• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Figures
 List of Tables
 Introduction
 Model test apparatus, procedure...
 Experimental results and discu...
 Volume change analysis
 Shoreline and hydrographic...
 Prototype application
 Concluding remarks
 Appendix A. Contour maps
 Appendix B. Results of empirical...
 Bibliography






Group Title: UFL/COEL (University of Florida. Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering Laboratory); 89/015
Title: Effects of seawalls on the adjacent beach
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076138/00001
 Material Information
Title: Effects of seawalls on the adjacent beach
Series Title: UFLCOEL
Physical Description: xii, 130 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Toue, Takao ( Dissertant )
University of Florida -- Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering Dept
Publisher: Coastal & Oceanographic Engineering Dept., University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1989
Copyright Date: 1989
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Sea-walls   ( lcsh )
Beaches   ( lcsh )
Breakwaters   ( lcsh )
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering thesis M.S   ( local )
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF   ( local )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Abstract: Beach erosion is found along many portions of the coast of the world. The causes of the erosion could be sea level rise, reduction in sediment supply, interruption of the littoral drift by structures. There are several conventional engineering solutions to combat such erosion. Those are (1) coastal structures such as groins, seawalls, breakwaters, and coastal dikes, and (2) non-structural solutions, such as beach nourishments. Among them, seawalls might be the most efficient and direct method to protect the up-land property provided that they are designed adequately. Recently, the adverse effects of seawalls on their fronting and adjacent beaches have gained great attention and raised criticism about the use of seawalls in the coastal area. The most often alleged effects are (1) offshore profile slope steepening, (2) intensified local scour, (3) transport of sand to a substantial distance offshore, (4) adverse down drift erosion and (5) delay post-storm recovery (Dean, 1986). Although numerous examples can be found from articles in newspapers or popular magazines reporting the adverse effects of seawalls, reliable and scientific based document is actually scarce. Moreover, the conclusion derived from the few technical reports on the adverse effects of seawalls remain controversial. Considering the merits of seawall as the reliable structure to protect upland erosion, abandoning of prohibiting seawalls altogether as means of coastal protection without firmly establishing their effects might be irrational. Therefore, there is a need to examine the effects of seawalls carefully and to quantify them if possible. Also, to examine the causes and effects of seawalls might lead to more rational design in the future.
Statement of Responsibility: by Takao Toue.
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 1989.
Bibliography: Bibliography: p. 126-129.
General Note: Document missing Abstract.
Funding: UFL/COEL (University of Florida. Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering Laboratory)
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076138
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20341078

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents 1
        Table of Contents 2
        Table of Contents 3
    List of Figures
        List of Figures 1
        List of Figures 2
        List of Figures 3
        List of Figures 4
    List of Tables
        List of Tables
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Model test apparatus, procedure and condition
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Experimental results and discussion
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
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        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Volume change analysis
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    Shoreline and hydrographic changes
        Page 71
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
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        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Prototype application
        Page 99
        Page 100
    Concluding remarks
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
    Appendix A. Contour maps
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
    Appendix B. Results of empirical eigenfunction analysis
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
    Bibliography
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
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