Title: Florida college farmer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075980/00058
 Material Information
Title: Florida college farmer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30cm.
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 1930)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1960?
Numbering Peculiarities: Suspended with v. 3, no. 5 (May 1932) and resumed with Dec. 1935 issue. Suspended with v. 9, no. 4 (may 1941) and resumed with New series v. 1 (summer 1948).
General Note: Published by Agricultural students at the University of Fla.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00075980
Volume ID: VID00058
Source Institution: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 01569450
lccn - 55047167

Full Text


the florida


college


farmer


VOLUME 11 NUMBER 2


JANUARY, 1960


-k
In this issue .....
2 MAR1960 "' GRADUATING SENIORS
SALUTE TO NATHAN MAYO
FLORIDA BLUE KEY MEMBERS
WHAT ABOUT GIBBERELLINS?


AG STUDENTS RECEIVE CAMPUS HONORS


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KIMBERCHIKS

VANTRESS CROSS

PARMENTER REDS

NEW HAMPSHIRE REDS



"Chicks hatched 10 minutes from the airport"



MIAMI INTERNATIONAL HATCHERIES, INC.

P. O. Box 48-1005
Miami 48, Florida


S.. BREED

BRAHMANS

FOR


BEEF






HEART BAR RANCH

Kissimmee, Florida Phone Tllden 6-5603


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January, 1960


What Do You Know About Gibberellins?....-----.. 4
Florida Blue Key 5
Graduating Seniors, February 1960 6
The College Farmer Salutes Nathan Mayo-----....... 7
Florida Flowers "Best Under the Sun".----.......... 8
Agri News 10
Career Day for Ag Fair Weekend 12
A Hall of Fame for Agriculture_ 12
Fair Plans Progress 12
STAFF
Editor Roderic Magie
Managing Editor.. Arnold Tritt
Editorial Assistants Donald Serdynski
Barbara Chaplin
Business Manager .Harold Stephens
Advertising Manager Porter Pierce
Circulation Manager Skip Stem
Circulation Assistants Dan Akins
Ben Thornal
Harold Croft
Promotion Manager Richard Kelly
Faculty Advisory Committee
Dr. Earl G. Rodgers, Dr. Ralph A. Eastwood
COVER: From left to right Jackson Brownlee, Rod
Magie, Carrol Hawkins. Brownlee and Magie were se-
lected for Florida Blue Key (see page 5); Hawkins re-
ceived membership into Phi Kappa Phi, national Honor-
ary scholastic fraternity.

The FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER is the student
publication from the College of Agriculture of the Univer-
sity of Florida. It is compiled, edited, and distributed by
students of this college. It is the privilege of any ag stu-
dent to use this publication as a medium of expression. It
is the voice of the Florida agricultural student.

Entered as second class mailing matter at the Post Office at University
Station, Gainesville, Florida, December 8, 1938 under an Act of
Congress of 1879. Twenty-five cents per copy, dollar a year. Pub-
lished four times during the year: November, January, March, and
May. Address all correspondence to Florida College Farmer, Dan
McCarty Hall, Gainesville, Florida.
PRINTED BY CONVENTION PRESS, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
JANUARY, 1960


the florida

college farmer


ENCLOSED $


FOR WHICH TO ENTER MY NAME


AS A SUBSCRIBER FOR YEARS.
NAME
ADDRESS
NAME
Rates-$1.00 Per Yr.-$2.50 for 3 Yrs.
FILL OUT AND MAIL THIS FORM TODAY



ATTEND

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

AGRICULTURAL FAIR

MARCH 18-19-20, 1960


IEDIIT1ORIAL

What should a prospective college student expect
to receive and what should he expect to give in the
course of obtaining an education?
What goals should be set and expectations met?
Anyone with pat answers to these questions would
be either a great humanitarian or a millionaire, for
this knowledge is sought by every college student.
Most students hope to make a name for themselves
during their stay at the university. Some do scholas-
tically, some through extra-curriculars, and some as
well-liked and respected persons.
All of these goals are to be admired and one or
more of them should be set up as a mark to reach.
None of them should be set so high that all other
considerations and obligations fall by the wayside.
To you freshmen and sophomores looking forward
to receiving a degree in agriculture, we ask this ques-
tion: What will you make of your college career?
Regardless of the answer, get the most possible out
of it. Only comparative few obtain the chance.
Feel free to seek the advice of the faculty, and stu-
dents further along than you. It is a rare person who
will not be honored and privileged to help as he might
have been helped at some earlier time.
The counsel received in many cases might smooth
out an otherwise bumpy way.
R.G.M.


Subscribe Today
FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER
Dan McCarty Hall
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida


Volume 11, Number 2


CONTENTS














WHAT DO YOU



KNOW ABOUT



GIBBERETLINS?

by
Kirti Singh,
Graduate Student
Department of Vegetable Crops


During the past few years gibberellin
effects on plants and plant systems have
attracted wide attention in the United
States as well as abroad. Much money
and time have been spent and are be-
ing spent in research on gibberellin ef-
fects in the various phases of plant
science.
The history of gibberellin knowledge
goes back to 1898 when a disease of rice
was described and the causative agent
identified as Fusarium heterospermum.
The rice disease was given the name
"bakanae disease" or "foolish seedling
disease" because the infected plants grew
taller than healthy ones, as though fool-
ishly wasting their energy. As a matter
of fact, the symptoms of the "bakanae
disease" already had been recorded as
early as 1808.
In 1926, long before the gardeners
knew about 2,4-D and DDT and the
discovery of auxins by Went (1928),
the unique ability of gibberellins to in-
crease plant growth was discovered by
Kurosawa, a Japanese plant pathologist
working in Formosa (now Republic of
China). He observed a peculiar fungus,
Gibberella fugikuroi (formerly known as
F. heterospermum) that affected rice.
Kurosawa found that sterile cell-free
solutions from the fungus, when sprayed
on rice seedlings, produced the same
over-growth as that caused by the disease.
Although considerable effort was ex-
pended on isolation of the active factor
or factors in gibberella culture filtrates.
it was not until 1938 that a team of
Japanese workers, led by Yabuta and
Sumiki at the University of Tokyo, ob-
tained the first crystalline material that
would cause the symptoms of the "foolish
seedling disease." This material, which
they named Gibberellin 'A' after the fun-
4


gus genus, was later found to be a mix-
ture of very similar compounds that
came to be known as gibberellins. Four
gibberelins have been described:
1. Gibberellic acid (Gibberellin X or
A.)
2. Gibberellin A (or Gibberellin Aj)
3. Gibberellin A2
4. Gibberellin A,
The activity of all four materials has
been reported to be the same, but re-
cent work indicates some differences.
Important as this discovery was, it
aroused little attention. Little did the
Japanese or the rest of the scientific world
then realize the vast potentiality and ver-
satility that gibberellins might have for
large segments of the plant kingdom. Not
until 1950 did any one outside Japan
pay any attention to gibberellins. In fact,
not until early in 1956 did it begin to
attract the serious attention of plant
scientists and then only at a few of the
experiment stations and universities of
the western world. Late that year, sam-
ples became generally available for ex-
perimental purposes. Commercialization
of gibberellins followed almost immedi-
ately.
In February of 1957, it was introduced
to the public and distributed for use on
flowering and ornamental plants. Even
scientific observations were still in their
beginning stage. Now at least seven com-
mercial companies in this country and
one each in Britain and Japan produce
gibberellins.
It is now well known that gibberellin-
like substances are widely distributed in
actively growing reproductive and vege-
tative tissues of higher plants. Many
unique responses have been recorded fol-
lowing treatment with gibberellins.


They make plants grow faster. The
most obvious effect is in lengthening of
the stem. Increased growth under some
conditions is reflected in greater fresh
and dry weights of treated plants. They
reverse dwarfism, causing some small
varieties to grow as tall as large varieties.
They break dormancy in some plants,
seeds and tubers, indicating that they
might replace the need for certain light
and critical temperature conditions. They
cause some plants to flower and set seed
sooner, which means plant maturity is
expedited. They accelerate the rate and
speed of germination of seeds of some
crops. They help set fruit in some plants
which might be important under adverse
field fruit set conditions. Gibberellins
actually have increased the yield per acre
in some crops and they also have been
effective in controlling the diseases of
some plants.
To date, experimental results indicate
that gibberellins are not toxic to animals,
even in huge doses. They have been fed
to mice, rats, poultry, and sheep in var-
ious doses with no ill effects. However,
much more testing is imperative before
gibberellins can be used on crops fed to
animals.


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER












FLORIDA BLUE KEY





Florida Blue Key is the honorary leadership service fraternity at the University
of Florida. Basic membership requirements include: an overall two-point average; five
completed semesters at the University; outstanding accomplishments in a major
area of campus life with significant participation in two other areas. To take part in
such widespread activity while obtaining a college education is a remarkable achieve-
ment. It is a high and deserving honor that Jackson Brownlee and Rod Magie, seniors
in Agricultural Economics, have been selected for membership.


Jackson Brownlee
A February graduate in Ag. Economics, Jackson hails
from Trenton but now claims Tampa as his home. He be-
gan his college career in '53 and completed two years. By
1955 he decided Uncle Sam needed his services more than
the U. of F. After his army obligation was completed he
returned to Gainesville.
From the time Jackson enrolled in Trenton High
School, he has continually distinguished himself as a quali-
fied and capable leader. The final achievement of his high
school career was his election as President of the State
Association of the Future Farmers of America.
After entering the University and orienting himself
for a few months, he pledged Alpha Gamma Rho, and was
elected Vice-President of his pledge class. Also during that
year he was elected to the Freshman Executive Council,
served as Under-Secretary of Men's Affairs, and Labor
Chairman for the U of F State Fair Exhibit Committee.
During his sophomore year he served his fraternity as
vice-president, rush chairman, and political representative.
He was an orientation group leader and a Florida Blue
Key Speaker's Bureau member. In addition, he served as
head usher of the Football Seating Committee, and edi-
torial assistant of the Florida College Farmer. It was at
he end of this year that he spent his two-year hitch with
Uncle Sam.
Returning from the service to begin his junior year, he
was elected alumni secretary for AGR, and was chairman
of the arrangements committee for the National AGR
Convention. The Ag. Council also profited from Jackson's
leadership that year as he served as chairman of many of
its more important committees. For his work on the
Council, he was presented the Gamma Sigma Delta Cer-
tificate of Recognition.
Proving his efficiency during his senior year, Jackson
served as Editor of the Florida College Farmer, president
of Alpha Gamma Rho, president of the Ag. Economics
Club, again spoke for the FBK Speaker's Bureau, and was
chairman of the special functions division for the 1959
Homecoming. Amidst all these activities, he has found
time to complete enough hours to graduate.
Certainly no one can deny the service and leadership
Jackson has so unselfishly contributed to the College of
Agriculture as well as the entire University. He has served
his university well, and it is only fitting that he should be
elected to Florida Blue Key.
JANUARY, 1960


Rod Magie
Born in Geneva, New York, Rod first became ac-
quainted with the wonders of Florida living in 1946 when
he moved to Bradenton, Florida. He attended Manatee
County High School where he participated in athletics and
school organizations. He was graduated in 1956 and en-
tered the University of Florida in September of that year.
Since his arrival at the University, Rod has been ac-
tive in campus organizations. He is president of Alpha
Zeta, honorary agricultural fraternity, vice-president of
the Ag. Council, and is past president of the Men's Coun-
cil. He belongs to Sigma Alpha Epsilon social fraternity,
and holds the rank of cadet company commander in
ROTC. Other organizations in which he has held mem-
bership include Grove Hall Area Council, Ag. Economics
Club, Thyrsus Horticultural Club, Gator Guard Drill
Team, and Scabbard and Blade.
Rod works to serve his college and university. He cur-
rently is chairman of the 1960 Agricultural Fair. The
Alpha Zeta annual fieshman-sophomore award for serv-
ice to the College of Agriculture was presented to him
during his junior year. He has been a member of the
Agricultural Convocation planning committee.
Outside the College of Agriculture, Rod has been busy
with campus-wide service projects. He was Under-Secre-
tary of Men's Affairs, Gator Growl program committee
chairman, chairman of the Hub opening committee dur-
ing the spring of '59, member of the freshman forum
planning committee, member of Circle K, and a Blue Key
banquet usher.
Still active in other fields, Rod is presently Editor of
the Florida College Farmer. He also is political repre-
sentative for SAE fraternity and is quite interested in
campus politics.
Among these activities, Rod has found time to work
each year to help with his college expenses. He has been
employed by University Plant and Grounds as a student
assistant for the Ornamental Horticultural Department, a
dorm counselor for University Housing, and is a table
waiter at his fraternity.
Rod is taking the Army Flight Training Program in
ROTC and plans to enter the service after graduation this
June.
Upon completion of this tour of Army duty, he plans
to return to the University of Florida to study law. This
will round out his education and be a fine start in a pro-
fessional career.


0









Graduating Seniors, February 1960


BSA DEGREES

Major


Herbert Andrews .......
Larry J. Bates ..........
Cecil Beugnot ..........
Gerald P. Brent ........
Raymond E. Brown .....
Jackson O. Brownlee ....
Benedict Burger ........
Nicholas E. Fuentes .....
Jack Gay ...............
William H. Gould ......
Carrol W. Hawkins ......
Richard F. Kelly ........
Thomas C. Kirtley ......
Edmundo Ochomogo ....
Alvin T. Ringer, Jr ....
William H. Ruggie ......
Praumuan Satarath ......
Robert O. Scharr ........
John F. Smith ..........
John W. Varick, Jr. .....
Walter R. Zigrang ......


Name
Oscar Ancalmo .......
Willard L. Anderson ..
Ronald L. Jones ......
Lester W. Kalch ......
S. Nagaraja Rao ......
Leon A. Garrard .....
Idwal W. Hughes .....
Jaime Lotero .........
Simon E. Malo .......
Edward S. Saunders ...
Kirti Singh ...........
Darrell W. Anthony ..
James H. Green ......
Eugene R. Turner ....
Thomas A. Wheaton .
Charles L. Dantzman ..
Clifford N. Nolan .....
Allyn O. Lunden .....
Hugh L. Popenoe ....


.


Major Home
........ Plant Pathology-MAG .................... El Salvador
........... Agricultural Education-MAG ............ Cypress, Fla.
......... General Agriculture-MAG ............ Belle Glade, Fla.
........... Poultry Husbandry-MAG .............. Gainesville, Fla.
........... Entomology-MAG ................ ............. India
........... Fruit Crops-M SA .................... Gainesville, Fla.
........... Entomology-MSA ........................... Bermuda
........... Agronomy-MSA ............................ Colombia
........... Fruit Crops-MSA ........................Tampa, Fla.
........... Agronomy-MSA .................... W hite Springs, Fla.
........... Vegetable Crops-MSA ......................... India
........... Entomology-M S .......................... M aryland
........... Bacteriology-M S .................. Gainesville, Fla.
......... Entomology-M S .............................. Oregon
S. .. .. Botany-M S ....................... W inter Park, Fla.
........... Soils- PH D ......................... G ainesville, Fla.
........... Soils-PH D .......... ... ....... Live Oak, Fla.
........... Agronomy-PHD .................... Gainesville, Fla.
........... Soils- PH D ................................ G uatem ala


Don C. Tomlin ............................Animal Husbandry and-PHD ................... Idaho
Nutrition
Willie E. Waters ........................... Vegetable Crops-PHD ................... .Kentucky
6 THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


Name


Home


............ Entomology ........................ St. Petersburg, Fla.
.......... Fruit Crops ............................. Sanford, Fla.
............... Agricultural Engineering .................. M iami, Fla.
............... Agricultural Economics ................ Belle Glade, Fla.
............... Agricultural Engineering ................ Greenville, Fla.
............... Agricultural Economics .................... Tampa, Fla.
.... .......... Soils ................ ... ..... ......... Tampa, Fla.
............... Agronomy ................................... Ecuador
.............. Dairy Science ............................ Largo, Fla.
............... Agricultural Engineering .................. DeLand, Fla.
............... Agricultural Economics .................... M ango, Fla.
............... Agricultural Education .................. Inverness, Fla.
............... Entomology ............................. Orlando, Fla.
............... Agronomy ................................. Nicaragua
............... Animal Husbandry and Nutrition .... St. Petersburg, Fla.
............... General Agriculture ................ Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
. ............ Soils ....................................... Thailand
............... Botany ................................ Clermont, Fla.
............... Agricultural Economics .................... Quincy, Fla.
............... General Agriculture .................. Springfield, N. J.
............... Fruit Crops ..........................Vero Beach, Fla.



ADVANCED DEGREES












THE COLLEGE


FARMER SALUTES -




Commissioner of Agriculture



NATHAN MAY


OUTSTANDING


LEADER IN FLORIDA


AGRICULTURE






The "Grand Gentlemen" of Florida
agriculture, Nathan Mayo, will retire
late this year after serving the State in
various capacities for over 40 years. Mr.
Mayo has served as Commissioner of
Agriculture longer than any other man
at this post, not only in Florida but
throughout the United States.
Renowned also as Florida's Dean of
the State Cabinet, he is responsible for
the administration of many laws bene-
fiting agriculture and the welfare of the
consuming public.
Some of these laws include: guaran-
teeing farmers the accuracy of stated
grades and qualities of many materials
they purchase; assuring customers of the
purity of Florida meats, fruits and vege-
tables; and protecting all citizens from
injurious foods and drugs by inspection
of products and manufacturing plants.
To enforce these laws, the State De-
partment of Agriculture maintains an
Inspection Bureau to make investigations
of various agricultural products. Samples
of the items are sent to the State Chemist
in the Nathan Mayo Building in Tal-
lahassee, where the samples are scienti-
fically analyzed to be sure they are prop-
erly graded and labeled.
Whenever any food or other item in-
spected is found improperly graded or
illegally labeled, corrections are manda-
tory. In the case of any illegality what-
soever, the product is immediately with-
drawn from the open market.
JANUARY, 1960


Nathan Mayo was born December 1,
1876, at Whitakers, North Carolina. His
father, Colonel James M. Mayo, was an
officer in the Confederate Army. Colonel
Mayo came to Florida when Nathan was
ten years of age, and the family made
their home in Ocala.
Nathan's first business venture was
peddling pies and doughnuts made by his
mother, and whatever surplus milk they
had. He also opened a small confection-
ery and cold drink stand in a piano box
in an alley adjoining the present Monroe
and Chambliss National Bank in Ocala.
At the age of 14 he started working in
a local drug store at the salary of $1.50
per week. He worked there for ten years.
On October 18, 1899, he married Nora
Newsom, now deceased. They were
blessed by three children; two sons, Nat
and Billy, and a daughter, Gertrude.
In 1901, Mr. Mayo borrowed $1,000.00
added it to his savings of $399.05, and
purchased a small general mercantile
business in Summerfield, a few miles
south of Ocala. His business grew rapid-
ly. During this time both Mr. Mayo and
his wife served as postmasters of the
Summerfield Post Office, which was in
their store.
He became interested in agriculture and
ventured into farming. He also set up a
grist mill next to his store, which was
soon enlarged, becoming one of the
largest mills of its kind in Florida.
Later he built the largest Sea Island
cotton gin south of Gainesville. Other


business ventures saw him
naval stores, timber, citrus,
enterprises.


I.
entering the
and nursery


Mr. Mayo first stepped into politics
in 1913 when he served as County Com-
missioner of Marion County. In 1921
and 1923, he served in the state legis-
lature as representative from his home
county.
On November 1, 1923, Governor Cary
Hardee appointed him Commissioner of
Agriculture for Florida, filling out the
term of his predecessor, W. A. McRae,
who had resigned.
Mr. Mayo initiated many important
projects while he was a member of the
legislature and after he was appointed
Commissioner of Agriculture. Several of
them are: tick eradication; higher ma-
turity standards for fresh citrus fruits;
improved rules and regulations regard-
ing weights and measures for the depart-
ment; a first offender's prison or cor-
rectional institution; the State Farmers
markets; mobile laboratories for inspec-
tion; and scientific analysis of various
products.
He was named Man of the Year in
1937 for service to Florida agriculture
by The Progressive Farmer. He has re-
ceived numerous awards in the field of
agriculture and public service since his
entrance into the life of serving the peo-
ple of Florida. He also has been honored
by being selected as an official of many
state and national organizations.


/P;i~lrL /a


gk 7~

C~











FLORIDA FLOWERS "BEST UNDER THE SUN"



JOHN W. EARLY
MANAGER, FLORIDA FLOWER ASSOCIATION
Prior to coming to Florida in 1958, Mr. Early was working on his doctorate at
Pennsylvania State University, where he received his M.S. degree in Agricultural
economics and a B.S. degree in horticulture.
His background in floricultural management and trade association activities makes
him well suited for his responsibilities with the Florida Flower Association.


It may be a play on words but never-
theless the production of flowers in Flor-
ida is a "big, blooming business." Here
in the land of sunshine is the center of
the nation's commercial production of
gladioli and pompon chrysanthemums.
Millions of American homes are beauti-
fied throughout the year with color, fra-
grance and sunshine in the form of
flowers from Florida.
Over 168,000,000 stems of gladioli and
21,000,000 stems of chrysanthemums are
shipped out of Florida annually. Less
than 100 growers are involved in this
highly specialized type of production that
takes in 8,000 acres of tropical soils used
for gladiolus growing and 400 acres of
shade-cloth houses used for chrysan-
themum production. Florida-the Land
of Flowers-can justly boast of this multi-
million dollar industry that spread its
sunshine to homes and businesses in
every state of the nation.
The commercial production of cut
flowers has prospered in the State be-
cause of pioneer farmers and sound bus-
inessmen who worked diligently at the
trade to make it an important part of
Florida agriculture. Like any other agri-
cultural business, there is great risk in-
volved with the weather, diseases, insects
and unpredictable market conditions. The
pioneers of this industry were aware of
all these problems and they joined to-
gether to form a trade organization for
the purpose of improving their industry
situation. Over a decade ago gladiolus
growers banded together to form the
Florida Gladiolus Growers Association.
In 1956 this group expanded its mem-
bership to include all commercial flower
growers in Florida and became known as
the Florida Flower Association, Inc. To-
day, this trade association is the coun-
try's leading commercial flower produc-
ing organization. In a course of a year
the Association handles financial trans-
actions amounting to over $450,000.00
for flower producers whose total sales
run over $14,000,000.00.


Headquarters of the Florida Flower
Association is located along the meander-
ing Manatee River in the city of Braden-
ton. The Association has 55 members,
primarily in the Fort Myers area, but
also has leading flower growing mem-
bers in the Tampa Bay area and along
Florida's East Coast in Delray Beach and
East Palatka.
Each year the membership meets to
elect its governing body-the board of
directors. Thirteen directors devote many
hours of their time for services that
involve no direct pay. These devoted in-
dividuals realize the value of trade as-
sociation activities and know that im-
measurable compensation is received as
individuals and as an industry in their
united efforts to support Florida's flower
industry.
The board of directors is the policy


maker for the association. Its members
are directed in their actions by the wishes
of the membership. It is this power-
ful group that is charged with rallying
to the defined purposes of the Associa-
tion which are stated in the corpora-
tion's charter as: to render financial,
business, and educational service to those
engaged in the growing, production,
packing, shipping, and handling of flower.
ing plants and related products; to foster
and promote laws and regulations bene-
ficial to the membership; to encourage
acquaintanceship among the flower pro-
ducers and shippers in the State; and to
do and perform either for itself or as
agent for its members all acts and
things permitted by laws of the State
of Florida and under the laws and regu-
lations of the United States, in this State
and in any other state.


BJB \
-


An annual ceremony in the Governor's Office is the signing of a proclamation declaring National
Flower Week in Florida. Governor LeRoy Collins signs the paper with delight as he is aware of the
economic and aesthetic value of Flowers to the State of Florida.
THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER








The Florida Flower Association may
be a young trade association but it has
accomplished much to benefit all flower
growers in the State-and in the nation.
Probably the one area in which the As-
sociation has served its members best is
in transportation. Transportation rates
and regulations are of vital concern to
every flower shipper because they have
direct bearing on the grower's profits,
the price of flowers at the wholesale and
retail level and the availability of the
commodity in many areas. The Associa-
tion has always taken a strong stand to
protect flower shippers from unruly rate
increases and traffic regulations that
would be detrimental to the industry.
Back in 1952 the Association rallied
their forces to testify at hearings in re-
gard to a proposed increase in rail rates.
This case, known as Ex Parte 185, was
defeated through hard work and co-
operation of member growers. Its de-
feat saved flower shippers in Florida an
estimated increase in shipping costs of
$600,000.00 a year.
In 1957 a long drawn out case known
as Ex Parte 210 was contested most
vigorously by the Association. This latter
case involved rail rate increases amount-
ing to 15 per cent. But the Association
was not about to allow such an un-
justified rate to go into effect to cover
payment of rail services that were not
offered to them by the railroads. After
many months of appearances before the
Interstate Commerce Commission and
the expenditure of thousands of dollars
for expert legal counsel, the Association
was informed that Florida flower ship-
pers were exempt from the rate increase.
Here again flower shippers were spared
the extra burden of over a half-million
dollar rate increase that very well could
have forced some operators out of busi-
ness.
Another staunch stand was taken by
the Association when the railroads tried
to establish minimum shipments of 100
pounds. Such action would have meant
that single boxes of flowers could not
have been carried by rail but only mul-
tiples of two boxes or more could be
shipped to one consignee. The Associa-
tion fought this attempt to a victorious
end and the railroads' efforts were
squashed. If such action had gone
through, it would have meant the elimi-
nation of any flower shipper who deals
directly with the retail flower trade.
Traffic rates have been kept under
the wing of the Association through the
operation of truck terminals in various
cities where members are clustered. At
present the Association maintains two
truck and cold storage terminals. These
are points where the members bring their
boxes of flowers for hauling to major
markets at a lower cost than offered by
competing truck lines. Tremendous sav-
JANrUARY, 1960


-A 2 FLORIDA FLOWER ASS. Inc.
TRUCK TERMINAL


TRyC K


The Florida Flower Association maintains truck terminals to coordinate flower shipments by their
members. Over 130,000 parcels of flowers are hauled by Association trucks during the 1959
season.


ings are given to members through this
cooperative project and prices of com-
peting firms are kept from becoming un-
weildly. Over 130,000 parcels of flowers
were hauled by the Association's spon-
sored trucking system during the 1958-
1959 season. The profits from this serv-
ice are normally rebated to those shippers
using the service. In 1959 a rebate of
five cents a parcel was returned to those
members using the truck service.
Essentially the Association is con-
cerned about any influence that will
make the growers subject to hard-
ship. Several years ago the Association
was instrumental in aiding Florida chry-
santhemum growers to eliminate substan-
tial costs in their operations. Negotia-
tions with tax authorities and an opinion
from the State's Attorney General ex-
empted certain supplies from a state
sales tax. This action has saved every
chrysanthemum grower $300.00 on every
$10,000.00 he spends on materials to
built his cloth houses.
Producing flowers is one end of the
marketing chain, and selling flowers is
the other vital end of the process. The
Association has benefited its members
along these lines by creating an interest
in Florida-grown flowers at the consumer
level. Two years ago a film titled "The
Miracle of Flowers" was produced by
the Association for distribution to the
American public. The film has received
tremendous acclaim throughout the na-
tion on TV, in schools, churches and
by other civic groups. To date the film
has been seen by an audience estimated
to be in excess of 70 million people.
In addition to the film, the Association
sends out news releases and publicity
stories about the flower industry in Flor-


ida. This year a new step is being taken
by the Association through publicity
stunts on major network television shows.
Flowers from Florida-highlighted with
the theme "Yesterday this sunshine was
in Florida"-are to appear on such pro-
grams as the Dave Garroway Show, The
Price is Right, and Beat the Clock. News
releases are made from the Association's
headquarters to inform the public and
the flower industry of current happen-
ings in the commercial flower business
in the Land of Sunshine and Flowers.
Research is an important leg of any
progressive industry. The Florida Flower
Association does not have its own re-
search staff but places its support be-
hind the excellent staff of researchers at
the University of Florida and its Agri-
cultural Experiment Stations. Scientists
from the University have been of in-
valuable assistance to the flower growers
in helping to solve production and mar-
keting problems.
The Association's activities are all
spearheaded by the board of directors.
Heading this group as the Association's
president is Joseph Povia, a flower ship-
per from Fort Myers. The board of di-
rectors meets each month or more often
if necessary. This governing group es-
tablishes the policies and functions of the
Association which are then carried out
by the Association's manager.


r












Agri




SNIE VS


I Alpha Zeta


The Fraternity of Alpha Zeta, in con-
junction with the staff of the College of
Agriculture, is organizing an Agricul-
tural Speakers' Bureau. The Bureau will
send trained student speakers through-
out Florida to spread information about,
as well as create interest in the field of
agriculture.
In order to insure the success of the
program, the first group of speakers will
be kept to a relatively small number,
selected from those best qualified. Each
student club will nominate a participant,
and the Faculty Committee will name ad-
ditional speakers.
The Speakers' Bureau will attempt to
reach both the general public and high
school students with its programs. Talks
would be given at various civic clubs and
schools about the State.
Dean Marvin A. Brooker is Head of
the Faculty Committee and Kenneth
Henderson is Chairman of the Alpha
Zeta Committee.

Forestry Club

The Forestry Club is enjoying a busy
year with a wide and varied program
of social and academic activities. Last
year, the club represented the School of
Forestry in the second annual South-
eastern Forestry Conclave, and tied for
second place among fourteen southern
forestry schools. This spring, the Con-
clave will be held at Auburn and the
following year at Gainesville.
A smoker was held at the beginning
of this semester in an accelerated effort
to interest freshmen and sophomores in
the club's activities. This has resulted
in a pleasing increase of attendance by
this group of students.
One of the most important annual
events is the Field Day held at the Aus-
tin Carey Memorial Forest. This year
a large turnout engaged in various con-
tests of skill and brawn, such as log roll-
ing, crosscut sawing, and log chopping.
After the many prizes were awarded, a
barbeque chicken dinner prepared by
the club topped off the day.


Livestock Judging Team


The 1959 University of Florida Live-
stock Judging Team completed another
year's activities after competing at the
Mid-South Livestock Judging Contest at
Mcmphis, the Southeastern Livestock
Contest at Atlanta, and the International
Livestock Contest at Chicago.
The team left for the Mid-South Con-
test Wednesday, September 23, stopping
en route for practice workouts. They
placed seventh in judging all classes and
third in swine judging. Buddy Frazee
was ninth individual over-all and fourth
in the sheep division.
On Friday, October 2, the group left
for the Southeastern Contest. They placed
second over-all and were high team in the
cattle division, winning the Angus, Here-
ford, and Shorthorn divisions. Glen
Barden placed third in the contest, and
was high individual in the Angus division.
Enrique Sosa was high individual in the
Hereford division.
The final contest, the Chicago Inter-
national, gave the team a fitting con-
clusion to their semester's work. It was


a great experience for the members, espe-
cially for three who saw snow for the
first time. They placed fifteenth in the
international competition with Buddy
Fiazee winning the fifth place individual
award for judging all classes.
The students, and faculty coach Don
Wakeman, were welcomed back on their
return by Dean M. A. Brooker, who
expressed the entire College's pride for
the team's success.

Meats Judging Team

The 1959 University of Florida meats
judging team placed seventh in the East-
ern National Intercollegiate Meats Judg-
ing Contest held in Baltimore, and scored
in a number of individual events.
The team took first place in pork car-
cass and cut judging; third in lamb grad-
ing; sixth in lamb judging; and placed
high in beef judging and grading.
Austin Tilton, San Mateo, Danny Co-
wart, Center Hill; and Wayne Wade,
Webster make up the Florida team. The
team coach is Dr. J. W. Carpenter, as-
sistant animal husbandman with the Flor-
ida Agricultural Experiment Station.


Seated, left to right-Dick Ingerman, Orlando; Dallas Townsend, Immokalee; Vladimir Cruz, Havana,
Cuba; Buddy Frazee, Reddick.
Standing, left to right-Don Wakeman, Coach; Enrique Sosa, Camaguey, Cuba; Dewey Burnsed,
Macclenny; John Stitt, Clewiston; Glen Barden, Monticello; M. A. Brooker, Dean.
THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


M









Future Farmers
of America

Using the theme "Opportunities in
Agriculture," the Collegiate Chapter of
the Future Farmers of America placed
an exhibit in the Greater Jacksonville
Agricultural and Industrial Fair Novem-
ber 10-22. The display highlighted a high
school graduate with four years of vo-
cational agricultural training choosing a
career. He could go to an Agricultural
College, then into research, agri-
business, industry, or agricultural edu-
cation. Or he could go directly into one
of the many fields of production such as
citrus, ranching, vegetables, and general
farming. Scenes of the agricultural col-
lege and some of the work done in the
fields of agricultural endeavor were shown
on an automatic slide projector. A panel
portraying production had a model farm
with a horn of plenty pouring forth a
wide variety of farm products.
Dr. R. J. Vilece, Assistant Professor of
Food Technology and Nutrition, spoke
to the club about his work with the Ful-
bright Commission in Ecquador at one
of the regular meetings this fall.

Thyrsus

Thyrsus Horticultural Club partici-
pated in the television program, "Agri-
views," carried by the University of Flor-
ida television station, WUFT, during De-
cember. The tropic of the program,
"Photoperiodism and Its Effects on Flow-
ers," was discussed by Ralph Repp and
Bill Meredith. The show is sponsored
monthly by the Agricultural Council of
the College of Agriculture.
Thyrsus, made up of students inter-
ested in ornamental horticulture, holds
its meetings semi-monthly. Half of the
meetings are devoted to speakers and
discussions are held at a faculty adviser's
house.
Dr. T. J. Sheehan and Mr. S. A. Rose
have been hosts to the club this fall. A
Christmas party at the Rose house com-
pleted December's activities.

XI Sigma Pi

Xi Sigma Pi, national forestry frater-
nity, honors by selection to membership
students excelling in scholarship, leader-
ship, and character. New members of the
fraternity are: James Ekford, Herbert
Jones, Richard Cochran, and George
Rionhard.
The local chapter annually awards the
outstanding junior in forestry the Tau
Alpha Nu award. Thomas Allen Marse,
of Pinetta, Florida, was winner this year.
This award is given in remembrance of
the first formed forestry honorary fra-
ternity at the University.
JANUARY, 1960


Officers for the fall semester are:
Roger Bollinger, forester; Frank Soren-
son, associate forester; Bruce Nelson,
secretary-fiscal agent; Bobby Dancy,
ranger; and Dr. Stephen L. Beckwith,
faculty adviser.

Dairy Science Club

Jack Gay, Largo, is the 1959 recipient
of the annual Virginia Dare Award made
by the Virginia Dare Extract Company.
Gay, president, was presented a plaque
and $25 by Dr. L. E. Mull, Professor
of Dairy Manufacturing and Dairy Tech-
nologist. The award is made each year
to a senior with a high scholastic average
and training in ice cream manufacturing
and judging.

Fruit Crops Club

A sale of citrus by the Fruit Crops
club, termed "very successful" by Harold
Stephens, president, highlighted the club's
activities during the month of Decem-
ber.
Proceeds from the sale went toward
the club's contribution to "Dollars for
Scholars," a campus-wide campaign to
raise funds for a student loan program.
Allen Weeks was chairman for the proj-
ect.


American Society
of Agronomy

ASA, the present holder of the Ag
Fair "best exhibit" trophy is laying plans
for the 1960 fair. The club has taken
the coveted prize for the last two years,
and will retire the award with another
win.
The exhibit this year will pertain to
advances in agronomy and soils. Benny
Whitman is general chairman, with
Bobby Durden heading the agronomy
sub-division, and Wayne Smith, soils.
Recently the Florida Soil and Crop
Service Society of Florida held its an-
nual meeting on the campus. To finance
club projects and serve the Society, club
members sold coffee during recesses.

Borden Award
A College of Agriculture student from
El Salvador was presented the 13th an-
nual Borden Award last week.
Francisco Lino Osegueda, San Salva-
dor, was presented the award by Dean
M. A. Brooker, College of Agriculture.
The Borden Award is presented annually
by the Borden Company to the senior
having the highest scholastic average
prior to his senior year.
(Continued on page 13)


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Phone MUtual 2-2153 P. 0. Box 912 LAKELAND, FLORIDA































This is the first architect's drawing of the main shrine building of the Agricultural Hall of Fame
which was submitted to the Board of Governors recently. Construction of the building, over 100 feet
high, is expected to be started in 1960.


HIGH SCHOOL CAREER

NEW FEATURE OF

AG FAIR WEEKEND

On Friday, March 18, the student
Agricultural Council will sponsor a Ca-
reer Day in conjunction with the 1960
Ag Fair. Groups from many high
schools over the State will attend.
The program will acquaint the pros-
pective college students with the Univer-
sity, and particularly the College of Agri-
culture.
The College Administration and the
Council feel agriculture is de-emphasized
in many high schools. Students interested
in college are placed in a separate course
of study from those who incline toward
agriculture. Because of this, many stu-
dents, although interested in agriculture,
turn away to another field which ap-
pears more attractive. By conducting
this Career Day, the Council is attempt-
ing to show the true picture of modern
agriculture.
First on the agenda for the high school
students is a forum on the University as
a whole. Information will be given on
admission requirements, costs of uni-
versity life, scholarships and loans avail-
able, housing, and other areas pertinent
to the entering student. A tour of the
campus will follow.
Visits to Dan McCarty Hall, experi-
mental farms, and the Ag Fair will ac-
quaint the participants with the College
of Agriculture. The Council hopes they
will leave with a truer impression of what
the field of agriculture has to offer, and
what the College of Agriculture can of-
fer them.


A HALL OF


FAME FOR


A AGRICULTURE

Work began this summer on the Agri-
cultural Hall of Fame near Kansas City,
Kansas, which is planned to be in oper-
ation in 1961 and attract 1 million visi-
tors annually.
Described as a "World's Fair of Agri-
culture," the Hall of Fame will tell the
story of agriculture and the men and
women responsible for its greatness. The
significance of this project is recognized
by thousands of Americans, including
President Eisenhower, interested in dedi-
cating the story of the land in permanent
form.
The shrine and adjacent grounds will
cover over 400 acres, augmented by an
additional 350 acre buffer zone. The
main building, shaped like a star, will


"chicks of the
highest degree"


be the honoring place for agriculture's
immortals. To the right of this structure
an early American village is planned. An
Indian village will be on the edge of a
lagoon and an outdoor theater will seat
4,000 spectators for pageants dealing with
agriculture.
Several other buildings will house a
variety of agricultural exhibits, new and
old, to contrast methods in farming to-
day with those of the past. When the
shrine is complete, the finest livestock
of many breeds and top quality poultry
will be kept on display. The newest in
fruits and vegetables are to be grown on
demonstration plots and in the green-
houses. Demonstration crops from for-
eign lands will complete the model farm
section of the layout.
The site, already covered with many
trees, will include a forestry plot. Five
small lakes on the grounds will be uti-
lized to demonstrate sound land and
wildlife management, and also afford
irrigation on the demonstration plots.
The Hall of Fame will be administered
by a Board of Governors with member-
ship of 92 individuals from 31 states. A
nine member executive committee con-
ducts the day-to-day business.
The public will be invited to submit
nominations for the Hall of Fame on
which the Board of Governors will vote.
As many as 12 honorees may be select-
ed the first year, but no more than three
annually thereafter.
(Continued on page 13)



AG Fair Plans Progress
Science in Agriculture will be the fea-
ture of the 1960 Ag Fair. The fair is to
be held in the Agriculture Engineering
Building on March 18, 19, and 20.
Rod Magie, fair chairman, says he an-
ticipates a larger and more comprehen-
sive event than in the past. He added
that last year's fair, under direction of
the student Ag Council for the first time,
was "very well planned, and will serve as
a basis for most of the 1960 fair."


BOX 666
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


Y







The fair is composed of student, de-
partmental, and commercial exhibits.
Commercial displays were initiated in
1959 and proved successful.
An added attraction this year will be
a Career Day for High school students.
This will take place on Friday, March 18.
A student committee of three is re-
sponsible for all the activities connected
with the fair. This includes Magie, fair
chairman; Bernard Lester, Career Day
chairman; and Richard Kelly, last year's
fair chairman and presently in charge of
publicity for the two events.


Half of Fame (Cont. from page 12)
Total cost will be $5 million. The en-
tire project will be constructed by pub-
lic subscription no tax money is in-
volved. Sponsors of the project include
farm organizations, land grant colleges,
state departments of agriculture, busi-
ness and industry, and interested indi-
viduals.
The Agricultural Hall of Fame will
be maintained by small admission fees
and endowments. Campaign organiza-
tions are being established in all the
states raising money to recognize those
who have given us strength through food
and fiber.
It is hoped this monument will serve
as a constant reminder to everyone, both
urban and rural, of the vital part agri-
culture has played in the development of
th. world's civilization.


Borden Award (Cont. from page 11)
Osegueda is majoring in animal hus-
bandry and nutrition and taking courses
in dairy science. Following graduation in
June 1960, he plans to work with the
Department of Agriculture in El Sal-
vador.
Present for the ceremonies was Wil-
liam C. Paddock, director of Escuela
Agricola Panamericana, El Zamorano,
Honduras. It was at this school that
Osegueda received a gold medal in honor
of Jos6 M. Lemus, president of El Sal-
vador. After graduation he received a
scholarship to the University of Florida.
His father is ambassador to Honduras
from El Salvador.
The award includes $300 and a certi-
ficate for achievement in the field of
dairy science.


AG Fair Planners
Left to Right-
-Rod Magie,
Dick Kelly,
Bernard Lester.




The College INN





Compliments



SOUTHERN DOLOMITE

PALMETTO, FLORIDA




Insecticides
Weed Killers John Bean Sprayers

SOUTHERN

MILL CREEK PRODUCTS CO.
P. 0. BOX 4297
TAMPA 7, FLORIDA
Offices in
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JANUARY, 1960


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INDEX TO ADVERTISERS
Baird Hardware Co. 15
College Inn 13
Florida Favorite Fertilizer Co. ................ 11
Florida Ford Tractor Co. 13
Florida State Hatcheries 12
Heart Bar Ranch Inside Cover
Hector Feed Mills 14
International Harvester ............ Back Cover
Lyons Fertilizer Co. 15
McDavid's Barber Shop 15
Miami International Hatcheries
Inside Cover
Respess Grimes Co. 15
Robertson Jewelers 15
Southern Dolomite 13
Southern Mill Creek Products .............. 13
Superior Fertilizer 15
West Coast Fertilizer Co. 14
Wilson and Toomer Co. 15
Windy's Barber Shop 14


PATRONIZE
FLORIDA COLLEGE
FARMER
ADVERTISERS


HECTOR FEED MILLS
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DEERFIELD BEACH, FLORIDA

PHONE BOCA RATON 4190- 4187

BRANCH WAREHOUSE at OKEECHOBEE Phone RO 6-1181


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Robertson Jewelers
211 West University Ave.
kIeqgistered Jewelers

o/ the

A-merican 7em Society
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P. O. Box 310
Tampa, Florida
Phone 4-3101



Since 1890


BAIRD
HARDWARE CO.
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA



McDavid's Barber Shop

Announces

The Addition of its

MODERN SHOE REPAIR SHOP

EXPERIENCED REPAIRMAN

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FERTILIZERS AND INSECTICIDES THAT ARE SUPERIOR
Factories and Offices: TAMPA and FORT PIERCE, FLORIDA


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growers through Ideal Fertilizers and
FASCO Pesticides. It is gratifying
that results throughout the years
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FLORIDA
AGRICULTI
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Plants in Jacksonville, Tampa, Cottondale, Port Everglades
GENERAL OFFICES JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA
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Asst to the President
Administration Byilding
Campus


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