• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 List of Figures
 List of Tables
 List of symbols
 Abstract
 Introduction
 Vertical structure of suspension...
 Approach to vertical transport...
 Experiments
 Application to Lake Okeechobee
 Summary, conclusions and recom...
 Appendix A. Description of cores...
 Appendix B. Concentration profiles...
 Appendix C. Time-concentration...
 Bibliography






Group Title: UFL/COEL (University of Florida. Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering Laboratory) ; 89/017
Title: Erodibility of fine sediment in wave-dominated environments
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00076136/00001
 Material Information
Title: Erodibility of fine sediment in wave-dominated environments
Series Title: UFLCOEL
Physical Description: xvii, 141 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Hwang, Kyu-Nam, 1961- ( Dissertant )
Mehta, A. J. ( Reviewer )
Sheng, Y. P. ( Reviewer )
Reddy, K. R. ( Reviewer )
University of Florida -- Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering Laboratory
Publisher: University of Florida -- Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering Laboratory
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1989
Copyright Date: 1989
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Turbidity   ( lcsh )
Sediment transport   ( lcsh )
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering thesis M.S
Suspended sediments -- Measurement   ( lcsh )
Erosion -- Okeechobee, Lake -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States--Florida--Lake Okeechobee
 Notes
Abstract: Prediction of turbidity due to fine grained bed material load under wave action is critical to any assessment of anthropogenic impact on the coastal or lacustrine environment. Waves tend to loosen the mud deposit and generate steep suspension concentration gradients, such that the sediment load near the bottom is typically orders higher than that near the surface. In a physically realistic but simplified manner, a vertical sediment transport model was used to simulate prototype trends in the evolution of fine sediment concentration profiles and corresponding erodible bed depth under progressive, non-breaking wave action. field data collection and laboratory experiments were carried out with Lake Okeechobee bottom sediment to determine the characteristic parameters related tot he fine sediment erodibility under waves. these measured parameters served as input data for the transport model. Prior field observations support the simulated trends, which reveal the genesis of near-bed high concentration fluidized mud layer coupled with relatively low surficial concentrations. It is recognized that estimation of the depth of bottom erosion requires an understanding of mud dynamics and competent in situ sediment concentration profiling. Measurement of sediment concentration in the upper water column alone, without regard to the near bed zone, can lead to an order of magnitude underestimation of the erodible bed depth.
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 1989.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (leaves 137-140).
Statement of Responsibility: by Kyu-Nam Hwang.
General Note: Typescript.
General Note: Vita.
Funding: This publication is being made available as part of the report series written by the faculty, staff, and students of the Coastal and Oceanographic Program of the Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00076136
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 22340512

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Acknowledgement
        Acknowledgement
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents 1
        Table of Contents 2
        Table of Contents 3
    List of Figures
        List of Figures 1
        List of Figures 2
        List of Figures 3
        List of Figures 4
    List of Tables
        List of Tables 1
        List of Tables 2
    List of symbols
        Unnumbered ( 13 )
        Unnumbered ( 14 )
        Unnumbered ( 15 )
        Unnumbered ( 16 )
        Unnumbered ( 17 )
    Abstract
        Abstract
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Vertical structure of suspension under water
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Approach to vertical transport problem
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
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        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Experiments
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
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        Page 72
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        Page 74
    Application to Lake Okeechobee
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
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        Page 96
    Summary, conclusions and recommendations
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
    Appendix A. Description of cores from Lake Okeechobee
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
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    Appendix B. Concentration profiles from settling tests
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
    Appendix C. Time-concentration relationship from erosion tests
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
    Bibliography
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
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