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UF together for a safe campus
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076209/00007
 Material Information
Title: UF together for a safe campus
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida Police Department
Publisher: Police Department, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2012
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Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00076209:00007

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2 Safety and Security, A Shared Responsibility 3 Jurisdiction, Structure, and Authority Crime Reporting And Public Information 4 Consumer Information Standards Of Conduct 5 Policy Regarding Sexual Assault Procedures 6-8 On and O-Campus Victim Assistance Resources and Agencies rf 9 Crimes of Violence And The Campus Conduct/Judicial Process Potential Sanctions 10 Possession Policy, Use, and Sale Of Alcoholic Beverages Alcohol Medical Amnesty Policy (MAP) 11 Laws Governing Alcohol And Controlled Substances 12 Reporting Emergencies Or Crime On Campus 13 Emergency Notications 14 Timely Warnings 15 Policy Information Regarding Missing Residential Students16-18 Crime Statistic Information, Location, Denitions, and Statistics19-21 Crime Prevention Programs22-23 Crime Prevention Tips24-25 Trac Safety 26 Transportation27-28 Security Of Facilities29-40 Annual University of Florida Fire Safety Report www.police.ufl.edu2012

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ntbf rb nIf you see an unsafe condition on campus such as a burned-out street light, pot-hole in the road, uneven sidewalk, or any other condition that could jeopardize personal safety, please call the University of Florida Police Department at (352) 392-1111 (V/ TDD), or Physical Plant Work Management at (352) 392-1121. If you have any suggestions regarding the safety and security of campus facilities please call the Community Services Division at (352) 392-1409. Lets work together for a safe campus.The University of Florida is a public land-grant institution with its main campus located on 2,000 acres within an urban population of 95,400. Included on the UF campus are residential facilities for approximately 10,000 students, and over 180 buildings used for a myriad of purposes. Today, the university is among the largest universities in the nation, with an enrollment of more than 50,000 students. The University of Florida recognizes the importance for an institution of higher learning to develop and maintain a safe and secure environment in which the academic and social pursuits of its members can be fully realized. The university has the utmost concern for the success of each student and strives to give each student maximum freedom to live his/her life free from outside interference. With this freedom, however, comes the responsibility of becoming an active participant in the exercise of personal safety. No communitys security plan can attain maximum eectiveness unless everyone contributes to making it work. Safety and security are both personal as well as shared responsibilities. Only by accepting this responsibility can members of the university community maintain a safe and secure academic environment. This brochure is provided to you as part of the University of Floridas commitment to safety and security on campus and satises all of the requirements of the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, formerly the Federal Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990. It is lled with information about a variety of security services and programs available to you as members of the university community. We hope that you will become familiar with this information and nd the programs useful. rf fThe University of Florida Police Department, a State of Florida and Nationally and Internationally accredited law enforcement agency, was estab lished to provide protection and service to the university community. We are committed to the prevention of crime and the protection of life and property; the preservation of peace, order, and safety; the enforcement of all laws and ordinances; and the safeguarding of your constitutional guarantees. The University of Florida Police Department is staed by highly trained ocers and Police Service Technicians (PSTs) who utilize only the very latest tools in the ght against crime to be better prepared to keep the campus community as safe as possible. The University of Florida has an array of services in place to promote an environment that is as crime-free as possible. We encourage you to familiarize yourself with these services and take advantage of them to help make your educational and living experience at the University of Florida as enjoyable and crime-free as possible. I encourage you to contact our Community Services Division at (352) 392-1409 and visit the departments web site on-line at: http://www.police.u.edu for additional information on available programs and services.f For persons with print related disabilities, upon request, this publication is available in an alternate format. For more information, contact the ADA Oce at: (352) 392-7056 or TDD# 846-1046 f

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nf The University of Florida Police Department, located at the intersection of Museum Road and Newell Drive, is an integral part of the University of Floridas dedication to developing and maintaining a safe and secure campus in an eort to make your time at the University of Florida as safe and enjoyable as possible. The UFPD provides a full range of police services including, but not limited to, investigating all crimes committed in its jurisdiction, making arrests, providing crime prevention/community services/programs, victim services, enforcing trac laws, and providing crowd control and safety functions for campus special events. In March 1996, the University of Florida Police Department became only the 14th university law enforcement agency in the country to achieve national law enforcement accreditation from The Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc., (CALEA) and, in 1997, the rst university police depart ment in Florida to become state accredited through the Commission for Florida Law Enforcement Accreditation, Inc. (CFA). In December 2007, the University of Florida Police Department became the rst police department to achieve the Triple Crown of law enforcement accreditation when it received initial accreditation from the International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators (IACLEA). The University of Florida Police Department currently maintains its accredited status with all three accrediting bodies, most recently receiving CALEA and IACLEA re-accreditation in March 2010, where CALEA recognized the depart ment as a Meritorious Agency. Accomplishing the Triple Crown of accreditation and Flagship status provides an excellent indication that the University of Florida Police Department is among the leaders in the eld of campus law enforcement. The UFPD maintains close working relationships with local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies in implementing and coordinating campus law enforcement operations. The UFPD has mutual aid agreements with the Gainesville Police Department, the Alachua County Sheris Oce, and the Santa Fe College Police Department for response to emergencies beyond the departments capabilities as well as for the investigation of alleged criminal oenses. Information regarding criminal activity engaged in by students at o-campus student organization locations is provided to UFPD by these local law enforcement agencies. Where appropriate, UFPD forwards this information to the Oce of Student Conduct and Conict Resolution (OSCCR) as a student judicial referral for potential consideration. The UFPD maintains very close working relationships with Dean of Students Oce, Department of Housing and Residence Education, Oce Student Conduct and Conict Resolution, Student Government, Interfraternity and Panhellenic Councils, Physical Plant Division, Transportation and Parking Services, University Counseling and Wellness Center, and many other campus and non-campus organizations. Through these relationships, the UFPD strives to achieve proactive, timely, and accurate communications regarding potential criminal activity that may impact the University of Florida community and the members who study, work, and visit the campus each day.The University of Florida Police Department is organized as a department of 90 sworn, full and part-time police ocers under the auspices of the Oce of the Vice President for Business Aairs and Economic Development All ocers are professionally trained and State of Florida certied, with the same authority and right to bear arms as any ocer within the State of Florida. By law, University of Florida police ocers are declared law enforcement ocers of the state and conservators of the peace with the right to arrest, in accordance with the laws of this state, any person for violation of state law or applicable county or city ordinances when such violations occur on or within 1000 feet of any property or facilities which are under the guidance, supervision, regulations or control of the State University System, except that arrests may be made o campus when hot pursuit originates on campus or in compliance with current mutual aid agreements. In performance of any of the powers, duties, and functions authorized by law, university police have the same rights, protection, and immunities aorded other peace or law enforcement ocers. Each ocer must maintain the mandated, on-going training requirements of the State of Florida Police Standards, including qualifying on the ring range every six months. rfbThe department strictly follows all laws regarding the release of infor mation written in Florida State Statutes Chapter 119. The department believes that dissemination of information is the key to educating our community about the occurrence of crime on campus. For this reason, the department ensures that news releases for media and public view on matters of public interest or concern are completed as quickly and eciently as possible. These releases are available for viewing on the media board 24 hours per day at the UFPD Front Desk Public Lobby located within the Patrol Division Building and on-line at: http://www.police.u.edu/mediapublic-information/press-releases/. Please review the information found in the Media/Public Information section and select the link for the news release information you would like to review. In accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, the UFPD maintains and updates both a Crime Log and Fire Log. The University of Florida Crime Log contains, by the date reported, all crime that occurs on the campus of the University of Florida. In addition to recording reported crimes that occurred on campus, it also includes crimes that occurred in or on non-campus buildings or property, on public property within the campus or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus, and crimes that occurred within the patrol jurisdiction of the University of Florida Police Department. The University of Florida Crime Log has information pertaining to the agency that responded to the crime, the UFPD report number of the incident, the report date/time, type of crime, the date/time of the crime, the location of the crime, and the disposition of the crime. The Crime Log is updated with an entry or addition within two business days of the University of Florida Police Department receiving the information. For the purpose of the Crime Log, a business day is any day Monday through Friday, except for days when the institution is closed. This log is available to the media and the general public in the UFPD Public Lobby Front Desk located within the Patrol Division Building and on-line at: http://www.police.u.edu/wp-content/asp/crimelog/default.asp. The UF Fire Log has information pertaining to the agency that responded to the re, the UFPD report number of the incident, the report date/time, type of re, cause of re, date/time of re, location, number of injuries/deaths, and estimated cost of property damage. As with the Crime Log, the Fire Log is updated with an entry or addition within two business days of receiving the information. Also similar to the Crime Log, for the purpose of the Fire Log, a business day is any day Monday through Friday, except for days when the institution is closed. This log is available to the media and the general public in the UFPD Public Lobby Front Desk located within the Patrol Division Building and on-line at: http://www.police.u.edu/wp-content/asp/relog/default.asp. In an extra eort to keep the university community informed, the UFPD routinely prepares and distributes campus crime alerts, timely warnings, and crime prevention tips. In addition, local newspapers, such as the The Independent Flor ida Alligator and The Gainesville Sun, and most local radio and television stations, regularly distribute information provided by the UFPD on matters of interest and personal and property safety. Various other public and safety information can be found at the UFPD Community Services Division or the departments web site online at: http://www.police.u.edu/. If you have questions, please contact Major Brad Barber either by calling (352) 273-3309 or by e-mail at wbarber@u.edu. tn f

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ntbf nThe University of Florida is committed to providing important information to its students, faculty, and sta. Consistent with this commitment, and pursuant to the University of Floridas notice and reporting obligations under various laws and Regulations, information concerning the following topics may be obtained at the following web sites: Florida, the academic programs available, policies for payment and refunds of fees, and special services available to disabled students: http://www.admissions.u.edu/. http://www.admissions.u.edu/annualcosts.html. the availability of federal aid for approved study abroad programs and policies concerning loan repayment upon withdrawal from the university: http://www.sfa.u.edu/applying/. pursuant to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act: http://www.registrar.u.edu/ferpa.html. http://www.ir.u.edu/factbook/degree.htm. http://www.ir.u.edu/accred.htm. safety provisions and statistics for certain reported crimes: http://www.police.u.edu/misc/together.asp. participation rates and nancial information: http://www.gatorzone.com/compliance/. http://election.dos.state..us/voter-registration/voter-reg.shtml. You may obtain copies of the universitys information reports and the States voter registration forms at the Oce of the University Registrar, located at 222 Criser Hall, and at various other oces throughout the University of Florida. Should you require assistance with obtaining any of this information, you may contact the Division of Student Aairs at 155 Tigert Hall or call (352) 392-1274.

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nf nb University policies exist for the purpose of providing a basis for quality campus life and for setting a standard of conduct for all members of the university community conducive to achieving the objectives of the University of Florida. Stated below are excerpts from University of Florida policies as they relate to issues of safety and security. For your safety and the safety of others, please read and become familiar with these policies.Standards of ConductThe Student Code of Conduct and other appropriately published rules of conduct play an important role in the universitys commitment to provide for the safety and security of all its community members. Failure of students, faculty, sta, or student organizations to comply with duly established laws or university regulations may subject violators to appropriate action by university or other appropriate civil authorities. Such action might include referral to University of Florida disciplinary processes through Employee Relations for sta members, the Oce of Student Conduct and Conict resolution for students and even the possibility of arrest of any community member committing a crime. The University of Florida will not attempt to shelter students or employees from federal, state, or local laws. The Student Honor Code and Student Conduct Code can be viewed on-line at: http://www.dso.u.edu/sccr/honorcodes/ conductcode.php. The regulations that apply to sta members can be viewed on-line at: http://regulations.u.edu/. Policy on Sexual AssaultThe University of Florida values the health and safety of every individual on campus and expects its students to treat other persons with respect and dignity. Any behavior causing the sexual abuse/ assault of another person will not be tolerated, is a violation of the university's Student Code of Conduct and may result in sanctions ranging from probation to expulsion. Disciplinary action on the part of the university does not preclude the possibility of criminal charges against the individual. The term sexual assault as used by the university is synonymous with sexual battery, stranger rape, gang rape, marital rape, date rape, and acquaintance rape occurring on or o campus. Regardless of the name used or the location where it occurs, sexual assault is a violation of state law and is dened as any oral, anal, or vaginal penetration by or union with the sexual organ of another, or the anal or vaginal penetration by another with any other object performed without consent (Chapter 794.011 Florida State Statute). Consent is dened as intelligent, knowing, and voluntary permission. Consent is not failure to physically resist, forced or coerced submission, inability to make decisions due to intoxication by any substance, or being unconscious, asleep, or physically unable to communicate non-consent. Sexual assault may take many forms including gang rape, acquaintance rape, date rape, and stranger rape and occurs both on and o college campuses. Sexual assault can occur any time of the day or night, at home, in the work place, in social settings, and in public places. Both men and women have been sexually assaulted by strangers, people whom they have known and trusted, and people whom they have dated.Procedures to Follow If You Are Sexually Assaulted call the police immediately, especially if the assailant is still nearby. The police will help you whether or not you choose to prosecute the assailant. Call a friend or family member for support and/or the University of Florida Police Departments Oce of Victim Services at (352) 392-5648 or (352) 392-1111 after hours. A Victim Advocate is available to assist you 24 hours daily and can help coordinate many of the services you may need both short term and long term. primary purpose of a medical examination is to check for physical injury, the presence of sexually transmitted diseases, or pregnancy as a result of the assault. The secondary purpose of a medical examination is to aid in the police investigation and legal proceedings. douching might be the rst thing you want to do, it is highly recommended that you dont. If you wish to pursue criminal charges in the future as a result of this incident, you might literally be washing away valuable evidence. Please keep in mind that this could be the evidence needed that could lead to the apprehension and conviction of the suspect. Wait until you have a medical examination. clothes, but save the clothing you were wearing at the time of the battery. Place each item of clothing in a separate paper bag and save for the police. Your clothing could also be used as evidence for prosecution. is personal, the reporting of a sexual assault is essential to taking that rst step to stop the perpetrator from victimizing others. Please note however, reporting this crime is not the same thing as prosecution. Prosecution can be determined later and will involve your active participation. In order to notify police as quickly as possible, please call 9-1-1. By calling 9-1-1, you will have access to the most immediately available law enforcement agency whether on or o campus. Services and many other university services are here and will assist you in both dealing with and reporting a sexual assault. The Oce of Victim Services will also assist you through the entire legal process regardless of how long that process may take. While the choice is clearly yours, the UFPD encourages anyone who becomes a victim of sexual assault to report this incident to law enforcement or other proper authorities. If you are a victim of a sexual assault and decide not to notify law enforcement, please obtain medical attention immediately and contact any of the victim support resources listed in this guide for assistance as your needs and level of comfort dictate. The University of Florida Police Department is proud to oer Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) training to all interested women of the UF community. The R.A.D. approach to personal safety education embodies a practical blend of threat avoidance strategies and real-world assault protection techniques for women. The R.A.D. course of instruction focuses on the development of personal safety skills that are easily mastered and can be safely practiced within a comfortable learning environment, and the integration of these skills with a threat assessment process designed to increase personal safety awareness. The goal of UFPDs R.A.D. training is to reduce victimization through informed decision-making and sensible action. R.A.D. training is not a traditional self-defense course. Instead, it enables women to learn, in a period of just a few hours, a set of cognitive and physical skills which can enhance their personal safety and be of benet for years to come. If you would like more information or would like to register for the next R.A.D. class, please call the Community Services Division of the University of Florida Police Department at (352) 392-1409, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. For more information regarding UFPDs RAD class please view on-line at: http:// www.police. u.edu/ communityservices/rapeaggressiondefenseprogram-rad/

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ntbf Where to Go For HelpMany sexual assault cases go unreported because the victim fears retaliation or possible humiliation if word gets around she/he has been the victim of a sex oense. It is a violation of Florida State Statute for any agency or media outlet to release the identity of a victim of sexual assault. Often victims tend to feel guilty, as though they did something to cause the attack, and many times keep the incident to themselves, or only share some of the incident with a close friend. While this may be helpful in the immediate sense, we encourage you to talk to a knowledgeable professional about your reactions to being victimized. The various services provided both on and o campus are available to all victims of violent acts and are designed to assist the victim in overcoming the trauma of the attack and proceeding with their lives. If you were sexually assaulted sometime in the past, you may still need to talk with someone about it. It was a traumatic experience and may still be aecting your life. Talking about being sexually assaulted may help you resolve your feelings. Victim Assistance AgenciesIf you or someone you know is the victim of a crime or a violation of the Student Code of Conduct, it is important that you contact agencies that can help provide the resources that can help you resolve the matter. Listed below are some agencies that may be able to assist you and include resources both on and o campus. ONC AMPUS RESOURCES : University of Florida Police DepartmentThe University of Florida Police Department (UFPD) provides law enforcement services for all of the University of Florida campus. The UFPD is available 24 hours daily. UFPD Oce of Victim ServicesThe UFPD Oce of Victim Services provides advocacy services to victims of crime for the purpose of ensuring they are kept informed and treated with fairness. UFPD advocates are available to assist victims 24 hours a day. Victims may consult an advocate directly by calling (352) 392-5648 weekdays from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., or after hours by calling the University of Florida Police Department at (352) 392-1111(V/TDD). Talking with an advocate is not the same as ling a police report, and victim advocates will provide support regardless of whether or not the victim chooses to report the crime to the police. The victim advocate will work to ensure that any victim of crime receive fair treatment in accordance with the provisions of Florida State Statute 960 which can be viewed on-line at: http://www.police.u.edu/victimservices/orida-state-statute-960crime-victimbill-of-rights/. All services are free and condential. University Counseling and Wellness Center The University Counseling and Wellness Center oers condential, no cost counseling services to currently enrolled students coping with any form of sexual exploitation issues. Professional psychologists and counselors provide short-term, individual, couples, and group counseling. The Center also coordinates with other campus and community resources to assist students in their recovery and continued academic progress. Appointments for counseling services may be made in person, by phone (352) 392-1575, during oce hours MondayThursday 8am-7pm, Friday 8am-5pm or online at: http://www.counseling. u.edu/cwc/. Students in need of immediate assistance are seen on an emergency nonappointment basis. Shands Hospital Emergency DepartmentShands at the University of Florida Hospital Emergency Room is available to anyone who has become injured or assaulted and requires immediate medical assistance. Shands at UF ER is open 24 hours a daily. Shands at UF is one of the most comprehensive hospitals and one of the leading referral medical centers in the Southeast. Shands at UF is the primary teaching hospital for the UF College of Medicine. More than 500 physicians representing 110 medical specialties work with a team of healthcare professionals to provide quality care for patients. The faculty from the UF College of Medicine includes nationally and internationally recognized physicians whose expertise is supported by intensive research activities. Shands' aliation with the UF Health Science Center allows patients to benet from the latest medical knowledge and technology.The University of Florida Student Health Care CenterThe University of Florida Student Health Care Center leads, collaborates and excels in the provision of comprehensive services through wellness promotion and compassionate and accessible care. The Student Health Care Center also has a Womens Health Care Clinic that is a nurse practitioner-run clinic with a female focus. The clinic includes but is not limited to services such as counseling on contraceptive options, sexually transmitted disease/infection (STD/STI) prevention, sexuality and other women's health, screening, diagnosis and treatment of STDs/STIs, breast exams and instruction in self-examination, pap smears and routine pelvic exams, and pregnancy testing. Fall/ Spring: Monday Friday: 8a 5p; Saturday: CLOSED; Sunday*: 12-4p (*Urgent care only). Summer: Monday Friday: 8a 4:30p; Saturday/Sunday: CLOSEDDean of Students Oce and Oce of Student Conduct and Conict ResolutionThe Oce of Student Conduct and Conict Resolution, located within the Dean of Students Oce, is responsible for the judicial aspects of the Code of Student Conduct at the University of Florida. Individuals associated with the Oce of Student Conduct and Conict Resolution are directly responsible for ensuring that students referred to their oce receive fair treatment in all aspects of the hearing process. Students, faculty, and sta who believe that there has been a violation of the student code can contact the oce to discuss options available for reporting incidents to the appropriate authority. Sexual Trauma/Interpersonal Violence E ducation (STRIVE)The Sexual Trauma/Interpersonal Violence Education (STRIVE) peer educators are available to hold open nonjudgmental forums for discussion of issues related to sexual violence. Topics can be tailored to your group's needs and may include: Healthy and Unhealthy Relationships, Dating Violence, Alcohol and Sexual Violence, and How Can Men Help.The University of Florida LGBT AairsThe University of Florida LGBT Aairs (LGBT) provides education, advocacy, and support for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, and straight-allied students, sta, and faculty at the University of Florida. LGBT Aairs aims to create a more hospitable campus climate for all students, faculty and sta by facilitating the ability of all LGBT Gators to pursue their studies, jobs, and lives free from the threat of bigotry and discrimination and by increasing awareness and sensitivity of LGBT issues throughout the entire campus community. The University of Florida Student Legal ServicesThe University of Florida Student Legal Services is essentially a pre-paid legal service for full time UF students. Student Legal Services provides students a full range of typical legal services, including advice and consultation, drafting of letters and legal documents, conferences and settlement negotiations with adverse parties, legal research, review and interpretation of legal documents, drafting and ling of legal documents, and some representation in court. Notary services are also available. Preventing legal problems through education is a primary goal of Student Legal Services. Student Legal Services also educates students on their legal rights and responsibilities through lectures, workshops, presentations, and the distribution of information and materials on a variety of legal issues.OFFC AMPUS RESOURCES : Gainesville Police DepartmentThe Gainesville Police Department (GPD) is a full-service, community oriented policing law enforcement agency dedicated to partnering with the citizens of Gainesville for problem resolution. In 2007, GPD continued its mission to serve and protect the City through enhanced programs and citizen interaction. This collaborative eort has made Gainesville one of the most livable cities in the United States. The goals of the agency are to reduce the number of calls for service, decrease crime through prevention and enforcement and enhance the quality of life for the citizens of Gainesville. nb

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nf nbAlachua County Sheris OceThe Alachua County Sheris Oce (ACSO) is a full service law enforcement agency dedicated to providing and maintaining the highest standards in services provided as has been done since creation of the oce in 1841. The ACSO not only provides the highest quality law enforcement services but also inmate detention, rendered with dedication to equality, fairness and professional integrity. The over 800 sworn and civilian employees strive to keep the streets and communities safe for Alachua Countys citizens. ACSO works in cooperation with the nine local municipalities (Alachua, Archer, Gainesville, Hawthorne, High Springs, LaCrosse, Micanopy, Newberry, Waldo) that make up Alachua County to ensure that the services they provide are supported by the countywide jurisdiction and authority vested in the Sheri. In addition, ACSO maintains a strong and active working relationship with both Santa Fe College and the University of Florida Police Departments. Alachua County Sheri's Oce Victim ServicesThe Victim Advocate Unit at the Alachua County Sheri's Oce has four full-time victim advocates. The program oers advocacy and services to victims who report their crimes to the Alachua County Sheri's Oce. Those served include victims of child physical abuse, child sexual abuse, DUI crashes, domestic violence, elder abuse, survivors of homicide victims, stalking victims, robbery victims and assault victims. Services oered to victims include: victim's rights throughout this process referral services criminal proceedings their families Compensation All services are free and available whether or not an arrest has been made.Alachua County Victim Services and Rape Crisis CenterThe Alachua County Victim Services and Rape Crisis Center provides primarily traditional core services to victims such as criminal justice accompaniment, crisis intervention and assistance with victim compensation. The Center is the cornerstone of victim services in the Gainesville/ Alachua County community. The program has received statewide and national recognition for providing creative and non-traditional services for victims of violence.Peaceful Paths The Peaceful Paths Domestic Abuse Network is designed to provide solutions for those that are victims of domestic violence. Domestic violence can take many forms. It may involve physical aggression, verbal abuse, emotional manipulation, forced sexual activity, or nancial control. Often abuse is not physical, but any abuse is still part of an indication of power and control and could lead to more aggressive actions in the future. Violence in a relationship is not an isolated incident, but a pattern of behaviors designed to control another person. The sta at Peaceful Paths can help those in need understand ve basic things to know: 1. You are not alone. 2. The abuse is not your fault. 3. You deserve to live in a safe environment. 4. There are resources to help. 5. Hope can happen here. The sta also wants you to know that you are not responsible for, nor do you deserve, any abuse that you receive, no matter what the circumstances. If you are experiencing abuse in any form, you deserve the help and support of people who understand the reality of physical and emotional abuse.The Alachua County Crisis Center The Alachua County Crisis Center oers 24 hours a day phone crisis and suicide intervention counseling to all residents of Alachua County. For more information about the range of services, please visit on-line at: http://www. alachuacounty.us/DEPTS/CSS/CRISISCENTER/ Pages/CrisisCenter.aspx bIf you or someone you know is the victim of a crime or a violation of the Student Code of Conduct, it is important that you contact agencies that can help provide the resources that can help you resolve the matter. Listed below are some agencies that may be able to assist you and include resources both on and o campus. UFPD Oce of Victim Services On-Campus ResourcesUniversity of Florida Police Department Museum Road and Newell Drive (352) 392-1111 (V/TDD)www.police.u.eduUFPD Oce of Victim Services Museum Road and Newell Drive (352) 392-5648http://www.police.u.edu/ovs/vap.aspUniversity Counseling and Wellness Center 3190 Radio Road (352) 392-1575http://www.counseling.u.eduShands Hospital Emergency Department 1515 SW Archer Road (352) 265-8000 The University of Florida Student Health Care Center P.O. Box 117500 1 Fletcher Drive (352) 392-1161http://www.shcc.u.edu Dean of Students Oce and Oce of Student Conduct and Conict Resolution 202 Peabody Hall (352) 392-1261 (352) 392-3008 TDDhttp://www.dso.u.edu/ or http://www.dso.u.edu/ sccrSexual Trauma/Interpersonal Violence Education (STRIVE) 3190 Radio Road P.O Box 112662 (352) 392-1575 http://www.counseling.u.edu/cwc/Strive-2011.aspx The University of Florida LGBT Aairs (LGBT) 202 Peabody Hall P.O. Box 114075 (352) 392-1261http://www.multicultural.u.edu/lgbt/The University of Florida Student Legal Services 368 J. Wayne Reitz Union P.O. Box 118505 (352) 392-5297(LAWS)http://www.studentlegalservices.u.edu O-Campus ResourcesGainesville Police Department 721 NW 6th Street (352) 334-2400http://www.gainesvillepd.orgAlachua County Sheris Oce 2621 Hawthorne Road (352) 367-4000http://www.alachuasheri.orgAlachua County Sheri's Oce Victim Services 2621 SE Hawthorne Road (352) 384-3317http://www.alachuasheri.org/victim_services/ overview.htmlAlachua County Victim Services and Rape Crisis Center 218 SE 24th Street (352) 264-6760http://www.alachuacounty.us/depts/css/victimser vices/Pages/VictimServices.aspx. Peaceful Paths Domestic Abuse Network (352) 377-TALK (8255) (24-hour hotline) 1-800-393-SAFE (7233)http://www.peacefulpaths.orgThe Alachua County Crisis Center 218 SE 24th Street (352) 264-6789http://www.alachuacounty.us/Depts/CSS/CrisisCenter/Pages/CrisisCenter.aspxThe State Attorney's Oce of Victim Services State Attorneys Oce 8 Circuit 120 West University Avenue (352) 374-3670 http://www.sao8.org/Victim%20Rights2.htmNorth Florida Regional Medical Center Emergency Center Newberry Road at I-75 (352) 333-4900http://nfrmc.com/Persons with hearing impairments, when trying to contact an oce that does not list a TDD number, use the Florida Relay Service (FRS) by calling 7-1-1.

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ntbf The State Attorney's Oce of Victim Services The Alachua County Victim Witness Advocate program is designed to ensure victims will work with an Assistant State Attorney and a Victim/Witness Advocate during the investigation and prosecution phases of a criminal case. Advocates provide victims with information and guidance concerning their case. The State Attorneys Oce Victim/Witness Program provides the following services: crime agencies Compensation Whether or not an arrest has been made in your case, the Victim/Witness Program is available to assist you. N orth Florida Regional M edical Center Emergency CenterThe North Florida Regional Medical Center Emergency Center is designed for faster, more patient friendly medical care. The physicians and nurses working in the emergency department have specialized training in emergency medicine. At present the facility contains 23 patient beds that provide specialized care for a variety of critical care needs.What Victims of Sexual Assault Can Expect From The University of Florida Police DepartmentIt is the policy of the University of Florida Police Department to ensure that sexual assault victims are aorded sensitivity and maximum humane consideration. All ocers, regardless of duty assignment, receive specialized training in the investigation of sex oenses. Topics discussed in this training are Florida law, University of Florida philosophy and policy, ocer sensitivity to the needs and feelings of the victim, support resources, and methods of successful investigation. is available throughout the process to address a victims needs and concerns as well as those of signicant others. sensitivity, dignity, and understanding. prejudging or blaming a victim. same gender will be accommodated. location of the victims choice. treatment with respect for a victims choice of medical facility. available both on and o campus. any time and will explain the criminal justice system and process. thoroughly and consistently, and will keep a victim informed on the progress of the case. will be withheld from the public and the press, in accordance with the Florida Public Records Law.What You Can Do If Someone You Know Has Been Sexually AssaultedIf you know someone who has been sexually assaulted, you can be of help. In the aftermath of a sexual assault, the victim may experience fear, insecurity, and/or frustration and need care and support from others. You, as a friend (or spouse or family member), can play an important role by providing reassurance, support, and guidance in their time of need. Allow your friend to reect upon what has happened and the feelings experienced, but do not press for details. Let her/him set the pace. Listening is one of the best things you can do at this time. In short, be a trusted friend. The decision to report this crime and perhaps move forward in the criminal justice system is a dicult one that is extremely personal for the victim. As a trusted friend, your advice can play a key role in helping her/him make that decision. If your friend has not received medical attention, encourage her/him to do so immediately. For additional help and support, call the University of Florida Police Departments Oce of Victim Services. A victim advocate can accompany you and your friend to the medical facility and assist in coordinating the medical attention she/he may need. Know that there is a possibility the medical facility will notify the police. However, it is up to your friend to make the nal decision as to whether a formal police report will be initiated. You can be a valuable resource to your friend by seeking out and providing information that will assist in understanding available options. For example, you can let your friend know that reporting the rape and collecting evidence does not automatically lock her/him into pursuing prosecution of the oender. What it does do is assist the police in identifying the method and possible identity of the assailant. Since those that commit sexual assault tend to do so more than once, any information that can be provided may fWhen a student violates city, state, or federal law by an oense committed o-campus that is not associated with a university activity, the disciplinary authority of the university will not be used merely to duplicate the penalty awarded for such an act under applicable ordinances and laws. The university will take disciplinary action against a student for such an o-campus oense only when it is required by law to do so, or when the nature of the oense is such that in the judgment of the Director of Student Conduct and Conict Resolution, that the continued presence of the student on campus is likely to interfere with the educational process or the orderly operation of the university, or that the continued presence of the student on campus is likely to endanger the health, safety, or welfare of the university community. If the Director of Student Conduct and Conict Resolution determines that disciplinary action is warranted, the Director of Student Conduct and Conict Resolution shall so notify the student in accordance with Rule 6C1-4.16(5). The action of the university with respect to any such o-campus conduct shall be made independently of any o-campus authority. nb

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nf prevent the sexual assault of someone else. You may be asked to testify in conduct proceedings regarding your friends remarks, actions, and state of mind, especially if you were one of the rst people she/he approached. Please take some time to write down or record a few notes that may prove to be of benet later. Making the decision to report a sexual assault to the police and to undergo the subsequent processes of evidence collection and possible legal and conduct proceedings will be very dicult for your friend. Although it is only natural that you will want to give advice, you must avoid trying to control the situation. A victim of sexual assault must be allowed to make her/his own decisions. Whatever decisions are made however, your friend needs to know that she/he will not be judged, disapproved of, or rejected by you. The victim of sexual assault can suer a signicant degree of physical and emotional trauma both during and immediately following the incident that may remain for a long period of time. By being patient, supportive, and non-judgmental you can provide a safe accepting climate into which your friend can release painful feelings. Sometimes friends or family members take the sexual assault of a loved one very personally, almost as if the assault had happened to them. They may feel resentment or anger and unleash this anger on the victim and/or others. Sometimes their sense of frustration and helplessness is pitted against a powerful urge for revenge. Do not make the mistake of discounting or ignoring your emotional responses. It is very important to realize that you too are responding to an unwanted crisis. You are trying to understand what has happened and adjust to unfamiliar realities. Therefore, do not hesitate to take advantage of the many support services found in our community which oer counseling for victims of sexual assault and their signicant others.Crimes of Violence and the Campus Conduct/Judicial ProcessBecause of the seriousness of the violation and the consequences to the victims of sexual assault and other crimes of violence, the University of Florida is committed to providing prevention services, educational programming, procedures that encourage reporting of sexual assault incidents, and support services for victims. An individual who is harmed by a violent act committed by a student in violation of the Student Code of Conduct at the University of Florida may receive special consideration according to state statute within the student conduct process. Though the primary act of violence discussed in this section focuses on sexual assault, other acts of violence that involve consideration and potential actions taken by the Oce of Student Conduct and Conict Resolution include, but are not limited to: against another Victims are given options concerning how or whether to proceed with an alleged incident of violence within the student conduct process; however, the Dean of Students Oce/Oce of Student Conduct and Conict Resolution can proceed with conduct action without the victims consent in order to protect the safety and wellbeing of the university community. The three options available to victims within the University of Floridas student conduct process include: 1. The victim asks for an investigation to be undertaken. If the evidence indicates substantiation, conduct charges are led against the accused student. The victim is called as a witness in a student conduct hearing. 2. The victim les a report with the Dean of Students Oce/Oce of Student Conduct and Conict Resolution and requests that a discussion take place with the accused student about the alleged incident. Information identifying the victim will not be released during the discussion. 3. The victim les a report with Student Conduct and Conict Resolution and adavits are obtained to preserve the testimony of witnesses in the event that the victim and the university may want to pursue an action in the future. This option is provided to the victim with their understanding that in crimes of violence, especially sexual assault, timeliness is very important for the preservation of physical evidence as well as oral testimony. Victims of violence whose cases are handled by Student Conduct and Conict Resolution will be provided the following to the extent feasible: on campus after the reporting of an alleged incident including, but not limited to, reassignments within the residence halls and changes of course sections to ensure the student victims academic and living situation are considered after an alleged sex oense has occurred; campus conduct processes; as it proceeds through the student conduct process; counseling and medical services both on and o campus as well as academic assistance aimed at retaining the victim as a member of the university community; manner by representatives of the university community; evidentiary portion of the conduct hearing; the victim throughout any investigation or campus conduct proceeding for the purpose of providing support; violence, the ability to testify from another room provided that it does not interfere with the accused students right to question the accuser or a witness; witnesses in advance of the hearing with the understanding that the hearing ocer/chair will determine the appropriate questions to be asked; from the student conduct hearing; the hearing body to be considered during sanctioning, if the charged student is found responsible; victim throughout the campus conduct process. In all cases handled by the universitys conduct process, both the accuser and the accused are entitled to the same opportunities to have others present during a disciplinary proceeding, and both the accuser and the accused shall be informed of the outcome of the disciplinary proceeding if requested. These procedures are also required to be followed by the University of Florida as outlined in federal law and do not constitute a violation of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).Potential Sanctions for Violation of Student Code of Conduct Involving Sexual Assault Or Other Crimes of Violence A student found responsible for violations of the Student Code of Conduct, specically including but not limited to sexual assault, shall be subject to sanctions commensurate with the oenses and any aggravating and mitigating circumstances, which may include one or more of the following unless otherwise expressly provided in the University of Florida Rule 6C1-4.016 which are available for viewing on-line at: https://www.rules.org/ gateway/ruleno.asp?id=6C1-4.016. 1. Reprimand 2. Loss of university privileges 3. Conduct probation 4. Deferred Suspension 5. Suspension 6. Expulsion 7. Restitution for university property 8. Repair of Harm through community/ university service work hours 9. Educational Requirements 10. No Contact order 11. Residence hall transfer or removal nb

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ntbf For more information about the rights of the victims, rights of the accused, and the conduct process of the University of Florida, refer to Student Rights and Responsibilities located in the Student Guide, or on the Dean of Students Oce website on-line at: http://www.dso.u.edu or the Student Conduct and Conict Resolution website on-line at: http://www.dso.u.edu/SCCR. Policy Regarding Possession, U se, and Sale of Alcoholic Beverages The use of alcoholic beverages by members of the University of Florida community while on campus is at all times subject to the alcohol beverage laws and ordinances of the City of Gainesville, County of Alachua, and State of Florida. Enforcement of these alcohol laws and ordinances on campus is the primary responsibility of the University of Florida Police Department (UFPD) and any other law enforcement agency representative participating in operations associated with mutual aid requests. The consumption of alcohol on the University of Florida is allowed only under certain circumstances and in designated locations. Violators are subject to University of Florida disciplinary action, criminal prosecution, ne, and/ or imprisonment. Any organization that requests the consumption of alcoholic beverages for any function on campus must coordinate that request through UFPD. Any organization that violates alcohol use policies/laws may be subject to sanctions by the University of Florida.Alcohol M edical Amnesty Policy (M AP)The University of Florida (UF) encourages a living and learning environment that promotes the health and safety of all members of the UF community. Drug or alcohol consumption-including excessive consumption, consumption of a dangerous substance, or consumption by someone with sensitivity--can cause serious physical and neurological harm or be life-threatening. As such, students are encouraged to make responsible decisions and to seek medical attention in serious or life-threatening situations that result from alcohol and/or other drug abuse; students are also encouraged to seek help for any situation where medical treatment is reasonably believed to be appropriate. If a student is so intoxicated s/he is unable to be awakened, letting that person sleep it o is not a reasonable alternative to getting him/ her the necessary medical help. Students may be hesitant to seek help in such emergencies because of fear of potential conduct and disciplinary consequences for themselves, the person in need of medical attention, or the organization hosting the event where the situation occurs. If medical attention is required, students should immediately contact professional medical personnel by calling 9-1-1. A (1) student who seeks emergency assistance on behalf of himor herself, another student, or a friend experiencing an alcohol and/or other drug related emergency, as well as (2) the individual in distress will not be subject to disciplinary action nor mandatory alcohol and other drug sanctions under the UF Student Code of Conduct. The University of Florida is committed to promoting a safe and healthy environment for all students. A medical amnesty policy benets our campus by encouraging students to make responsible decisions in seeking medical attention in serious or life-threatening situations that result from alcohol and/or other drug abuse and in any situation where medical treatment is reasonably believed to be appropriate. If a student is so intoxicated or drugged that s/he is unable to be awakened, letting that person sleep it o is not a reasonable alternative to getting him/her the necessary medical help. This policy seeks to diminish fear of disciplinary and conduct sanctions in such situations and to encourage individuals and organizations to seek needed medical attention for students in distress from alcohol and drug use. If the student is involved in any subsequent (i.e., repeat) alcohol and/or drug abuse incidents, the situation will be evaluated by the Dean of Students Oce and/or the Coordinator of Residential Judicial Programs to determine if the student qualies for medical amnesty. The availability of medical amnesty for students with repetitive violations will be determined on a case by case basis. Typically, situations will be handled through the regular conduct process and will be considered for sanctioning purposes if a student does not demonstrate a commitment to the steps recommended by the health care professional and is involved in repetitive alcohol and/or drug abuse incidents. (1) The Medical Amnesty Policy applies to UF students who initiate and seek assistance and/or medical treatment on behalf of themselves, another student, or a friend. (2) If a representative of a UF student organization hosting an event calls for medical assistance, this act of responsibility might mitigate potential Student Conduct Code consequences that could arise against the organization, i.e., the fact that an organization sought help will be favorably considered in potential sanctioning for university policy violations. UF student organizations involved in an incident must agree to take recommended steps to address concerns. In appropriate situations as determined in the conduct process, mitigation could result in the requirement of participation in an educational program or educational activities rather than other disciplinary consequences. (3) The protocol applies only to the UF Student Code of Conduct, Housing & Residence Education Community Standards, and Greek Life policies. Law enforcement agencies may act within their jurisdictions in enforcing the laws enacted by the State of Florida, the United States, or any other state or nation where jurisdiction may be invoked. (4) The Medical Amnesty Policy applies only to individuals use of alcohol and drugs where medical attention is needed. It does not apply to other prohibited behavior such as illegal distribution of illicit substances, harassment, or assault. (5) The Medical Amnesty Policy does apply to UF students who are a victim of sexual assault and have also engaged in underage alcohol consumption. If you wish to view the entire Medical Amnesty Policy, please view on-line at: http://www.police. u.edu/medical-amnesty-policy/. nb

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nf Drinking Age LawsFlorida State Statute 562.111 (which can be viewed in more detail on-line at: http:// www.leg.state..us/Statutes/index. cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&Search_ String=&URL=0500-0599/0562/ Sections/0562.111.html) makes it unlawful for any person: Under the age of 21 years to have in his or her possession alcoholic beverages; To sell, give, serve, or permit to be served alcoholic beverages to a person under 21 years of age or to permit a person under 21 years of age to consume said beverages on licensed premises; To misrepresent or misstate his or her age or any other person for the purpose of inducing any licensee or his agents or employees to sell, give, serve, or deliver any alcoholic beverages to a person under 21 years of age.Open Container LawsCity Ordinance Section 4-4(b)(1). It is unlawful for any person to consume or have in his or her possession any alcoholic beverage in any open container on any public street, thoroughfare, sidewalk, or on the premises of any publicly owned parking facility in the city. Nor shall any person consume or have in his/her possession any alcoholic beverages in an open container on any private property, except as a lawful guest and with the consent of the owner or person in charge of such private property. City Ordinance Section 4-4c. Except in the section commonly known as the executive suite boxes, it is unlawful for any person to consume or to have in his or her possession any alcoholic beverages within the stands, stadium, or grounds of Florida Field, the stadium located on the campus of the University of Florida. This prohibition shall apply at any place within the gates of said stands, on the grounds, in the aisles, or at any other place in said stadium.Controlled SubstancesThe possession and use of controlled drugs by members of the University of Florida community must at all times be in accordance with the provisions of Florida Law, the rules of the Board of Regents of the State of Florida, and the rules of the University of Florida, which include the Student Code of Conduct. Under Florida law, no person may possess substances regulated under the provisions of Florida State Statute Chapter 893 which can be viewed on-line at:http://www.leg.state..us/Statutes/index. cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&URL=08000899/0893/0893ContentsIndex.html&Stat uteYear=2012&Title=%2D%3E2012%2D%3 EChapter%20893. (controlled substances and designer drugs) unless dispensed and used pursuant to prescription or otherwise authorized by law. Possession, sale, and delivery of such substances is prohibited unless authorized by law. Under the Student Code of Conduct, students at the University of Florida who possess, use, or deliver controlled substances and designer drugs not dispensed and used pursuant to prescription are subject to disciplinary action, up to and including expulsion from the university. Disciplinary action against a student under university rules does not preclude the possibility of criminal charges against that individual. The ling of criminal charges similarly does not preclude action by the university. The use of illegal drugs and the misuse of prescription and other drugs pose a serious threat to the physical and mental well being of university students, faculty, sta, visitors, and guests of the university. The university is committed to providing accurate information and educational programs to prevent such use of drugs. If you require further information about the programs and services, or any other related assistance available from the University of Florida, please contact any of the following: Gatorwell Health Promotion Services, 3190 Radio Road (352) 273-4450 and found on-line at: http://gatorwell.ufsa.u.edu/Alcohol-andOther-Drugs.aspx. University Counseling and Wellness Center, 3190 Radio Road, (352) 392-1575 and found on-line at:http://www.counseling.u.edu/cwc/. The UFPD Community Services Division, Jennings Annex Building, UFPD, (352) 392-1409 and found on-line at: http://www.police.u.edu/ community-services/. The University of Florida complies with all provisions of the Federal Drug-Free Work Place Act requirements. In conjunction with this Act, the University of Florida is committed to providing a campus environment free of the abuse of alcohol and the illegal use of alcohol and other drugs. The university has adopted and implemented programs that seek to prevent the illicit use of drugs and the abuse of alcohol by university community members. For a full text, please go to the University of Florida Drug-Free School and Work Place Policy Statement on-line at: http://www.hr.u.edu/ emp_relations/policy/df_statement.asp. nb

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ntbf rfbbfAll emergency situations involving: All emergencies should be immediately reported to 9-1-1. The timely reporting of criminal or suspicious activity is essential in helping detect, deter, prevent, and perhaps apprehend those that engage in any activity that may pose a safety threat to all of our community members. All telephones on and o campus, including cellular and pay phones, may be used to dial 9-1-1 at no charge. While on campus, persons should be aware that dierent telephone systems might require you to dial an outside line before dialing 9-1-1. Please become familiar with any phone system you might use prior to use in an actual emergency situation. As an added security measure, Emergency Blue Light non-dial, outdoor emergency telephones are located at strategic points throughout campus, including all parking garages. All total, there are currently more than 300 Emergency Blue-Light phones available for use on campus. These phones are easily identied by the word Emergency and their distinctive blue lights can be seen both day and night. When the button is activated/pushed or the receiver is lifted (depending on the model of Emergency Blue Light phone) the caller is immediately placed in contact with the UFPD Dispatch Center. In addition to providing voice contact with a police dispatcher, the dispatcher will also know the callers precise location. These Emergency Blue Light phones are for emergency use only. Additionally, all elevators in educational buildings have emergency phones with direct contact to the UFPD Dispatch Center as well. These phones are maintained by the Physical Plant Division (PPD) and all provide a system by which one can directly establish communication for reporting elevator or other emergencies. All non-emergency incidents occurring on campus, including criminal oenses, should be reported to the UFPD at (352) 392-1111 (V/TDD) or come to the UFPD located at the corner of Museum Road and Newell Drive. When calling for either emergency or non-emergency service, be prepared to:1. Clearly identify yourself 2. Give your location if known or provide visible landmarks/buildings if you are unfamiliar to campus 3. Explain the nature of your call with as much detail as you can provide. Please note, if this is an emergency call, notify the dispatcher immediately. If possible, stay on the line unless otherwise advised by the dispatcher. The dispatcher will coordinate the appropriate law enforcement, re rescue, and/or medical service response necessary for your call for service. Members of the university community are strongly encouraged to report all crimes and suspicious activity to the UFPD at (352) 392-1111 or appropriate law enforcement agency. No one knows your daily work environment like you do; so be aware of your environment and report any suspicious packages or persons promptly. Because police reports in the state of Florida are open to public records review under Chapter 119 of the Florida State Statutes, the UFPD cannot and will not hold reports of crime in condence unless a specic legal exemption exists for the criminal incident indicated. Persons wishing to anonymously report criminal or suspicious activity, as well as potentially disruptive or concerning behavior occurring on campus, can do so by using UFPDs Silent Witness Program. The Silent Witness program is an internet based reporting system one can use to submit information to UFPD for follow-up investigation. To use the Silent Witness program, go to http://www.police. u.edu/wp-content/asp/secure_ufpd/silent_witness. aspx. Information submitted via this program is reviewed by the UFPD Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. through 4:00 p.m. (excluding holidays). Do not use this system in emergency situations. Crimes reported to and occurring within the jurisdictional authority of the UFPD will be thoroughly documented and investigated. Oenders identied during the criminal investigation process will be referred, as appropriate, to the UF Oce of Student Conduct and Conict Resolution and/or the Oce of the State Attorney for the 8th Judicial Circuit for any possible discipline/prosecution. bffALL EMERGENCIES ............................. 911 (V/TDD) University of Florida Police Department: Calls For Service ............ (352) 392-1111 (V/TDD) General Information ..................... (352) 392-5447 Victim Advocate ............................. (352) 392-5648 Patrol .................................................. (352) 392-6652 Investigations ................................. (352) 392-4705 Community Services .................... (352) 392-1409 Training ............................................. (352) 392-8949 Property Recovery ......................... (352) 273-FIND SNAP ................................................. (352) 392-SNAP Police Administration ................... (352) 392-5444 Records .............................................. (352) 392-6651 Media Coordinator (PIO) ............. (352) 273-3309 Dean of Students Oce .............. (352) 392-1261 TDD ..................................................... (800) 955-8771 Department of Housing and Residence Education .................................... (352) 392-2161 (V/TDD) Transportation and Parking Services ............................. (352) 392-7275 University of Florida Counseling and Wellness Center ..................... (352) 392-1575 Alachua County Crisis Center ..................................... (352) 264-6789 Alachua County Victim Services And Rape Crisis Center ................ (352) 264-6760 Peaceful Paths Domestic Abuse Nework ............ (352) 377-8255 Oce of the State Attorney Victim/Witness Program ............. (352) 374-3627bfb trrb

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nf Emergency N otications In conjunction with the associated requirements of the Jeanne Clery Act, the University of Florida (UF) employs a multimodal approach to emergency notications, using several dierent methods to inform the campus community under the branding of UF Alert. The University maintains a large campus involving diverse operations and it is important to understand no single approach has the ability to reach 100 percent of the population. Therefore, UF has developed the ability to broadcast emergency notication across four campus-wide media the Universitys homepage, text messaging system, e-mail, and voice over internet protocol (VOIP) mass notication. Conrmation there is a signicant emergency or dangerous situation and authorization to send messages is time dependent and determined by the incident. Conrmation of signicant emergencies will require direct investigation by appropriate University personnel. Taking into account the safety of the community, University personnel will determine the content of the notication and initiate the appropriate elements of the emergency notication system, unless the notication will, in the professional judgment of responsible authorities, compromise eorts to assist victims or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency. For all campus law enforcement issues, the University of Florida Police Department (UFPD) will be primarily responsible for conrming a signicant emergency or dangerous public safety situation on campus through victim, witness or ocer observations. Upon conrmation, UFPD at the Ocer-in-charge (OIC) or above level will have the primary responsibility to prepare and issue campus law enforcement emergency notications to ensure they are sent out as expeditiously as possible. For non-law enforcement emergencies including but not limited to hazardous materials releases, utility failures, computer systems/ telecommunications failures, hazardous weather, etc. aecting the University of Florida campus, other departments at UF including, but not limited to Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S), and Physical Plant Division (PPD), may also conrm that a signicant emergency exists. Conrming departments will report the non-law enforcement emergency to the UFPD or the University Emergency Management Coordinator or his/her designee, who will have the primary responsibility to prepare and issue non-law enforcement emergency notications in cooperation with University Relations. Whether the emergency is a law enforcement or non-law enforcement issue, those authorized to issue emergency notications will be responsible for determining the appropriate segment or segments of the campus community to notify. Incident circumstances may require only a oor, building, facility, area etc. will need to be notied, as compared to the entire campus.Examples of situations that may require immediate emergency notications could include: assault, robbery, arson, sexual battery, murder (even if the suspect is in custody), etc. The emergency notications will include information that will enable members of the university community to take actions to protect themselves, including information about the type of incident, location and instructions on what actions to take and other safety tips. Notications involving immediate life safety issues may need to be initiated on short or no notice without full authorization. Approval to activate campus-wide notications will be provided from the highest level listed below as circumstances permit: 1. President or designee 2. Vice President for Business Aairs and Economic Development or designee 3. Chief of Police and/or Environmental Health & Safety Director or designees 4. Ocer-In-Charge or other Police/Police Communications Supervisor The determination of the appropriate segment of the university to receive emergency notications is the responsibility of the UFPD as the primary issuer. Those emergency notications not requiring campus-wide distribution may be sent to individual buildings or sections of campus. Occupants in those areas might be informed of the emergency through activations of building re alarms, direct interaction with a University ocial and/or a reverse 911-style telephone notication system. Message content is incident-specic and the person authorizing the notication is responsible for coordination of content language. The UFPD, EH&S, and University Relations currently have approved message templates for several incidents they may require emergency notications. These message templates are designed to help expedite the issuance of any emergency notication that must be issued. Any decision to postpone information provided to the campus community would be determined by the same ocial with authorization to conrm an emergency and initiate a notication. The list of individuals authorized to delay the issuance of an emergency notications based on the aforementioned circumstances are listed above. The UF homepage (www.u.edu) serves as the ocial source of emergency information for the University. The page will be updated as necessary during an incident requiring emergency notications. A text messaging service for emergency notications is available to active students, faculty and sta. Messages are initiated by the University and distributed through vendor provided services. Students are automatically enrolled in the system when entering a cellular telephone number for emergency contact during the ISIS course registration process and are required to update their information during each semesters course registration. Faculty and sta are encouraged to participate by providing emergency contact information in MyUFL. Updates can be made at MyUFL (https://my.u.edu/ps/signon.html) > My Account > Update Emergency Contact. To conrm subscription to the service, students and employees can text SUBSRIBE UFAlert to 23177 and will receive a reply indicating subscription status. Everyone is encouraged to add the vedigit numbers and in their cellular telephone contact list and name it UF Alert. This action will assist in identifying authorized UF text messages on your telephone. A blast e-mail service provides another method for emergency notication. Students, faculty and sta are automatically enrolled in the system and do not need to register for the service. Messages are sent to University-provided email accounts. An archive of previous emergency notication emails, beginning July 2009, is available at the UF EH&S oce. Additionally, a VOIP mass notication system is employed on Campus for emergency notication purposes. The system provides audio messages to indoor and outdoor speakers. Speakers or telephones are installed in most academic classrooms and other areas depending on size of the room/area. Outdoor speakers are mounted in selected high-trac pedestrian areas, such as the Plaza of the Americas and Reitz Lawn. The same system provides an audio and text message to most VOIP telephones located throughout campus such as in classroom and oce areas. Interests outside the University Individuals who are not a student or employee, such as parents of students and local community members, can access emergency notications through several resources. Most notably, the UF homepage is available to anyone with internet access and will post emergency notications. Information is also provided to the local media and normally broadcast by area news outlets including television, radio and newspaper. Information is also provided on the UF Alert ocial Facebook page (www.facebook.com/ ufalert) and Twitter account (www.twitter.com/ ufalert). Individuals can also call UFs rumor control number, staed by University Relations, for updated information at 866-UF FACTS (866-833-2287).Test and Exercises The Clery Act requires that the university conduct at least one test of its emergency notication system each year. This test will be conducted in the fall semester, whereby the University of Florida will send a coordinated test message through the campus-wide systems UF homepage, text messaging, e-mail and VOIP nbtb

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ntbf mass notication. The university will also conduct a test of the system in the spring semester unless an actual emergency notication occurred during the semester that required the activation of the systems. These tests will evaluate emergency notication procedures and performance of the various systems. In connection with these tests, the university will publicize the emergency response and evacuation procedures to the campus community. Information on the Universitys emergency notication systems are available on the Environmental Health & Safetys website (EH&S) http://www.ehs.u.edu/disasterplan/Emergency_ Notications.htm. Records of each test will be maintained by EH&S and include a description of the test, date and time of the test, and whether the test was announced or unannounced. Additionally, drills are regularly conducted by the university police to test procedural operations and functionality of the notication systems. Timely Warnings In compliance with the Clery Act the University of Florida also provides timely warnings to students, sta, and faculty in an eort to communicate prevention strategies or basic safety information about crimes or activities reported to campus security authorities, local police agencies, or UFPD, that are considered to be a threat to public safety but do not require emergency notications. In serious situations where imminent threat exists, an emergency notication will be issued and a timely warning may not be necessary. A timely warning may however serve as a follow-up to an emergency notication. Though timely warnings are not intended to be emergency notications, they will be issued in a timely manner. Though pastoral and counselor sta are encouraged to advise victims of crime to report potential issues that may lead to a timely warning, there is no requirement that they do so. Consequently, if information that could lead to a timely warning is provided to a pastoral or counselor member, it may not be information shared with UFPD and a timely warning may not be issued. Timely warnings are intended to promote safety and enable members of the campus community to protect themselves. Timely warnings will include information about the crime or incident that led to the necessity of the warning, and also related prevention information. Timely warnings are issued to the campus community in a manner designed to get the word out quickly. At present, timely warnings are issued through the same blast e-mail system described previously in discussing emergency notications, as well as posted on the UFPD website and notications sent to local media outlets. As indicated in the Clery Act, timely warnings must be issued for specic crimes, if (1) the crime is reported to campus security authorities, (2) the crime is determined to pose a serious or continuing threat to UF students, sta, faculty, or visitors, and (3) the crime occurred on campus, in or on non-campus buildings or property owned by UF, or on public property that is within the campus or immediately adjacent to campus. Crimes that may necessitate the issuance of timely warning include: manslaughter) tions, and illegal weapons possession that the victim was intentionally selected because of the victim's actual or perceived race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, ethnicity, or disability vandalism of property, or A timely warning may also be issued for incidents/activities to include: Investigations of a series of car thefts in a certain area Unsolved burglaries A pattern of drug dealings or activities that puts students, sta, or faculty at risk Prevention notices, etc. nbtb

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nf rbbbr The University of Florida views the safety of the students residing in residential housing as a foremost concern. In pursuit of this and in an eort to inform the university community, a summary of the Universitys policy regarding missing residential students is provided below. The complete Policy and Procedures can be viewed on the web link: http://www.police.u.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/M issing-Residential-Student-Policy.pdf. Report of a Potential M issing Residential Student: In situations where one believes a residential student may be missing, time is of the essence. One should never delay in reporting a residential student they believe is missing. The State of Florida does not require that someone be missing for more than 24 hours before a missing person report and procedures can be initiated. Therefore, the Univer sity of Florida Police Department (UFPD) strongly encourages anyone who believes another person is missing to call our department at (352) 392-1111 immediately. If information about a potential missing residential student is received by the Director of Housing and Residence Education or the Dean of Students, eorts will immediately be undertaken to determine the students whereabouts. As soon as the circumstances dictate, and no later than 24-hours from the time a person was believed to be missing, the Director of Housing and Residence Education or the Dean of Students will contact the UFPD at (352) 392-1111 and provide information that the residential student might be missing. Any other member of the University community (e.g., faculty, sta, or students) who is concerned that a residential student may be missing is also encour aged to contact the UFPD to report their concerns as well. tttOFFICIAL NOTIFICATION PROCEDURESThe procedures below are the steps to be followed in implementing the Residential Missing Student Policy. 1. Registering Emergency Contact Information: All UF students have the ability to provide emergency contact information in the Integrated Student Information System (ISIS). Once logged into ISIS, students can open the "My Record" tab and select "Update Emergency Contact Info." All emergency contact information is condential and will only be accessed by authorized University ocials on a need-to-know basis. 2. Initial Inquiry: If the Director of Housing and Residence Education or the Dean of Students has reason to believe that a residential student may be missing, they will undertake an initial inquiry. These eorts may include, but are not limited to, checking the student's room, class schedule, friends, locating the student's vehicle, and calling a cell phone number. They will report the matter to the University Police Department as quickly as possible based on the facts and circumstances. If the University of Florida Police Department receives information that a residential student is potentially missing, it will undertake an initial inquiry to determine whether the residential student is missing. The University Police Department will contact the Emergency Dean to inform sta members about the fact that a residential student may be missing and to coordinate eorts. The University Police Department will be responsible for making the determination whether the residential student is missing. An ocial missing person report relating to a missing student should be referred immediately to the University of Florida Police Department. 3. Determination that a Residential Student is Missing: Once the University Police Department makes a determination that a residential student is missing, the following steps will be taken as soon as possible but no later than 24 hours from the deter mination. These steps may be done concurrently or one after the other. a. The University Police Department will complete a report and enter information into the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) and Florida Crime Information Center (FCIC) systems. b. The University Police Department will notify the missing residential students emergency contact that the student is missing. If the missing residential student is under 18 years of age and has not been emancipated, the University Police Depart ment will notify the custodial parent or guardian in addition to the student's emergency contact. c. The University Police Department, working closely with the Dean of Students and the Director of Housing and Residence Education, will make contact and will keep all applicable parties informed during the course of the investigation until the matter is closed.REASON FOR POLICY To ensure the safe and speedy return of any missing University of Florida residential student.RELATED INFORM ATION Higher Education Opportunity Act, Pub. L. 110-315, 488(g) 34 C.F.R. 668.46(h) Fla. Stat. 743.015 Fla. Stat. 937.021 Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to End the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003, Pub. L. 108-21, 204

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ntbf Crime statistics are provided in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, are for your information. These statistics are compiled and released annually by the University of Florida Police Depart ment. The totals you see below represent the compilation of all designated Clery Act crimes reported to campus law enforcement ocials and Campus Security Authorities (CSAs). For Clery Act reporting purposes, CSAs are University of Florida ocials who have signicant responsibility for student and campus activities, including, but not limited to, student activities, student housing, student athletics, and student judicial and discipline proceedings. Specically, UF has identied the following functionaries as CSAs: CRIMETo ensure that all designated CSAs are knowledgeable of Clery Act reporting requirements, CSAs of the University of Florida are sent an email advisory each fall and spring semester detailing the requirement that they provide to the UFPD any information brought to their attention regarding any Clery Act reportable crime. Please note that under the guidelines of the Clery Act, this information can be brought to the attention of the CSA by a victim, witness, other third party or even the oender; and regardless of whether or not the individuals involved in the crime, or reporting the crime, are associated with the institution. If the CSA receives the crime information and believes it was provided in good faith, the CSA is required to report that information to UFPD. In good faith means there is a reasonable basis for believing that the information is not simply rumor or hearsay. That is, there is little or no reason to doubt the validity of the information. Exempt from CSA reporting requirements are pastoral and professional counselors. A pastoral counselor is an individual associated with a religious order or denomination, is recognized by that religious order or denomination as someone who provides condential counseling, and is functioning within the scope of that recognition as a pastoral counselor. A professional counselor is a person whose ocial responsibilities include providing mental health counseling to members of the institutions community and who is functioning within the scope of his or her license or certication. This denition applies even to professional counselors who are not employees of the institution, but are under contract to provide counseling at the institution. Despite this exemption, UF aliated pastoral and professional counselors are encouraged to discuss with clients, if applicable, the procedures for condential crime reporting within the University of Florida. The statistics provided below also include Clery Act crime report data received from other law enforcement agencies with jurisdiction in geographical areas outside of the main campus where the University of Florida owns, leases, or controls property where signicant student activity occurs. In order to comply with this portion of the statistical reporting requirement, the UFPD completes an annual process of property identication, determination of law enforcement jurisdiction, request for Clery Act crime statistics from appropriate law enforcement agencies, and follow-up contact to ensure a reasonable, good-faith eort is completed in the collection of required statistics. This same process is also conducted with the local law enforcement agency that has jurisdictional control over public areas adjoining the University of Florida. The crime statistics reported are broken down geographically according to the following catego ries: Total Campus (Total) and Campus Residential (Res); Non-campus Building or Property; and Public Property. The following denitions apply to these geographic categories: Campus: (1) Any building or property owned or controlled by an institution within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area and used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the institutions educational purposes, including residence halls; and (2) Any building or property that is within or reasonably contiguous to the area identied in paragraph (1) of this denition, that is owned by the institution but controlled by another person, is frequently used by students, and supports institutional purposes (such as a food or other retail vendor). N on-campus building or property: (1) Any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is ocially recognized by the institution; or (2) Any building or property owned or controlled by an institution that is used in direct support of, or in relation to, the institutions educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution. Public property: All public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities, that is within the campus, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.

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nf nbMurder The willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another. N egligent M anslaughter The killing of another person through gross negligence. Forcible Sex Oenses Any sexual act directed against another person, forcibly and/or against that persons will; or not forcibly or against the persons will where the victim is incapable of giving consent. Forcible sex oenses include: Forcible Rape The carnal knowledge of a person, forcibly and/or against the persons will; or not forcibly or against the persons will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/ her temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity (or because of his/her youth). Forcible Sodomy Oral or anal sexual intercourse with another person, forcibly and/or against that persons will; or not forcibly or against the persons will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her youth or because of his/ her temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity. Sexual Assault with an Object The use of an object or instrument to unlawfully penetrate, however slight, the genital or anal opening of the body of another person, forcibly and/or against that persons will; or not forcibly or against the persons will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her youth or because of his/ her temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity. Forcible Fondling The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratication, forcibly and/or against the persons will; or not forcibly or against the persons will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her youth or because of his/ her temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity. N on-forcible Sex Oenses Unlawful, nonforcible sexual intercourse. Non-forcible sex oenses include: Incest Non-forcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law. Statutory Rape Non-forcible sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent. Robbery The taking, or attempting to take, anything of value under confrontational circumstances from the control, custody, or care of another person by force or threat of force or violence, and/or by putting the victim in fear. Aggravated Assault An unlawful attack by one person upon another where either the oender displays a weapon, or the victim suers obvious severe or aggravated bodily injury involving apparent broken bones, loss of teeth, possible internal injury, severe laceration, or loss of consciousness. Burglary The unlawful entry into a building or other structure with the intent to commit a felony or a theft. M otor Vehicle Theft The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle. Arson To unlawfully and intentionally damage, or attempt to damage, any real or personal property by re or incendiary device. Liquor Law Violations The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, or use of intoxicating alcoholic beverages. Drug Related Violations (Sale and Possession) The unlawful cultivation, manufacture, distribution, sale, purchase, possession, transportation, or importation of any controlled drug or narcotic substance; or, the unlawful manufacture, sale, purchase, possession, or transportation of equipment or devices used for preparing and/or taking drugs or narcotics (drug paraphernalia). Weapon Law Violations The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, or use of rearms, cutting instruments, explosives, incendiary devices, or other deadly weapons. A hate crime is considered a criminal oense committed against a person or property which is motivated, in whole or in part, by the oenders bias. Bias is a preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons based on their race, gender, religion, disability, sexual orientation or ethnicity/national origin. Although there are many possible categories of bias, under the Clery Act, only the following six categories are reported: A preformed negative attitude toward a group of persons who possess common physical characteristics (e.g., color of skin, eyes, and/or hair; facial features, etc.) genetically transmitted by descent and heredity, which distinguish them as a distinct division of humankind (e.g., Asians, blacks, whites). A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons because those persons are male or female. A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons who share the same religious beliefs regarding the origin and purpose of the universe and the existence or nonexistence of a supreme being (e.g., Catholics, Jews, Protestants, atheists). A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons based on their sexual attraction toward, and responsiveness to, members of their own sex or members of the opposite sex (e.g., gays, lesbians, heterosexuals). A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons of the same race or national origin who share common or similar traits, languages, customs and traditions (e.g., Arabs, Hispanics). A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons based on their physical or mental impairments/challenges, whether such disability is temporary or permanent, congenital or acquired by heredity, accident, injury, advanced age or illness. In conjunction with the Clery Act, hate crimes include any of the following oenses that are motivated by bias:

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ntbf rffntb rffntb rfnb rfntb rff f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f ntnrbf f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f ft f f f r r ft f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f rf bbfnnnrt f f rfbtnf r f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f r f ft r f r f f f f r Hate Crimes (by prejudices) n f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f tb f f f f f f f rntfn f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f nt f f f f f f f f f f f f f f fNumber of Arrests/Referrals Select Offensesrff rff rf rff rff rf rff rff rf rff rff rf Liquor Law Violations f f r r r rr t r rf f f f f r r Drug Law Violations f f f f f t r f f f f rf Weapons Law Violations f f f f f f f t f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f All statistical information provided below is designed to assist those viewing the information in making an assessment of the level of Clery Act crime occurring within/on University of Florida geographical areas. rfnf nbThe University of Florida Police Department maintains a daily Crime Log that records, by the date reported, all crime that occurs: The Crime Log has information detailing the agency that responded to the crime, the UFPD report number of the incident, the report date/time, type of crime, the date/time of the crime, the location of the crime, and the disposition of the crime. Crime Log information is posted within two business days of UFPD receiving the initial report or additional information of a crime. For the purpose of the Crime Log, a business day is any day Monday through Friday, except for days when the institution is closed. Crime information can only be withheld from the Crime Log if, in the opinion of UFPD, it would jeopardize an ongoing criminal investigation, cause a suspect to ee or evade detection, or result in destruction of evidence. The UFPD must however disclose and update the crime log information once those issues are no longer a concern. The Crime Log, which contains mandated information dating back to January 1, 2004, including the most recent 60-day period, is open to public inspection anytime at http://www.police.u.edu/wp-content/asp/ crimelog/default.asp or by contacting the UFPD Public Information Ocer at (352) 273-3309 during normal business hours. If you are interested in reviewing a searchable map of crimes that occur on the University of Florida campus, please use the Crime Reports icon below.

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nf b Resources for the university community in the areas of crime prevention and personal safety education are available from a variety of sources, including the Dean of Students Oce, the Student Health Care Center, and the University of Florida Police Department (UFPD). In 1976, the UFPD established the Community Services Division, a specialized unit to help the department in carrying out its responsibilities for crime prevention and personal safety within the university community. The Community Services Division directs its eorts toward reducing criminal opportunity through the development and implementation of educational programs and activities. Special emphasis is placed on personal safety and every student, sta, faculty member, or visitor is encouraged to take a responsible and proactive approach to their own personal safety and security. The ultimate goal of these programs is to make the university environment as safe and crime-free as possible by raising the level of awareness of individuals and promoting willingness to assume individual responsibility in reducing opportunities for crime to occur. A description of the various programs and services is provided below. If you would like to receive more information about crime prevention programs, please visit the University of Florida Police Department website at: http:// www.police.u.edu/ or call the Community Services Division at (352) 392-1409.UFPD K-9 TeamThe UFPD has responded to the need for increased security precautions on campus and at special events that take place on campus with the formation of a K-9 Unit. The K-9 Unit consists of Sergeant Matt Davis with his K-9 partner Gator and Ocer Henri Belleville with his K-9 partner Rocky. Sergeant Davis has been with UFPDs Patrol Division since 2001 and Gator is a ve-year-old pedigree German Shepherd. Ocer Henri Belleville has been with the University of Florida Police Department since 2005 and Rocky is a two-year-old pedigree German Shepherd. Both Gator and Rocky are imported from Europe and are specially trained and certied in the search and detection of explosive devices. Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention ProgramsThe university oers a number of education programs and resources available to everyone in the university community. These programs include presentations, information, and literature promot ing responsible decision-making concerning the use of alcohol and drugs. These programs are presented on a continuing basis through Gatorwell Health Promotion Services, Dean of Students Oce, Department of Housing and Residence Education, Interfraternity and Panhellenic Councils, and the University of Florida Police Department. The University Counseling and Wellness Center is located on campus at 3190 Radio Road. Individual appointments and group sessions are available for students who want assistance with alcohol and drug use issues. All services are provided free to registered students and are completely condential. Please call (352) 392-1575 for additional information or to schedule an appointment. Gatorwell Health Promotion Services has many locations on campus, but the main oce is in the Counseling and Wellness Center. Gatorwell oers condential screening assessments for alcohol and drug use and referrals to campus and community agencies for recovery assistance. Brochures, fact tn rThe Community Services Divisions Crime Prevention Resource Center is a fantastic source for a myriad of literature on various topics of crime prevention. Also, anyone can receive personal counseling on crime prevention and self-defense tactics from an ocer in the division.Orientation ProgramsThe University of Florida Police Department par ticipates in the Dean of Students Oces new student orientation program called Preview. Preview presentations are provided for all new freshman and transfer students. A police ocer provides an overview of safety and security programs, safety policies, as well as safety tips and resources. A police department victim advocate provides information on victimization issues and assistance provided by the Oce of Victim Services. Preview presentations provide students with the information they need to make informed decisions about the choices they will face while helping them learn how to reduce their risk of becoming a victim of crime. The University of Florida Police Department also participates in the Human Resources NEO program. A police ocer provides an overview of safety and security programs, safety policies, and safety tips, as well as resources for additional information at each of the several sessions held each month. Both Preview and NEO provide opportunities to learn about security programs, safety policies, and resources available, and both programs emphasize the importance of personal responsibility in the control of crime.

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ntbf sheets, posters, videos, CD-ROMs, and other educational materials are available to all students. Gator well sta also provides educational programming to campus organizations and residence halls as requested. Gatorwell works collaboratively with the Dean of Students Oce to address alcohol, drug use, and other related issues. For more information, view the Gatowell website on-line at http://gator well.ufsa.u.edu/ or call (352) 273-4450. The University of Florida Police Department Community Services Division oers educational programs, presentations, and literature promoting responsible decision-making and providing education on the legal consequences of alcohol and drug use. The resource center maintained in the Community Services Division contains an excellent supply of brochures, posters, and other printed materials about this subject, which are available to the public free of charge. Students should take time to familiarize themselves with the University of Florida Alcohol Policy, which is available on-line at http:// www.ufsa.u.edu/faculty_sta/committees/ alcohol_drug_education/uf_alchohol_policy. Please call (352) 392-1409 for further information. The University of Florida is committed to promoting a healthy and safe environment for all UF students. UF encourages all students to make responsible decisions and seek medical attention in serious or life-threatening situations that result from alcohol and/or other drug abuse. Because students may be hesitant to seek help in the case of an alcohol or other drug related emergency, UF created a Medical Amnesty Policy (MAP). Under this policy, the person calling for help and the person in crisis will not be referred for Student Code of Conduct violations regarding the alcohol or drug use. MAP incidents will not be entered on the students ocial academic record either. Although law enforcement agencies still have the right to enforce the law, UF encourages students to make responsible decisions in seeking medical attention. For more information on the amnesty policy, visit http://www.police.u.edu/medical-amnestypolicy/. General questions can be directed to the Counseling and Wellness Center at (352) 392-1575 and questions for student organizations can be directed to the Dean of Students Oce at (352) 392-1261.Personal Safety and Rape Prevention ProgramsPersonal safety is a top priority at the University of Florida. Programs are directed towards educating the university community on personal safety issues, increasing public aware ness, and providing facilities to aid in the prevention of crime. The University of Florida is a pioneer in this area. Informational programs on the issues of date/acquaintance rape, relationship violence, workplace violence, and personal safety are provided on a regular basis. The Community Services Division of the University of Florida Police Department is proud to oer RAD (Rape Aggression Defense) self-defense training to all women of the university community. RAD training focuses on personal safety skills and threat assessment to empower women with the ability to protect themselves in violent situations. For more information, call the Community Services Division at (352) 392-1409. Other organizations that contribute to the success of these programs include the University of Florida Police Departments Oce of Victim Services, University Counseling and Wellness Center, Student Conduct and Conict Resolution, Depart ment of Housing and Residence Education, Student Government and other student organizations, and the Alachua County Victim Services and Rape Crisis Center.University Sponsored Programs for N ew Students and Their ParentsDuring orientation programs such as Preview, Scholars Program, and Minority Orientation, discussion groups are organized with students, parents, and police. The purpose of these groups is to provide newcomers and their parents with impor tant information and literature on personal safety, campus security, available emergency and crime prevention services, and other safety and security issues of concern. Annual Spring Break Safety FairThe University of Florida Police Department, other local law enforcement agencies, and community organizations sponsor an annual pre-Spring Break information fair. The fair provides a fun and informative day for students, encouraging Spring Break safety and compliance with laws and regulations, including beach and alcohol laws. The fair is held on the Reitz Union Colonnade and usually attracts between 10,000 and 12,000 participants.Free Bicycle RegistrationBicycles can be a target for theft on the University of Florida campus. The UFPD oers a free bicycle registration program to help combat this problem. Registration provides an opportunity for instruction in the proper type and use of security devices for bicycle protection, as well as information pertaining to bicycle laws and safety. This service is available at several locations at the beginning of each semester, during regular business hours at the Community Services Division, or at any time at the UFPD Patrol Building Front Desk. Bikes can also be pre-registered on-line at http://www.police. u.edu/. Click on the OPERATION IDENTFICATION link (under Online Personal Property Registration) and complete the provided form. After selecting the non-electronic category, the option to select bicycle equipment is available under the property type drop-down menu. Then bring your bicycle to UFPD to conrm your serial number and receive your decal. Bicycle RodeoThe bicycle rodeo is a childrens program designed to teach safe bike riding techniques, the value of predictability in trac, and the rules of the road. Operation Identication The Community Services Division sponsors Op eration Identication (OP ID), a program promot ing identication of personal property in residence halls, sorority and fraternity houses, family villages, and business and academic oces. During OP ID programs, items of personal property are registered and the participants are provided an opportunity to talk one-on-one with police ocers about security concerns. Ocers can assist in locating serial numbers and MAC addresses on wireless devices as well. The Community Services Division can also register property during regular business hours. As an added convenience, property can be registered online. Any type of property can be registered with the police department on-line at http://www.police. u.edu/. Click on the OPERATION IDENTIFICATION link (under Online Personal Property Registration) and complete the provided form. Multiple items can be registered and you may add to your list at any time by returning to the website. b

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nf Gator Watch Crime Watch Programs Gator Watch Crime Watch programs are available for all members of the community. Students have access through their housing facilities and university employees can attend programs through their work units. Gator Watch Crime Watch programs introduce concepts of personal responsibility and how an individual can positively aect crime by being ob servant and reporting to the police. Basic personal safety and property security principles are also taught. Contact the Community Services Division at (352) 392-1409 for more information or to establish a Gator Watch Crime Watch in your area.Stall StoriesStall Stories is a publication featuring stories about personal safety, crime prevention, and special security issues. Published in cooperation with the Community Services Division, the Department of Housing and Residence Education, and other university departments, Stall Stories are routinely placed on the inside of bathroom stall doors in all residence halls.Voluntary Inspection Program (V.I.P.)The Voluntary Inspection Program was created to encourage apartment complexes and rental properties to practice safety standards known as Community Safety Guidelines. The program is a partnership between local law enforcement agencies, the University of Florida, and the Gainesville Apartment Association. To participate, complexes must volunteer to be inspected by a specially trained law enforcement ocer using the Community Safety Guidelines. If the complex passes inspection, they receive a certicate to display as well as a free listing on the University of Florida Police Department website. If the property where you live has not been inspected, encourage the management to participate in the V.I.P. and help make our community safer for everyone. For additional information about V.I.P., including request forms, the Community Safety Guidelines, and currently certied residential properties, view the UFPD V.I.P. website on-line at http://www. police.u.edu/community-services/voluntaryinspection-program/.Sexual Oender/Predator Registration in Florida The federal Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act requires colleges and universities to issue a statement advising the campus community where state law enforcement agency information concerning registered sex oenders/predators may be obtained. The act also requires registered sex oenders/predators to contact the appropriate state ocials and provide notice of each higher education institute in that state at which the offender/predator is employed, carries on a vocation, or is a student. In accordance with Florida State Statute 775.21 (The Florida Sexual Predators Act) and Florida State Statute 943.0435, convicted sex oenders in Florida must register with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) within 48 hours of establishing permanent or temporary residence. The FDLE makes information concerning the presence of registered sexual oenders/predators available to local law enforcement ocials and the public. It is then the responsibility of the county sheri or the municipal police chief to make required notication to all community members of the presence of predators only (not oenders) in a manner deemed appropriate by the sheri or police chief. It is the responsibility of the county sheri to notify the university if an oender or predator is enrolled, employed, or carrying on a vocation at the university. The UFPD is required to inform members of the campus community where to obtain information about such oenders/predators. Any member of the University of Florida community who wishes to obtain further information regarding sexual oender/predators in our area may refer to the FDLE website at http://www.fdle. state..us/Content/home.aspx, call 1-888-FLPREDATOR (1-888-357-7332), or utilize the FDLE website searchable database at http://oender. fdle.state..us/oender/Search.jsp. The FDLE searchable database may be used to nd all registered sex oenders in any city, county, or zip code in the state. You can also access the FDLE searchable database from the University of Florida Police Department website at http://www.police. u.edu/. You may also contact the UFPD for copies of notications received from the Alachua County Sheris Oce, Department of Corrections, or Florida Department of Law Enforcement. b

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ntbf Personal Safety Tips behavior of the people around you. Follow your intuition; trust your feelings about suspicious situations. Report all suspicious persons or activity to law enforcement. faced with situations in which you do not feel relaxed or in charge. If you feel uncomfortable, act on it. about a person, a situation, and your own feelings and reactions, the safer you will feel. your awareness and your ability to identify and act on your feelings. They also increase the opportunity for victimization. body and no one has the right to force or pressure you to do anything you do not want to do. Remember that cell phones, iPods, and other electronic devices divert your attention from your surroundings and block out environmental sound, which increases your vulnerability. Always avoid shortcuts through wooded areas, parking lots, or alleys. alone, avoid isolated and poorly lit areas. Do not use headphones while biking, jogging, walking, or exercising outdoors. a ride through SNAP at (352) 392-SNAP or online at http://www.snap.u.edu/. You can also call UFPD at (352) 392-1111 for an escort from an ocer.Personal Safety and the InternetThe internet is very much like our society. The majority are people only have the best intentions and behave responsibly. However, there are always potential oenders mixed in the population. Observe the same precautions online that you would in everyday life. Be aware of the possibilities and take the appropriate steps to avoid situations you know or suspect could be dangerous. Below are some basic personal safety tips that you should consider whenever participating in internet communication. social networking sites. Use the additional privacy settings available on the sites to restrict access to your posted information. Regularly check the settings and make updates as necessary. as your home address or telephone number to people you meet online. such as your telephone number, the name of your apartment complex or dorm, or your class schedule on social networking sites. Not everyone is who he or she may seem, and posting your personal information online can increase your risk of victimization. anyone whom you met online, try to verify the persons identity, possibly through a third person whom you know and trust, and verify other information the person provided, such as place of employment or classes the person attends. Online predators thrive on the anonymity of the medium. If the persons identity or other provided information is proven to be false, STOP COMMUNICATION WITH THAT PERSON IMMEDIATELY. tf such a meeting and make it on YOUR terms. Choose a public location that you know well, and tell a friend about the meeting. Arrange your own transportation to and from the meeting. Bring a friend along for security or consider a double date the rst time. Set your conditions for the encounter and dont let the person you are meeting change them. Stay near other people and in well-lit areas throughout the meeting. Keep a cell phone available to you at all times. Note the persons physical description (gender, race, age, height, weight, hair color, clothing, facial hair, scars/marks/tattoos, etc.) in case something goes awry and you need to describe the individual to the police.Reduce Your Risk of Drug-Facilitated Sexual Battery used in drug-facilitated sexual battery (rape) can be slipped into any type of beverage and you will never know because such drugs are colorless, odorless, and tasteless. bartender or server. of friends, arranging beforehand to watch each others drinks. with, seek medical attention immediately and request the hospital conduct toxicology testing.

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nf bb A telephone call is considered obscene or harassing if it is received at a location where you have a reasonable expectation of privacy and the caller makes repeated calls or makes any comment, request, suggestion, or proposal which is obscene, lewd, lascivious, lthy, vulgar, or indecent. If you receive harassing or obscene phone calls: Report obscene or harassing phone calls received on campus to the University of Florida Police Department by calling (352) 392-1111. Report obscene or harassing phone calls received o campus to the Alachua County Combined Communications Center by calling (352) 955-1818. They will connect you with an ocer from the appropriate law enforcement agency. Pay attention to any background noises, the callers sex, accent, speech pattern, or anything else to aid in identication. Keep a log of calls received, including dates, times, and details of the calls. If calls are received on your voicemail or answering machine, save the message(s). Use the *69 service on your telephone. By pressing *69 the telephone number of the last caller is identied. There is a charge of $1.25 per use. When you receive an unwanted telephone call, use this service, document the number in your call log, and provide the number to the police. tf Study/Workplace Safety working or studying late, let others know where you are, what time you plan to return, how to reach you, and what route you will take on the way home. Do not list such information on any social networking sites. are locked. Avoid using stairs in remote sections of a building. Be aware of the loca-tions of the UFPD Emergency Blue Phones. doors, even for a short time. cabinet or drawer. Avoid leaving them on or beneath a desk. unattended, even for a brief period of time. secured facilities. your laptop. This is a free prevention, protection, and recovery program for students, faculty, and sta. To download the software, click on the Front Door Software icon listed on the UFPD home page, which can be viewed on-line at http://www.police.u.edu. other electronic devices with UFPD. This is a free service that you can do on your own using the UFPD website or you can bring your property to the Community Services Division for assistance. law enforcement. or request a ride when youre ready through SNAP at (352) 392-SNAP or on-line at: http:// www.snap.u.edu/. You can also call UFPD at (352) 392-1111 for an escort from an ocer after hours. Residence Security Tips locked at all times. halls. residence hall, apartment, or house. is a safety risk and a violation of housing policy. laundry room, game room, or a neighbors residence, even if just for a few minutes. unattended in the common areas, even for a brief period of time. of forced entry, leave immediately, seek safety, and notify the police by calling 9-1-1. returning home, especially at night. residence in case of re or other emergency. available to your community. law enforcement.

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ntbf tSafety Tips for Vehicle Operators bicycles and pedestrians, overtaking you when making right turns. turn signals. Other trac may not always see you or recognize your intentions. pedestrians, and other trac when turning.Bikes on CampusIn Florida, a bicycle is considered a vehicle when operated on the roadway. As a result, bicycles are subject to the same responsibilities and regulations as motorists. The same nes apply to motorists and bicyclists for trac violations, such as failing to yield to a pedestrian, running a stop sign or red light, going the wrong way on a one way street, or riding on the wrong side of the road. Additionally, there are laws specic to bicycle operators, such as a mandatory white front light and red rear light if the bicycle is being ridden between sunset and sunrise, an allowance for only one person per permanently axed seat, a requirement to keep at least one hand upon the handle bars at all times, and a restriction against wearing more than one ear bud at a time. Bike HelmetsFlorida law requires all people 16 years of age or younger to wear a helmet when riding a bicycle. All cyclists are encouraged to wear a bike helmet for their safety. Serious head injuries can be avoided when bicyclists wear this important piece of safety gear.Bicycle Safety E ducation ProgramThe University of Florida Police Departments Bicycle Safety Education Program is designed to promote a greater awareness of the duties and responsibilities associated with the operation of bicycles in the greater campus trac mix. The goal of the program is to provide members of the university community with a desirable combination of education, encouragement, enforcement, and facilities necessary to gain voluntary acceptance of, and compliance with, bicycle safety standards and the law.M opeds and M otor Scooters on CampusMopeds are considered motor vehicles unless they are being operated solely by human power. When they are under engine power, they cannot be ridden on sidewalks. Motor scooters are also considered motor vehicles and cannot be driven on sidewalks or in bike lanes. Both mopeds and motor scooters are subject to the same laws as all other motor vehicles including running stop signs, failing to yield to pedestrians, and speeding. Florida also has trac laws specic to the operation of motorcycles and mopeds. For example, no person shall operate a motorcycle or moped while carrying anything which prevents the driver from keeping both hands on the handlebars. M otorcycles on CampusAny person operating a motorcycle on campus is subject to the same laws and responsibilities as the driver of any other vehicle. Motorcycle operators are required to have proper driver license endorsements and wear proper protective head gear and eye protection as provided by Florida State Statute 316.211. Any rider choosing not to wear a helmet must be over 21 years of age and carry $10,000 or more of personal injury protection insurance. Furthermore, the operator of a motorcycle shall not overtake and pass in the same lane occupied by the vehicle being overtaken, and no person shall operate a motorcycle between lanes of trac or between adjacent lines or rows of vehicles. Preventing Auto, M otorcycle, and Scooter Theft Dont make your car an easy target for a thief. On average it takes less than 30 seconds to steal a car. Give a thief an inch and he or she will take your car for miles. Here are some tips to make it harder for the thieves: and take the keys. A Gallup poll found that thirty-one percent of us dont always lock our car doors. Twelve percent leave a window cracked open, usually for ventilation, and fourteen percent of us dont always remove our keys. attracted not only by your car, but also its contents. theft deterrent device. steering wheel lock or security alarm. pied, even for just a minute. etched on the car windows. Drop a business card into your door panels. This may make your car more easily identiable to law enforcement in the event that it is stolen and subsequently recovered. by following the recommended security measures indicated by your manufacturer. These vehicles are often taken simply be cause of their lightweight and availability.

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nf Department (UFPD). In the event that your bicycle is lost or stolen, you will have a better chance of it being returned to you if recovered. This is a free service and any UFPD ocer can assist you. steel U type lock. Always lock your bicycle by putting the U-lock through the bikes frame, a wheel, and the rack. This is especially important if your bicycle has quick-release wheels. it next to the rear wheel. Then put the U-lock through both of the wheels, the frame, and the bicycle rack. removed and the frame and remaining wheel can easily be stolen. ground. This will make it harder for a thief to tamper with it and less likely that the mechanism will fail as a result of exposure to the weather. such as a bicycle rack, or leaving it parked in the same place for a long period of time. cut to release the other bicycle, leaving your bicycle unsecured. bicycle. These areas must remain clear at all times and cant be used as a location to secure your bicycle. Pedestrian Right of WayWalking is a primary mode of transportation around the University of Florida, so it is important for pedestrians to remember that they are also subject to trac control signals. While vehicles must yield to pedestrians in a clearly marked crosswalk or intersection, pedestrians must yield to vehicles when crossing anywhere else. Even though vehicles are required to yield, always remember to make eye contact with the driver before proceeding into the path of an oncoming vehicle.Trac Safety WeekEach fall and spring semester, the University of Florida Police Departments Community Services Division hosts Trac Safety Week by providing information to the university community about trac safety. During Trac Safety Week, information is sent to students, sta, and faculty via various electronic media to help promote trac and pedestrian safety both on and o campus. This information is contained primarily within the Headlight on Trac brochure which informs community members about trac safety items of interest as well as other helpful information. Internet Based Information Regarding Trac SafetyInformation pertaining to Florida trac laws can be viewed on-line at: http://www.senate.gov/Laws/Statutes/2011/Chapter316. Information detailing the cost of nes for trac violations, including bicycle/pedestrian violations and motor vehicle violations in Alachua County, can be found on-line at the Alachua County Clerk of the Court website at: http://www.alachuacounty.us/depts/clerk/trac%20 citations/pages/trac-nes.aspx. For more information about trac safety and laws, visit the University of Florida Police Department Community Services Division website at: http://www.police.u.edu/community-services/ or call (352) 392-1409.t

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ntbf tff http://www.police.u.edu/community-services/student-nighttime-auxiliary-patrol-snap/ Student N ighttime Auxiliary Patrol (SNAP)SNAP is a free, nightly, campus point-to-point, safety and transportation service co-sponsored by Student Traffic Court, Student Government, and the University of Florida Police Department. All SNAP employees are University of Florida students who have passed a stringent background check and driving test. Employees are equipped with a police radio and picture ID, and their communications and activities are monitored by the University of Florida Police Department. SNAP is available when classes are in session during the fall and spring semesters from 6:30 p.m. until 3:00 a.m. nightly. During the summer, SNAP operates from 8:30 p.m. until 3:00 a.m. nightly. SNAP escorts are available by calling (352) 392-SNAP, or by using the smart phone app, which is available on the University of Florida Police Depart ments home page at: http://www.police.ufl.edu/. University police officers are available to provide escorts after SNAPs regular hours by calling (352) 392-1111.Gainesville Regional Transit System (RTS)The Gainesville RTS is a public commuter bus service that provides transportation to locations throughout Gainesville, the University of Florida, and portions of Alachua County. Designated students, faculty, and staff have access to RTS fixed-route services upon presentation of a Gator 1 ID card. For more information on route times and locations call (352) 334-2600 or visit the RTS on-line at: http://go-rts.com/. Gator Lift Service This service provides on-campus transportation for students, faculty, and staff with temporary or permanent disabilities. The buses are equipped for wheelchairs and have steps for easy access. The Gator Lift Van operates from 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. For daytime service call (352) 494-2305. For more information on the Gator Lift Van, service please call (352) 392-7275 or visit on-line at: http:// www.parking.ufl.edu/subpages/gatorlift.html. Transportation and Parking Services (TAPS)TAPS supervises the operation of a shuttle bus, which pro vides transportation to various locations within the university campus. TAPS also provides point-to-point transportation through Campus Cab for UF faculty and staff on the Main Campus, East Campus, and some UF facilities in Alachua County. For more information on either service call (352) 392PARK or visit the TAPS on-line at: http://www.parking.ufl.edu/. Shands External TransportationFree medical center shuttle service is provided for patients, visitors, and staff, Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. External transportation operates three shuttle services incorporating nine shuttle buses on five predeter mined routes. For more information on available shuttle buses, visit the Health Science Center Parking and Shuttle Information site on-line at: http://www.health.ufl.edu/ contact_us_Parking.shtml. The Visitor Parking Shuttle operates 7:00 a.m. to 9:15 p.m. and provides transportation to and from the West Visitor Parking Garage (Garage 3), Shands Main Entrance, and the West Dental Entrance. The Cancer Center Shuttle operates 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., providing transportation to and from the Cancer Center, Childrens Medical Services (Gerold L. Schiebler Building), Hope Lodge, Ronald McDonald House, 1329 Building, and Shands Main Entrance. The Shands Vans (employee shuttles) operate 6:30 a.m. to 12:30 a.m. daily, providing transportation to and from the Archer Road Commuter Lot, Renal Dialysis, Blue 1 Garage IX (Archer Rd.), Shands Main Entrance, and the 1329 Building. In addition to regular stops, the Shands Vans respond to all other stops on request when the other shuttle services are on or off line. http://www.snap.u.edu

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nf On-Campus Housing SecurityThe Department of Housing and Residence Education security programs exist to support the University of Floridas educational mission. The safety and security of residents' property are shared responsibilities of residents and the University of Florida. The Department of Housing and Residence Education provides security programs, but cannot guarantee personal and property safety. The department increases resident safety by providing services including security stang, safety-related facilities review, and educational programming. Residence halls and entrances to student living areas are locked 24 hours per day and are restricted to residents and their guests. Access to these facilities is controlled by either card access or key control. If maintenance personnel are required to assist in repairing housing facilities, the maintenance will be performed with the permission of the resident and he/she will be present when the repairs are to be conducted. The only exception will be granted in times of emergent need when repairs are essential to prevent potential or further destruction of property or when hazardous condition may result. Residents and guests are required to conform to visitation hours, all residence hall rules and regulations, as well as all city ordinances and state and federal laws. Reported crimes occurring on campus are handled the same as those occurring in the city of Gainesville, Alachua County, and your home town. Additionally, if an alleged perpetrator is a student, the perpetrator also risks disciplinary action by the university through the university conduct process. Civil, criminal, and/or university action against alleged perpetrators can occur individually, concurrently, or sequentially. Security upgrades to facilities are reviewed on a continuing basis and changes are adopted whenever necessary to improve safety measures. Keys to facilities are regularly inventoried and a key control policy by Department of Housing and Residence Education sta is in place. Building and room locks are changed on a routine basis, and exterior doors to graduate and family housing apartments, which include dead bolt locks, are changed at the time a tenant moves out in preparation for a new tenant. These locks can also be changed immediately upon request if a key is lost and a tenant believes facility security has been potentially compromised. Housing Security Stang Internal Sta All residence hall sta members monitor both internal and external security at all residence halls. Live-in residence hall sta members are trained to respond to safety and security concerns and to pro vide support and appropriate referrals to any victim of crime. Live-in sta includes Resident Assistants, Graduate Hall Directors, Residence Life Coordinators, and Residence Directors. Additionally, uniformed maintenance and custodial sta members have been trained to report all suspicious activities or persons they might see as they complete their routine duties in residential living areas. The Department of Housing and Residence Education also maintains ten Residence Fraternity and Sorority Security ProgramsFraternity and sorority house residents are free to determine what level of security they feel is necessary for their respective houses. To assist them, however, interior and exterior premise security surveys are conducted on an annual basis by the University of Florida Police Department, and recommendations are submitted to the appropriate house ocial and to the Dean of Students Oce. The University of Florida Police Department also oers residents educational programs on personal safety and property security, as well as other topics of concern. At the end of the spring semester contact is made with each sorority and fraternity to assist with security of unoccupied houses during the summer break.Sorority Row SecurityA uniformed police ocer is stationed nightly on patrol in the Sorority Row area to provide for the safety of sorority members. The Sorority Row ocer maintains close working relationships with the House Directors of the various sororities in an eort to keep sorority members informed and educated on security issues pertinent to their area. The ocer will provide escorts as requested and is always ready to help with security concerns of any kind.Access to University FacilitiesIn the interest of students, sta, and faculty of the University of Florida, campus facilities are continuously maintained and all necessary security provisions are provided. Many cultural and athletic events held in university facilities are open to the public. Other facilities, such as the bookstore, libraries, and cafeterias, are likewise open to the public. Access to academic and administrative facilities on campus is generally limited to students, employees, and visitors for the purpose of study, work, teaching, and conducting other university business. All buildings are locked and opened by designated personnel based upon predetermined scheduling as the facility is required to meet the needs of the University of Florida. While most academic and support buildings are opened during the normal business day, this schedule may change from semester to semester and/or as directed by each building occupant. Landscaping and LightingLandscaping and outdoor campus lighting are designed with safety and security in mind and utilized in an eort to provide pedestrians peace of mind. The University of Florida has a comprehensive campus lighting program that is constantly monitored and updated as needed. The more heavily traveled walkways on campus are well-lighted and equipped with emergency telephones to promote and enhance personal safety, especially during nighttime hours. Those areas of campus that are traveled by foot during daytime hours, but are impossible to light for nighttime travel, are posted with signage to discourage use after dark. Pedestrians and bicyclists should travel well-lit pathways, and not take unlit short cuts that could jeopardize their safety. Hall Information Desks that are staed 24 hours per day. Information Desk sta provides assistance or referral services to residents who call or stop by the area desks. The University of Florida Police Department and Housing Security provide security for the graduate and family housing through regular car and foot patrols. Live-in sta includes Resident Directors, Resident Managers, and Assistant Resident Managers.External StaThe Department of Housing and Residence Education security dispatcher is trained to respond to all requests from residents and sta by dispatching the appropriate sta or agencies. Housing Security Assistants and Security Shift Leads provide external security at single student residence halls. These security assistants are radio dispatched and patrol single student residence halls on foot and by vehicle from 10 p.m. to 4 a.m.The Security Assistants primary duties include:1. Securing entrances 2. Safety and security patrols of bike racks, parking lots, commons areas, and the facilities/grounds 3. Watching for and reporting suspicious activities Security Assistants are student employees hired, trained, and supervised by a full-time Department of Housing and Residence Education administrator. In addition to the security services provided by residence hall security sta, the Department of Housing and Residence Education promotes crime prevention and personal safety through educational programming. Numerous services, workshops, and publications are available to residents of single student housing areas as well as graduate and family housing residents, with each program being designed to meet the needs of the specic residential area. For more information about University of Florida Department of Housing and Residence Education security programs, call (352) 392-2171 (V/TDD).N ighttime Building Security (NTBS)NTBS is a specialized security program staed by department trained and background checked se curity personnel who are used each night to secure the many buildings located in the core of campus. NTBS sta members are equipped with police radios to monitor on-going activity and picture IDs to ensure proper identication when and if questioned. The primary function of NTBS personnel is to ensure that these buildings are properly secured after-hours or as requested. In addition to providing building security, this program enhances the per sonal safety of students, faculty, and sta working in academic buildings after hours by providing law enforcement with more eyes on the streets and around our buildings.n

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ntbf nfb frO-campus apartment complexes, townhome/condominium communities, and other multi-family dwellings pose unique problems. Because of the temporary nature of many residents of rent/lease properties, you need to make an extra eort to be aware of your environment. This includes knowledge of what measures your landlord has taken on behalf of your safety. The Voluntary Inspection Program (VIP) is intended to provide prospective renters with information on residential rental properties and units that have voluntarily agreed to be inspected on the basis of the Community Safety Guidelines. These guidelines were developed through the combined eorts of the Gainesville Apartment Association, Alachua County Sheris Oce, Gainesville Police Department, University of Florida Student Government, and the University of Florida Police Department. Residential rental property owners voluntarily request inspections under this program, and only a limited number of rental units are inspected at any one site. Apartment inspections are conducted by specially trained law enforcement ocers from one of the following agencies: the University of Florida Police Department, the Gainesville Police Department, the Alachua County Sheris Oce, or the Santa Fe College Police Department. A list of the guidelines used by the inspectors as well as properties inspected and certied according to these guidelines is available on-line at: http://www.police.u.edu/community-services/voluntary-inspectionprogram/. This list is subject to change as properties are certied and decertied. Given that certications are valid for 2 years, please check the list whenever you are considering that information. By participating in the VIP, including the publication of the list, the Univer sity of Florida accepts no responsibility for the safety or any other condition of the properties listed. The University of Florida expressly disclaims giving any guarantees, warranties, or any other representations that the properties are safe or recommended. The university does not approve or recommend to students or others any o-campus rental properties listed. Students living o campus must make their own individual and personal choices with regard to the selection of living accommodations. The S.C.O.P.E. program is designed to provide the traditional principles of community oriented policing to the campus environment, with an emphasis on the campus residential community, for the purpose of achieving a better understanding and working relationship between the University of Florida Police Depart ment, the University of Florida Department of Housing and Residence Education, and the resident students. The goals of the S.C.O.P.E program are: Florida Department of Housing and Residence Education, resident students, and the University of Florida Police Department. members throughout the various housing locations. ing the level of crime on campus and recommend crime prevention methods to lower the level of crime in an area. nel, resident students, and the University of Florida Police Department, thereby increasing the level of trust and understanding of one another. To achieve these goals ocers are assigned to each of the campus residence facilities, where they are expected to interact on a daily basis with residents and residence life sta. S.C.O.P.E. is also available in select administrative and academic buildings across campus. For more information regarding the SCOPE program, please review the website on-line at: http://www.police.u.edu/ patrol-division/student-community-oriented-police-eort/.

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nf br

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ntbf The rst is any instance of open ame or other burning in a place not intended to contain the burning. Some examples are: The second type of re is any instance of open ame or other burning in an uncontrolled manner. Some examples are: For inclusion in this report, the University of Florida will include all res that meet dened guidance regardless of size, cause or whether the re results in injury, death or property damage. nfrbIn October 2009 the Department of Education published nal regulations relating to the Campus Fire Safety Right-to-Know legislation. Beginning October 1, 2010, an institution that maintains any on campus student housing facility must prepare an annual re safety report. The information in this report presents information for facilities managed by UFs Division of Housing and Resident Education and all UF associated fraternities and sororities that maintain a residential structure for the calendar year 2011. (Denition of a re Any instance of open ame or other burning in a place not intended to contain the burning or in an uncontrolled manner and results in physical damage to property or injury/death.)

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nf n nnThe following table (page 2) summarizes re events for the last three years, 2009, 2010 and 2011. Statistics are provided for Campus Housing, Greek Housing and Total Housing. Causes of each re, damages caused by each re, general location of each re, injuries and death resulting from each re. C AMPUS HOUSING GREEK HOUSING T OTAL HOUSING 2009 2010 2011 2009 2010 2011 2009 2010 2011 Causes of Fires Electrical 0 0 0 2 1 1 2 1 1 Cooking 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 1 3 Smoking 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 Candles 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Arson 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Fires Reported 0 1 3 2 2 1 2 3 4 Injuries 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 Deaths 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Property Damage $0 $100 $1,500 $13,300 $1,550 $2,000 $13,300 $1,650 $3,500 SOURCE OF 2011 FIRES (Campus) -Grease Fire Yulee Hall 2/20/11 $1,500 (Campus) -Grease Fire Lakeside 3/21/11 $0 (Campus) -Grease Fire Beaty Towers 2/8/11 $0 (Greek) -Fire alarm panel short ed Chi Omega 8/20/11 $2,000

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ntbf C AMPUS HOUSING GREEK HOUSING T OTAL HOUSING 2009 2010 2011 2009 2010 2011 2009 2010 2011 SOURCE OF 2010 FIRES (Campus) Grease Fire Beaty Towers 9/10/10 $100 (Greek) HVAC fan motor burned up Alpha Chi Omega 3/13/10 $1,500 (Greek) Futon mattress caught re with Hooka pipe Sigma Chi 11/17/10 $50 SOURCE OF 2009 FIRES (Campus) -No activity to report (Greek) HVAC fan motor burned up Alpha Epsilon Phi 2/1/09 $13,000 (Greek) Bathroom exhaust fan seized up and shorted out Phi Delta Theta 8/26/09 $300 Disclosure of Fire Safety Standards and M easures: DOHRE Responses Description of each campus student housing facility re safety and sprinkler system. rnfbFacility Year Built % Space Sprinkled Fire Alarm Systems Total Sq. Foot age Sq. Ft. Sprinkled Ground Floor Sq.ft. Total Floors Sprinkler Date BROWARD /YULEE AREA Broward Hall 11 1954 0.00% yes 159,100 0 9,680 6 2014 Rawlings Hall 553 1958 0.00% yes 82,930 0 12,620 5 2016 Reid Hall 20 1939 100.00% yes 42,400 42,400 8,480 5 2005 Yulee Hall 39 1950 100.00% yes 43,350 43,350 8,670 5 2007 Mallory Hall 41 1950 100.00% yes 43,350 43,350 8,670 5 2006 GREATER T OLBERT AREA Tolbert Hall 45 1950 100.00% yes 54,300 54,300 8,320 6 2006 North Hall 50 1950 100.00% yes 36,600 36,600 9,150 4 2005 Riker Hall 52 1950 100.00% yes 43,440 43,440 3,730 6 2004 East Hall 592 1961 100.00% yes 44,230 44,230 8,846 4 2008 Weaver Hall 53 1950 100.00% yes 46,840 46,840 9,368 5 2012 L AKESIDE/SPRINGS /KEYS Keys Complex 1002 1989 100.00% yes 13,450 13,450 4,483 3 2007 Keys Complex 1003 1989 100.00% yes 13,450 13,450 4,483 3 2008n

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nf Facility Year Built % Space Sprinkled Fire Alarm Systems Total Sq. Foot age Sq. Ft. Sprinkled Ground Floor Sq.ft. Total Floors Sprinkler Date Keys Complex 1004 1989 100.00% yes 13,450 13,450 4,483 3 2009 Keys Complex 1005 1989 100.00% yes 13,450 13,450 4,483 3 2010 Keys Complex 1006 1989 100.00% yes 13,450 13,450 4,483 3 2011 Keys Complex 1007 1989 100.00% yes 13,450 13,450 4,483 3 2012 Keys Complex 1008 1989 0.00% yes 13,450 0 4,483 3 2014 Keys Complex 1009 1989 0.00% yes 13,450 0 4,483 3 2015 Keys Complex 1010 1989 0.00% yes 13,450 0 4,483 3 2016 Springs Complex 1081 1995 100.00% yes 18,550 18,550 4,638 4 1995 Springs Complex 1082 1995 100.00% yes 18,550 18,550 4,638 4 1995 Springs Complex 1083 1995 100.00% yes 18,550 18,550 4,638 4 1995 Springs Complex 1084 1995 100.00% yes 18,550 18,550 4,638 4 1995 Springs Complex 1085 1995 100.00% yes 18,550 18,550 4,638 4 1995 Springs Complex 1086 1995 100.00% yes 18,550 18,550 4,638 4 1995 Lakeside Complex 1181 2000 100.00% yes 30,255 30,255 10,085 3 2000 Lakeside Complex 1182 2000 100.00% yes 30,255 30,255 10,085 3 2000 Lakeside Complex 1183 2000 100.00% yes 30,255 30,255 10,085 3 2000 Lakeside Complex 1184 2000 100.00% yes 40,360 40,360 10,085 4 2000 Lakeside Complex 1185 2000 100.00% yes 40,360 40,360 10,085 4 2000 Lakeside Complex 1186 2000 100.00% yes 2,565 2,565 2,565 1 2002 BEATY /JENNINGS AREA Beaty Towers 750 1967 100.00% yes 82,810 82,810 5,915 14 1998 Beaty Towers 751 1967 100.00% yes 76,950 76,950 5,915 13 1999 Jennings Hall 593 & 595 1961 100.00% yes 108,920 108,920 18,820 5 2010 GRAHAM/HUME AREA Graham Hall 591 1961 0.00% yes 39,800 0 7,960 5 2016 Simpson Hall 590 1961 0.00% yes 38,930 0 7,786 5 2019 Trusler Hall 588 1961 0.00% yes 40,540 0 8,108 5 2020 Hume Hall 575 2002 100.00% yes 75,973 75,973 9,520 5 2002 Hume Hall 574 2002 100.00% yes 3,708 3,708 3,708 1 2002 Hume Hall 577 2002 100.00% yes 75,973 75,973 9,520 5 2002 MURPHREE AREA Murphree Hall 135 1939 100.00% yes 97,450 97,450 21,612 4 1992 Thomas Hall 17 1905 100.00% yes 35,920 35,920 11,973 3 1993 Sledd Hall 16* 1929 33.00% yes 43,310 14,292 10,827 4 2021 Fletcher Hall 134* 1939 33.00% yes 50,500 16,665 12,625 4 2022 Buckman Hall 15 1905 100.00% yes 29,580 29,580 9,860 3 1993rn fbb

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ntbf Facility Year Built % Space Sprinkled Fire Alarm Systems Total Sq. Foot age Sq. Ft. Sprinkled Ground Floor Sq.ft. Total Floors Sprinkler Date GRADU ATE AND F AMILY HOUSING C ORRY VILLAGE Corry Village 276 1958 100.00% yes 6,920 6,920 3,460 2 1996 Corry Village 277 1958 100.00% yes 10,910 10,910 5,455 2 1997 Corry Village 278 1958 100.00% yes 10,910 10,910 5,455 2 1997 Corry Village 279 1958 100.00% yes 10,910 10,910 5,455 2 1998 Corry Village 280 1958 100.00% yes 10,910 10,910 5,455 2 1998 Corry Village 281 1958 100.00% yes 10,910 10,910 5,455 2 1999 Corry Village 282 1958 100.00% yes 10,910 10,910 5,455 2 2000 Corry Village 283 1958 100.00% yes 10,910 10,910 5,455 2 2001 Corry Village 284 1958 100.00% yes 10,910 10,910 5,455 2 2001 Corry Village 285 1958 100.00% yes 10,910 10,910 5,455 2 2004 Corry Village 286 1958 100.00% yes 10,910 10,910 5,455 2 2004 Corry Village 288 1958 0.00% yes 18,410 0 9,205 2 2012 Corry Village 289 1958 100.00% yes 18,410 18,410 9,205 2 2011 DIAMOND VILLAGE Diamond Village 296 1965 100.00% yes 12,180 12,180 6,090 2 2002 Diamond Village 297 1965 100.00% yes 12,180 12,180 6,090 2 2003 Diamond Village 298 1965 100.00% yes 12,180 12,180 6,090 2 2003 Diamond Village 299 1965 100.00% yes 12,180 12,180 6,090 2 2004 Diamond Village 300 1965 100.00% yes 12,180 12,180 6,090 2 2002 Diamond Village 301 1965 100.00% yes 12,180 12,180 6,090 2 2004 Diamond Village 302 1965 100.00% yes 12,180 12,180 6,090 2 2001 Diamond Village 303 1965 100.00% yes 18,310 18,310 9,155 2 2003 Diamond Village 304 1965 100.00% yes 18,310 18,310 9,155 2 2004 Diamond Village 305 1965 100.00% yes 18,310 18,310 9,155 2 2003 Diamond Village 306 1965 100.00% yes 18,310 18,310 9,155 2 2002 T ANGLE WOOD VILLAGE Tanglewood Village 527 1973 0.00% yes 12,530 0 6,265 2 2024 Tanglewood Village 528 1973 0.00% yes 7,320 0 3,660 2 2024 Tanglewood Village 529 1973 0.00% yes 7,320 0 3,660 2 2024 Tanglewood Village 530 1973 0.00% yes 7,320 0 3,660 2 2024 Tanglewood Village 532 1973 0.00% yes 14,150 0 7,075 2 2023 Tanglewood Village 533 1973 0.00% yes 17,690 0 8,845 2 2023 Tanglewood Village 535 1973 0.00% yes 10,720 0 5,360 2 2023 Tanglewood Village 536 1973 0.00% yes 9,840 0 4,920 2 2023 Tanglewood Village 538 1973 0.00% yes 92,400 0 46,200 2 2023 Tanglewood Village 539 1973 0.00% yes 9,800 0 4,900 2 2023 T OTALS 70.83% 2,303,734 1,631,731 Bedrooms are not sprinkled; only corridors are sprinkled. Update provided by the Department of Housing as of: 7/1/2012 All buildings are owned by the University of Florida Board of Trustees. rn fbb

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nf The Department of Housing and Residence Education is a self-supporting auxiliary operation. A Housing Master Plan exists that includes the installation of sprinklers in residence facilities; however, the funding cannot be "secured" more than one year prior to the proposed project. The funding source for these projects is student rent which is approved on an annual basis by the Board of Trustees. If additional funding sources become available for sprinkler projects, master plan target dates could be moved forward. In addition all Housing and Resident Education facilities are equipped with re extinguishers in compliance with currently adopted NFPA 10 coverage requirements. All extinguishers are inspected monthly by University of Florida Fire Equipment Services and all required testing is completed and performed as required by NFPA 10.All 24 active fraternity houses and 16 active sorority houses are completely protected with automatic sprinkler systems in all public, service and sleeping areas of the building. In addition, all fraternities and sororities are equipped with fully functional re alarm systems which are monitored 24 hours a day by University of Florida Police Department (UPD). UPD personnel are responsible for dispatching emergency services when a re alarm signal is received. System inspections are conducted as required by the Florida Fire Prevention Code (currently adopted edition) by factory trained contractors, certied and licensed by the State of Florida. All fraternity & so rority houses, all Housing and Residence Education facilities and all remaining University of Florida buildings are provided with re extinguishers as required by currently adopted NFPA 10 and monthly inspections are performed by University of Florida Fire Equipment Services. Currently over 8,400 extinguishers inspected each month. The 100% completion rate currently stands at 101 months. rn bFACILITY Year Built % Space Sprinkled Fire Alarm Systems Total Sq. Footage Extinguishers Provided Total Floors FRATERNITIES F ACILITIES Alpha Epsilon Pi 2010 100% Yes *N/A Yes 3 Alpha Gamma Rho +45 yrs 100% Yes *N/A Yes 2 Alpha Tau Omega +50 yrs 100% Yes *N/A Yes 3 Beta Theta Pi 1955 100% Yes *N/A Yes 2 Chi Phi 1969 100% Yes 14,453 Yes 2 Delta Chi 1966 100% Yes 9,989 Yes 1 Delta Tau Delta +45 yrs 100% Yes *N/A Yes 2 Delta Upsilon +50 yrs 100% Yes *N/A Yes 3 Georgia Seagle Hall +50 yrs 100% Yes *N/A Yes 3 Kappa Alpha 1971 100% Yes 14,250 Yes 2 Kappa Sigma 2008 100% Yes *N/A Yes 3 Lambda Chi Alpha 1965 100% Yes 12,750 Yes 2 Phi Delta Theta +50 yrs 100% Yes *N/A Yes 3 Phi Gamma Delta +45 yrs 100% Yes *N/A Yes 2 Phi Kappa Tau +45 yrs 100% Yes *N/A Yes 2 Pi Kappa Alpha +50 yrs 100% Yes *N/A Yes 3 Pi Kappa Phi 1963 100% Yes 10,500 Yes 2 Pi Lambda Phi 1955 100% Yes 12,600 Yes 2 Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1964 100% Yes 19,084 Yes 3 Sigma Chi 1964 100% Yes 20,489 Yes 2 Sigma Nu 1984 100% Yes 8,640 Yes 2 Sigma Phi Epsilon 1955 100% Yes 26,854 Yes 2 Tau Epsilon Phi 1958 100% Yes 14,530 Yes 2 Theta Chi 1955 100% Yes 14,478 Yes 2rn fbb

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ntbf SORORITY F ACILITIES Alpha Chi Omega 1955 100% Yes 17,383 Yes 2 Alpha Delta Pi 1954 100% Yes 17,335 Yes 2 Alpha Epsilon Phi 1957 100% Yes 11,542 Yes 2 Alpha Omicron Pi 1997 100% Yes 16,665 Yes 2 Chi Omega 1956 100% Yes 17,851 Yes 2 Delta Delta Delta 2008 100% Yes *N/A Yes 3 Delta Gamma 1952 100% Yes 20,307 Yes 2 Delta Phi Epsilon 1963 100% Yes 13,895 Yes 2 Delta Zeta 2004 100% Yes 16,995 Yes 3 Kappa Alpha Theta +35 yrs 100% Yes *N/A Yes 2 Kappa Delta 1956 100% Yes 14,889 Yes 2 Kappa Kappa Gamma 2008 100% Yes *N/A Yes 2 Phi Mu 1956 100% Yes 10,753 Yes 2 Pi Beta Phi 1993 100% Yes 12,355 Yes 2 Sigma Kappa 1955 100% Yes 12,059 Yes 2 Zeta Tau Alpha 1954 100% Yes 16,684 Yes 2 rffnrn fbb In addition to providing the aforementioned re statistics, the University of Florida also maintains a daily Fire Log that records, by the date reported, any re that occurs in an on-campus student housing facility as well as any fraternity or sorority used by University of Florida students. The res reported and included on the Fire Log include those that were already extinguished as well as those discovered while still burning. They include emergency situations involving res that necessitated a call to 9-1-1 for re department assistance, as well as minor res, such as a small trash can re that was easily extinguished without assistance. Fires can be reported by anyone, regardless of the individuals association with the University of Florida. Unlike Clery crime reporting, in which a crime is reported when its brought to the attention of a campus security authority or a local law enforce ment agency, there are no such restrictions with re reporting. Any student housing re that is reported to any ocial at the University of Florida will be documented in the Fire Log. The Fire Log, which contains mandated information dating back to January 1, 2009, including the most recent 60-day period, is open to public inspection anytime at http://www.police.u.edu/media/relog/default.asp or by contacting the University of Floridas Fire Safety Coordinator at (352) 392-1904. Information mandated in the Fire Log includes: agency that responded to the re, the UFPD report number of the incident, the report date/ time, type of re, cause of re, date/time of re, location, number of injuries/deaths, and estimated cost of property damage. The Fire Log is updated with an entry or addition within two business days of receiving the information. For the purpose of the Fire Log, a business day is any day Monday through Friday, except for days when the institution is closed. Anyone wishing to view Fire Log information prior to January 1, 2009 in person should contact the University of Floridas Fire Safety Coordinator and it will be provided within two business days of a request for public inspection. Anyone can access the Fire Log, regardless of their association with the University of Florida.nb

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nf tbfbrUndergraduate Housing Areas: Sta conducts four mandatory re drills annually, one at the beginning of each semester in each residence hall: Summer A/C, Summer B, Fall, and Spring. Sta may choose to conduct more than one re drill at the beginning of the semester if additional training or education is needed for sta or residents. Residence Life supervisors provide prior notice of re drills to UFPD and the Assistant Director of Housing for Facilities Management. Prior notice may or may not be made to student sta. Prior notice is not made to residents. Sta completes writ ten reports to the Assistant Director of Housing for Facilities Management after all res, re alarms, or re drills.Instructions for Graduate Hall Directors Completing Fire Drills: Contact Mr. Mark Hill via email (markh@housing.u.edu) and inform him of your re drill time: Mr. Hill: My name is ______ ________ and I am the GHD for __________. I will conduct a re drill in__at __. This email should be sent 24 hours before your scheduled drill. You may or may not choose to alert your sta of the fact that you will be conducting a drill, but your drill should take place at a time when all sta will be present, as this should be an educational experience. We want them to be comfortable and aware of our procedures. Go to the area oce and contact UFPD (2-1111) to let them know that you are going to have a re drill: Hi, this is ______ ______ calling from ________. We are about to have a re drill, and I just want to let you know. This call will ensure that the Police and Fire Department are informed of the drill, and they will not come to the hall. Please let the DA know that you are conducting a drill as well. Send a sta member (or you may go) to a pull station in the location where the drill will occur. Pull the pull station and return to the oce. If the sta members were not informed of the drill ahead of time, ask the DA to call each sta member and request their presence in the oce. Once everyone is present, you may begin. Visually point out where the alarm acknowledge button is located, and press it. Announce why you are pressing this button and where the trouble is. Designate 1 sta member to be the Centrally Informed Person (CIP). You do not have to send 2 sta members to the area since the drill is planned, but be sure to remind them that during an actual alarm, two sta members should go to check the aected area.. The CIP should distribute keys to sta. Direct all remaining sta (those without keys) to hall entrance/exit doors, and send 1 or 2 sta members to move students towards our *designated areas. (Note: Designated areas should be recorded on the top of the birthday rosters located in the RA/RCA on call booklets-This is mandatory!!) Sta members that are assigned to oors should be directed to go to every room and knock hard stating Housing, keying in, Fire Drill. Make sure that all rooms and bathrooms are checked for students. Once the room is checked, the sta member should leave and lock the door. S/he should then move on to the next location. If sta members nd students inside rooms during the drill, the sta member checking the room should make a note of the room and follow up with a report after the drill. If a sta member notices policy infractions, s/he should return to the students room to conscate it after the drill. Once the sta members have nished checking all rooms, they should return to the area oce for further instruction. Before you (GHD) reset the panel, walk outside to observe the students who evacuated-assess how you feel this went, and make notes. Once all rooms are checked and you have assessed the situation outside, you can reset the alarm in the oce. It should read System Normal. Once you see this, send all sta members in the oce outside to alert sta to allow students to return to the building. In case of an alarm, the panel in the aected building should be reset, not the one in the oce (Hume and Lakeside). Instructions for resetting the panel are on the right hand side of the re panel. *In Hume Hall re member that the small key in the lock on your 1st oor re panels should remain to the right, or the panel cannot be reset. One or two sta members will be needed to unlock room doors for students if they forgot their keys during the course of the drill. Please verify the identity of each student after keying into the room. All sta members should return to the building for debrieng. What went well? Any questions or suggestions related to how we can improve next time? Are you feeling comfortable with the procedures? Any disciplinary problems during or after the drill? File incident reports as needed. Instruct sta members on how to ll out a le alarm/drill/report. Log the drill in the re alarm log binder. Call UFPD back and explain that the drill is over. Designated areas are physical locations outside of your residence hall, where residents should proceed during a re, re drill, or re alarm. The location of your designated area should be away from the building, as this will decrease the likelihood of objects harming residents. All designated areas should be writ ten on the top of the drinking age roster in the RA/RCA On-call Log.Graduate and Family Housing Areas: Because Graduate/Family Housing apartments have direct outside access, no re drills are conducted in these facilities. Fraternities and SororitiesAll active fraternities and sororities conduct at least 1 required re drill per occupied semester (2 to 3 per year minimum). Fire drills are performed in cooperation with UFPD. More frequent re drills are conducted at the discre tion of facility management. Reports with results, problems or other issues are submitted to the oce of the Fire Safety Inspector assigned to the Fraternity and Sorority facilities for the University of Florida within the rst two weeks following the start of each semester for review and follow-up if required.Division of Housing and Resident E ducationThere is no residency requirement at the University of Florida. Students voluntarily become part of the campus residential community. By signing a Housing Contract, they acknowledge and agree to follow the standards of the community. The Housing Community Standards are considered a part of the University of Florida Student Code of Conduct (6C1-4.016) and can be found on the internet at: http://www.admin.u.edu/ddd/attachments00-01/710rules/4016.pdf. All Housing Community Standards including Fire Safety community standards are available via the internet at: http://www.housing.u.edu/reslife/commstandards/. The 2010 2011 Community Standards for undergraduate/single student housing and graduate and family housing follow. UNDERGRADU ATE/SINGLE STUDENT COMMUNITY STANDARDS FIRE SAFE TY A. E VACU ATION Immediate evacuation when an alarm sounds, and/or emergency ashing lights have been activated and/or when instructed to do so by appropriate hall sta is mandatory. Re-entry into a building before receiving conrmation from appropriate hall sta, UFPD, the re department, or other emergency personnel is prohibited. Re-entry is not permitted while the alarm is sounding. For safety reasons, using an elevator to evacuate a building is not permitted. B. COOKING Persons should not leave their food items unattended on the stove or in the oven at any time. Persons are responsible for the proper use of approved cooking appliances and attention to food items while using the appliances and will be responsible for any damages that may occur. C. COOKING APPLIANCES Persons are allowed to use the following items in their room or kitchen areas: electric fondue pots, air stream ovens, electric crock pots, coee pots, hotdog cookers, frying pans, drip coee makers, toasters (not toaster ovens), bread makers and popcorn poppers. These items are permitted so long as they are single units with sealed heating elements. Convenience items such as blenders, mixers, can openers and juicers are also permitted.

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ntbf The following items are permitted, but may be used only in kitchen areas: toaster ovens, electric hamburger cookers, wae irons, ceramic sealed hot plates, hot plates with exposed coils, deep fryers, and counter-top electric grills without ames (e.g. George Foreman TM grills). D. MICROWAVE OVENS Microwaves will be permitted in resident rooms provided the following guidelines are met: a) a maximum of two microwave ovens are permitted in a student room if each individual unit is .75 cubic feet or less; b) microwave ovens must be UL approved; c) each unit and/ or units combined must not exceed 1500 watts (only one microwave oven is permitted if the unit(s) exceeds .75 cubic feet and/or 1500 watts). E CANDLES AND INCENSE Possession or use of all candles and incense for any purpose is prohibited in the residence halls. F. EXTENSION CORDS/MULTI-PL UG ADAPTORS For the protection of the residential community, residents are permitted to use extension cords with the following restrictions: 1. Only UL (Underwriters Laboratories) certied three-prong grounded ex tension cords that are 14 gauge or heavier are permitted to be possessed and/or used inside the residence halls. 2. The extension cord must be equipped to plug in one item only. An extension cord that meets all other requirements and is designed for more than one item to be plugged into it is not allowed because this type of extension cord is considered a multi-plug device without a circuit breaker. NOTE: The lower the gauge number, the heavier/thicker the cord is. Cords cannot exceed 10 feet in length. Only one appliance/item may be plugged into an extension cord; only one extension cord may be used per double outlet. 3. Only UL (Underwriters Laboratories) certied multi-plug adapters with circuit breakers are permitted to be possessed and/or used inside the residence halls. Mini-generators with circuit breakers that back-up devices or conserve power are prohibited. 4. Up to three appliances/items may be plugged into one multi-plug adapter per double outlet. The maximum wattage for a double out let is 1500 watts. 5. Extension cords and multi-plug adapters may not be connected. Items may not be plugged into outlets/plugs contained in other items. 6. Air-freshener plug-ins (e.g. Glade TM plug-ins) with a built-in outlet may be used only if the outlet in the air-freshener is not used. NOTE: Regulations concerning extension cords and multi-plug adapters are written in compliance with State Fire Codes and the engineering specications of our various buildings. G. AIR CONDITIONERS/HEATERS Residents may not install air conditioners or ceiling fans in their rooms. Residents may not plug AC units into any other outlet not designed specically for the unit. Open coil space heaters are not permitted. Other appliances/items may not be plugged into outlets designed specically for AC use. NOTE: Thomas and Buck man residents please speak with hall sta concerning AC use in your area and follow applicable guidelines for Thomas and Buckman Halls. H. RESIDENCE HALL DECORATIONS 1. Live cut trees (such as Christmas Trees) are prohibited in the residence halls. 2. Strands of lights (Holiday Lights) may be used in residence hallrooms but may not be plugged into each other to create a string of lights. 3. External doors, doorframes and hallways may not be decorated. Only one door nametag and message board is permitted per resident. 4. No ags, banners or other cloth/ammable decorations are to be hung on and/or from the ceiling. All decorations should be adhered to the decorative strip provided for posting or if none is provided, decorations should not be higher on the wall than the door frame. I. REFRIGERATORS Are permitted in resident rooms provided the following guidelines are met: plug which must be plugged into the wall outlet. NOTE: In cases in which the wall outlet is inaccessible, the refrigerator may be plugged into an extension cord that is ten feet in length or less, 14 gauge or thicker/heavier, and has room for only one item. J. BARBECUE GRILLS Persons are permitted to use barbecue grills at a safe distance (50 feet or more) from all buildings. The use of grills is not permitted under any covered walkways, landings, or balconies. Residents are responsible for attentive supervision in proper use of all grills while cooking. Propane tanks should not be stored in or within 50 feet of buildings. K. LAMPS All oor style halogen lamps are prohibited in residence halls. Halogen lamps specically designed and marketed as desk lamps that have a bulb that is fully unexposed behind a solid glass casing that is unable to be tampered with and is at 50 watts or less are acceptable. Only UL (Underwriters Laboratories) approved lamps can be used in the residence halls. L. PERSONAL CARE ELECTRICAL DE VICES Hair/blow dryers, curling irons, straightening irons, and other personal care electric devices must be plugged directly into the outlets. M. SPRINKLERS Residents are not permitted to hang items from, cover, or otherwise tamper with re sprinkler devices. SMOKING The University of Florida has a No Tobacco Policy. Smoking and tobacco use are prohibited in all facilities and areas of the University of Florida campus with no exception. This includes but is not limited to indoor and outdoor areas and properties. This policy applies to all faculty, sta, students, consultants, contractors, and visitors.GRADU ATE AND FAMILY HOUSING COMMUNITY STANDARDS FIRE SAFE TY POLICIES A. E VACU ATION Immediate evacuation when an alarm sounds, and/or emergency ashing lights have been activated, and/or when instructed to do so by appropriate sta is mandatory. Re-entry into a building before receiving conrmation from appropriate sta, UFPD, the re department, or other emergency personnel is prohibited. Re-entry is not permitted while the alarm is sounding. B. COOKING Persons should not leave their food items unattended on the stove or in the oven at any time. Persons are responsible for the proper use of approved cooking appliances and attention to food items while using the appliances and will be responsible for any damages that may occur. C. STOVES Stove burners should be free from ammable items such as cardboard, cloth, and newspapers. Burner trays are not to be covered with plastic wrap or aluminum foil. D. AIR CONDITIONERS CORRY RESIDENTS ONLY Under limited situations, residents may be able to supply their own air conditioners. The unit must not exceed 10 amps and 12,000 BTUs. The resident must have a qualied person assist in the installation of the unit. Installation must be performed by Housing and Residence Education sta and there is a charge for installation. The amount of this charge will be noted at the signing of the contract. E HEATERS Open coil space heaters, radiant heaters, or kerosene heaters are not permitted. F. BARBECUE GRILLS Grills (charcoal and gas red) and other gas oper ated devices should not be used in or within 50 feet of buildings. The use of grills is not permitted under any covered walkways, landings, balconies, or breezeways. Propane tanks should not be stored in or within 50 feet of buildings. Grills not in use minus gas tanks can be stored on the ground oor outside buildings as long as emergency exit access is clear. G. LAMPS All oor style halogen lamps are prohibited in Graduate and Family Housing apartments. Halogen lamps specically designed and marketed as desk lamps that have a bulb that is fully unexposed behind a solid glass casing that is unable to be tampered with and is at 50 watts or less are acceptable. Appropriate Village and/or maintenance sta shall decide if a halogen lamp meets qualications. Only UL (Underwriters Laboratories) approved lamps can be used in the residence facilities.. H. CANDLES AND INCENSE Candles and incense use should be super vised by residents. Residents are required to be present in the room in which candles and incense are in use.

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nf I. SPRINKLERS Residents are not permitted to hang items from, cover, or otherwise tamper with re sprinkler devices. SMOKING The University of Florida has a No Tobacco Policy. Smoking and tobacco use are prohibited in all facilities and areas of the University of Florida campus with no exception. This includes but is not limited to indoor and outdoor areas and properties. This policy applies to all faculty, sta, students, consultants, contractors, and visitors.Fraternities and SororitiesAll fraternity and sorority facilities have No smoking and No open ame policies in eect. Portable electrical appliances are kept to a minimum and generally restricted to personal care items and dorm size refrigerators. Microwaves, toaster ovens and coee makers are generally provided for facility occupants in dining areas. Fire Shield power strips are the only acceptable power strip permit ted in Greek housing. No extension cords or halogen lighting are allowed.Undergraduate/Single Student Housing Areas: 1. When a re alarm sounds, (or upon receiving a call from the desk about analarm) all sta members should report to the area desk immediately. 2. The University Police Department should be contacted immediately and informed of the location of the alarm. Dial 9-1-1. 3. The rst sta member to arrive at the area desk will function as the Centrally Informed Person. This individual will coordinate all communications with Hall Sta, the University Police Department, and the Fire Department. The Centrally Informed Person will remove the key ring from the Fire Department lockbox and assign a sta member to carry the key ring and the MSDS resource notebook (located near the re panel) to the Gainesville Fire Rescue Command Post. [This is usually a white Ford Excursion with District Chief logo on the side.] 4. Two sta members should then proceed to the problem area in order to gather information/details about the alarm. The sta members should then report back to the area desk immediately with this information. No sta member should attempt to enter an area that appears to be dangerous. 5. All remaining sta members will be directed to designated areas to conduct crowd control, monitor exit/entrances, assist emergency personnel with building access, raise awareness to emergency personnel for students with disabilities or special needs, and to help maintain order. 6. At no time should a sta member attempt to re-enter a building unless directed to do so by emergency personnel or a hall supervisor. No sta member should attempt to silence an alarm unless directed to do so by emergency personnel or a hall supervisor. 7. In the case of an actual re, sta members should respond using Fire Procedures that are specically designed for the hall/building in which the re is taking place. Please refer to your area manual for complete instructions. The GFR Commanding Ocer will return the key ring and MSDS notebook to the Area Oce and the Centrally Informed Person will inventory and sign in the key ring, placing back in the appropriate key box. The MSDS notebook will be returned to its location near the re panel. 8. At the close of Fire/Alarm/Drill, the Centrally Informed Person should complete a Fire/Alarm/Drill Report. (In most cases this form will be completed by the RD/RLC/ADH in your area.) This form must be completed and turned into the Assistant Director of Housing for Facilities Management electronically (within 24 hours of the Drill or Alarm). The Professional Sta member in the area may need to ensure that the electronic version of the re/alarm/drill report is completed. In the event of an actual re, the Assistant Director for Facilities Management should be contacted at home as indicated on the Fire/Alarm/Drill Report Form.Graduate and Single Family Housing Areas:Residents are encouraged to develop a family re evacuation plan; this is a responsibility of the residents. Sta prompts these actions and provides information about re evacuation from individual apartments at resident orientation meetings. Policies regarding re safety education/training programs to students, sta and faculty. Sta Training/E ducation: Experiential re alarm systems training in their assigned facilities. the beginning of each semester in student rooms. ment (pull stations, extinguishers, re alarm system) training. ation procedures including use of pull stations, extinguishers, re alarm systems, etc. as relevant to their work duties.Sta Training/E ducation Written M aterials this report.) FIRE: Where smoke, ames and/or heat are present. ALARM: Where smoke, ames and/or heat are not present. Possible tampering with pull station, heat and/or smoke detectors and/or a malfunction of the Fire Alarm System for unknown reasons. When a Pull Station is pulled to evacuate the building. (i.e. bomb threat, gas leak, etc.) DRILL:Prior notice to UPD and Mr. Hill should occur before the drill. A scheduled activation of the Fire Alarm System. Required by the State Fire Marshall in all Residence Halls at the beginning of each Semester.Fire Safety And General Information The purpose of this section is to (1) provide a basic re protection and pre vention program for all residence halls and Village Communities; and (2) outline procedures to implement the program in all Housing Units. This presentation is in the form of relatively short sections regarding various aspects of re protection, prevention, and emergency procedures. The Assistant Director of Housing for Facilities Management is Designated Fire Marshall for the Department Of Housing and Residence Education and Coordinates the Fire Prevention Program.Fire PreventionThe best re protection is prevention and is the result of the combined efforts of student, sta and professional inspecting personnel. Students, sta, and faculty should be made aware of the most common causes of res which are frequently overlooked or ignored, and which in many cases have resulted in the loss of life and property. The following are common causes of res that have occurred or could occur in residence facilities: causes wear of the protective covering increases the possibility of short circuits. into the blades, stopping the machine, thus causing the motor to heat up and ignite the material. Resident Training/E ducation Written M aterials Undergraduate Residence Halls Preview, and at time of check-in. handouts during freshmen orientation includes re safety information. Resident Training/E ducation Experiential Undergraduate Residence Halls

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ntbf community standards. Resident Training/E ducation Written M aterials Graduate and Family Housing Web Site The safety of the Village is the responsibility of each resident. Residents are asked to review the Housing Community Standards on what items are allowed in their apartments and remember these considerations: stairwells. The Resident Guide as well as The Villager is also part of the rental agreement because new policies, procedures, and other ocial information are published there. Thus, the importance of reading every issue of The Villager is stressed. Information posted periodically in Weekly Community Update or weekly e-mail sent to all GFH residents: Smoke DetectorsSmoke detectors should not be unhooked or covered as this is a re code violation. Please make sure your smoke detectors are in working order. If not, complete a HAWK or Maintenance Work Request.Resident OrientationsEach month each village holds a new resident orientation. At this meeting, re safety procedures are reviewed, which include no smoking in the area; safe grilling practices; how to sound the building re alarm system; and apartment evacuation when the building alarm is sounding. Additionally, residents are encouraged to develop a family re escape plan. This is an individual responsibility of the residents. Plans for future improvements in re safety, if determined necessary by the institution. Division of Housing and Residence E ducationOngoing upgrades to re alarm systems including the installation/upgrade of re sprinklers, heat detectors, smoke detectors, etc. are routinely budgeted for as part of the department Master Plan for facilities.Fraternities and SororitiesAll active fraternity and sorority facilities are protected by automatic sprinkler systems monitored by re alarm panels that report 24 hours a day to Univer sity of Florida Police department (UFPD). UFPD personnel are responsible for dispatching emergency services. Future plans include upgrade of re panels as necessary, and many fraternities are developing plans to build new facilities. As these new facilities are built, re safety considerations will be a priority.