Pinocchio

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Pinocchio the story of a marionette
Physical Description:
167 p. : col. ill. ; 21 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Collodi, Carlo, 1826-1890
Firman, Sidney Grant, 1868- ( Editor )
Richardson, Frederick, 1862-1937 ( Illustrator )
John C. Winston Company ( Publisher )
Publisher:
The John C. Winston Company
Place of Publication:
Chicago
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Puppets -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1923   ( rbgenr )
Fantasy literature -- 1923   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1923
Genre:
Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
Fantasy literature   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Illinois -- Chicago

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by C. Collodi ; translated from the Italian ; edited by Sidney G. Firman ; illustrated by Frederick Richardson.
General Note:
Baldwin Library copy 2 lacks illustrations on pages 47, 53, and 75.
General Note:
Baldwin Library copy 2 has variant cover.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002254510
oclc - 05322526
notis - ALK7024
lccn - 24000542
System ID:
UF00076176:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text



































































The Baldwin Librar)












I'l - \L






-I .-... -



1-27 .'- .


,11 /'




r i

4- -*.'*r4.
1~- -_.'







Iz~' -
II --, -



\I L' ~ -
P.R. ,1j~t





















































THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR THE PREVENTION OF BLINDNESS










- ;.~ "-'4!~'
, .
, ,
I-;J~
u~,



~SC i.. i~rr
~c


$I
L-;

~1*-s~: ;t~\" i.
.b;~c~c;r
j;cf,
ii
ri-
n

1

.-L ~
~;. 5~
I;
~i~ji~ ,j

~x~'/ Y

I
"
lr







r
~1


i ~i


PINOCCHIO AND HIS COMPANIONS WALKED AND WALKED UNTIL THEY CAME TO THE
GRAY GOOSE INN.






PINOCCHIO


THE STORY OF A MARIONETTE

BY
C. COLLODI

TRANSLATED FROM THE ITALIAN

EDITED BY
SIDNEY G. FIRMAN


ILLUSTRATED BY
FREDERICK RICHARDSON














THE JOHN C. WINSTON COMPANY


TORONTO


CHICAGO


PHILADELPHIA

































































Copyright, 1923, by
THE JOHN C. WINSTON COMPANY
COPYRIGHT, 1924, IN THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS

All rights reserved


PRINTED IN THE U. S. A.


The Winston Clear-Type Popular Classics
PINOCCHIO ....... ............. ............. C. Collodi
EDITED BY SIDNEY G. FIREMAN
ROBIN H OOD ............................... ..
EDITED BY GEORGE COCKBURN HARVEY
ALICE'S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND...Lewis Carroll
TREASURE ISLAND.................Robert Louis Stevenson
EDITED BY GILBERT SYKES BLAKELY
HEIDI................ ................. Johanna Spyri
EDITED BY ADELINE ZACHERT
TALES FROM SHAKESPEARE.....Charles and Mary Lamb
GRIMM'S FAIRY TALES............ ......
EDITED BY ORTON LOWE
THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ................ .......
EDITED BY ORTON LOWE
KIDNAPPED........................Robert Louis Stevenson
EDITED BY MYRTLE L. KAUFMANN
BIBLE STORIES EVERY ONE SHOULD KNOW
Jesse Lyman Hurlbut, D.D.
HANS BRINKER .... ...... ............ ..lary .1 apes Dodge
EDITED BY RUTH HILPERT
ROBINSON CRUSOE........................ Daniel DeFoe
EDITED BY LORA B. PECK







PREFACE


The delightful story of Pinocchio was written about
fifty years ago by an Italian named Lorenzini. Although it
closely resembles a folk tale, it is a true fairy story.
Lorenzini wrote more than twenty other books, but he
is best known as the author of Pinocchio. However, he had
so little confidence in his own literary ability that he wrote
under the assumed name of C. Collodi. Collodi was the
name of his native village, and there not long ago a tablet
was set up to mark his birthplace.
Pinocchio is an ideal story for children. It is so simple
that a young child can understand it, and so full of interest
that an adult can enjoy reading it. It is a story about a
puppet, or marionette, that came to life and had many
exciting experiences.
From the moment it was written, Pinocchio was an
unbounded success. A puppet story was sure to make a
strong appeal to the Italian people, for puppet shows were
almost as common in Italy then as motion picture enter-
tainments are in America now. Punch and Judy is almost
the only puppet show that children in America have ever
seen, but they like the story of the marionette, Pinocchio,
quite as well as do their young Italian friends.
The present edition was made from one of the first
translations printed in England, and contains some incidents
that are not found in other versions of the story.


SIDNEY G. FIRMAN.








CONTENTS


THE STORY OF A MARIONETTE .......
MASTER CHERRY'S VISITOR .........
THE MARIONETTE .................
PINOCCHIO RUNS AWAY .............
THE TALKING CRICKET ..............
PINOCCHIO'S HUNGER ...............
PINOCCHIO LOSES HIS FEET.........
GEPETTO RETURNS HOME ..........
THE NEW FEET .................. .


PINOCCHIO SETS OUT FOR SCHOOL ....................
PINOCCHIO GOES TO THE SHOW .................... .
FIRE-EATER PARDONS PINOCCHIO .....................
THE FOX AND THE CAT ................. ..........
THE GRAY GOOSE INN ................. ...........
THE A SSASSINS .....................................
PINOCCHIO IS HANGED ON THE BIG OAK ............
PINOCCHIO IS SAVED BY THE FAIRY WITH BLUE HAIR.
PINOCCHIO REFUSES THE MEDICINE ..................
PINOCCHIO IS ROBBED OF HIS MONEY AND IS SENT TO
PRISON ........................ .... ... ......
PINOCCHIO IS CAUGHT IN A TRAP ................. ..
PINOCCHIO DISCOVERS THE ROBBERS .................
PINOCCHIO GOES TO FIND THE FAIRY AND HIS FATHER.
PINOCCHIO REACHES THE ISLAND OF THE INDUSTRIOUS
B EES ............................... .. .........
PINOCCHIO DECIDES TO BE A GOOD BOY ..............
PINOCCHIO GOES TO SCHOOL .........................
PINOCCHIO GOES TO SEE THE DOG-FISH ..............
PINOCCHIO JUMFS INTO THE SEA .....................
PINOCCHIO IS RESCUED FROM THE FISHER-MAN ........


PAGE
. . . . 11


13
17
22
24
29
31
33
37
42
45
49
51
57
60
66
70
73

83
88
93
97

101
109
111
113
123
128





8 CONTENTS

PAGE
PINOCCHIO INVITES THE BOYS TO HIS PARTY .......... 138
PINOCCHIO GOES TO THE LAND OF BLOCKHEADS ....... 142
PINOCCHIO HAS DONKEY EARS ....................... 144
PINOCCHIO Is SOLD ................................. 149
PINOCCHIO IS SWALLOWED BY A FISH ................. 155
THE COTTAGE .................. ................... 159
PINOCCHIO BECOMES A REAL BOY .................... 166








ILLUSTRATIONS
PAGE
THE PIECE OF WOOD STRUCK GEPETTO A TERRIBLE BLOW 15
"PINOCCHIO, GIVE ME BACK MY WIG!" HE SHOUTED.. 19
"HOLD YOUR TONGUE, YOU WICKED CRICKET!" SHOUTED
PINOCCHIO............... .. ......... ........ 25
HE MADE PINOCCHIO A SUIT OF CLOTHES FROM SOME
WALL-PAPER THAT WAS COVERED WITH PRETTY
FLOW ERS............. .. ........ ... ........... 39
THE SHOWMAN WAS NAMED FIRE-EATER ............. 47
THEN HE TOOK OUT THE MONEY THAT FIRE-EATER HAD
GIVEN HIM ................................ 53
THEN THEY DREW OUT TWO LONG KNIVES AND TRIED
TO STAB HIM ................................. 63
So THEY HANGED PINOCCHIO TO THE BRANCH OF A TREE 67
THE DOCTORS CAME AT ONCE ...................... 71
JUST THEN THE DOOR OPENED AND FOUR BLACK RABBITS
ENTERED ........................ ... ........... 75
"LISTEN TO ME, THEN," SAID THE PARROT ........... 85
"MY NAME IS NOT MELAMPO," SAID THE MARIONETTE 91
THEY SAW A LITTLE BOY JUMP FROM A ROCK INTO THE
S E A .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 9
"DRINK, MY BOY, IF YOU WISH TO," SAID THE LITTLE
W OMAN............. ....... ................... 105
HE TURNED AND SAW TWO SOLDIERS ................. 119
THE FISHER-MAN WAS FURIOUS AT SEEING PINOCCHIO
SNATCHED FROM HIM........................... 129
"IS THE FAIRY AT HOME?" ASKED 'THE MARIONETTE.. 133




10 ILLUSTRATIONS

PAGE
"You BRAYED WELL, I KNEW YOUR VOICES"........ 147
INSTEAD OF A DEAD DONKEY, HE PULLED UP A LIVE
M ARIONETTE................................... 153
THE GARDENER TAUGHT HIM How TO TURN THE PUMP-
ING MACHINE.................................. 163





PINOCCHIO


THE STORY OF A MARIONETTE
ONCE upon a time there was a piece of wood.
It was not worth much. It was only a
piece of fire-wood like those that we burn
in winter in the stove or in the fire-place to warm
the rooms.
I cannot say how it happened; but one fine
day an old carpenter found this piece of wood
in his shop. The name of the carpenter was Mas-
ter Antonio, but almost everybody called him
Master Cherry because the end of his nose was
almost as red as a ripe cherry.
When Master Cherry saw the piece of wood
he was pleased. He rubbed his hands together
with delight, and said softly to himself:
"This wood has come just at the right time.
I will use it to make a leg for the table."
As soon as he had said this, he took a sharp
ax to cut away the bark. But before he could
strike the first blow, he stopped with the ax held
high in the air. He had heard a very small voice
say, "Do not strike me hard!"
Master Cherry was very much surprised.
He turned his eyes all around the room to see
where the little voice came from. He looked




PINOCCHIO


under the bench. He looked in the cupboard. He
looked in the basket of shavings. He even opened
the door of the shop and looked into the street; but
no one could he see.
At last Master Cherry laughed and began
to scratch his head.
"I see how it all is," he said. "I only thought
I heard some one speak."
Again he took up the ax, and this time he
struck the piece of wood a terrible blow.
"Oh! you have hurt me!" cried the same lit-
tle voice.
Master Cherry stood as still as if he had
turned to stone. His eyes started out of his head
with fright. His mouth remained open, and his
tongue hung down almost to the edge of his chin.
He was trembling with fear, but as soon as
he was able to speak, he said:
"Where on earth did that little voice come
from? There is no one here. Is it possible this
piece of wood has learned to cry and speak like
a child? I cannot believe it. It is only a piece of
fire-wood. If I threw it on the fire, it would boil
a pot of beans. Can anyone be hiding inside it?
If anyone is hiding there, so much the worse for
him. I will settle him at once."





MASTER CHERRY'S VISITOR


As he said this, he took the poor piece of
wood in his hands and began to beat it against
the wall.
Then he stopped to listen to see if he could
hear the little voice. He waited two minutes.
He waited five minutes. He waited ten minutes,
but he could hear nothing.
"I see how it all is," said he as he tried to
laugh and pushed his wig back into place. "I
only thought I heard some one speak."
But all the time he was frightened, and he
tried to sing to give himself a little courage.
He put aside the ax and took his plane, but
as soon as he began to smooth the wood, the lit-
tle voice laughed and said:
"Stop! You are tickling me!"
This time Master Cherry fell down as if he
had been struck by lightning. At last, when he
opened his eyes, he found himself sitting on the
floor. His face was quite white, and the end of
his nose, instead of being red, had become blue
from fright.

MASTER CHERRY'S VISITOR
At that moment some one knocked at the
door.




PINOCCHIO


S"Come in," said the carpenter; for he did
not have the strength to rise to his feet.
A little old man at once walked into the
shop. His name was Gepetto, but some of the
bad boys called him "Indian Pudding," because
his yellow wig looked so much like a pudding.
"Good day, Master Antonio," said Gepetto.
"What are you doing there on the floor?"
"I am teaching the A. B. C.'s to the ants,"
said Antonio. "What can I do for you?"
"I have come to ask a favor of you," said
Gepetto.
"Well, here I am, ready to serve you," replied
the carpenter, as he rose to his knees.
"This morning an idea came into my head,"
said Gepetto. "I thought I would make a won-
derful puppet or marionette that could run and
jump. With it I could travel about the world
and earn a living."
"Good for you, Indian Pudding," shouted the
same little voice that had frightened Antonio.
Gepetto was very angry and said, "Why do
you insult me?k
"I did not insult you," said Antonio.
"Yes, you did," said Gepetto. "I heard what
you said, but I shall not quarrel with you. Give






- .-,


A


THE PIECE OF WOOD STRUCK GEPETTO A TERRIBLE BLOW


tii3i


r. r 'l




THE MARIONETTE


me a piece of wood so I can make my marionette,
and I shall go home and not trouble you again."
Master Antonio was delighted. He went to
the bench and got the piece of wood that had
frightened him. But just as he was going to
give it to his friend, the piece of wood jumped
out of his hands and struck Gepetto a terrible
blow upon the knees.
"You have a nice way of giving presents,"
said Gepetto. "You have almost lamed me!"
"I did not do it. It was the wood," said An-
tonio.
"I do not believe you," said Gepetto, as he
limped out of the door with the piece of wood in
his hand.
THE MARIONETTE
Gepetto lived in a small room with one win-
dow. The only furniture he had was an old
chair, a bed, and a broken table. At one end of
the room there was a fire-place in which a fire
was burning; but the fire was painted. Over the
fire was a painted kettle that seemed to be boil-
ing and sending out clouds of steam.
As soon as he reached home, Gepetto took
his tools and began to make his marionette.
"What name shall I give him?" he said to




PINOCCHIO


himself. "I think I shall call him Pinocchio. It
is a name that will bring him luck. I once knew
a whole family that was named Pinocchio. The
father was named Pinocchio. The mother was
named Pinocchia, and the little children were
named Pinocchi, and all of them did well."
Having found a name for the marionette, he
began to work in earnest. First he made. the
hair, then the forehead, and then the eyes.
As soon as the eyes were finished, he was sur-
prised to see them move and begin to stare at
him. Soon he became angry and said:
"Wooden eyes, why do you stare at me?"
No one answered.
Then he took his knife and made the nose,
but as soon as he had finished it, it began to grow.
And it grew, and it grew, until it seemed as if it
never would stop growing.
Gepetto cut it off, and cut it off, until he was
tired, but it only grew longer and longer.
Before he had finished the mouth, it began
to laugh and make fun of him. "Stop laughing!"
said Gepetto; but he might as'well have spoken
to the wall.
"Stop laughing, I say!" he shouted in an,
angry voice.



















" I


:c


"PINOCIIIO, GIVE ME BACK MY WIG!" H4 SHOUTEX


~j~?L4
~t~f~3-~ r : I




THE MARIONETTE


The mouth then stopped laughing, but stuck
out its tongue as far as it would go.
Gepetto pretended not to see this, and went
on with his work. After the mouth was finished,
he made the chin, then the throat, then the arms
and the hands.
As soon as he had made the hands, Gepetto
felt his wig pulled off. He turned around, and
what do you think he saw? He saw his yellow
wig in the hands of the marionette.
"Pinocchio, give me back my wig!" he
shouted.
But instead of giving it back, Pinocchio put
it on his own head, and was almost smothered
by it.
Pinocchio's conduct made Gepetto feel very
sad. He dried a tear and said:
"You young rascal! You are not yet finished,
and still you do not have respect for your father.
You are a bad, bad boy!"
Then he began to make the legs and the feet,
but before they were finished they began to kick
him.
"I deserve it," he said to himself. "I should
have thought of it before. Now it is too late."
Then he placed the marionette on the floor
2




PINOCCHIO


and began to teach him to walk. At first his legs
were stiff, and he could not move. But Gepetto
held him by the hand and showed him how to put
one foot before the other.

PINOCCHIO RUNS AWAY
After a few moments Pinocchio began to
walk and then to run about the room. At last
he jumped through the open door and ran down
the street.
Gepetto ran after him, but he was not able
to catch him. Pinocchio leaped like a rabbit.
His wooden feet made more noise on the pave-
ment than twenty pair of heavy shoes.
"Stop him! Stop him!" shouted Gepetto.
But the people only stood still with wonder,
as the marionette ran past them like a race-
horse. They only laughed at Gepetto as he ran
after him.
At last a soldier heard the noise and thought
that a colt had escaped from his master. He
placed himself in the middle of the road with his
feet spread apart so nothing could pass him.
When Pinocchio saw him, he tried to escape
him by passing between his legs. But the sol-
dier caught him by the nose and held him fast.




PINOCCHIO RUNS AWAY


It was a very large nose and just the size to be
held by a soldier.
As soon as the soldier put Pinocchio into the
hands of Gepetto, he tried to punish him by pull-
ing his ears. But just think how surprised he
was because he could not find them. In his hurry
to finish the marionette, he had forgotten to
make the ears.
So he took him by the neck and led him
away. As they went along Gepetto said:
"We will go home now and settle this af-
fair."
But Pinocchio threw himself on the ground
and would not take another step. Soon a crowd
of idle persons gathered and made a ring about
them. Some of them said one thing, and some
another.
"Poor marionette!" said several. "He is
right in not wishing to go home. Who knows how
that bad old Gepetto will beat him!"
Some one said: "Gepetto seems like a good
man, but with boys he is very cruel. If that poor
marionette is left in his hands, he will tear him
in pieces."
So at last the soldier set Pinocchio free, and
led Gepetto away to prison. The poor man, who





PINOCCHIO


had done nothing wrong, cried like a child. When
he came to the prison, he said:
"Wicked boy! And I tried so hard to make
a good marionette! But it serves me right. I
should have thought of it before."
What was done afterwards is a story that is
very hard to believe, but I will tell it to you just
as it happened.

THE TALKING CRICKET
While poor Gepetto was being taken to pris-
on for no fault of his, that imp Pinocchio, find-
ing himself free from the hands of the soldier,
ran off as fast as his legs could carry him. In or-
der that he might reach home quicker, he ran
across the fields. In his hurry he jumped over
banks, hedges, and ditches full of water, just as
a wild animal would have done if chased by
hunters.
When he came to the house, he found the
door was not locked. So he opened it and went
in. He threw himself on the floor to rest, but
he quickly got up again. He heard some one in
the room who was saying, "Cri-cri-cri!"
"Who calls me?" said Pinocchio in a fright.
"It is I!" said the voice.









































































































































"HOLD YOUR TONGUE, YOU WICKED CRICKET!" SHOUTED PINOCCHIO


. . . . . .....










to,



... ... .... ......
.. .. ... .... ... .. ... .
07




. .. ...... .


... .. ...
. .. .......

Z-Z



..... ...... ..




sm...




THE TALKING CRICKET


Pinocchio turned around and saw a big
cricket crawling slowly up the wall.
"Tell me, Cricket, who may you be?" said he.
"I am the Talking Cricket," it said, "and I
have lived here for more than a hundred years."
"It doesn't matter how long you have lived
here," said the marionette. "The room is mine
now, and you will do me a favor by going away
at once, without even turning around."
"I will not go away," said the Cricket, "until
I have told you a great truth."
"Tell it to me, then," said Pinocchio, "and be
quick about it."
"Woe to those boys who rebel against their
parents, and run away from home," said the
Cricket. "They will never have any good luck,
and sooner or later, they will be very sorry."
"Sing away, little Cricket, as long as you
please," said Pinocchio. "But I have made up my
mind to run away to-morrow morning as soon as
it is light. If I stay here, what happens to other
boys will happen to me also. I shall be sent to
school and shall be made to study. To tell you
the truth, I do not wish to study. It is much more
amusing to run after butterflies and to climb
trees and take young birds out of their nests."




PINOCCHIO


"Poor little goose!" said the Cricket. "Do
you not know that you will grow up to be a per-
fect donkey, and every one will make fun of
you?"
"Hold your tongue, you wicked old Cricket!"
shouted Pinocchio.
But the Cricket was not angry. It only said:
"But if you do not wish to go to school, why do
you not learn a trade? Then you will be able to
earn a piece of bread."
"Do you want me to tell you?" replied Pinoc-
chio. "Well, I will tell you. Among all the
trades in the world there is only one that I like."
"And what is that?" asked the Cricket.
"It is to eat, drink, sleep, and amuse myself,
and to lead an idle life from morning until
night."
"As a rule," said the Talking Cricket, "those
who follow that trade end in a hospital or in a
prison."
"Take care," said Pinocchio, "or you will
make me angry."
"Poor Pinocchio! How I pity you!" said the
Cricket.
"Why do you pity me?" said he.
"Because you are a marionette," said the





PINOCCHIO'S HUNGER


Cricket, "and what is worse, you have a wooden
head."
At these last words Pinocchio jumped up in
a rage, and taking a wooden mallet from the
bench, he threw it at the Talking Cricket. Per-
haps he never meant to hit him; but unfortu-
nately he struck him exactly on the head. The
poor cricket had hardly breath to cry out "Cri-
cri-cri" before he was flattened against the wall.

PINOCCHIO'S HUNGER
Night was coming on, and Pinocchio remem-
bered that he had eaten nothing all day. He be-
gan to feel a gnawing in his stomach that was
very much like an appetite. In fact, his hunger
grew so quickly that he could hardly wait for
something to eat.
He ran to the fire-place, where a kettle was
boiling. He was about to take off the lid to see
what was in it, when he saw that the kettle was
only painted on the wall. You can imagine his
feelings. His nose began to grow again, and be-
came three inches longer.
Then he began to run about the room. He
looked in drawers and in every other place for a
bit of bread. He thought there must be a crust




PINOCCHIO


of bread or a bone, but he could find nothing at
all.
And all the time his hunger grew and grew
until he felt as if he should faint. Then he began
to cry and said:
"The Talking Cricket was right. It was
wrong to disobey my father and run away from
home. If he were here now, I should not be dying
of hunger. Oh! what a dreadful thing hunger
is!"
Just then he thought he saw something on
the floor. It was round and white and looked like
a hen's egg. He sprang and seized it. It was in-
deed an egg.
Pinocchio was overjoyed. Thinking it was
a dream, he kept turning the egg over in his
hands. He felt it and kissed it, and as he kissed
it, he said:
"Now how shall I cook it? Shall I make an
omelet? Shall I fry it? Or, shall I boil it? No,
the quickest way of all is to cook it in a bowl of
hot water. I am in such a hurry to eat it."
So he placed a bowl on a brazier full of red-
hot coals. He poured a little water into the bowl.
When the water began to boil, he broke the egg-
shell over it, so that the egg might drop in, But




PINOCCHIO LOSES HIS FEET


instead of the yolk and the white, a little chicken
hopped out. It was very gay and polite. It made
a bow and said:
"Many thanks, Master Pinocchio, for saving
me the trouble of breaking the shell. Good-by
until we meet again. Keep well and give my best
wishes to all at home."
As it said this, it flew through the open win-
dow and was soon lost to sight.
The poor marionette stood there staring out
of the window. His mouth was open and the
empty egg-shell was in his hand. But as soon as
his surprise was over, he began to cry and scream
and stamp his feet on the floor. Between his
sobs, he said:
"Yes, the Talking Cricket was right. If I
had not run away from home, and if my papa
were here, I should not now be dying of hunger!
What a terrible thing it is to be hungry!"
The sight of food had made him more hun-
gry than ever. So he thought he would leave the
house and go out to look for some one who would
give him a piece of bread.
PINOCCHIO LOSES HIS FEET
It was a wild and stormy night. The thun-
der was terrible and the lightning was so bright




PINOCCHIO


that the sky seemed on fire. A strong wind was
blowing clouds of dust over the streets and mak-
ing the trees creak as it passed.
Pinocchio was afraid of thunder, but hunger
was stronger than fear. So he closed the door
and ran to the village. He ran so fast that he
panted like a dog after a chase.
But he found the village all dark and desert-
ed. The shops were closed, the windows were
shut, and there was not even a dog in the street.
It seemed like the land of the dead.
Pinocchio took hold of a door-bell and began
to ring it with all his might. He said to himself,
"That will bring somebody."
And so it did. A little old man with a night-
cap on his head appeared at a window and called
to him in an angry voice:
"What do you want at such an hour of the
night?"
"Would you be kind enough to give me a lit-
tle bread?" said Pinocchio.
"Wait there and I will come back directly,"
said the little old man.
He thought the marionette was one of the
bad boys who ring door-bells at night to disturb
people who are sleeping.




GEPETTO RETURNS HOME


In half a minute the window was opened
again, and the voice of the little old man called
to Pinocchio: "Come near the house and hold out
your cap."
Pinocchio pulled off his cap, but just as he
held it out a great basin of water was poured
down on him. It wet him from head to foot as if
he had been a pot of dried-up roses.
Pinocchio went home like a wet chicken. He
was tired and hungry, and so he sat down and put
his feet on the brazier to dry them.
And then he fell asleep; and while he was
asleep, his feet, which were made of wood, took
fire and were burned to cinders. Pinocchio slept
on as if his feet belonged to some one else. At
last, about daybreak, he awoke because some one
was knocking at the door.
"Who is there?" he asked, yawning and rub-
bing his eyes.
"It is I!" answered a voice.
And the voice was the voice of Gepetto.

GEPETTO RETURNS HOME
Poor Pinocchio, whose eyes were not half
open yet, had not noticed that his feet were
burned off. So as soon as he heard his father,
3




PINOCCHIO


he jumped up and started for the door. But
after he had stumbled two or three times, he
fell flat on the floor. The noise he made in fall-
ing was like that of a bag of wood that had been
thrown from a fifth story window.
"Open the door!" shouted Gepetto from the
street.
"Dear papa, I cannot," said the marionette,
as he cried and rolled about on the floor.
"Why can't you?" asked Gepetto.
"Because my feet have been eaten," said
Pinocchio.
"And who has eaten your feet?" asked Ge-
petto.
"The cat," said Pinocchio; for he saw her
playing with some shavings, and thought she
had eaten his feet.
"Open the door, I tell you!" shouted Gepet-
to. "If you don't, when I get into the house, I
shall punish you."
"Believe me, father," said Pinocchio, "I can-
not walk. I shall have to walk on my knees for
the rest of my life."
Gepetto thought the marionette was trying
to fool him, so he climbed up the side of the house
and came in through the window. He was very




GEPETTO RETURNS HOME


angry, but when he saw Pinocchio lying on the
floor without any feet, he felt very sorry for him.
He took him up in his arms and kissed him, and
said:
"My little Pinocchio, how did you happen
to burn your feet?"
"I don't know, papa," said Pinocchio. "It
was a terrible night. It thundered and light-
ened. I was very hungry, and the Talking Crick-
et said to me, 'It serves you right. You were bad
and ran away from home.' Then I said, 'Take
care, Cricket.' And he said, 'You are a mario-
nette and have a wooden head.' So I threw the
hammer at him and he died, but it was his fault,
for I did not wish to kill him.
"Then I found an egg and tried to cook it, but
a chicken flew out of the shell and said, 'Good-by
until we meet again.' I was so hungry that I
went to the village to beg for something to eat,
but an old man poured a basin of water on my
head. So I came home and sat down by the brazier
to dry my feet. Imust have fallen asleep with my
feet near the coals, for when I awoke, they were
burned off. Now I am hungry."
Gepetto could -not understand all that the
marionette had told him, but.he. did understand




PINOCCHIO


that he was dying of hunger. So he took three
pears from his pocket, saying:
"These three pears were to be my breakfast,
but I am glad to give them to you. Eat them. I
hope they will do you good."
"If you wish me to eat them," said Pinocchio,
"be kind enough to peel them for me."
"Peel them?" said Gepetto. "I am surprised
to find you are so dainty. In this world you
should accustom yourself to eat anything that
is set before you."
"No doubt you are right," said Pinocchio,
"but I never eat fruit that has not been peeled."
So Gepetto found a knife and peeled the
three pears. He put the skins on the table.
Having eaten the first pear in two mouth-
fuls, Pinocchio was about to throw away the
core; but Gepetto caught hold of his arm and
said:
"Do not throw it away. In this world every-
thing may be of some use."
"But I have made up my mind that I shall
never eat cores!" Pinocchio shouted angrily.
And so the three cores, instead of being
thrown out of the window, were placed on the
table with the skins.




THE NEW FEET


After he had eaten the three pears, Pinoc-
chio yawned and said, "I am still hungry."
"But, my boy, I have nothing more to give
you," said Gepetto. "I have only the skins and
the cores of the three pears."
"Well, if there is nothing else," said Pinoc-
chio, "I will eat the skins!"
When he began to eat the skins, he made a
sour face, but one after another he soon ate them
all. Then he ate the cores. When he had eaten
everything, he said, "Now I feel better."
"Now you see I was right," said Gepetto,
"when I said that we should not be too particu-
lar about what we eat. We never can tell what
may happen to us."

THE NEW FEET
As soon as the marionette had satisfied his
hunger, he began to cry because he wanted a new
pair of feet. But to punish him for being bad,
Gepetto allowed him to cry and complain for
half a day. Then he said to him:
"Why should I make you new feet? Perhaps
you wish to run away from home again."
"I promise you," said the marionette, sob-
bing, "that I will always be a good boy."




PINOCCHIO


"All boys promise that," said Gepetto, "when
they wish to get something."
"I promise you that I will go to school and
study," said Pinocchio.
"All boys repeat that same story, when they
are trying to get something," said Gepetto.
"But I am not like other boys," said Pinoc-
chio. "I am better than all of them, and I al-
ways speak the truth. I promise you that I will
learn a trade so that I shall be able to take care
of you in your old age."
Gepetto tried to look cross, but his eyes were
full of tears and his heart was full of pity for the
poor marionette. Without saying another word,
he took his tools and two small pieces of wood
and set to work.
In less than' an hour the feet were finished.
They were as swift and graceful little feet as if
they had been made by a great artist.
Then Gepetto said to the marionette, "Shut
your eyes and go to sleep!"
So Pinocchio shut his eyes and pretended to
go to sleep, and while his eyes were shut, Gepetto
fastened the feet on with a little glue. He did
it so well that one could not tell where the legs
and the feet were joined.











































HE MADE PINOCCHO A SUIT OF CLOTHES FROM SOME WALL-PAPER
THAT WAS COVERED WITH PRETTY FLOWERS


;.
r~l:~ ,
~

rB


~eL- -


B~




THE NEW FEET


As soon as the marionette saw that he had
feet, he jumped down from the table on which
he had been lying. Then he leaped and capered
about the room as if he had gone mad with de-
light.
"To pay you for what you have done for me."
said Pinocchio, "I will go to school at once."
"You are a good boy," said Gepetto.
"But if I go to school," said Pinocchio, "I
must have some clothes."
Gepetto was so poor that he did not have
even as much as a penny in his pocket. But he
made Pinocchio a suit of clothes from some wall-
paper that was covered with pretty flowers. And
he made him a cap of brown paper with a feather
stuck in the side.
There was no mirror in. the house, and so
Pinocchio ran to look at himself in a pail of
water. He was so pleased with what he saw that
he went about like a peacock.
"I look just like a gentleman," he said.
"Yes, indeed," said Gepetto, "for bear in
mind that fine clothes do not make a gentleman,
but clean clothes."
"But," said the marionette, "I am still in
want of the most necessary thing."
3




PINOCCHIO


"What is that?" asked Gepetto.
"A spelling-book," said the marionette.
"You are right," said Gepetto, "but how shall
we get one?"
"It is quite easy," said Pinocchio. "You
have only to go to the book-store and buy one."
"I have no money," said Gepetto. "But wait
a minute," he added, as he put on his old coat
and ran out of the house.
He soon returned with a spelling-book, but
the old coat was gone. The poor man was in his
shirt sleeves, and it was snowing.
"Where is your coat, papa?" asked Pinoc-
chio.
"I have sold it," said Gepetto.
"Why did you sell it?" asked Pinocchio.
"Because it made me too warm," said he.
Pinocchio understood the answer at once.
He threw his arms around Gepetto's neck and
kissed him again and again.
PINOCCHIO SETS OUT FOR SCHOOL
As soon as it stopped snowing Pinocchio
set out for school with his spelling-book under
his arm. As he went along he said to himself:
"To-day I shall learn to read. To-morrow I
shall learn to write and the day after I shall




PINOCCHIO SETS OUT FOR SCHOOL 43
learn to do problems. Then I shall be able to
earn a great deal of money. Then I shall buy my
papa a new coat. It shall be made of gold and
silver with diamonds for buttons. I ought to do
this for him, because he sold his coat to buy me
a book."
While he was saying this, he thought he
heard music. It sounded like the noise of fifes
and drums. He stopped to listen.
"Where can that music be?" said he. "What
a pity that I have to go to school."
He stood still for a few moments. He was
trying to decide what to do. Should he go to
school or should he go after the fifes? At last
he said:
"To-day I shall go and hear the fifes and to-
morrow I shall go to school."
Then he ran on and came nearer to the sound
of the fifes and the beating of the drum. Soon
he found himself in the middle of a crowd of peo-
ple. They were trying to crowd into a small
building that was painted in many bright colors.
"What is this place?" asked Pinocchio of a
little boy who was standing beside him.
"Read the sign, and then you will know,"
said the boy.




PINOCCHIO


"I should be glad to read it," said Pinocchio,
"but I do not know how to read."
"Blockhead!" said the boy. "Then I will
read it for you. The sign says,

'GREAT MARIONETTE THEATER.' "
"Has the play begun?" asked Pinocchio.
"It is beginning now," said the boy.
"How much does it cost to go in?" he asked.
"Two cents," said the boy.
Pinocchio was very anxious to see the show,
so he said:
"Will you be so kind as to lend me two cents
until to-morrow?"
"I should be very glad to lend them to you,"
said the boy, "but it happens that I cannot spare
them to-day."
"I will sell you my coat for two cents," said
the marionette.
"What do you think I could do with a paper
coat?" said the boy. "If it rained I could not
get it off my back."
Pinocchio felt very sad, but he said, "Will
you give me two cents for my spelling-book?"
"I am a boy and I don't buy from boys," said
he.





PINOCCH:O GOES TO THE SHOW 45
"I will buy the spelling-book for two cents,"
called out a man who bought old clothes. He had
heard what the two boys said, and thought this
was a rare bargain.
So the book was sold then and there. And
to think that poor Gepetto was at home shiver-
ing with the cold because he had sold his coat to
buy the spelling-book!
PINOCCHIO GOES TO THE SHOW
When Pinocchio went into the theater, some-
thing happened that almost ended the show.
Harlequin and Punchinello were on the
stage, and all the people were laughing at the
funny things they did. But as soon as Pinocchio
entered, Harlequin stopped short and pointed
his finger at him. Then he said:
"Do I dream or am I awake? Surely that is
Pinocchio!"
"It is indeed Pinocchio!" cried Punchinello.
"It is Pinocchio! It is Pinocchio!" shouted
all the marionettes at once, as they ran onto the
stage from all sides. "It is Pinocchio! It is our
brother Pinocchio! Long live Pinocchio!"
"Pinocchio, come up here," cried Harlequin,
"and throw your arms around your wooden
brothers!"




PINOCCHIO


At this invitation, Pinocchio made a leap
from the floor in among the seats. Another leap
landed him on the head of the leader of the band,
and from there he sprang upon the stage.
The embraces, the hugs, and the kisses that
Pinocchio received from the other marionettes
stopped the whole show. At last the people grew
tired of waiting.
"Go on with the play! Go on with the play!"
they shouted.
But it was all breath thrown away; for the
marionettes put Pinocchio upon their shoulders
and carried him about the stage.
Just at that moment out came the show-man.
He was so big and so ugly that the sight of him
was enough to frighten any one. His beard was
as black as ink, and so long that it reached from
his chin to the ground. I need only to say that
he stepped upon it when he walked. His mouth
was big and his eyes were like two lanterns with
lights burning in them. And in his hand he car-
ried: a :hip: that. he. cracked as he. walked about.
As soon as he came in, there was silence. No
one dared to breathe. You could have heard a
pin. drop.. .The poor marionettes trembled like
so many leaves.

























-r ~-'
IL..4~L YI -.:


THE SHOW-MAN WAS NAMED FIRE-EATER




FIRE-EATER PARDONS PINOCCHIO 49
"Why have you come to stop the play?" he
asked of Pinocchio in a gruff voice.
"Believe me, it was not my fault," said Pinoc-
chio.
"Do not say another word," said the show-
man. "To-night we will settle this matter."
As soon as the play was over, the show-man
went into the kitchen where a fine sheep was
roasting for his supper. There was not enough
wood to roast it, so he called Harlequin and
Punchinello to him.
"Bring that marionette here," he said. "You
will find him hanging on a nail. He seems to be
made of dry wood. If he is thrown on the fire,
he will make a fine blaze for the roast."
At first Harlequin and Punchinello did not
move, but the show-man looked at them so severe-
ly that they left the room. In a short time, they
returned carrying poor Pinocchio. He was
wiggling like an eel out of water, and screaming
at the top of his voice. "Papa! papa! save me!"
he cried. "I will not die! I will not die!"

FIRE-EATER PARDONS PINOCCHIO
The show-man was named Fire-eater, and
he looked like a terrible man. His black beard
4




PINOCCHIO


covered his chest and legs like an apron, but he
did not have a bad heart. When he saw Pinoc-
chio struggling and screaming, "I will not die!
I will not die!" he was sorry for him and asked:
"Are your papa and mamma still alive?"
"Yes, my papa is," said Pinocchio, "but I
never had any mamma."
"Poor old man! I pity him," said Fire-eater.
"Who can say how sorry he would be if I should
throw you among those burning coals! So I
shall pardon you. To-night I shall have to eat
my mutton half-cooked, but the next time you
fall into my hands beware."
The next morning Fire-eater called Pinoc-
chio to him.
"What is your father's name?" he asked.
"Gepetto," said Pinocchio.
"And what is his trade?" asked Fire-eater.
"He is a beggar," said Pinocchio.
"Does he get much money?" asked the show-
man.
"No," said Pinocchio. "He never has a
penny in his pocket. He had to sell the only coat
he had to buy a spelling-book so I could go to
school."
"Poor fellow!" said Fire-eater. "I feel sorry


50




THE FOX AND THE CAT


for him. Here are five gold pieces. Go at once
and take them to him."
Pinocchio thanked the show-man a thousand
times: Then he said good-by to the marionettes
and set out for home.
THE FOX AND THE CAT
He had rot gone far when he met a fox lame
in one foot and a cat blind in both eyes. The fox,
who was lame, was leaning on the cat, and the
cat, who was blind, was led by the fox.
"Good day, Pinocchio," said the fox in a very
friendly way.
"How do you happen to know my name?"
asked the marionette.
"Oh, I know your father well," said the fox.
"Where did you see him?" asked Pinocchio.
"I saw him yesterday at the door of his
house," said the fox. "He had no coat and he
was shivering with the cold."
"Poor papa!" said Pinocchio, "but that will
soon be over. He shall shiver no more."
"Why?" asked the fox.
"Because I have become a gentleman," said
Pinocchio.
"You have become a gentleman?" said the
fox with a rude laugh.




PINOCCHIO


The cat also began to laugh, but she combed
her whiskers with her paws and he did not see
her.
"There is nothing to laugh at," said Pinoc-
chio.
Then he took out the money that Fire-eater
had given him.
"You can see for yourselves that here are
five gold pieces," he said.
As the money rang in his hand, the fox put
out the paw that had been lame, and the cat
opened her eyes, which looked like two green
lanterns; but she shut them so quickly that
Pinocchio did not see her.
"And now," said the fox, "what will you do
with all this money?"
"First of all," replied the marionette, "I


shall buy a new coat for my papa.
buy a spelling-book for myself."
"For yourself?" asked the fox.
"Yes, indeed," said Pinocchio.
go to school and study."
"Look at me," said the fox.
wished to study, I have lost a leg."
"Look at me," said the cat.


Then I shall


"I intend to

"Because I

"Because I


wished to study, I have lost the sight of my eyes."









II I A


THEN HE TOOK OUT THE MONEY THAT FIRE-EATER HAD GIVEN HIM


B
L~L Te




THE FOX AND THE CAT


At that moment a black-bird that sat in the
hedge beside the road began to sing.
"Pinocchio," he said, "do not listen to what
bad companions tell you. If you do, you will be
sorry."
Poor black-bird! It would have been well
for him if he had not spoken; for the cat sprang
upon him and ate him in one mouthful.
"Poor black-bird!" said Pinocchio. "Why
did you treat him so badly?"
"I did it to teach him a lesson," said the cat.
"He will learn not to meddle in the affairs of
other people."
When they had gone a little farther, the fox
stopped and said to Pinocchio: "Should you like
to double your money?"
"In what way?" asked Pinocchio.
"Should you like to turn your five gold
pieces into a hundred or a thousand?" asked the
fox.
"I think so," said Pinocchio, "but in what
way?"
"The way is easy," said the fox. "Instead of
going home, you must go with us to the Land of
the Owls."
Pinocchio thought a moment.




PINOCCHIO


"No," he said, "I will not go with you. I will
go home to my papa. Who knows how badly he
felt yesterday when I did not come back? I was
a bad boy, and the Talking Cricket was right
when.he said, 'Woe to those boys who disobey
their parents and run away from home.' Only
yesterday I almost lost my life in Fire-eater's
house."
"Well, go home then," said the fox, "and so
much the worse for you."
"Yes, so much the worse for you," said the
cat.
"Between to-day and to-morrow your five
gold pieces would become a thousand," said the
fox.
"How could they become so many?" asked
Pinocchio.
"I will tell you," said the fox. "In the Land
of the Owls, there is a place called the Field of
Wonders. If you plant one gold piece in that
field and water it with two pails of water, it will
begin to grow. Then you must go to bed and
sleep until morning. The next day you will find
a beautiful tree with as many gold pieces on it
as there are leaves on a cherry-tree."
When Pinocchio heard this, he forgot all




THE GRAY GOOSE INN


about his papa and the new coat. He also for-
got about the spelling-book and the school. He
said to the fox and the cat: "Come, let us start
at once. I will go with you."

THE GRAY GOOSE INN
Pinocchio and his companions walked and
walked until they came to the Gray Goose Inn.
"It is almost night," said the fox, "and we
are very tired. Let us stop to eat and rest our-
selves for an hour or two. We will start again
at midnight, so we can reach the Field of Won-
ders to-morrow morning."
So they went into the inn and ordered their
supper.
The cat ate nothing but fish. The fox ate a
rabbit and some fat chickens. Pinocchio ate the
least of all. He ordered some walnuts and a
piece of bread, but he left them on his plate. He
could think of nothing but the Field of Wonders
and the gold pieces.
After supper, the three companions went to
bed. The cat and the fox slept in one room and
Pinocchio in another. They told the inn-keeper
to call them at midnight, so they could go on
their journey.




PINOCCHIO


Pinocchio soon fell asleep and dreamed that
he was in a field full of trees that were covered
with gold pieces. He was just about to reach out
his hand and pick them, when he was awakened
by some one knocking on the door of his room.
It was the inn-keeper, who had come to tell
him that the clock had struck midnight.
"Are the others ready?" asked the mario-
nette.
"Ready!" said the inn-keeper. "They left
two hours ago."
"Why were they in such a hurry?" asked
Pinocchio.
"Because the cat heard that her oldest kit-
ten had frozen its feet and was in danger of
death," said the inn-keeper.
"Did they pay for their supper?" asked
Pinocchio.
"Certainly not," said the inn-keeper. "They
would not think of hurting your feelings by pay-
ing for it."
"And where did my friends say they would
wait for me?" he asked.
"They will meet you at the Field of Wonders
to-morrow morning," said the inn-keeper.
So Pinocchio paid a gold piece for his sup-




THE GRAY GOOSE INN 59
per and that of his friends. Then he set out. It
was so dark he could not see the road, and he
stumbled along without knowing where he was
going. Some night-birds flew across the road
and brushed Pinocchio's nose with their wings
as they passed. They frightened him so much
that he called out: "Who goes there? Who goes
there?"
After he had walked a little farther, he saw
a small insect that was shining dimly on the
trunk of a tree. It looked like a night-lamp.
"Who are you?" he asked.
"I am the ghost of the Talking Cricket," said
a very weak and faint voice.
"What do you want?" asked Pinocchio.
"I want to give you some advice," said the
voice. "Go back and take the four gold pieces to
your poor father, who is very sad because you did
not come back yesterday."
"By to-morrow my papa will be a gentle-
man," said Pinocchio. "These four gold pieces
will then be four thousand."
"My boy," replied the voice, "do not believe
those who promise to make you rich in a day.
They are sure to be rogues. Listen to me and go
back."




PINOCCHIO


"No, I shall not go back," said Pinocchio. "1
have made up my mind to go on."
"The hour is late," said the voice.
"I have decided to go on," said he.
"The night is dark," said the voice.
"I have decided to go on," said he.
"The road is dangerous," said the voice.
"I have decided to go on," said he.
"Remember that boys who will have their
own way, sooner or later are sorry for it," said
the voice. "Good-night, Pinocchio, and may you
be saved from the assassins."
As soon as the Talking Cricket had said this,
it became as dark as if the light had been blown
out; and the road was darker than ever.

THE ASSASSINS
As the marionette went on his way, he said,
"Boys ought to be pitied. Everybody scolds us
and tries to tell us what to do. The Talking
Cricket tells me I am to meet assassins. But that
doesn't matter, for I don't believe in assassins.
I have never believed in them. I think our papas
make up stories about. them to scare little boys
who wish to go out at night. If I should meet
assassins on this road, do you think they would





THE ASSASSINS


frighten me? Not the least in the world. I
should go to meet them and say:
"'Assassins, what do you want of me? Re-
member there is no joking with me. So go on
about your business!'
"When I said this, I think they would run
away like the wind. However, if they did not
have sense enough to run away, then I should
run away myself. And that would end it."
Pinocchio had hardly time to finish saying
this to himself when he heard a slight rustle of
leaves behind him. He turned to look and dimly
saw two objects wrapped in black cloaks. They
were running after him, at full speed.
"Here they are now," he said to himself.
He did not know where to hide his gold
pieces, so he put them in his mouth and held
them under his tongue.
Then he tried to escape. But he had not gone
a step before he was seized by the arms and heard
two awful voices say to him:
"Your money or your life!"
Pinocchio could not speak because the
money was in his mouth, but he gave several low
bows by way of saying, "I have not a penny in
my pocket."
I




PINOCCHIO


"Come now! Let us have no nonsense," said
the robbers.
"Give up your money or you will die," said
the taller of the robbers.
"And after we have killed you, we will kill
your father," said the other.
"No, no, not my poor papa!" cried Pinoc-
chio; and as he said this, the gold pieces rattled
in his mouth.
"0 you rascal!" said the taller of the robbers.
"You have hidden the money in your mouth.
Take it out at once!"
Then the shorter assassin drew out an ugly
knife and tried to force it between Pinocchio's
lips. But Pinocchio, as quick as lightning, bit off
his hand and let it fall to the ground. Just think
how surprised he was then to see that it was not
a hand at all, but the paw of a cat.
Then Pinocchio freed himself from the
assassins. He jumped over the hedge and be-
gan to run through the fields. They ran after
him like two dogs chasing a rabbit. The one who
had lost a paw, ran on one leg, but I do not know
how he managed to run so well.
After a race of several miles, Pinocchio
could run no farther. So he climbed up the trunk











































































THEN THEY DREW OUT TWO LONG KNIVES AND TRIED TO STAB HIM


:I

-; ';';"
.,r ."




THE ASSASSINS


of a very tall pine-tree and seated himself on the
topmost branch. The assassins tried to climb
after him, but after they had gone up halfway,
they slid down again, tearing the skin from their
hands and knees.
Then the assassins gathered some dry wood,
piled it under the pine-tree and set fire to it. In
less time than it takes to tell it, the tree began to
burn like a candle. Pinocchio saw the flames
come nearer and nearer, and as he did not wish
to be roasted, he jumped from the top of the tree
and started to run across the fields. The assas-
sins ran after him without stopping once.
When day began to come, they were still fol-
lowing him. Soon Pinocchio came to a wide ditch
full of dirty water. What was he to do? "One,
two, three," cried he, and then leaped across.
The assassins also jumped, but-splash,
splash-they fell into the middle of the ditch.
Pinocchio heard the splash and shouted back: "A
fine bath to you, assassins!"
He thought they would be drowned, but
when he looked back, he saw they were both run-
ning after him. They still wore their black
cloaks, and the water was dripping from them,
as if they had been hollow baskets.
5




66 PINOCCHIO
PINOCCHIO IS HANGED ON THE BIG OAK
Pinocchio's courage now failed him, and he
was about to give himself up for lost. But all at
once he saw not far away a small house as white
as snow.
"If I can only reach that house," he said to
himself, "maybe I shall be saved."
He soon reached the house and knocked at
the door.
No one answered.
He knocked again and again with great
force, for there was no time to lose. He could al-
ready hear the steps and heavy breathing of the
assassins. Still no one answered.
Seeing that knocking was useless, Pinocchio
began to kick the door with all his might. The
window then opened, and a beautiful Fairy ap-
peared at it. She had blue hair and a face as
white as snow. But her eyes were closed and
she did not see him. He was about to speak, but
before he could open his mouth, he felt himself
seized by the collar, and the same horrible voices
said to him: "You shall not escape again!"
When the marionette saw death staring him
in the face, he trembled so that his wooden legs
creaked and the gold pieces rattled in his mouth.














































































So THEY HANGED PINOCCHIO TO THE BRANCH OF A TREE


i._




PINOCCHIO IS HANGED


"Now then," said the assassins, "will you
open your mouth, or not? Will you not answer?
This time we shall force you to open it."
Then they drew out two long knives and
tried to stab him. But the marionette was made
of very hard wood and the knives were broken
into a thousand pieces.
"I know what we shall do," said one of them.
"Let us hang him."
"Yes, let us hang him," said the other.
So they hanged Pinocchio to the branch of a
tree called the Big Oak.
Then they sat down on the grass and waited
for him to die. But at the end of three hours the
marionette's eyes were open, his mouth was shut,
and he was kicking more than ever.
At last they were out of patience. Then they
said to Pinocchio: "Good-by till to-morrow. Let
us hope you will be kind enough to die with your
mouth open."
Then they went away.
Little by little, the marionette's eyes began
to grow dim, but he still hoped that some one
would come to save him. At last his breath be-
gan to fail him. He shut his eyes, opened his
mouth, and hung as if he were dead.




PINOCCHIO


PINOCCHIO IS SAVED BY THE FAIRY WITH BLUE HAIR
While Pinocchio was hanging to the branch
of the Big Oak, the beautiful Fairy with blue
hair looked out of the window and saw him. She
felt so sorry for him that she sent a great dog to
rescue him and bring him to her.
As soon as the dog returned with him, the
Fairy took him up in her arms and laid him
gently on a bed. Then she sent for three famous
doctors.
The doctors came at once. One was a crow,
one an owl and one was a Talking Cricket.
"Doctors," said the Fairy, "I wish to know if
this marionette is alive or dead."
When she had said this, the crow.felt Pinoc-
chio's pulse. Then he felt his nose. Then he felt
his toes. When he had done this, he said: "I
think the marionette is quite dead. If he is not
dead, it is a sign that he is still alive."
"I regret," said the owl, "that I cannot agree
with the crow. In my opinion, the marionette is
still alive. But if he is not alive, it is a sign that
he is dead."
"And have you nothing to say?" the Fairy
asked of the Talking Cricket.
"In my opinion," said the cricket, "the wisest
































































THE DOCTORS CAME AT ONCE


( .~.:.
.- r. .~
R
r
~.
:
i
"~:''~ c~7~l~i~;p~YI -r
.p. : ;~
'B~Ir~
'`'
Tr ~!: ?r:
D.

:~I:

ct



T- Ir







ii



a







,~


:5b




PINOCCHIO IS ROBBED


and planted in it the four gold pieces that he had
left. Then he covered them with a little earth.
"Now, then," said the fox, "go to the canal
and bring a pail of water and water the ground
where you have planted them."
Pinocchio went to the canal, and as he had
no pail, he took off one of his shoes and filled it
with water. And so he watered the ground.
"Is there anything else to be done?" he
asked.
"No, nothing else," said the fox. "We can
all go away now. You can come back in a few
minutes and find a tiny shrub with its branches
full of gold pieces."
When they had seen Pinocchio water his
seeds, they wished him a good harvest and went
away.
PINOCCHIO IS ROBBED OF HIS MONEY AND IS
SENT TO PRISON
Pinocchio returned to the town and began to
count the minutes. When he thought he had
waited long enough, he hurried back to the Field
of Wonders.
As he walked along, he could hear his heart
beat tic-tac, tic-tac, like a clock. All the time he
was saying to himself:




PINOCCHIO


"And what if I should find two thousand
gold pieces instead of one thousand? What if I
should find five thousand instead of two thou-
sand? Oh! what a fine gentleman I should be
then! I should have a fine house full of cake and
candy."
While Pinocchio was saying these things, he
stopped to look for the little tree with its
branches full of money, but he saw nothing.
Then he went to the very place where he had
planted the money, but there was nothing.
Just then he heard some one laugh. He look-
ed up and saw a parrot who was smoothing his
feathers.
"Why are you laughing?" asked Pinocchio.
"I am laughing," said the parrot, "because
as I was smoothing my feathers, I tickled myself
under the wing."
Pinocchio said nothing. He went to the
canal and filled his shoe with water and began to
water the ground. While he was doing this, the
parrot laughed again.
"You ill-mannered parrot!" shouted Pinoc-
chio. "Will you tell me what you are laughing
at?"
"I am laughing at simpletons who believe all









ihi


-.jI- j.eW


U


"LISTEN TO ME, THEN," SAID THE PARROT


C3


1- --
i,:u
t.
i4


O

I'


f- ^




PINOCCHIO IS ROBBED


the foolish things that are told them," said the
parrot.
"Are you speaking of me?" asked Pinocchio.
"Yes, I am speaking of you," said the par-
rot. "You are simple enough to believe that
money could be planted and gathered in the
same way as beans and corn."
"I don't understand you," said the mario-
nette.
"Listen to me, then," said the parrot. "While
you were in the town the fox and the cat returned
to the field. They took the money you had
planted and fled like the wind, and he that
catches them now will be very clever."
Pinocchio stood with his mouth open, star-
ing at the parrot. He could hardly believe what
she said. Suddenly he began to dig in the earth
where he had planted the gold pieces; and he
dug, and he dug, but the money was not there.
Then he ran back to the town to complain to
the judge.
When Pinocchio was brought before the
judge, he told how he had been deceived by the
fox and the cat, who had robbed him of his
money. The judge listened to what he had to
say, and when he had finished, he said:
5




PINOCCHIO REFUSES THE MEDICINE 73
thing for a doctor to do, when he does not know
what he is talking about, is to be silent. This
marionette has a face that is not new to me. I
have known him for some time."
Up to this time, Pinocchio had been lying
as still as if he were dead. Now he began to
tremble so much that he shook the bed.
"That marionette there," added the Talking
Cricket, "is a rogue."
Pinocchio opened his eyes, but shut them
again at once.
"He is a good-for-nothing run-away."
Pinocchio hid his face under the covers.
"That marionette is a bad boy who will make
his poor father die of a broken heart."
All at once sounds of sobbing and crying
were heard under the covers.
"When a dead person cries, it is a sign that
he will get well," said the crow.
"I do not like to disagree with you," said the
owl, "but when a dead person cries, it is a sign
that he is sorry to die."
PINOCCHIO REFUSES THE MEDICINE
When the three doctors had gone, the Fairy
placed her hand on Pinocchio's head and found
it so hot that she knew he had a fever. So she




PINOCCHIO


poured some medicine into half a glass of water
and offered it to the marionette.
"Drink it," she said, "and in a few days you
will be cured."
Pinocchio looked at the glass, and drew up
his face.
"Is it sweet or bitter?" he asked.
"It is bitter," said the Fairy, "but it will do
you good"
"If it is bitter, I will not take it," said he.
"Drink it," said the Fairy, "and when you
drink it, I will give you a lump of sugar to take
away the taste."
"Where is the lump of sugar?" asked Pinoc-
chio.
"Here it is," said the Fairy, as she took a
piece from the sugar-bowl.
"Give me the lump of sugar first," said
Pinocchio. "Then I will drink the medicine."
So the Fairy gave him the sugar and he swal-
lowed it in an instant.
"Now keep your promise and take the medi-
cine," said the Fairy.
Pinocchio took up the glass and smelled of
the medicine. Then he put it down again.
"It is too bitter," he said. "I cannot drink it."













































1..



JusT TEN TE DOOR OPENED AND FOUR BLAC RABBITS ENTERED
JUst THEN TAE DOOR OPENED AND FOUR BLACK RABBITS ENTERED




PINOCCHIO REFUSES THE MEDICINE 77
"How can you say that," asked the Fairy,
"when you have not even tasted it?"
"I know it from the smell," said Pinocchio.
Then he added, "I would rather die than drink
that bitter medicine."
Just then the door opened and four black,
rabbits entered. They were carrying a hammock
that was tied to some long poles.
Pinocchio was frightened, and sat up in bed.
"What do you want?" he asked.
"We have come for you," said the largest
rabbit.
"To take me?" asked Pinocchio. "But I am
not dead yet."
"No, not yet," said the rabbit; "but you have
only a few minutes to live. You have refused
the medicine that would have ,cured you."
"0 Fairy, Fairy!" screamed the marionette.
"Give me the medicine! Give me the medicine!
I will not die! I will not die!"
So taking the glass in his hands, he swal-
lowed the medicine at once; and when he turned
around, the rabbits had gone.
In a few minutes Pinocchio became well and
jumped down from the bed. A marionette is
made of wood, and can be cured very quickly.




PINOCCHIO


When the Fairy saw him running and caper-
ing about the room, she said: "Then my medi-
cine must have done you good."
"Well, I should think so," said Pinocchio.
"It has saved my life."
"Then why did you have to be coaxed to take
it?" asked the Fairy.
"It is this way," said Pinocchio. "We boys
are more afraid of medicine than of being ill."
Then Pinocchio told the Fairy all that had
happened to him since he left his home. He told
her about Fire-eater, about the fox and the cat
and about the assassins. Then he thanked her
for saving him from a terrible death on the
Big Oak. And he said he should always love
her for being so kind to him.
"I love you also," said the Fairy. "If you
will stay here, you shall be my little brother, and
I will be your little sister."
"I should like to stay," said Pinocchio, "but
I shall have to go to see my papa."
"What have you done with the four gold
pieces?" asked the Fairy.
"I have lost them," replied Pinocchio, but he
did not tell the truth; for he had them in his
pocket.,




PINOCCHIO REFUSES THE MEDICINE 79
As soon as he told the lie, his nose grew two
inches longer.
"Where did you lose them?" asked the Fairy.
"In the forest," he replied.
Then his nose grew still longer.
"If you lost them in the forest," said the
Fairy, "we shall go and find them."
"Oh, I remember now," replied Pinocchio, "I
did not lose them in the forest. I swallowed them
when I took the medicine."
As soon as Pinocchio told this falsehood, his
nose grew so long that it touched the side of the
room and he could not move.
"How foolish you are to tell lies," said the
Fairy.
Then Pinocchio began to cry, and the Fairy
let him cry for a long time. At last she opened
the window and a hundred woodpeckers flew in
and pecked at the long nose until it was its usual
size again.
"I have sent word to your father," said the
Fairy, "and he will be here to-night."
"Really? Is it true?" asked Pinocchio. as he
jumped about for joy. "Then if you are willing,
I should like to go to meet him."
"Go, then," said the Fairy, "but be careful




PINOCCHIO


not to lose yourself. Take the road through the
woods, and I am sure that you will meet him."
Pinocchio set out and ran into the woods.
But when he came near the Big Oak, he stopped
because he thought he heard something in the
bushes. Two persons stepped out into the road.
Can you guess who they were? They were the
cat and the fox.
"Why, here is our dear friend Pinocchio!"
cried the fox. "How did you happen to be here?"
"It is a long story," answered Pinocchio,
"and I will tell it to you when I have more time.
But do you know that after you left me the other
night at the inn I fell into the hands of assassins
on the road?"
"Assassins?" said the fox. "Poor Pinocchio!
And what did they want?"
"They wanted to rob me of my gold pieces,"
said he.
"Oh, the villains!" said the cat and the fox to-
gether.
"I ran away from them," said the mario-
nette, "but they followed me. At last they caught
me and hung me to a branch of the Big Oak."
"Wasn't that terrible!" said the fox and the
cat together.




PINOCCHIO REFUSES THE MEDICINE 81
"What are you doing here now?" asked the
fox.
"I am going to meet my papa, who may come
at any minute," said he.
"What have you done with your gold
pieces?" asked the fox.
"I have four of them in my pocket," said
Pinocchio. "I spent one at the Gray Goose Inn."
"And to think," said the cat, "that instead of
four pieces they might now be four thousand!"
"Why don't you listen to me?" said the fox,
"and go and plant your gold pieces in the Field
of Wonders to-day?"
"I cannot go to-day," said Pinocchio.
"Another day will be too late," said the fox.
"Why?" asked Pinocchio.
"Because the field has been sold to a man
who will not allow any one to plant money there
after to-day," said the fox.
"How far off is the Field of Wonders?" asked
Pinocchio.
"Not two miles," said the fox. "Will you
come with us? In half an hour you will be there.
You can plant your money at once, and in a few
minutes you can gather gold pieces until your
pockets are full. Will you come with us?"
6




PINOCCHIO


Pinocchio thought of the good Fairy. He
thought of Gepetto. He thought of the warnings
of the Talking Cricket. So he waited a little
while before answering. Then, like all boys who
have not a grain of sense, he ended by saying: "I
will go with you."
And they all went on together.
After they had walked for half a day, they
reached a town called "Trap for Blockheads."
As soon as Pinocchio entered the town, he saw
that the streets were full of dogs who had lost
their coats and were dying from hunger. There
were sheep that had sold their wool, and were
shivering with cold. There were roosters who
had run away from home and were begging for
corn.
"And where is the Field of Wonders?" asked
Pinocchio.
"It is only a step from here," said the fox.
They left the town and soon came to a field.
It looked like all other fields, but the fox said it
was the Field of Wonders.
"Here we are," he said. "Now stoop down
and dig a little hole in the ground and plant
your gold pieces in it."
Pinocchio did as he was told. He dug a hole




PINOCCHIO


"Officers, that poor marionette has been
robbed of four gold pieces. Take him and lock
him up in prison."
Pinocchio was so surprised that he could not
say a word to save himself from this unjust pun-
ishment. He was locked up in prison, and there
he remained for four months. At the end of that
time the king passed through the town and or-
dered all the prisoners to be set free. Except for
this, I cannot say how long Pinocchio might have
stayed there.
PINOCCHIO IS CAUGHT IN A TRAP
You can imagine Pinocchio's joy when he
found himself free. He at once left the town
and took the road that led to the Fairy's house.
On account of the rainy weather, the road
was like a marsh. Pinocchio sank in up to his
knees, but he would not give up. He tried to run
and splashed himself from head to foot. He
hoped to reach the Fairy's house before dark,
but he soon became so hungry that he tried to
find something to eat.
He saw some grapes in a field and jumped
over the hedge to gather them. Oh, that he had
never done it! He had hardly reached the vines
when his legs were caught between two iron




PINOCCHIO IS CAUGHT IN A TRAP 89
bars. They hurt him so much that he became
dizzy and stars danced before his eyes. He had
been caught in a trap that the farmer had set
to catch a thief who stole his chickens.
Pinocchio soon began to cry and scream. It
was useless for him to do this. There was not a
house in sight and not a single person passed
down the road.
At last night came on. The trap hurt the
marionette terribly, and he was afraid to be
alone in the fields after dark. Just at that mo-
ment he saw a fire-fly passing over his head, and
called to it.
"0 little fire-fly," he said, "will you have pity
on me and free me from this trap?"
"Poor boy!" said the fire-fly. "How did you
happen to be caught by those irons?"
"I came into the field to pick some grapes,"
said he.
"But were the grapes yours?" asked the fire-
fly.
"No," said Pinocchio, "but I was so hungry."
"Hunger is not a good reason for carrying
off other people's fruit," said the fire-fly.
"I know it," said Pinocchio. "I shall never
do it again."




PINOCCHIO


At that moment they heard the sound of
footsteps. It was the owner of the field, coming
to see if one of the weasels that ate his chickens
had been caught in the trap.
He took his lantern from under his coat, and
was surprised to see that he had caught a boy
instead of a weasel.
"You little thief!" said the farmer. "Then
it was you who carried off my chickens."
"No, it was not I! Indeed, it was not!" cried
Pinocchio. "I only came into the field to pick
some grapes."
"He who steals grapes would steal chickens,
too," said the farmer. "Now I shall give you a
lesson that you will not forget in a hurry."
Then the farmer opened the trap. He took
the marionette by the neck and carried him home
as if he had been a lamb. When he reached the
yard in front of his house, he threw the mario-
nette on the ground and put his foot on his neck.
"It is late and I wish to go to bed," he said.
"We shall settle this matter to-morrow. My dog
who watched the house died this morning and
you shall take his place to-night. You shall be
my watch-dog."
As the farmer said this, he took a heavy col-
































0-0
IA














"M I














"MY NAME IS NOT MELAMPo," SAID THE MARIONETTE





PINOCCHIO DISCOVERS ROBBERS 93
lar covered with brass nails and strapped it
around the marionette's neck. It was so tight
he could not draw his head out, and a heavy chain
held him fast to the wall.
"If it should rain to-night," said the farmer,
"you can go and lie down in the kennel. The
straw on which my dog has slept for the last four
years is still there. It will serve as a bed for
you. If robbers should come, be sure to keep
your ears open and to bark."
After saying this, the farmer went into the
house and shut the door.
Poor Pinocchio lay on the ground more dead
than alive from cold, hunger and fear. From
time to time he took hold of the collar and tried
to pull it off; but, at last, he went into the kennel
and fell fast asleep.

PINOCCHIO DISCOVERS THE ROBBERS
Pinocchio had been asleep for about two
hours, when he was aroused by some one whisp-
ering near him. He put the point of his nose out
of the kennel and saw four little beasts with
black fur. They looked like cats as they stood
whispering together. But they were not cats.
They were weasels. One of them came to the




PINOCCHIO


door of the kennel and said in a low voice: "Good
evening, Melampo."
"My name is not Melampo," said the mario-
nette. "I am Pinocchio."
"And what are you doing here?" asked the
weasel.
"I am acting as watch-dog," said he.
"Then where is Melampo?" asked the wea-
sel. "Where is the old dog who lived in this
kennel?"
"He died this morning," said he.
"Is he dead?" asked the weasel. "Poor dog!
He was so good. But I judge by your face that
you are also a good dog."
"I beg your pardon, I am not a dog," said
Pinocchio.
"Not a dog? Then what are you?" asked the
weasel.
"I am a marionette, and am only acting as
watch-dog," said the marionette.
"Well, then, I will offer you the same terms
that we made with the dead dog, said the wea-
sel. "I am sure you will be pleased with them."
"What are the terms? asked Pinocchio.
"One night in every week," said the weasel,
"you are to permit us to visit the poultry yard,




PINOCCHIO DISCOVERS ROBBERS 95
as we have always done. We will carry off eight
chickens. Seven of these chickens are to be
eaten by us, and one will be given to you. You
must pretend to be asleep, and you must never
bark and awake the farmer."
"Did Melampo do that?" asked Pinocchio.
"Certainly. We were always on the best of
terms with him," said the weasel. "Sleep quietly
and before we go we will leave beside the ken-
nel a fine chicken for your breakfast."
Thinking they were safe, the four weasels
went to the poultry yard, which was near the
kennel. They opened the gate with their claws
and slipped in one by one. But they had only
just passed through when they heard the gate
shut.
It was Pinocchio who had closed it, and he
also put a large stone against it to keep it closed.
Then he began to bark exactly like a dog. He
said, "Bow-wow, bow-wow!"
The farmer heard the barking and ran to
the window.
"What is the matter?" he asked.
"The robbers have come," said Pinocchio.
"Where are they?" he asked again.
"In the poultry yard," said Pinocchio.




PINOCCHIO


In less time than it takes to tell it, the farmer
came down with his gun in his hand. He
caught the weasels and put them into a bag.
Then he said to Pinocchio: "How did you man-
age to discover the four robbers? My faithful
dog Melampo never found out anything, and he
was such a good watch-dog, too."
The marionette might have told everything.
He might have told the farmer of the wicked
bargain that had been made between the wea-
sels and the dog, but he only said to himself:
"What is the good of saying anything about the
dead? The best thing to do is to leave them in
peace."
"When the thieves came into the yard, were
you asleep or awake?" asked the farmer.
"I was asleep," answered Pinocchio. "The
weasels woke me with their chatter. Then one
of them came to the kennel and said to me: 'If
you promise not to bark, and not to wake the
master, we will give you a fine chicken.' To think
that they should have dared to make such an
offer to me! I am only a poor marionette. I
have nearly all the faults in the world, but will
never be guilty of sharing in the gains of dis-
honest people!"




PINOCCHIO FINDS THE FAIRY


"Well said, my good boy!" cried the farmer.
"And in proof of my gratitude, I will at once set
you free, so you may go home."
Then he removed the dog-collar.
PINOCCHIO GOES TO FIND THE FAIRY AND HIS FATHER
As soon as Pinocchio was free from the dog-
collar, he started to run across the fields. He
did not stop until he came to the road that led
to the Fairy's house. Then he turned and looked
down into the valley.
He could see the woods where he met the fox
and the cat. He could see the top of the Big
Oak, to which he had been hung. But, although
he looked everywhere, nowhere could he see the
little house of the Fairy with the Blue Hair.
Suddenly he began to run, and in a few min-
utes he reached the field where the little house
had once stood, but it was no longer there. In-
stead of the house, there was a marble slab on
which these words were cut:
"Here Lies
The Fairy with the Blue Hair,
Who Died from Sorrow
Because She Lost Her
Little Brother Pinocchio."
You can imagine the marionette's feelings
when he spelled out these words. He burst into
7




PINOCCHIO


tears and fell on the ground. He cried all night
and when morning came, he was still crying.
"0 little Fairy," he sobbed, "why did you die?
Why didn't I die instead of you? I am so wicked
and you are so good!"
And in his grief, he tried to tear his hair, but
it was made of wood, and he could not run his
fingers through it. After a time he dried his
tears and set out to find the Fairy; for he could
not believe that she was dead.
When he had traveled for many miles, he
came to the sea-shore. It was lined with people
who were looking out on the water, shouting and
waving their arms.
"What has happened?" asked Pinocchio of
an old woman.
"A poor -father who has lost his son has gone
away in a boat to search for him," replied the
old woman. "The sea is so rough that the boat is
in danger of sinking.
"Where is the little boat?" he asked.
"It is out there where I am pointing," said
the old woman.
Pinocchio looked in that direction and saw
the tiny boat. It was so far away that it looked
like a nutshell with a very little man in it. All

































AT

-<-'-'i


,.


'.
















THEY SAW A LITTLE BOY JUMP FROM A ROCK INTO THE SEA




PINOCCHIO REACHES THE ISLAND 101
at once he screamed: "It is my papa! It is my
papa!"
Suddenly a great wave rose, and the boat
was seen no more.
"Poor man!" said the fishermen, as they
turned to go home.
Just then they heard a shout, and they
turned around. They saw a little boy jump
from a rock into the sea, as he said: "I will save
my papa!"
Being made of wood, Pinocchio floated eas-
ily, and swam like a fish. At one moment they
saw him go under the waves. Then he appeared
again. At last they lost sight of him, and he was
seen no more.
"Poor boy!" said the fishermen, as they
turned to go home.
PINOCCHIO REACHES THE ISLAND OF THE
INDUSTRIOUS BEES
Pinocchio hoped to be able to save his father,
and swam all night. And what a horrible night
it was! The rain came down in torrents. It
hailed. The thunder was awful, and the flashes
of lightning made it as light as day.
In the early morning he saw a long strip of
land not far off. It was an island in the midst of




PINOCCHIO


the sea. He tried to reach the shore, but the
waves tossed him about as if he had been a stick
or a straw. At last a great billow threw him far
up on the sands.
Pinocchio fell with such force that his ribs
and his bones creaked, but they did not break.
"Again I have had a lucky escape," he said
to himself.
Little by little the sky cleared, the sun shone
out and the sea became as quiet and as smooth
as oil.
The marionette put his clothes in the sun to
dry, and then he looked in every direction to see
if he could see a little boat with a man in it. He
looked and he looked, but he could see nothing,
except the sky and the sea.
"I wish I knew what this island is called,"
Pinocchio said to himself. "I should like to know
if the people have the habit of hanging boys to
the branches of the trees, but whom can I ask?"
The idea of being alone on this island made
him so mad that he was just beginning to cry.
But at that moment he saw a big fish swimming
by. It was swimming slowly with its head out
of the water.
Not knowing the name of the fish, he called


102




PINOCCHIO REACHES THE ISLAND 103
to it in a loud voice: "Mr. Fish, may I have a
word with you?"
"Yes, two if you wish," said the fish.
"Will you be kind enough to tell me if there
are any villages on this island?" said he. "I
should like to get something to eat without be-
ing in danger of being eaten myself."
"Certainly there are villages," said the fish.
"You will find one only a short distance from
here."
"And what road must I take to go there?"
asked Pinocchio.
"You must take the path on your left and
follow your nose," said the fish.
"Good-by, Mr. Fish," said Pinocchio. "Ex-
cuse the trouble I have given you. Many thanks
for your politeness."
Then he took the path that had been point-
ed out to him and walked as fast as he could. In
about half an hour he reached a little village
called "The Village of the Busy Bees."
The streets were full of people, running here
and there. All were at work. All had something
to do. You could not have found an idle person
if you had searched for him with a lighted lamp.
"Ah!" said the lazy Pinocchio at once, "I see




104 PINOCCHIO
that this is no place for me. I wasn't born to
work."
All this time Pinocchio was dying of hunger.
He saw a man coming down the road, panting for
breath. He was dragging two carts full of char-
coal after him.
"Please, sir," Pinocchio called to him, "will
you have the kindness to give me a halfpenny?
I am dying of hunger."
"You shall have not only a halfpenny," said
the man, "but if you will help me drag these two
carts home, I will give you two pennies."
"I am surprised at you," answered the mar-
ionette. "I do not care to do the work of a don-
key. I shall never draw a cart."
"Then, my boy," said the man, "eat a slice of
your pride for your breakfast."
In a few minutes a mason passed by. He
was carrying a heavy basket of lime on his shoul-
ders. Pinocchio called out to him: "Please, sir,
will you have the kindness to give me a half-
penny? I am dying of hunger."
"Carry the lime for me," said the mason,
"and I will give you five pennies."
"But the lime is heavy," said Pinocchio, "and
1 don't want to tire myself."












































"DRINK, MY BOY, IF YOU WISH TO," SAID THE LITTLE WOMAN


11 tl L


~a~j=.c ~


S-~-,4





PINOCCHIO REACHES THE ISLAND 107
"If you don't want to tire yourself," said the
mason, "amuse yourself by being hungry, and
much good may it do you."
In less than half an hour twenty other per-
sons went by. Pinocchio asked them to give him
something, but they all answered: "Instead of
begging, go and look for a little work and learn
to earn your own bread."
At last there came a little woman who was
carrying two cans of water.
"Will you give me a drink of water out of one
of your cans?" asked Pinocchio.
"Drink, my boy, if you wish to," said the lit-
tle woman as she set down the two cans.
Pinocchio drank like a fish, and as he dried
his mouth, he mumbled: "I have cured my thirst.
Now I should like to have something to eat."
The little woman heard these words and
said: "If you will help me carry home these two
cans of water, I will give you a fine piece of
bread."
Pinocchio looked at the cans, but he said
nothing.
"And besides the bread, you shall have some
cabbage with oil and sugar," said the little
woman.




PINOCCHIO


Pinocchio again looked at the cans, but he
said nothing.
"And after you have eaten the cabbage, I
will give you a pudding with some syrup."
The reward was too great for Pinocchio to
refuse.
"I will carry one of the cans to your house,"
he said at last.
The can was heavy, and the marionette was
not strong enough to carry it in his hapds. He
had to carry it on his head.
When they came to the house, the little wo-
man made Pinocchio sit down at a small table.
Then she placed before him the bread, the cab-
bage, and the pudding.
Pinocchio did not eat the food. He devoured
it. His stomach was like a house that no one had
lived in for five months. After he had eaten for
some time, he turned to look at the little woman,
and then he stared at her with his eyes and
mouth wide open.
"What has surprised you?" she asked.
"Are you really the Fairy?" asked Pinoc-
chio. "You have the same voice, and the same
blue hair. Oh, yes, it is really you!" he added,
as he threw his arms around her.


108




PINOCCHIO DECIDES TO BE GOOD 109
PINOCCHIO DECIDES TO BE A GOOD BOY
At first the little woman would not admit
that she was the Fairy with the blue hair. But
when she saw that Pinocchio knew her, she said:
"You little rogue! How did you happen to know
me?"
"It was my great love for you that told me,"
said he.
"But when you saw me last," said the Fairy,
"I was only a child. Now I have grown until I
am almost a woman."
"But how did you manage to grow so fast?"
asked he.
"That is a secret," said the Fairy.
"Teach it to me," said he. "Don't you see, I
am always no bigger than a ten-pin?"
"But you cannot grow," said the Fairy.
"Marionettes never grow. They are born mar-
ionettes. They live marionettes and they die
marionettes."
"I am tired of being a marionette," said Pin-
occhio, "I should like to be a real boy."
S.: And you will become one when you deserve
it," said:the Fairy..
W..h:_. at can I do to deserve it?" asked Pinoc-
chio.




110 PINOCCHIO .
"It is very easy," said the Fairy. "You only
have to learn to be good."
"I promise you," said Pinocchio, "that I will
begin to-day. I shall try to care for my papa.
But where is my papa?"
"I do not know," said she.
"Shall I ever see him again?" asked Pinoc-
chio.
"I think so," said the Fairy. "Yes, I am quite
sure of it."
When Pinocchio heard this he was wild with
joy. He was so pleased that he began to kiss the
Fairy's hands.
Then he said, "Dear Fairy, is it not true that
you were dead?"
"No, it seems that it is not true," said she.
"Oh, how glad I am!" said Pinocchio.
"You were very sad when you thought I was
dead," said the Fairy. "So I know you have a
good heart. And when boys have good hearts,
there is always hope for them even if they have
bad habits. That is why I came to care for you."
"Oh! how good of you!" shouted Pinocchio
as he jumped and clapped his hands for joy.
"Then you must obey me and do everything
that I ask you to do," said the Fairy.




. PINOCCHIO GOES TO SCHOOL 111
Jr "I shall always do that," said Pinocchio.
"To-morrow morning," said the Fairy, "you
will begin to go to school."
"I think it is too late for me to go to school
now," said the marionette.
"Oh, no," said the Fairy. "It is never too late
to learn."
"But I do not wish to follow any trade," said
the marionette.
"Why not?" asked the Fairy.
"Because it tires me to work," said the mar-
ionette.
"My boy," said the Fairy, "those who talk in
that way almost always end in a prison or in a
hospital. Some boys are born rich and some are
born poor, but all have to work. Woe to those
who lead idle lives. Idleness is a dreadful illness
and must be cured in childhood. If it is not
cured then, it can never be cured."
Pinocchio hung his head with shame and
said:
"I will study. I will work. I will do any-
thing you say so I may become a good boy."
PINOCCHIO GOES TO SCHOOL
The next day Pinocchio went to school.
All the boys roared with laughter when they




PINOCCHIO


saw a marionette walk into the school. They
played all kinds of tricks on him. One boy car-
ried off his cap and another pulled his jacket.
For a time Pinocchio pretended not to care,
but at last he lost his patience. Then he turned
to those who were teasing him and said: "Be
careful, boys. I did not come here to be made fun
of. I do not annoy you, and you shall not annoy
me."
"Hear this boaster!" said one of the boys
who tried to grab hold of Pinocchio's nose.
But Pinocchio reached out his foot and gave
him a kick on the knee.
"Oh, what hard feet!" cried the boy as he
rubbed the place where the marionette's wooden
foot had hit him.
"His hands are harder than his feet," said
another boy who tried to trip Pinocchio and re-
ceived a blow on his side.
All boys like a boy who will not let other boys
abuse him. So they soon became very fond of
Pinocchio. The teacher also liked him, for he al-
ways studied his lessons. He was the first to
come to school and he was the last to leave when
school was over.
But Pinocchio had one fault. He had too


112