• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Editor's note
 Introduction and Materials and...
 Results
 Discussion and conclusions
 Literature cited
 Figures and tables
 Appendix: Physical and biological...






Group Title: Technical paper / Florida Sea Grant College ; no. 35
Title: Data base formation and assessment of biotic and abiotic parameters associated with artificial reefs
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 Material Information
Title: Data base formation and assessment of biotic and abiotic parameters associated with artificial reefs
Series Title: Technical paper Florida Sea Grant College
Physical Description: 26 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Bortone, Stephen A
Van Orman, Doyal
Florida Sea Grant College
Publisher: Marine Advisory Program, Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1985
 Subjects
Subject: Artificial reefs -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Artificial reefs -- Computer programs   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Bibliography: p. 10-11.
Statement of Responsibility: by Stephen A. Bortone and Doyal Van Orman.
General Note: Grant NA80AA-D-00038.
Funding: This collection includes items related to Florida’s environments, ecosystems, and species. It includes the subcollections of Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit project documents, the Florida Sea Grant technical series, the Florida Geological Survey series, the Howard T. Odum Center for Wetland technical reports, and other entities devoted to the study and preservation of Florida's natural resources.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075986
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 13188717

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Editor's note
        Unnumbered ( 3 )
    Introduction and Materials and methods
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Results
        Page 7
        Page 6
    Discussion and conclusions
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Literature cited
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Figures and tables
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Appendix: Physical and biological data and correlation coefficient analysis
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
Full Text
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Technical Paper No. 35


DATA BASE FORMATION AND ASSESSMENT
OF BIOTIC AND ABIOTIC PARAMETERS
ASSOCIATED WITH ARTIFICIAL REEFS
by
Stephen A. Bortone
and
Doyal Van Orman



Central Science
Library
SEP 10 1987
University of Florida


Li


FLORIDA SEA GRANT COLLEGE












DATA BASE FORMATION AND ASSESSMENT OF BIOTIC
AND ABIOTIC PARAMETERS ASSOCIATED WITH ARTIFICIAL REEFS



by

Stephen A. Bortone

and

Doyal Van Orman



Biology Department
University of West Florida
Pensacola, Florida 32514



Project No. IR-83-12


Technical Papers are duplicated in limited quantities for specialized audi-
ences requiring rapid access to information and may receive only limited
editing. The text of this paper is retyped exactly from copy provided by the
senior author. This paper is provided by the Florida Sea Grant College with
support from NOAA Office of Sea Grant, U.S. Department of Commerce, grant
number NA80AA-D-00038. It was published by the Sea Grant Extension Service,
John T. Woeste, Dean, in conducting Cooperative Extension work in Agriculture,
Home Economics, and Marine Sciences, State of Florida, U.S. Department of
Agriculture, U.S. Department of Commerce, and Boards of County Commissioners,
cooperating. Printed and distributed in furtherance of the Acts of Congress
of May 8 and June 14, 1914. The Florida Sea Grant College is an Equal Employ-
ment Opportunity-Affirmative Action employer authorized to provide research,
educational information and other services only to individuals and institu-
tions that function without regard to race, color, sex, or national origin.






TECHNICAL PAPER NO. 35


July 1985






















































EDITOR'S NOTE:


A companion study, "Biological Survey and Analysis
of Florida's Artificial Reefs," by Stephen A. Bortone
and Doyal Van Orman is published in Technical Paper
No. 34, July 1985.








INTRODUCTION


There is a critical need for accurate data in order to make decisions
regarding the construction, emplacement, and further development of artificial
reefs in the State of Florida. The past, present and potential importance of
artificial reefs as a center for recreational and commercial fishing activi-
ties as well as a solution to problems in management and conservation of
marine fisheries has a direct affect on Florida's economy. At a meeting of
Florida Sea Grant's Reef Advisory Committee it was made clear through discus-
sion with the committee members that Florida needs to be able to make intelli-
gent and rational decisions concerning the emplacement of artificial reefs. A
problem arises, however, in the fact that there are too few data available on
which to base these decisions.

Through our continued discussions a point was made which might help solve
some of the immediate problems in the decision-making and evaluation process
as well as indicate the future needs regarding needed research on artificial
reefs. This has to do with determining what data on artificial reef biology
were available and then an evaluation of those data. A data matrix listing
reefs on the vertical axis and the associated biotic and abiotic data or
attributes available from published and non-published sources on the hori-
zontal axis would permit several goals of our initial investigations into the
future of artificial reef research to be realized: 1) a compilation of what
data were available; 2) an indication of the completeness and extensiveness of
the data; 3) a summary of the descriptive statistics of the data; 4) a prelim-
inary analysis of the relationship among the biotic and abiotic parameters
through correlation analysis; 5) some preliminary modeling of the artificial
reefs to form the basis of prediction through stepwise and multiple linear
regression analysis. This compilation, description and analysis would give
those of use interested in understanding the present state-of-knowledge, the
current status of available research, and questions which should be posed a
perspective on the entire subject.

This study is to be used in concert with two other Florida Sea Grant
College sponsored research projects: one dealing with an annotated biblio-
graphy of most of the available literature known to refer to artificial reefs;
and another review paper summarizing the past research on artificial reefs as
well as indicating trends and future needs in artificial reef research. The
present study when coupled with the other two studies will give investigators
interested in the development and future status of Florida's artificial reefs
a distinct advantage in planning future research so that it will be efficient,
significant, and useful to all those interested in this potentially valuable
resource.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

A careful search was made to find sources of data for the matrix. Al-
though there are literally thousands of articles written on artificial reefs,
our prime concern was to find articles in which a field study had been con-
ducted which addressed both biological and non-biological data. A second
concern was to obtain data from studies relevant and applicable to Florida
zoogeographic areas. Therefore, our main emphasis was on studies conducted in
the Carolinian province, and in the subtropical and tropical Western Atlantic.








Studies from areas outside those mentioned above were considered if they were
particularly complete and/or if they were from areas where at least compari-
sons might be made on the family or the generic level.

In total, data were obtained from 177 reefs primarily from Florida and
the southeastern coastal areas of the United States. These reefs were listed
on the vertical axis, and their associated physical and biological parameters
were listed horizontally. The physical data were obtained directly from the
research sources or, as in many cases because the data were incomplete or
lacking, the data were supplemented from other sources. Below are presented
the physical parameters considered in this report along with the code used in
the computer printout found in the appendix, the criteria for inclusion,
definition of units, and source of information.

Each reef was assigned a five digit identification number. The first two
digits of the number indicate the state in which the reef is located. The
third digit gives its geographic area (generally follows those areas from the
Florida Artificial Reef Atlas), and the final two digits identify the specific
site. For permitted reefs in Florida the areas and sites correspond to the
numbers listed in the Atlas of Artificial Reefs published by Florida Sea
Grant, Non-permitted Florida reefs and reefs located in other states can be
identified from the literature references.

The state legend is as follows:


00 Florida
02 New Hampshire
04 Rhode Island
06 New York
08 Delaware
10 Virginia
12 South Carolina
14 Alabama
16 Louisiana
18 California
20 Washington
22 Mexico
24 Virgin Islands

The following is a listing of reef
to the literature cited:

Reef Number

00348
00429
00634/00640
00635
00636
00637/00638
00639
07011/07111/12011
12010
14001


01 Maine
03 Massachusetts
05 Connecticut
07 New Jersey
09 Maryland
11 North Carolina
13 Georgia
15 Mississippi
17 Texas
19 Oregon
21 Hawaii
23 Puerto Rico
25 All others

identification numbers with references


Literature

Stone et al., 1979
Smith et al., 1979
Hastings, 1979
Bortone, 1976
Wickham et al., 1973
Hastings et al., 1976
Klima and Wickham, 1969
Steimle and Ogren, 1982
Parker et al., 1979
Crozier et al., 1977









15001
16001
18001/18002/18003
20008
20010
23001
24001


Lukens, 1981
Sonneir et al., 1976
Turner et al., 1969
Walton, 1982
Hueckel and Slayton, 1982
Fast, 1974
Randall, 1963


Below are listed the headings on the computerized data matrix as printed
in the appendix:


YR-BLT:



MATERIALS:


Year built, usually determined from Florida
Sea Grant's Atlas of Artificial Reefs (Aska
and Pybas, 1983).

Primary material of which the reef was composed:


A = Aluminum
R = Rubber tires
C = Cement
S = Steel


P = Plastic or fiberglass
F = Fish aggregating device
N = Natural materials (rocks)
W = Wood


L = Low, S = Special


ham (1971).

AREA:

DEPTH:

SUBSTRATE:


DST-SHORE:

DRAINAGE:


The profile should be a ratio of height to water
depth, but for our purposes structures such as
boats, barges, ships, or other vessels were
considered to have high profile. Rubber, tires,
etc., were considered to have low profile. The
category "special" indicates mid-water fish
attractors such as those used by Klima and Wick


Recorded as M2 when available.

Recorded in meters.

Recorded as: S = sand; M = mud; G = gravel;
C = coral; R = rocks; 1 = shell material;
V = vegetation.

Nearest landfall in nautical miles.

Each major watershed for the Florida coastal area
was assigned an identifying number:


Nassua Sound
lolomato River
Halifax River
Indian River
Biscayne Bay
San Carlos Bay
Tampa Bay
Suwannee River


St. Johns Rivers
Mantanzas River
Banana River
Lake Worth
Florida Bay
Charlotte Harbor
Waccasassa Bay
Deadman Bay


PROFILE:


H = High,








17 = Apalachee Bay
19 = St. Andrews Bay
21 = Pensacola Bay
23 = Mobile Bay
25 = Big Marco River


DST-PASS:


DRAIN-VOL:





DST-100F



WIND-DIR:


WIND-VEL:




LATITUDE:


CURR-DIR:





TIDE-TYPE:


TIDAL-VA:


W-STMP-L:


W-STMP-H:

W-STMP-A:


18 = Apalachicola Bay
20 = Choctawhatchee Bay
22 = Perdido Bay
24 = Mississippi Sound


A drainage code was then assigned to each reef
based on its proximity to that drainage.

Distance in nautical miles to the pass or en-
trance of the closest drainage.

Mean volume of discharge of the nearest drainage
in cubic feet per second. Sources for the drain-
age information was State Univ. System of Florida
Institute of Oceanography (1973), U.S. Dept. of
Interior (1975), and U.S. Dept. of Comm. (1980).

Distance in nautical miles to the 100 fathom
depth. Plotted and measured from NOAA charts
1:80000 and 1:486200.

Predominant wind direction. The direction in
degrees from which the wind most often blows.
Obtained from Bureau of Land Management charts,
Outer Continental Shelf, Eastern Gulf of Mexico,
Visual No. 6.

Mean wind velocity recorded in nautical miles per
hours (knots). Obtained from Bureau of Land
Management charts, Outer Continental Shelf,
Eastern Gulf of Mexico, Visual No. 6.

Latitude of the site recorded as xx degrees xx
minutes xx seconds.

Resultant water current entered in degrees.
Recorded as the direction the current sets and
obtained from Bureau of Land Management charts,
Outer Continental Shelf, Eastern Gulf of Mexico,
Visual No. 6.

S = semidiurnal; D = diurnal; M = mixed. Obtain-
ed from Fernald (1981).

Tidal variation. No data were obtained for this
category.


Lowest winter surface temperature.
Farenheit.

Highest winter surface temperature.

Average winter surface temperature.


Entered in









S-STMP-L:

S-STMP-H:

S-STMP-A:

W-BTMP-L:

W-BTMP-H:

W-BTMP-A:

S-BTMP-L:

LONGITUD:


S-BTMP-H:

S-STMP-A:

W-SSAL-L:


W-SSAL-H:

W-SSAL-A:

S-SSAL-L:

S-SSAL-H:

S-SSAL-A:

W-BSAL-L:

W-BSAL-H:

W-BSAL-A:

S-BSAL-L:

S-BSAL-H:

S-BSAL-A:

WINTER:


SUMMER:


WIN-SUM:


Total number of individuals within
reef for Dec., Jan., and Feb.

Total number of individuals within
reef for June., Jul., and Aug.

The combined sums of the above.


each family by


each family by


Lowest summer surface temperature.

Highest summer surface temperature.

Average summer surface temperature.

Lowest winter bottom temperature.

Highest winter bottom temperature.

Average winter bottom temperature.

Lowest summer bottom temperature.

Longitude entered as xx degrees xx minutes xx
seconds.

Highest summer bottom temperature.

Average summer bottom temperature.

Lowest winter surface salinity recorded as part
per thousand.

Highest winter surface salinity.

Average winter surface salinity.

Lowest summer surface salinity.

Highest summer surface salinity.

Average summer surface salinity.

Lowest winter bottom salinity.

Highest winter bottom salinity.

Average winter bottom salinity.

Lowest summer bottom salinity.

Highest summer bottom salinity.

Average summer bottom salinity.








Logarithm scale of winter abundance.


LSUM: Logarithm scale of summer abundance.

LWIN-LSUM: Logarithm scale of combined winter and summer
abundance.

Species identified in the -literature were arranged according to the
Hoese, Moore, and Sonneir (1977) classification scheme. Those species not
included in their publication were entered at the end of appropriate families.
In cases where information was incomplete only the family identification code
was used. These data were recorded for each reef with he reported abundance
entered for each species in the appropriate season in which the data were
collected. This provided abundance figures by seasons for each species by
reef. If seasonal information was lacking, the abundance was entered as
annual data. In instances where abundance was reported in qualitative terms
numerical values were substituted for comparative analysis purposes. The
numeric values uses were: rare = 1; moderate or occasional = 10; common or
frequent = 100; and abundant = 1000.

For analysis the biological data set was reduced to four families which
are represented by the following codes: 54 = Serranids; 62 = Carangids; 65 =
Lutjanids; and 68 = Haemulids. These families represent the majority of reef
target species sought by recreational fishermen, and most often addressed in
terms of reef fisheries management. The summer and winter seasons were se-
lected for analysis because the greatest amount of biological abundance data
was recorded for those seasons by the majority of the most thorough studies.

RESULTS

Physical parameters were obtained on 177 artificial reefs. Of these, 155
were permitted Florida reefs, and-the remainder from other states, Puerto
Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The composition of these structures was pre-
dominantly steel, a combination of steel, rubber, and concrete (mixed), or
concrete (Fig. 1). Their physical attributes indicate a broad variance in
most features (Table 1). It is noted that the reef areas, considered one of
the most important factors by Smith (1972) and Walton (1982), was only ad-
dressed by seven of the studies. Other prominent factors such as the height
of the structures, their cryptic nature, and accurate evaluations of the
compositions of the substrate upon which they were placed were so few and
varied that they had to be estimated and recorded in qualitative terms. As
such they could not be used as part of the descriptive statistics of physical
features or in the data matrix for analysis.

Of the 177 artificial structures for which physical data were available,
only 23 provided biological information which paralleled our needs. Out of
these 23 reefs, only nine were noted in Florida coastal waters, and only one
study addressed a (1) Florida permitted reef (Smith et. al., 1979). Four of
the other studies were conducted within the Carolinian province, and two in
the tropical Western Atlantic. The remaining eight studies encompassed other
coastal areas of the United States.


LWIN:









Reduction of the biotic data to four key families with abundance figures
for winter and/or summer periods resulted in lowering the number of studies
containing usable information to 11 reefs (Crozier et. al., 1977; Fast, 1974;
Hastings, 1979; Hastings et. al., 1976; Klima and Wickham, 1969; Randall,
1963; Steimle and Ogren, 1982; Stone et. al., 1979; Wickham et. al., 1973).
To complicate matters, two studies (on three separate reefs) presented
abundance data in qualified terms such as rare, common, etc., and necessitated
the conversion of the figures to a log scale for purposes of analysis (Crozier
et. al., 1977; Hastings et. al., 1976). One study covering three reefs
recorded only five species for each reef (Steimle and Ogren, 1982). The
overall effect was that out of the reduced data, a combination of six to nine
studies (depending on whether or not they contained data for all families for
both seasons) were used for analysis (Table 2).

Correlation coefficient analysis was used to indicate relationships
between biotic and abiotic variables associated with the reefs (Appendix).
Correlations which were noted as significant (.05 level) are presented by
family.

SERRANIDS

Winter abundance was negatively correlated with: river drainage volume,
winter surface salinity, and summer surface salinity. Summer abundance
was negatively correlated with winter surface salinity.

CARANGIDS

Winter abundance was negatively correlated with drainage volume, current
velocity, winter surface salinity, and summer surface salinity. Winter
abundance was positively correlated with distance from 100 fathoms.

LUTJANIDS

Both winter and summer abundance were positively correlated with depth
and distance from shore.

HAEMULIDS

Winter abundance was negatively correlated with drainage volume and
current velocity. Both winter and summer abundance was positively cor-
related with year built and winter surface temperature.

In most instances, family abundance was correlated to non-controllable
factors such as drainage volume, temperature, salinity, and current velocity.
The Lutjanids were the only family for which there were correlations (depth
and distance to shore) that could be controlled by persons constructing arti-
ficial reefs.

Stepwise regression and attempts to build a predictive model using mul-
tiple linear regression were unsuccessful because of the number of missing
data in the cells of the matrix.








Logarithm scale of winter abundance.


LSUM: Logarithm scale of summer abundance.

LWIN-LSUM: Logarithm scale of combined winter and summer
abundance.

Species identified in the -literature were arranged according to the
Hoese, Moore, and Sonneir (1977) classification scheme. Those species not
included in their publication were entered at the end of appropriate families.
In cases where information was incomplete only the family identification code
was used. These data were recorded for each reef with he reported abundance
entered for each species in the appropriate season in which the data were
collected. This provided abundance figures by seasons for each species by
reef. If seasonal information was lacking, the abundance was entered as
annual data. In instances where abundance was reported in qualitative terms
numerical values were substituted for comparative analysis purposes. The
numeric values uses were: rare = 1; moderate or occasional = 10; common or
frequent = 100; and abundant = 1000.

For analysis the biological data set was reduced to four families which
are represented by the following codes: 54 = Serranids; 62 = Carangids; 65 =
Lutjanids; and 68 = Haemulids. These families represent the majority of reef
target species sought by recreational fishermen, and most often addressed in
terms of reef fisheries management. The summer and winter seasons were se-
lected for analysis because the greatest amount of biological abundance data
was recorded for those seasons by the majority of the most thorough studies.

RESULTS

Physical parameters were obtained on 177 artificial reefs. Of these, 155
were permitted Florida reefs, and-the remainder from other states, Puerto
Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The composition of these structures was pre-
dominantly steel, a combination of steel, rubber, and concrete (mixed), or
concrete (Fig. 1). Their physical attributes indicate a broad variance in
most features (Table 1). It is noted that the reef areas, considered one of
the most important factors by Smith (1972) and Walton (1982), was only ad-
dressed by seven of the studies. Other prominent factors such as the height
of the structures, their cryptic nature, and accurate evaluations of the
compositions of the substrate upon which they were placed were so few and
varied that they had to be estimated and recorded in qualitative terms. As
such they could not be used as part of the descriptive statistics of physical
features or in the data matrix for analysis.

Of the 177 artificial structures for which physical data were available,
only 23 provided biological information which paralleled our needs. Out of
these 23 reefs, only nine were noted in Florida coastal waters, and only one
study addressed a (1) Florida permitted reef (Smith et. al., 1979). Four of
the other studies were conducted within the Carolinian province, and two in
the tropical Western Atlantic. The remaining eight studies encompassed other
coastal areas of the United States.


LWIN:









DISCUSSION


There is no shortage of literature which addresses artificial reefs, and
while many of the studies were designed to accomplish certain goals in arti-
ficial reef research most were not directed to support the type of information
needed in this investigation. Within the available publications there exists
a definite lack of continuity in the way researchers assess standing crops and
present the results of their investigations.

Different methods of measuring the density and diversity of artificial
reef communities include timed and non-timed spot counts, transect evalua-
tions, kill and collect results, and hook and line assessments. Variations in
the time frames in which the studies were conducted covered single and short
term limited observations, seasonal studies with several assessments, and
controlled samplings at regular intervals over extended periods.

The contrast in formats used in reporting the results of the studies was
also significant. Some studies reported only on the target species on a reef
while others recorded all species observed, but failed to provide abundance
data or presented the information in qualitative terms. Other methods in-
cluded reporting seasonal abundance as it was collected and recorded, or
consolidating the results of extended efforts into one figure which ignored
the impact of seasonal fauna changes. Few thoroughly addressed the influence
of physical features to biological observations. This resulted in many miss-
ing cells in the data matrix and prevented analysis using stepwise and mul-
tiple linear regression.

These are examples of the variations in methodology which serve to ad-
versely influence results of data combined from a wide range of sources. Con-
sidered in concert with the results of the data reduction and statistical
analysis, it appears that the variations in sampling techniques and reporting
methods would cause non-representative results.
CONCLUSIONS

Wide variations in the methodology in existing literature make it impos-
sible to construct a data matrix and mathematical model which will be useful
in predicting fish populations on artificial reefs. A consistent point which
appeared as a result of our efforts is that a common or convertible method of
collecting and reporting data is necessary if we expect to rely upon each
other's research result for information useful in interpreting conditions and
making decisions concerning management and research.

While this investigation failed to establish a functional data base, it
provided other significant information. It helped provide valuable insight
into our present status in evaluating artificial structures, the wide range of
efforts being expended on artificial reef research by the scientific
community, and a direction in which to proceed to attain our future research
goals. It exemplified the need to construct a data matrix for use as a tool
in directing further functional research, and established the necessary
methodology with which it can be initiated. Then, as more and better data are
produced, it will be possible to construct a predictive mathematical model.








Most of all, the results clearly show that a concerted, unified effort is
needed if research is to proceed in a positive direction which will lead to
the proper answers for successful management of our marine resources.








LITERATURE CITED


Aska, D. Y., and D. W. Pybas. 1983. Atlas of artificial reefs in Florida.
Florida Sea Grant College, 15 p.

Bortone, S. A. 1976. Effects of a hurricane on the fish fauna at Destin,
Florida. Florida Sci. 39(4): 245-248.

Buckley, R. M. 1982. Marine habitat enhancement and urban recreational
fishing in Washington. Mar. Fish. Rev. 44(6-7): 28-37.

Crozier, G. F., R. L. Shipp, T. Mcllwain, N. J. Doorenbos, D. L. Daniels, L.
E. Brown, D. Dean, E. E. Jones, D. Clarke, J. Uebelacker, R. Lukens, and
J. Booker. 1977. Development of Gulf Coast Artificial Reefs. In Final
Report: NOAA/Sea Grant 04-5-158-54-07 (1). 33 p.

Fast, D. E. 1974. Comparative studies of fish species and their populations
on artificial and natural reefs off southwestern Puerto Rico. M.S.
Thesis, Univ. Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras. 90 p.

Fernald, E. A. Ed. 1981. Atlas of Florida. 276 p.

Hastings, R. W. 1979. The origin and seasonality of the fish fauna on a new
jetty in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Bull. Florida State Mus., Biol.
Sci. 24(1): 1-222.

Hastings, R. W., L. H. Ogren, and M. T. Mabry. 1976. Observations on the
fish fauna associated with offshore platforms in the northeastern Gulf of
Mexico. Fish Bull. 74(2): 387-402.

Hoese, H. D., R. H. Moore, and V. F. Sounier. 1977. Fishes of the Gulf of
Mexico. 327 p.

Hueckel, G. J., and R. L. Stayton. 1982. Fish foraging on an artificial reef
in Puget Sound, Washington. Mar. Fish. Rev. 44(6-7): 38-44.

Klima, E. F., and D. A. Wickham. 1969. Attractions of coastal pelagic fishes
with artificial structures. Trans. Amer. Fish. Soc. 100(1): 86-99.

Lukens, R. R. 1981. Ichthyofaunal colonization of a new artificial reef in
the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. Gulf Research Report 7(1): 41-46.

Parker, R. 0., Jr., R. B. Stone, and C. C. Buchanan. 1979. Artificial reefs
off Murrells Inlet, South Carolina. Mar. Fish. Rev. 41(9): 12-24.

Randall, J. E. 1963. An analysis of the fish populations of artificial and
natural reefs in the Virgin Islands, Carib. J. Sci. 3(1): 31-47.

Smith, G. B., D. A. Hensley, and H. H. Mathews. 1979. Comparative efficacy
of artificial and natural Gulf of Mexico reefs as fish attractants.
Florida Mar. Research Pub., No. 35, p. 7.








Smith, L. 1972. Construction and studies of an artificial reef of Brunswick,
Georgia. Proceedings of sport fishing seminar, Coastal Plains Center for
Marine Development Services, Seminar Series 1: 5-6.

Sonneir, F., J. Tierling, and H. D. Hoese. 1976. Observations on the
offshore reef and platform fish fauna of Louisiana. Copeia 1: 105-111.

State University System of Florida, Institute of Oceanography. 1973. A sum-
mary of knowledge of the eastern Gulf of Mexico.

Steimle, F. W., Jr., and L. Ogren. 1982. Food fish collected on artificial
reefs in the New York bight and off Charleston, South Carolina. Mar.
Fish. Rev. 44(6-7): 49-52.

Stone, R. B., H. L. Pratt, R. 0. Parker, Jr., and G. E. Davis. 1979. A
comparison of fish populations on an artificial and natural reef in the
Florida Keys. Mar. Fish. Rev. 41(9): 1-11.

Turner, C. H., E. E. Ebert, and R. R. Givens. 1969. Man-made reef ecology.
Calif. Dept. Fish Game, Fish Bull. 146, 221 p.

U. S. Department of Commerce. 1980. Eastern U.S. coastal and ocean zones
data atlas. Office of Coastal Zone Management, U.S. Dept. of Comm.,
Washington, D.C.

U.S. Department of Interior. 1975. Bureau of Land Management. Compilation
of historical and existing physical oceanographic data from the eastern
Gulf of Mexico. Bureau of Land Management Contract No. 08550-014-16. 97p.

Walton, J. W. 1982. The effects of an artificial reef on resident flatfish
populations. Mar. Fish. Rev. 44(6-7): 45-48.

Wickham, D. A., J. W. Watson, Jr., and L. H. Ogren. 1973. The efficacy of
midwater artificial structures for attracting pelagic sport fish. Trans.
Am. Fish. Soc. 102(3): 563-572.

Woodhead, P. M. J., J. H. Parker, and I. W. Duedall. 1982. The coal-waste
artificial reef program (C-WARP): A new resource potential for fishing
reef construction. Mar. Fish. Rev. 44(6-7): 16-23.








FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTION OF ARTIFICIAL


BY TYPE


OF MATERIAL


STEEL

MIXED

CONCRETE

TIRES

MIDWATER

UNKNOWN

ALUMINIUM

PLASTIC

ROCK


10 20 30 40 50


NUMBER OF REEFS


REEFS


60


FIGURE I.








TABLE 1. DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS OF
VARIABLE N

Year Built 148

Reef Areas (M2) 7

Depth (M) 174

Distance to Shore* 169

Distance to Pass* 154

Nearest Drainage Vol. (M3/SEC) 95

Distance to 100 Fath* 161

Wind Velocity** 164

Current Velocity** 147

0 Winter Surface Temp (Co) 163

Summer Surface Temp (Co) 163

Winter Bottom Temp (Co) 25

Summer Bottom Temp (Co) 25

Winter Surface Salinity (/oo) 162

Summer Surface Salinity (0/oo) 162

Winter Bottom Salinity (0/oo) 25

Summer Bottom Salinity (0/oo) 25


*Nautical Miles
**Knots


THE PHYSICAL
X

1974

209

25

7

9

232

46

12

1

20

28

23

25

30

31

6

35


FEATURES FOR
SD

8

157

20

6

7

211

38

1

1

3

1

2

1

11

10

6

1


177 ARTIFICIAL REEFS
MIN MAX

1920 1982

40 450

2 115

0 29

0 31

6 892

.3 127

11 14

.1 3

14 23

28 29

15 23

24 29

5 36

5 36

5 35

35 36










TABLE 2. DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS FOR THE NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS OF FOUR MAJOR
FAMILIES OF FISHES OCCURRING ON ARTIFICIAL REEFS DURING THE SUMMER AND
(IN PARENTHESES) WINTER SEASONS

FAMILY NO. OF STUDIES NO. OF INDIVIDUALS SD MIN MAX


Serranidae
G roupe rs/Seabasses


Carangidae
Jacks


Lutjanidae
Snappers


Haemulidae
Grunts


369
(343)


1340
(1012)


613
(359)


1257
(774)


580 2 1502
(582) (1) (1501)


1434
(1096


983
(804)


15 4000
(0) (2022)


0 2101
(0) (2000)


750 50 2010
(759) (6) (2000)












APPENDIX

Physical and Biological Data

and

Correlation Coefficient Analysis












SUNS r2T BID/DATAI FO CERTAIN TAnILIts


OBS IEF rAIJILT VINTER SUMMER


VIN SUl LVIN


LSUM LVIH SiU


2.7011
2.1391
0.1931
14. 011
2.414?


(.2114
3.2511
5.1358
11.1577
2.4371
1.5(03


i 11348

3 (1104
1 00113
4 01348
10434
6 00134
1 00434
S 00834
9 06436
10 00137
It 00137
I2 00637
13 00137
14 00431
15 03001
16 00(31
!7 00631
18 00437
19 07011
20 1:011
21 14001
22 14100
:3 14001
14 14001
25 :3001
26 230C;
:7 13001
21 :300:
;7 14001
30 24001
31 24031


II
I!
4
494
7
0
0



i
31 1
2012


1010
2312
1012
30






1501
2000
2000
:000

15

15
3;
Hq


23
15
25
1201


65
0
50
300
400
1510
2001
1000
1222
2420
;21
2010
4000
7
60
1502
2111
1;01
200




4(3
21,
25
187:


34




0
'5
0
56


711
3522
2112
2010
1454
4442
151
3111




3013
4112
4101
4000
3
315
32
697


1.7911 3.9120
12.1155
I1.1111 11.4207
14.1181 32.2362
.91071 13.1155
7.2103 6.9071
12 1111 20.7233
11.1207 34 1414
4 7.9078 9.2103
(.(1071 .2103
11.5129 116. 11
27.1310
1.9459
(.0307
29.9334 29.7331
13.1155 20 7233
13.1155 10.4207
13.8155 13. 155
0.0000 0 0000
2 7011 5 7031
2.3021 5 ;193
6.3135 14 4970
S11.901C
3.2189
16 7981


1.1774
4.3144
5.2470
21.5501
4.41t
1.5403


4.1254


z0.5154
3(.0303
14.4139
9.9135
23.4165
40.1172
10.471?
17 0011




34.7150
22.1096
17.1070
15.2011
0 6931
5 7526

6 1421
15.1421


10:01 THUISDAT, DECEMBt R 11, 1913 1





















MERGED PHYSICAL AND REDUCED 810 DATA


L C
A U
T A.
I I
T

0 I
E R

212235

232235
252235
252235

302300 310
302300 130
301300 330





300030 315
300030 315

300702 315
300712 315
300712 315

300712 311

315







V S
I U
N M
T M
E E
R 8

II II
15 15

4 15
144 1201
7 9
0 65

0 0
4 50

311 400
2012 1510
I11 2001
i 010 1000
3122 !22 0
1022 :43O0
0 1221
1101 I10
1 000
Z a


T T V V V
I I -
D O S 5 S



T P P P

I I L H
PA L N A


M II 71 74

M 71 74 1
0 41 78 74
8 11 71 74

0 41 5t 57
0 4( 5 57
D (t 59 57
O 4 51 57
0 1 74 14
0 42 74 44
D 1 74 14
O 6 74 44
D (2 74 14
D 14 74 44
D 42 74 14
0 42 7 614
D 12 74 44
D 12 74 64










L L
V S
I U
N M

2.7041 I 2716
2.r111 3 25 11
0 1i11 5 1351
14 0$16 10 1577
2.4849 2 4391
8 5$ 03

I 71HIk, 3 1120
13 1155
11 .111 18 4207
I 11081 3122362
4 .107 13 1155
9 21013 1 171
16 1111 .0 7233
1i 4207 36 8414
6 1071 9 1103
II 511 : 1111

1' 0c30
030
220


5 5
S 5
T T
Ht H
P F


L R

III
10 88
Iq I)


80 a8

II It
10 1f
80 8I
80 01



10 11
10 8I
00 It


II 11
10 II
I0 II
80 04










V
I




U
M

8.1774
4 31 44
5 1470
11 5501
4 4198
8 501

4 0154

20 5954
34 30303
14 4213

21 6865

40 8172
1 01it
17 t00l
07 2308


1 00341 72
1 00348 72
1 00348 71
4 00348 71
5 10434 68
6 01044 68
7 00314 41
8 00434 48
1 00431 71
10 00637
11 00437
11 00437
13 00637
14 00138
15 00 311



18 00639 6
19 07011 61
20 1 011 47


1I Sil 1 0
is S 7 00


S L
0
a N
T C
8 1

U



020841
820840
800840



413024

!il0:4





ii3 410
I5412 4
8546.4
854244
II((4


o1003 THURSDAY, OECEMBER Is. t181

























EIRGED PHYSICAL AND REDUCED B10 DATA


T T V V v S S S V V V S

0 D S S S S S I I I
OOSSSSSS3t12
EATTTTTTTTTT
E A T T T T T T T T T T
_ H m M m K m x K m i
T F P P P P F P P P
- - -
PAL AL AL Al


175380
171352
17512


V V V S S


L
V
I
N

20 0338
13 8155
:3 1!55
3. 8253

:70211
O 23084
. ltl5


11 .407

13 1255
0 0100
S 7031
S 1930
14 4970
! 9010
i 1119
;i 7V11


L
V

N







S735

19 1074
t15. 101
1) 131

1 1252

IS I1(1


1.03 TTIURSDAY. DECEMItR 15, 113
























FAMILt.54

VAR: ABLE N MEAN T5O DEV SUN MINIHUM Mki IMll




!R SLT i1 57141117 5 0943794 40.00000000 0t 7'

AREA 4 iss o00000000 1oo1 0il 11 7 20.00000000 (o 36

PT0 0 i 37;10000 54391327 131 00000000 3z

3ST -;RE IC OOCCo ) 71414490 z8 911 000000 0

3ST_.FASS 4 $ "2000002 4'.i o0 I 000u000 i 1

R01IN V0 3 7018 616 7 114.04C02434 zIlIt.0000 000 0i7 8351

;ST ;.CT ( 47,50000 20 15694i69 137 0000t00 so0

VIN CVL 4 ItI !700000 0 31000000 44 70000C000 I 1:

,URI VEL 0 1333]333 0) 05773)10 0 70000000 0 0

V S7F? 7; 00000 c400o0 009 ,st 0000000c01 7 71




V _SS'L .A 4 16,666 t I 1,4700,4 104 00000000 34 31

S 55l. 3 34 333133333 C 770350' 103 0000000 ;4 35

';;il7? 341 83333313 12 1300i6 100 00000000 1 i;:0

.iN 11i :2710 7 it l600;1534 67 3627$436 0 30

U."'ER )1 333133331 : 8 4I3(1 .1 3124 00000000 2 :502

ViN _Um s 7 ;S6616 ; 71 196671?19 5221 000000000 3 3003

:53.7 1 i -7'i :1 :::, 17 il5816C0 C 00

LV" i' .:H944 : 0 t906I 93 13 7 8l6l : 35






























19


10 03 THURSDAY. DECEMBER 1. lt3


MIRGID PHYSICAL AND REDUCED 110 DATA






















ERGED ?HTSICAL tAND REDUCED 810 DATA 10 03 THURSDAY, DECEMHBE 15. 1183
FA(ILY=4

CORRELATION COrtFIC:INTS I PROu :R: UNDER HO:RHO.0 I H8UNBt OF 0SERVATIONS

Ta sLT AXE DEPTH OST SHRE DST FASS oDRAIVO oST_r100 VIXDVEL CURRVtL VSTMPA SSTMF_A V STTP?_ S_STMP_



R 0 1788 -0 11402 0.77577 0 (3318 0 11878 -0.94114 0 53941 -0 55I07 -O.tlll4 -0 116t5 0 0 000
1 ;121 0 9126 0.2131 0 2501 0 3312 0 till 0 410 0 443f 0.1 11 0. 88 4 1 0000
4 3 5 5 4 3 4 4 3 4 3


IUmER 3 60439 0 79737 0 27313 0 l06IS -0 015 -0 74788 0. $847 -0 4(J74 -0 14711 -0.0198 0 00000
0 1506 3 :024 0 1121 0 9501 0 9749 0 4811 0.4015 0.542 0 4611 0.9100 1.0000
7 4 1 8 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 0

VI S-S 0.05811 0.23097 0.34123 0.12771 0.13103 -0 85623 0 62173 -0 50122 -0.185 23 -0.10011 0.08008
0.1411 0 5735 0.5741 0.8371 0 8690 0 345 0.3783 0.411 0.3451 0.8790 1.0000
4 3 5 5 8 3 4 3 4 4 1 1

'W;I 0 84515 0 13207 0.6031 0.47351 0 5227 1 -1 00000 0. 5 338 -4 51778 -1.00000 -0 11214 0 00000
0.154( 3 ?157 0 1643 0 4205 0 4772 0.0001 0.4061 0.4322 0.0001 0 8878 1 0001
1 1 5 5 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 0 0


LSL0 0 40164 0 23367 0 38(67 00780 1 -0 0 3 1 40 307 -0 420311 0 0.43 -4 0 04473 0 00001
2 37!1 0 766 30.3681 3 4891 0 5058 a 0741 0 516( 0 570( 0.0746 0 9551 1.0000
q4 8 I 4 3 4 4 3 4
SU81-41( 142 0

:4 _SUN 0 88261 0..5382 0-49102 0 4004 0 4761; -0.98688 0 44317 -0 4018 -0.81888 0 07210 0 000O 0
0 1317 0 1A 66 0 400I C 5 41i 0 5238 0 095 0 5367 0. 981 0.0t59 0 1172 1 000O
1 3 5 ; 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 0 0

VSSAL_k S_SSAk_A V BSAL_. 5_8S_!._A VINTER LVIX



VIXTEI -0 9 970 -3 6720 :0003 0 00534
3 '1635 0 1635 0 0000 0 0130
3 1 0 o I


SUM~0R -0 74:.4 -0 74204 0 80802 0 91886
I 4677 3 4677 0 05 7 0096



'I .1 1512;3 -8 8717-0 I 91343 0 ?5955
0 3504 0 3 5: 0 0047 0 0021
S 3 0 0 6

7V'N -! 0o0c -i 7530 0 t8534 1 00000
: 00 ; C o01; 0 0110 0 0030



S" -O 3 3602, 1 0 8 5

7 0 0 8 8


6 1 013 S 33





















FAI LYT 61


YARIABLE M MtIH STD DEV SUN MItillUM MAllUMU




HI BLT 71 1661367 2 7111740i0 (7 000001111000

IREA 3 1O0 01OOO00 163 935'i311 570 0O00000 40 365

DEPTA 6 17.00000000 I 91381202 191 00000000 5 3

:S3 TSRE 4 011000000 1332241 10 1000000 0 ii

35T PA SS 4 15200000 4 46(5236 ; 100003I C 0

HRAIN.VO 5 674.0000100 i37 71168907 33810 000000G0 4117 i352

DST 101 4 34.4751000" 0 20 156 4669 137.90000000 5 0

VIN_ VL it ;166(67 0 28577180 66 70000000 11 12

CURR_ VL 5 1 21000000 0 04472113 1 10000000 0

V 5TA 6 50000001 0 5 43137013 317 00000000 57 '

5 STP A a t4 0000011c 0 504 0000000l( It4

4 SSAL A 5 34 40000000 0 074:79 3732 00000000 31 3

S SSL A 04 20001000 4721136 171 00000000 04 31

VI'TtE 6 1010 36666667 13 23;9612 9 6064 00000000 0 "122

';i 5 10 7 02178 0 7 54176743 53 70139448 3 11

SUE1R ;1340 151100000 1434 7I414559 10721 00000000 15 4000

VIN SUM 6 1010 13733313 !l'l 26391090 12245 000Co000 30 444

'S5M J 18 3263l:5 13 70 1171 148 73 98199 3 17

LV;: SU 63 19 6107221: 1 943;6i 117 664334 1 2 4 1i




























21


MERGED PHYSICAL AND REDUCED BIO DITA


10 Ol TURSDAY DECrMBI R 15. 1il 6






















1ERCED PHYSiCAL AND REDUCE 110 DATA 10 03 THURSDAY. DECEMBER 15. 19I1
rAMILTs41


CORIELATION COErFFCIEtTS I PRO ) :8: UNDERI 0 :H0.0 I NUMBER O0 OBSERVATIONS


YRBLT AltE D0OTH DSTSHRE DST-PISS DIAINTO DST 100f VIXDJn EL CUR.YVEL V STHP A SSTHP A V_BTrP S_TrMP1_



VIKTER9 01 610 a 13 63 0.67130 0.43347 S1761 -0 97999 0 59356 -0.57303 -. 99979 -o0 11I5 0o00000


0 1389 0 9119
I I

S0UItER 01543 0 14344
9 W169 0 0342
6 3


VIN SUN 0 01123 0 33952
0 1387 0 77?5
4 3

LVIN 0 98095 0 16534
51 :t 4 0 8290
3 3



S32556 0 0281
I 2


LV;.:S S 3 :!30o 0 25579
L W717 NS 373



AS0L A SSAL A



VTTEh -0 '9999 -0 99999
: 203 C 0020
3 3

- U W Et -: i031 -3 t6031
: 3:S' 0 3539



VIN SUN -0 98023 9t01:8




.V:i -3 39084 -a 9V0? 4
0 3862 0 0862










: i
-0 714'


0.2145 0 1111 1 414 0 0027



0 50217 0 23!02 0.24419 -0 53079
0 3101 0 6096 I 711 0 3360
6 1 4 1


0.58100 0.37811 0.35131 -6 97913
0.3011 0 M3 0 6149 0.1277
5 5 4 3


0.1115 0 15250 0 11 s46 0 00000
0.4381 0 7480 0 9263
4 4 3 3


0 5096T8 34663 0.37453 -0 70335
0 3037 0 5435 0 6215 1849
1 1 4 3


O 595i 0 0 38464 0 39747 -0 19050
0 2096 0 5231 0 60251 0173



V BSALA S_SAL _A VINTER L1VI



I 00000 0 97791
0 0000 0 0039
0 0 6


0 95395 0 94764
0 0025 1 0141
0 0 6 I


0 93905 0 97361
0 0002 0 0046
0 30 1


S 9779 1 00000
0 0039 O 3000



0 91447 0 $7990
0 0033 0 00I7


0.4004 0 42170 0.0017 0 114
4 4 3 4

0 14938 -4 42077 -0 35079 -0 1011196
0 3306 0 4061 0 3360 0 1811
4 6 5 6


0 63247 -0.57417 -0 97393 -0 12803
a 3673 0 4253 0 1277 0 8717
4 4 3 4

0 99702 -0 99084 300001 -0 99084
0 0491 0.08361 0611
3 3 1 3


0.71632 -0.61210 -0 70315 -0 31770
0 2837 0 1965 0 1149 I 6101
4 5


0 60878 -0 64621 -0 99050 -0 113:3
0 3111 0 3537 0 0178 0 7!(8
4 4 1


I 1101



0. 0000







4
I 0100





0.0000
I 0003





0 00000





0 00001
1 0000
4






















MERGED PHYSICAL AHD REDUCED 0BI DATA 10 03 THUISDAT. DECEMBER 15. 1)ll 1



ARIABLE M MAN STD DEY SUN MINIMUM MAIIMm1




YR B:T 49 4000C0 91331011 347 00000000 tO 74

IREA 155 0000000 0 1 01186747 620,00000000 40 365

DOET'. 6 17 6666t667 I 0166434 106.00000000 9 31

OST SHRE 6 3 36000000 4 1063410 0 i000000 0

DST FASS 1 01l00003 84 4 6lS 11I 1000000 0 11

DRAIHNV0 ;G I A i666667 1141 04021434 11086.c0000000 37 8312

DST _;cl q 34 47s00000 :c0 1564669 137.90000000 5 si

VIND ( E_ L q 11 17500000 0 3S000000 44 70000000 11 1

CURRVtL 0 23331313 0 0-771503 0 70000000 0 I

V STP _A 4 64 75000000 t434150 219 00000000 5?7

S STMP A 4 1 00000000 C 33.00000000 84 S4

V SSAL A 3 34 66666667 1.1470054 104 00000000 I3 36

S SSAL_ A 4 33333333 0 17735027 103 00000000 34 35

VINTER i 3I9 3331333) 104 81472697 1156.00000010 0 :00

LVIN 6 11535106 5 1 109010 30 62175331 I I

SUtIIER 7 113 4(2571 43 183 212060)7 42(I 4.00000000 :

V:H SO ;110 83333333 169l 4Z90t791 i642 00000000 0 4101

V0SU 0 : 1656930i I7 104130D 54 9416279

vIN IX-S 7 1 4453 94 941407986 57 02671762 5 21





















nKRCED PHYSICAL AND IDOUCED 810 DATA 10 03 THUlRSDA. DCtBS!R 15, I10:
rAMILl-tS

CORRELATION COEFTrCIEXTS J POB *' :l: UNDER 10:110.0 I NUMtI 01 OISERVATIONS

IILT AIt OtFTI DSTSHIE DST_PISS DIAINV 0 OST_101r VINDOVIL CURIVIL V STPA S STmPA VITiKP_ S_ STMF_



VIINTE 0 .83I74 -4 6701 0 89754 0 895 0 19393 -0 70187 0 10803 -0 41185 -0.70817 -0 01433 0.00000
3 14:1 0 5321 0 0100 0 0391 0 la11 0 494 0 6t20 0.5132 0 4984 0 0345 1.0001
I I 1 1 4 1 8 4 3 4 4 0 0

SUllHE 0.61573 -0 4931 0.188500 0 91250 0 9202 -0 54197 6 19162 -0 34100 -0 $4517 -0.l04i32 01000
3).;18 0 5306 0 0191 0 0111 0 0711 0 6323 0 7937 0 6350 0.4323 0 9337 1 0000
5 6 6 4 4 2 4 4 0


VIH SUI 0.8ti96 -3 71030 0.93601 0 12345 0.91996 -0 s5447 0 21161 -0 35276 -0.55447 -0.01615 0.00000
S1390 3.4501 0.0112 0 0;1: 0 0800 0 6258 0 784 0. 472 0.1258 0 1338 1.0001
4 s 5 5 3 4 4 3 4 4 a 0

LVIX I 9?:50 0 13107 0 64111 0 339117 0 "141 0 00000 1 9771 -1 00000 OO0000 -1 00000 0.0001
S1121 ] 0 !57 0 3514 0.6601 0 8401 1314 0.0001 0.0001 1.0001
S 3 4 4 3 2 3 3 2 3 3 0 I

LS'JN 0.7019 0 02791 0 9 5 0 677 0 733 0 0 00000 0 71681 -0 35475 8.00000 -0.04715 0 00000
0 ii8i 9 71 9 0327 01t 0: 484O C 4110 3551 0 35!8 0t 8o0
1 4 i : 3 3 2 3 2 0 0

LV:I SU~ C ''73 -0.38711 0 ?875i 0 7? i 1 297: 0 0C000 1 8048( -0 9t119 0 0t000 -0 9801 0 00000
1 11851 7464 1249 0 3233 0 5166 3 40T2 0.1737 0.1737 : 0o00
3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 0

V SSAI A_ 5SA AV E5AL A S BSAL A VI TE 1 .415



VItTER -3.68798 -0.6078t ;1 000 0 5944
i 3l17 0 &170 3 00C C 119



UIVER 5 -0 53318 533618 0 2z' 0 ?7!6
S}": Z11 63W2 775 3 :143



'I0SUB -0l Q54. -0 5;1: 0 0730 C 09;53
1 633 0 331( 0153 0 40
3 3 6 I

WIN -: 3.Coe -1 00D00 10 8544 0: 200
L : ; 9 :; 6:9 0 0030



LSS"? -C 8l48 -0 04785, 3 :34 t 51:1
3 : Z5( 30;S 7 58 im



577U 0 z. 1 <;6. i : ':-so I
-..; ] -' -. .S























ED i ? S;C;iCAL AN REDi'CEDU 390 DATA :1 03 THURSDAY ECESER 1. :198 :1
FAMILY.01


7Xii!BLE N ltA STE 3EV Sm KmIIrNUM nMAIIMUM




'. BL: 40 00M0c00 l ;31i32 347 .00o 000CC 4 '

IP.7 I ;33 n030000 3 3!:i747 :00 OoIIHgoo 40 30

0I?' 4 6? 6iLL&467 t:1(4934 :c6 004000V00 31


3S- 3dRE 3 .30000 4 SI4:8 a 1300 333C

57 5; 0 3 3;;i130 3 l!3t 030Ctt3 1 :

; :;|1 VC 3 3701 li I67 1:4& 54021434 :!0 Ol 00000000 37 8&314

57- .C 4 14 471
Si :. : :700000 0 3300004 4O0 C44 0030O0 0;


:? .. 3 333331) : 0730 3 1 0033303

44 4 14 300C : 0443400a ;!C 3003C00 0 7

4 14 0042100C 3N) 03300033 84


_33.l 4 T 34 ,!60 67 1 ::04730 l04 :1300000 34 I




4l17t N 4 ; & 7 a4' 14 7 4643 000330 3 :C0

LV;N s 9 4504434 4 677 04 ''034 i0


ISUMME i s.: 0713 4 7 *. i' 4 7 0300 0 32 1003

S- u; 4 3 4 '5 4 1' : 847l4 s;! C,00 00 4 433I

.-* :3 ::;(404: ; 0l048" '1 S204:;0 10

:V' !;i' t )(;l* : U5]P : !>:tC!l:;






















EC:E ?a!CAL ANC RE JCEC BIC ATI :a I23 C 7IEAY S Ct;E!34 !1 017;



CODaLAT:OHN C3[rF CLIENTS i PIOB .: UNDER xi RniO I NUMBER OF OBSERVATIONS

RBLT AREA DEPTH DSTSHIE DSTPASS DRAIN VO DST_I00F VINRCVEL CURl_VEL V STIP A S STllP V PTHP 5A rTP_1



7VI TE 0 92227 20792 0 51827 0 4)526 0.57502 -0 9971? 0 2451- .0 20182 -0 19719 02 171l 0000'0
3 ?77 6167 0 3404 3 1912 0.4!0 1 0477 0 735S 0 7914 0 8477 t 7I28 I.CI01
S 3 S 4 3 .4 4 3 4 4 0 7

SUF.EP -7 01443 0 3i320 -0 1475i -0 0-111 0 1I197 -4 15710 0 03341 0 1il37 -0 1705 0 0088 0 0o00l
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