to make sure I had read
it correctly," Kauwell said.
She believes teaching begins with
helping students to learn how to use what


Ricky Telg (left) and Grady Roberts (right), faculty members in the agricultural education
and communication department, are recipients of the USDA/NIFA Excellence in Teaching
Awards, boosting the University of Florida to having the most awards of any other college of
agriculture or related sciences in the nation. (photo by Laura Kubitz)


they know when presented with problems
and case scenarios and to develop skills
that will assist them in achieving their
goals. It means taking the time to mentor,
encourage and empower students as well
as finding ways to facilitate learning and
personal growth.
"I find great pleasure in catching
glimpses of the 'ah-hah moment'," Kauwell
said.
Michael Kane, a professor in environ-
mental horticulture, received the Excellence
in Teaching Award in 2009. The professors
he had in his undergraduate and graduate
years took the time to be mentors, build his
confidence and nurture his curiosity for the
plant sciences. These experiences are the
root of his teaching philosophy, he said.


Kane strives to provide students with
positive but challenging learning experi-
ences; enforce accountability; provide
current and professional-looking class
handouts; develop laboratory exercises
that are organized and exciting; and to be
an exceptional mentor for his graduate
students.
"When my wife and I attended the
awards ceremony in Washington, D.C.,
we had the opportunity to meet the other
teaching award winners," Kane said. "I
quickly realized that we all shared a com-
mon trait a deep and sustained desire
to work closely with our students and
colleagues and be innovative in our quest to
become more effective teachers." 0


The University of Florida now leads all institutions in the number of faculty recognized

by the USDA Excellence in College and University Teaching Awards.


10 CALS CONNECTION Spring 2011









Alumni Recognized at TailGATOR


JACK VOGEL,
B.S. '69 in
forestry.
"In his quiet
way, Jack and
the talented and
diverse group
of professionals
he employs have
reached all cor-
ners of the state, helping to keep Florida's
forests well managed and a green and
growing asset for all." George Blakeslee,
associate director of the School of Forest
Resources and Conservation

GILLIAN
FOLKS
DAGAN,
B.S. 'oo, Ph.D '04
in food science
and human
nutrition.
"Gillian is
one of the most
respected young
food scientists in the U.S. She is excel-
ling in her career, is a clear leader in our
profession, and remains very committed
to helping our department and UF." -
Charles Sims, professor and interim chair
in the food science and human nutrition
department


7 PAUL WILLIS,
B.S. '79 in
agricultural
and extension
education.
"Mr. Willis
is the kind of
man that leaves
an impression
wherever he goes.
The extent to which he cares for students
is extraordinary; he goes above and beyond
for people." Micah Scanga, Alpha
Gamma Rho brother and CALS graduate
student

FRANKIE
HALL, B.S.'79
in agricultural
and extension
education.
"Frankie Hall
Sis, and has always
been, a person
l of infectious
enthusiasm. His
can do' attitude and high level of energy
contribute to his ability to get things
done. If there is a project he believes in,
he will see it to completion." Saundra
TenBroeck, associate professor
L in the department of animal
go sciences


BRIDGET
CARLISLE,
B.S. '95 in animal
sciences, M.Ag.
'05 in agricultural
education and
communication.
"Bridget has
the respect and
appreciation of
the commercial livestock industry in Polk
County. She has a strong client-centered
attitude and focus. She is genuinely
interested in keeping the business of cattle
ranching a viable one for years to come in
Polk County. I hope she intends to serve
the rest of her extension career right here!"
- Nicole Walker, director of the Polk
County Extension Service

For more information on
these outstanding alumni, visit
www.cals.ufl.edu/taitgator.


Bahamas continued from page 6
science camp. Many of the activities were
improvised, but the camp was a success,
Foster said.
Based upon assessments completed
by Foster at the beginning and end of the
camp, students were inspired to pursue
more education. Foster is even trying to
help one of the campers obtain an intern-
ship at UF or NASA.
For Juwan Rolle, II, the camp gave him
a glimpse of what his future could be like.
Since the camp ended, Juwan friended
Chester on Facebook and has been asking
what college is like.
"He is a scientist at heart," Chester said.
"He was ready to jump into every chal-
lenge. I think the camp opened his eyes to
possibilities he may not have known were
an option for him." 0


Spring 2011 CALS CONNECTION 11





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