Title: Florida college farmer
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075980/00041
 Material Information
Title: Florida college farmer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30cm.
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 1930)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1960?
Numbering Peculiarities: Suspended with v. 3, no. 5 (May 1932) and resumed with Dec. 1935 issue. Suspended with v. 9, no. 4 (may 1941) and resumed with New series v. 1 (summer 1948).
General Note: Published by Agricultural students at the University of Fla.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075980
Volume ID: VID00041
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01569450
lccn - 55047167

Full Text





PUBLISHED BY


THE STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


















































Spring is for turning the soil, for putting seeds
into the ground. Spring is for setting to action the
plans made when snow covered the fields.

Spring is for youth-and for all who are young
in heart. Give them high purposes and good tools
with which to work, and young and old alike will
do a good job.

Such philosophy applies to farming, particularly
soil conservation farming. Many an experienced,
successful farmer has changed to soil-conserving
methods-and been even more successful. The


young farmer-on the other hand-simply begins
farming the conservation way, because he wants
his land to be good while he's farming it-and good
enough to be worth leaving for someone else when
he's ready to quit farming.

All of us, working together, can make a lot of
soil conservation progress with young farmers-
if we teach them young and teach them well.


JOH DERI OL N LL


PAGE TWO


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


(5f" s ...do i q&I &* cHfaf




















Born i
Count
versity
versity
Anima


Gulf Field Staff Adds University-Trained
Man as Pasture Ruepeseitative
We are happy to announce the addition to the Gulf Field Staff of Mr. Keu
Tuten as pasture representative. Mr. Tuten is a native of Florida, studied at
the Universities of Florida and Pennsylvania and is experienced in diversified
field crops and cattle raising. For over 50 years, The Gulf Fertilizer Company
has devoted its energies to providing growers and farmers with dependable
friendly service and products that bring best income. Gulf field representatives
serve limited areas so they can devote attention to the soil and crop needs of
their territories.
KEN TUTEN
n Jasper, Fla. (Hamilton
y), educated at Uni-
of Florida and Uni-
of Pennsylvania in
I Husbandry.



Serving Florida Agriculture for over 50 years

THE GULF FERTILIZER COMPANY
TAMPA, FLORIDA


m *A.U pjq 1 Kta


NORRIS CATTLE
OCALA, FLORIDA


For the

Finest

Quality in

Brahman

Cattle,

We Ask

That You

Contact Us.



Co.
Ph. MA 2-7151


SPRING, 1954 PAGE THREE


Box 1051


I I


SPRING, 1954


PAGE THREE













The Florida College Fca mer


Volume 6, Number 3


Spring, 1954


Lehman B. Fletcher. ............................ .. Editor

EDITORIAL STAFF
George Montague Edwards .................. Managing Editoi
Ralph Voss.............................. Associate Editor
Anne Cawthon
Julian Webb ......... Editorial Assistants
Jackson Brownlee, ...............
Lawrence Shackleford

DEPARTMENTAL EDITORS
Julian Webb .................................... Poultry
Joe Friedheim........................ Animal Husbandry
Morgan Laffitte .........................Ag. Engineering
Bob Gayvert ............................Ag. Economics
Ed Saunders .................................Agronomy
Darwin Bennett ............................Ag. Education
Wallace Laird.................................. Forestry
Paul Zopf ............... ................. Horticulure

BUSINESS STAFF
Courtney Stephens ......................Business Manager
Art Duchane......................Asst. Business Manager

CIRCULATION STAFF
Tommy Rowand...................... Circulation Manager
Marianne Sommers,
Peggy Hoyt, ................ Circulation Assistants
Richard McRae

FACULTY ADVISORY COMMITTEE
J. Clyde Driggers ................................ Chairman


Entered as second class mailing matter at the Post Office at University
Station, Gainesville, Florida, December 8, 1938, under an Act of Congress
of 1879. Fifteen cents per copy, fifty cents per year, $1.25 for three years,
$2.00 for five years. Published four times during the year: November,
January, March, and May. Address all correspondence to Florida College
Farmer, Florida Union Building, Gainesville, Florida.





Content ..

Ag Fair ........ .................................. 6
H appy Birthday ...................................... 8
Ag College Enrollment............................... 9
4-H Rural Youth Conference............................o
Salute to Jeannette Zetrouer Chitty...................... 11
Spring Brings Many 4-H Activities .................... 12
Chick and Egg Show .................................. 1
4-H and FFA Judging Teams............................ 14

COVER STORY
Here are the girls that entered the Ag Fair Queen Contest:
From left to right are, Pat Guthrey, Nancy Pelstring, Nancy Dennis,
Joan Jones, Shirley Nichols, Verena Fogel, Shayla Christopher, Jane
Woodrow, Edyne Lurie, Patty Poppell, Shiela Makstein, Gail Corbean.


7rom the Cdltor 's Desl

Spring approaches and the thoughts of seniors in the College
of Agriculture, as in all colleges, turn to graduation. Our
graduating class will be 90 strong. We are hoping that there
will be jobs for all of us and that we will be able to put the


FLETCHER


knowledge gained in our four
years here at the University of
Florida to work for the betterment
of the agriculture of this state.
Unfortunately, many of the
graduates find themselves faced
with military service. When it
starts to happen to you, you really
begin to wonder about the ad-
visability of entering college im-
mediately upon graduation from
high school and then having to
enter military service after finish-
ing a four year course. It seems
to me that high school graduates
should strongly consider fulfilling
their liability for military service
before entering college, enabling
them to start work upon gradua-
tion. This is written in retro-
spect, and I am firmly convinced


that it is the best choice.
A DEVIATION IN POLICY
Last Fall, we announced the creation of a regular feature
in which we would salute a leader in Florida agriculture. To
quote from the announcement, "We will choose a man who
has made a definite contribution." This issue certainly ful-
fills the promise of selecting a leader, but it so happens we
have chosen a woman. It is a real pleasure to present Mrs.
Jeannette Zetrouer Chitty to our readers and add our voice to
the many people who are praising the fine work she is doing.
MORE ON THE COVER AND AG FAIR
Probably few people will fail to notice the picture on the cover
of this issue. After studying it, you can well appreciate the
hard task of selecting the Ag. Fair Queen from this group of
lovely contestants.
In addition to the Queen contest, handled so well by Alpha
Tau Alpha, other parts of the 1953 were equally as good. In
spite of bad weather, the exhibits were visited by thousands.
Each club participating should be commended but we should
like to especially commend the American Society of Agronomy
for their winning display. For a sophomore organization (this
is their second year) they are providing strong competition
for the older clubs.
It would seem that the completion of the construction
planned in the stadium will render it unsatisfactory as a site
for the Ag Fair. We would like to recommend that the fair
be taken to the livestock pavilion. Admittedly, it is some-
what removed from the main campus but it is our prediction
that people will take the trouble to go there if the fair is
worth seeing. It could become a permanent home and offers
many physical advantages over other locations, including the
stadium.
PLEASE NOTE
Your attention to the article in this issue concerning enroll-
ment trends in the College of Agriculture is invited. This is
a very important question; if this college is to grow with the
University, it must not lag behind in number of students.
Though no definite conclusion is possible, the article presents
the background of the problem and makes its predictions on
the available information.


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


PAGE FOUR









LET


P.nO. Box 3
P. O. Box 310


FERTILIZER COMPANY
Tampa, Florida


CATTLEMEN
May We Send You Complete Analysis, Samples,
Feeding Charts and Quotations on Beef Cattle Feeds


F-R-M
Range "Cow Boys"
(Cattle Pellets)
Grain Base


Calf Starter


F-R-M
Calf Creep Feed


32% Beef Steer
Concentrate


Manufactured By

FLINT RIVER MILLS, Inc.


TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


* BAINBRIDGE, GA.


SPRING, 1954PAGE FIVE


Be sure to call for your nearest Lyons representa-
tive and discuss your grove problems. He will be
glad to help you plan your grove program.

YOUR
OWN
NET
SALES
BE THE JUDGE OF HOW GOOD A FERTILIZER SHOULD BE
For many years, season after season, the users of Lyons Fertilizers have been producing permium
crops of highest quality fruits and receiving higher profits. Now, more than ever, high quality
fruit will command high prices. Plan now to increase your own net sales next season. The price
of good fertilizer is small when it increases your net returns.
PLAN NOW TO USE LYONS FERTILIZERS


SPRING, 1954


PAGE FIVE
















Dr. J. Wayne Rielz
(center) presenting
Earl W. Brown,
President, Florida
Chamber of Commerce
and Nathan Mayo,
Commissioner of
Agriculture, awards
for outstanding work
in promotion of
Poultry Husbandry


ALTHOUGH RAIN and cold weather were
the order of the day, the annual Ag
Fair nevertheless played host to thousands
of visitors during its two days of tenure,
Friday and Saturday, March 5 and 6.
Held beneath the west stands of Florida
Field, this year's extravaganza once again
drew rave notices for its many outstand-
ing exhibits and displays which depicted
the various College of Agriculture Clubs'
connection with agriculture.
The fair was sponsored by Alpha Zeta,
national agriculture fraternity, and is be-
lieved to be the only such undertaking
handled entirely by students.
Miss Nancy Pelstring of Hollywood,
Florida, reigned as Ag Queen during the
two days of festivities.
The various exhibits were judged on
the basis of educational aspects, originali-
ty, attractiveness and effort. Judges were:
Dr. J. Wayne Rietz, provost for agricul-
ture; Dr. C. V. Noble, Dean of the Col-
lege of Agriculture; Dr. Albert S. Muller,
professor and counselor to Latin Ameri-
can students in agriculture; and Dr.
Joseph R. Beckenbach, associate director,
Agricultural Experiment Station.
The winning exhibit was entered by
the student section of the American
Society of Agronomy, and therein lies a
story by itself. The club is the newest in
the College of Agriculture, having been
organized less than a month ago by com-
bining the Agronomy and Soils clubs.
The ASA blue-ribbon display had as
its theme, "Service to agriculture through
the education of future farmers." The
club prepared two educational exhibits
and one crop demonstration set to be
furnished county agents, 4-H instructors,
vocational agriculture teachers, and others
interested in agricultural youth instruc-
tion.
The two exhibits prepared by the club


Winning exhibit
sponsored by
A.S.A.


include a crop seed collection containing
20 grass and o3 legume crop seeds in
individual vials attractively labeled, and
o3 labeled bottles containing the common
plant food carriers of nitrogen, phos-
phorus, potash lime, minor elements and
fillers.
The crop demonstration offers 36
varieties of seed ready for planting.
Based on a total plot size of 1,800 square
feet, it includes seed of so fall-planted
legumes and inoculants, 16 fall-planted
grasses and miscellaneous crops, 72 pack-
ages of plant food, labels and stakes, a
field plot design and general instruction
sheet.
Robert D. Woodward, display chair-
man of ASA, received the trophy pre-
sented the winning exhibit at the square
dance Saturday night. The presentation
was made by Courtney Stephens, presi-
dent of Alpha Zeta
The second place exhibit, sponsored by
the Dairy Science club, showed the
amount of feed needed by a champion
milker to produce too gallons of milk in
3o days plus a display of various dairy
products that are the end produce from
that amount of milk. The cow used in
the exhibit was Blonde Lad's Doll, owned


by Steve Simmons. St. Johns County,
grand champion Jersey at the State 4-H
Dairy Show in Orlando.
Thyrsus, horticulture club, finished
third with a display which featured vari-
ous horticulture crops of importance in
Florida, including citrus, ornamental
shrubs and flowers, and vegetables grown
in winter for Northern markets.
Other student organizations with ex-
hibits were: Block and Bridle, Newell
Entomology Society, Poultry Science,
Forestry, American Society of Agriculture
Engineers, 4-H, FFA, College Farmer, and
Lambda Gamma Phi, pre-veterinary
society.
Another highlight of the square dance
was the coronation of Miss Pelstring as
Ag Queen. Miss Pelstring, sponsored by
the Dairy Science club, was awarded a
loving cup by contest chairman James
Edwards. Her court included Miss
Verena Fogel, Gainesville, representing
FFA, and Miss Jane Woodrow, Coral
Gables, representing Block and Bridle.
Other entries in the Ag Queen contest,
sponsored by Alpha Tau Alpha, honorary
professional fraternity of agricultural
education were: Misses Edyne Lurie,
Miami Beach, ASA; JoAnn Jones, Jack-


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


PAGE SIX











AG


FAIR


'54


Thousands Visit Exhibits Of


Various Agricultural Departments


In Spite Of Adverse Weather


By CHARLES SONNEBORNE


DA. L
* U-.


tHHRdICH TMr
UIV I 1WAR


Ir:"-'7r!fE I


Dri,/, Eh. H. H.


Ir. Punr L. Coullrgt F. m ri; Niiicmo Di ii-.
dTampai. Forttrm %i CIi hr r' phui.
We'er Palm Bt:t1111- 4-H (:lul, ,h ,- I
NI;1k.ttin. Nlianii. I iunhda (,nifhia. Phi
Pat (GuthrcN. NIulirimnL. P0uIrM it
Ind C.-til Corl-,M. G.1111c,%jillllln I mrso1C1
\ riou --mvnitite- dtIiiniun III0111
11011 %%It[, tht: ir %% r -hairrriair. I.' D).
NIart,',If. puulh(ait%. (.harltr; B S-i111IJoI1M
Ind i \Irgill L.1Hfcitt-lett ri ii%. Lo-o
(irr.ird datnce. NI.-ri Er Heinr% plact
Edwards.


J*H (CIO-

C il,rii
*,I F/ it --,1 -
( hiIb


G TTIVES
L*
,IrnUl'


"NNJLll. RURAL

v~ ^ ^ -


I,~tv'


SPRING, 1954


PAGE SEVEN

















Thappj






Birltda




IOU ure cdai4 Ilamae. 41

Iil dacuck for ieeliiq pTd w toda


CLVae ke' 4ie one vAoqge4

Wna rkf Irflrda^ ^db yfOU'rJcl


Dear FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER:
You'll be twenty-four years old this
month. It hasn't been an easy twenty-
four years, haF it? Since that first edition
in April of 1930 there have been many
ups and downs. The first editor, Arthur
J. Hill and his hard working staff success-
fully carried our magazine through its
first year. The next year, incoming editor,
William Fifield wrote, "THE FLORIDA
COLLEGE FARMER has just completed its
trial run and has proven itself worthy of
existence... It has lived through its
first year and now takes its place in the
College of Agriculture as a permanent
activity." But who could foresee the
years to come bringing suspension due
to financial conditions from 1932 to 1935
and again during the war years?
Through all these troubles, FLORIDA
COLLEGE FARMER, you certainly can't com-
plain of the talent and hard work of
those who nursed you along. Your past
editors and staffs too seem to have
profited from their association with you.
We point with pride to the accomplish-
ments of these fine men:
Arthur M. Hill-head of Arthur Hill
Experiment Laboratory in Vero Beach
William M. Fifield-director of the
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
William Lofton--member of the faculty
of the Agricultural Education department
J. Russell Henderson-agronomist for


the Florida Agricultural Extension Serv-
ice
William J. Platt-Florida District Agri-
cultural Extension Agent
Lloyd Rhoden-County Agent, Leon
County
Wilmer Bassett--operates Basset Dairies,
Inc., Monticello, Fla.
Clyde Driggers-Associate Professor of
Poultry Husbandry, University of Fla.
The present staff hopes that this im-
pressive list is an indication of what the
future holds for them and succeeding
staffs.
After publication was resumed in 1935
under editor Lloyd Rhoden THE FLORIDA
COLLEGE FARMER was changed from a
monthly to a quarterly publication. At
that time Editor Rhoden stated the
purposes of the magazine. He said that
THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER has a five-
fold function
(i) It is a connecting link for various
agricultural interests.
(2) It provides entertainment and in-
formation for its readers.
(3) It serves as an instrument of ex-
pression for students of the College of
Agriculture.
(4) It provides training for students.
(5) It serves an educational function
for its readers.
Striving to carry out these purposes,
our magazine includes everything from


By ANNE CAWTHON






informative articles on various phases of
crop and livestock production, to personal
experience stories and jokes. Full cover-
age is given to 4-H. Future Farmers of
America and other agricultural activities
in the State and here on campus.
But what of your present and future,
FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER, as the first
publication by any single college on the
University of Florida campus? Despite
the financial stress and lack of student
support and contributions, your staff feels
that you are improving in every way.
Our magazine compares favorably with
those from other agricultural schools in
the Nation. There is lots of room for
improvement. The possibilities are im-
mense, but we need suggestions and help!
Happy birthday and best wishes to you,
FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER. Our sincere
thanks to all your contributors, advisors
and advertisers past and present who have
given you life.
Sincerely,
Anne Cawthon


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


r


PAGE EIGHT













Ag College Enrollment





Increasing or Decreasing?



by LAWRENCE SHACKLEFORD



THE COLLEGE of Agriculture of the Uni- 1914, and then his master's degree in the of graduates receiving BSA degrees for
versity of Florida has come a long, same field, the past few years. Why have they in-
long way since the graduation of Frank A great number of our County Agri- creased and decreased? What about the
Townsend Wilson of Lakeland, Fla. Mr. culture Agents, Vo Ag teachers, Vet present? Below is the number of grad-
Wilson was the first graduate of the Col- teachers and the various Agriculture spec- uates each year from 1937 to 1950:
lege of Agriculture; majoring in General ialists in the state as well as many promi- Studying the graph below we find a
Agriculture. He received his BSA degree nent rural workers and farmers have slight increase from 1937 to 1941, a de-
in 19o9. graduated from this College of Agricul- crease between 1941 and 1945 and then
Many great men have studied and ture, of which, we are very proud. up again from 1945 to 1950. From 1950
learned since that time. They have In view of the fact that we do have until the present we have witnessed a
learned ways to improve our agricultural an excellent College of Agriculture here drop, then a leveling off. What are the
system that life is so dependent upon. at the University of Florida, a thoughtful factors affecting these fluctuations over
Our well known Director of Agriculture question has been raised-Is there a de- the period of years? Dividing this span
Extension, Mr. H. G. Clayton, was an crease in enrollment and number of grad- of time into periods of increases and de-
early graduate of the College of Agricul- uates annually in the College of Agricul- creases we will discuss the reasons of fluc-
ture here at the University of Florida. ture? In our attempt to answer this ques- tuation of each period.
Mr. Clayton received his BSA degree in tion let's look at the trend in the number Between the years 1937-41 we find a
slight increase in graduates of the College
of Agriculture. The main reason for this
increase is probably due to the increase
360 in population, along with the fact that
we were again on the upgrade after a
340 decline in business or sometimes referred
20 to as the "Hoover years."
The biggest decrease of course came in
300 the period of 1941-45. We may readily
280 guess the number one reason for this de-
crease. Yes, "the war years." The United
260 States recruited every able-bodied Ameri-
240 can in the defense of our country. The
number of graduates reached its lowest
220 point in 1945 of seven graduates. This
was the lowest since 1912.
The period 1945-50, we may refer to as
180 "the silent years" as far as war goes. That
S is the period after World War II and
0 prior to the Korean "police action." Dur-
140 ing this period the College of Agriculture
experienced its greatest increase in en-
120 rollment and. number of graduates in
100 history, reaching its peak during the
1949-50 term. Summer school reached an
8o all high enrollment in 1949 of over
60 3oo students. It is interesting to note
that summer school enrollments during
4o this period 1945-50, was almost equal
those of the regular sessions. Why did
this occur? After World War II was over
33 35 3 39 41 43 45 47 49 51 53 and the GI Bill was set up, many GI's
hurried back to either finish their college
This graph shows the number of graduates from the College of Agriculture by years. education or take advantage of the GI
The information was obtained from the Office of Dean C. V. Noble. (Continued on page 18)


PAGE NINE


SPRING, 1954












Rural Youth


Conference


Held Mar.26-28
By JULIAN WEBB

W HAT WAS considered the most highly
successful Rural Youth Conference
ever, was held March 26-28, at Florida
State University in Tallahassee. The
conference is an annual event sponsored
jointly each year by the members of
Florida State University and University
of Florida 4-H Clubs. Playing host to
this year's conference was the Florida
State University Collegiate 4-H Club.
On Friday evening the members of the
two clubs journeyed to Camp Seminole
for a Picnic Supper and Informal Get-
Together. The supper was financed and
prepared by McCrory's of Tallahassee
through The Florida Chain Store Coun-
cil, Mr. James E. Gorman, Representative.
Saturday morning forty members were
on hand to open discussions which were
held in the Trophy Room of the F. S. U.
Student Center. Ann Edwards, Past
President of the F. S. U. Collegiate 4-H
Club, presided.
Much of the credit for the success of
Rural Youth Conference must be given to
Dr. Sam Neel. Chaplain at F.S.U., who
was the speaker for this year's conference.
Dr. Neel, a former prisoner of war, wove
his discussions around the theme "What
Can I Believe?".
Dr. Neel stated that, "Undisciplined
freedom of any sort is not good". Dr.
Neel pointed out that a person would
not eat what they wanted to, whenever
they wanted to. even if they were free to
do so, because it might prove harmful
or unhealthful. He used a similar
illustration in his discussion of Good and
Bad. He declared, 'That what may be
good for some of us, it might be bad
to others". "Three large meals a day
may be good for a thin person while it
may be harmful to an obese individual."
Dr. Neel continued on to state that,
"truth and freedom are inextricably re-
lated". "Only as one discovers truth and
brings his life into harmony with truth,
can he achieve freedom", he declared.
"As man has learned truths of the
physical world, he has achieved a greater
freedom in travel and communication,
and a greater freedom from disease and
famine. In his spiritual and emotional
life, too, man has found freedom only
as he has discovered those truths which
govern these fields," declared Neel.
Next year's conference will be held at
the University of Florida in Gainesville
in March or April.


A Problem Problematical

By PHIL WILLIAMS


South of Square Root in the land of Wyse
Where they've proved that the sun will rise,
Where prognostication for legislation
Is based on mathematical formulaezation,
There's gloom:
They've a problem problematical
That none can analyze,
No matter what's hypothesized!

Baffling Beta and Rigorous Rho
Have very nearly come to blows
In the specification of model zee,
One says it's recursive a priori;
Who knows:
It's a problem problematical
That none can analyze,
No matter what's hypothesized.

Bewilderment spread through the land of Wyse,
So the battling leaders had to decide,
They based their verdict on stochastic activity
With an unbiased coin using Gauss probability:
T'was solved:
This problem problematical
That none can analyze
Has now become exogenized!


Florida's 1953 Farm
Cash Receipts Rise,
Most States Lower
FARMING IN Florida yielded somewhat
higher cash receipts last year than in
1951 and 1952, in spite of a downward
trend nationally reported by the Agricul-
tural Marketing Service of the U. S.
Department of Agriculture.
Cash farm receipts in Florida came to
107 percent of 1952 receipts, whereas for
the United States as a whole cash receipts
were down to 96 percent of the '52
figure.
U. S. farm operators realized a net
income of 12.8 billion dollars in 1953.
Though this was 5 percent less than the
amount received in 1952 and 13 percent
lower than 1951, it was 4 percent higher
than the postwar low of 1950. Income
in 1951 reflected the sharply increased
demand caused by the Korean emergency.
Total cash receipts in 1953 were lower
than in 1952 in 37 states, and higher in
11 states. The decreases ranged from
less than I percent in North Dakota to
26 percent in Nevada, while increases
ranged from less than i percent in Penn-
sylvania to 20 percent in Mississippi.


Florida's increase of 7 percent placed this
state second to Mississippi in gains regis-
tered.
The realized net farm income is ob-
tained by subtracting total estimated
expenses of production from estimated
gross farm income. Changes in inven-
tories and livestock numbers are not
taken into consideration.

HIGH QUALITY beef has a deep red color,
fine grain, an outside covering of creamy
white fat, and is well marbled.

MOST OF Florida-produced milk is sold as
whole milk, and at least 80 percent of
the whole milk sold by Florida dairy
farmers goes to consumers as fluid milk.

IN 1953 the nation's agricultural exports
totalled $2.8 billion.

SOUTHERN OR field peas that are suitable.
for Florida gardens include the Alabama
Crowder, Brown Crowder, Dixie Lee,
Texas Cream 12, and Improved Bush
conch varieties. It is advisable to plant
by early May.

ALYCE CLOVER hay is a good feed for fatten-
ing steers.


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


PAGE TEN














This Issue We Salute:


The Story of a Girl's

Dream That Materialized







SShe called t



Stardu"t




By RALPH VosS


OUR SALUTE this edition is the story of
a girl's dream that has materialized.
Her dream was a majestic sky castle
surrounded by vast lush pastures filled
with contented black cattle lazily grazing
in grass up to their knees. But as she
grew older she was not contented with a
mere dream. She loved animals with a
passion and her personal choice of the
animal kingdom was Angus cattle. The
fact that other girls played with the
conventional doll had no affect on her.
Even when she had to lead the horse to
the fence to mount him she rode among
her Grandfather's cattle and constantly
insisted on being a "cow-puncher". She
never ceased to amaze her elders. A girl
with a love for cattle was rare indeed.
It was in this atmosphere that Mrs.
Jeannette Zetrouer Chitty spent her child-
hood days. At 16, she was well on her
way to her "Stardust" dream. ("Stardust"
was the name she gave to her dream
ranch.) Jeannette not only won reserve
champion at the Ocala S.E. Fat Stock
Show, but the coveted first place in Show-
manship as well. This was the first the
livestock world saw of Jeannette. But
she really set them on their heels in 1945,
when she won Grand Champion of the


same show.
But these honors were not handed to
her on a silver platter. She found by
actual experience, what it was to rise in
the morning while the sun was still
shining on China, feed and groom her
steer before the school bus came. She
discovered the hardships involved in try-
ing to get a steer that is off his feed, to
eat again while precious time is flying by.
All these things she filed in her mind for
future reference.
In high school Jeannette was cheer-
leader for two years and during her senior
year, she was class president. It has been
said that, "For a little girl, she sure got
around."
In 1945, she persuaded her father to
go into the Angus cattle business with
her as a partner. When the first heifers
arrived from Iowa and New York, it
marked the beginning of "Stardust"
ranch.
While returning from a visit to the
Chicago International Livestock Show,
she purchased the six year old herd sire
of the University of Ill., Postelmere 5'.
With an outstanding foundation herd and
a new herd sire, Jeannette set out to fill
in the missing links in her childhood


dream.
The first triumph came in 1950, when
a daughter of Postelmere 5 was reserve
champion at the Tampa State Fair, and
grand champion at the Webster show.
She also sold the Univ. of Fla. their pres-
ent Angus herd sire. Another recent
accomplishment was the Junior Champi-
on Angus bull at the Tampa State Fair
in 1953-
Until 1950, Jeannette had little in-
terest in things not pertaining to "Star-
dust". But on Nov. 22nd, 1950, Jean-
nette and Henry M. Chitty were united
in matrimony. For the two of them it
was the happiest moment of their lives
and they have been inseparable ever
since. They have made a successful
team. Together they are working hard
to put "Stardust" on an independent
basis. Henry is an Animal Husbandry
graduate from Clemson University.
It was rare enough to see a coed on
the campus of U. of F. in '46 and '47, but
for the same girl to be an Animal Hus-
bandry student was beyond belief. But
Jeannettee didn't mind the puns. She
graduated with a B. S. Degree in Animal
Husbandry in 1947 after only three years
of college life. She was a member of
Phi Kappa Phi, honorary fraternity, and
the Block and Bridle Club. Also, in
1917, she outshowed all men students and
(Continued on page i9)


PAGE ELEVEN


SPRING, 1954













Spring Brings


4-H Activities

F OUR-H CLUB work in the State of
Florida reached a peak of successful
activity this Spring. Two of the most
outstanding events of the year for 4-H
Clubbers were recently held at the
Central Florida Exposition in Orlando,
February 22-27. They were the State 4-H
Poultry and Egg Show and Judging Con-
test and the Seventh Annual State 4-H
Dairy Show.
Winners in the Poultry Show were as
follows: Best Cock in Show, Bill Platt,
Volusia County; Best Hen in Show,
Sandra Dennison, Orange County; Best
Cockerel in Show, Jack Sellards, Orange
County; Best Pullet in Show, Jack
Sellards, Orange County, Best dozen eggs
in Show, Delores Mercer, Duval County,
Best Display by Club Member, Jack
Sellards, Orange County, and Best Pen of
Broilers in Show, John Schroham, Orange
County.
Duval County exhibited the Best to
Dozen Eggs from a County while the Best
io Birds from a County were exhibited
by Orange County.
The winning judging team was the
Orange County Boys' team composed of
Jim Aitken, Hugo Desch, Jimmy Rich,
and Jack Sellards.
The top individual judge was Jack
Sellards, Orange County, who was fol-
lowed closely by Hugo Desch, Orange
County, Florrie Roberts, Manatee Coun-
ty, Jim Aitken, Orange County and
Jimmy Thompson, Dade County, in that
order.
Winner of the $100o.oo Department of
Agriculture Scholarship was Jack Sellards
of Orange County. This scholarship is
presented on the basis of individual's
judging, exhibit, and record book.
The new 4-H Dairy Show Barn and
show ring at the Central Florida Exposi-
tion provided a comfortable place for the
largest and most keenly competed State
4-H Dairy Show to date. Twenty-one
counties from all areas of the state were
represented. The Central Florida Ex-
position and the State Department of
Agriculture provided a combined tqtal of
S2500 in premiums.

Animal Husbandry Prof: "If you lead
a donkey to a pail of water and a pail of
beer. which will he drink?"
Student: "The water."
Professor: "That's right. Why?"
Student: "Because he's an ass."

FOREST TREES were planted on a record
715,548 acres last year in the United
States, 37 percent more than in 1952.


Chick and Egg Show Has Theme


"To Produce More in '54"


By JIULIAN WEELB


XTREMELY ADVERSE weather conditions
failed to hinder the enthusiasm and
success of the Poultry Science Club as
they presented the '954 version of the
Florida Baby Chick, Poult and Egg
Show.
Poultrymen from all parts of the state
were present to inspect the entries which
represented many of the leading poultry-
men throughout the state of Florida.
The show was held March 5 and 6,
in conjunction with the Annual Agricul-
tural Fair.
The purpose of the show is to stimulate
interest in and encourage production of
higher quality poultry and poultry
products, and to provide instructive and
educational features which will benefit
both the poultryman and the consumer.
The theme of this year's show can
easily be presented in the challenge issued
by Poultry Science President, Herman
Jones, to the poultrymen of the state,
"To Produce More in '54".
Jones was General Chairman of this
year's show and was very capably assisted
by Richard Karau, Chairman of the Chick
Show, and Art Duchaine, Chairman of
the Egg Show.
There were three divisions of the Egg
Show: Open, F.F.A., and Collegiate.
Winners in the Open Show which was
open to anyone in the state were as fol-
lows: Extra large White, A. B. Thompson,
Tallahassee, Extra large Brown, Roy
Darby, Chiefland, Large White, W. C.
Cushman, Gainesville, Large Brown,
August Leschak, Summerfield.
The Champion dozen eggs of the
Open Show was shown by W. C. Cushman
of Gainesville.
In the collegiate Show which was open
to University students, the winners were:
Extra large White, Bill Burger, Extra
Large Brown, Robert Neil, Large White,
Dick Noles, Large Brown, Stephen Mc-
Call. The Collegiate Champion dozen
was shown by Dick Noles.
In F.F.A. competition the Best Exhibit
of Four Dozen Eggs was shown by the
Melrose Chapter, Edward Allen, Advisor.
W. C. Cushman of Gainesville, had the
Grand Champion Dozen Eggs of the
entire show.
Judges for the Egg Show were: Mr. F.
W. Risher, Poultry and Egg Marketing
Specialist, Jacksonville, Fla., Mr. Thomas
Mullin, Director, Poultry and Egg Inspec-
tion Division Tallahassee, Fla, Mr. O.


D. Davis, Poultry and Egg Inspector,
Dept. of Agriculture, Gainesville, Fla.,
Mr. D. L. Smith, Poultry and Egg In-
spector, Dept. of Agriculture, Orlando,
Fla.
Winners in the chick show which was
divided into fve classes were: S. C. White
Leghorns, Oakcrest Poultry Farm, Jack-
sonville, Fla., New Hampshires, Wright's
Farm and Hatchery. Dinsmore, Fla.;
White Plymouth Rocks. Oakcrest Poultry
Farm, Jacksonville, Fla.; Miscellaneous
Class, Oakcrest Poultry Farm, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
In the Poult division the winners were:
Best entry of Bronze Poults, Norman Ott,
Homestead, Fla., Best entry of Beltsville
White Poults Bischoff Turkey Farm and
Hatchery, Tampa, Fla.
The Grand Prize for the best entry of
chicks went to Wright's Poultry Farm
and Hatchery, Dinsmore, Fla.
The Grand Prize for the best entry of
poults went to Bischoff Turkey Farm and
Hatchery, Tampa, Fla.
Judges for the Chick and Poult Show
were: Dr. D. C. Gillis, Administrator
N.P.I.P., State Livestock Board, Talla-
hassee, Florida, Mr. W. E. VanLanding-
ham, R.O.P. and Hatchery Inspector,
State Livestock Board, Tallahassee, Fla.,
Mr. J. S. Moore, Extension Poultryman,
University of Florida. Gainesville, Fla.
Trophies were awarded to each of the
Grand Prize Winners at the afternoon
program in which the winners were an-
nounced. Awards were also presented to
the Hon. Nathan Mayo, Commissioner
of Agriculture, and to Mr. Earl W.
Brown, President of the Florida Chamber
of Commerce, for their outstanding work
in the promotion of the poultry industry
in the State of Florida.
Another feature of the show was
"Casey at the bat". "Casey", a hen, was
trained to perk a release controlling an
electric circuit which automatically batted
a rubber ball through a miniature base-
ball diamond. If the ball hit the back
wall of the diamond feed was released
so that the bird may eat. When the bird
became hungry again she pecked the
release and the process was repeated.

FARMER COOPERATIVES in the United
States now have a membership of 7,400,-
ooo, an increase of 4 percent over a year
ago and a record high.


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


PAGE TWELVE











7


MOUNTED IMPLEMENTS HAVE COME OF AGE


When tractors replaced work animals on farms it
seemed natural that implements should be trailed
behind the source of power in the traditional man-
ner. Until recently, pull-type plows were accepted
without question. Today, the trend is toward
mounted implements!
With the development of hydraulic systems, it
became obvious that there were many advantages
in mounting plows and similar implements directly
on the tractor, eliminating extra wheels and frames
. thereby lowering the cost of the implement.
In doing so, however, it was apparent that new
engineering problems were involved if the full
potential of tractors and mounted tools was to be
realized.
Today, Allis-Chalmers is the pace-setter in this
field. Here are some of the features that make the
WD-45 and CA Tractors with matching equipment
recognized as outstanding. With these tractors, en-
gine power spaces rear wheels in or out to fit the
job. Hydraulic TRACTION BOOSTER makes
use of the implement's weight to increase traction
as needed. Implements are free-swing pulled
from a single master hitchpoint located ahead of
the tractor rear axle. Automatic SNAP-COUPLER
makes changing implements a matter of seconds.
Yes mounted implements have come of age, for a
significant advancement in the efficiency of power
farming.


Model CA Tractor lifts hydraulically to
cross grassed waterway.


SNAP-COUPLER is an Allis-Chalmers trademark.



AC LLIISICHO MLERS.
ACTOR DIVISION MILWAUKEE 1, U. 5. A


PAGE THIRTEEN


SPRING, 1954













I1L1~ Extra!


EXTRA crop

quality and profits

with


IDEAL


& FASCO


Brands

Extra quality in your fertilizer
means extra quality and quantity in
your crops. IDEAL Fertilizers are
quality fertilizers containing high-
grade organic to assure a continu-
ous plant food supply. Organics are
now more plentiful and less expen-
sive which means greater crop insur-
ance for you at less cost.
FASCO Pesticides, too, offer you
the extra values of the most effective
control materials, manufactured in a
modern factory under scientific
supervision.
So feed your crops with IDEAL
Fertilizers, kill their enemies with
FASCO Pesticides-your profit com-
bination.

WILSON & TOOMER
FERTILIZER COMPANY
and Divisions
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL
SUPPLY COMPANY
PENINSULAR FERTILIZER WORKS-TAMPA
CARTLEDGE FERTILIZER CO.- COTTONDALE
GENERAL OFFICES JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


Well over 100 FFA judging teams competed at the Florida State Fair-and Summerfield
and Ocala teams won in beef and swine judging, and dairy judging respectively. Going
to Kansas City next fall as Florida's official representatives are the standing team,
left to right: FFA Executive Secretary Al Cox, and Adviser Sam Love, Larry Holder,
Rodney Buchalla and Perry Smith, all of Summnerfield; Seated is the Ocala team which
will go to Waterloo, Iowa, left to right, Adviser M. C. Roche, Carl Magee, Duncan
Vright, Mickey McGee.


Ocala, Summerfield Win


FFA State Fair Judging...


THE SUMMERFIELD FFA Chapter Livestock
judging team walked off with the title of
state champions in judging livestock at
the recent Florida State Fair in Tampa
and, as a result, the three-man team
coached by Sam Love will represent Floi
ida in national competition next October.
The Summerfield team is composed of
Rodney Buchalla, Larry Holder and
Perry Smith, all 15 years of age and ninth
grade students in the Summerfield High
School, where they are taught vocational
agriculture by Love.
In the contest at Tampa, 115 teams of
three students per team judged two
classes of swine, beef and dairy cattle.
Out of a possible i8oo points the Sum-
merfield team scored a total of 1323.
For being the state champions, they
receive the new rotating trophy presented
by the Florida State Fair, as the old tro-
phy was retired last .year by the Bartow
FFA Chapter after it had been in com-
petition for 25 years. Summerfield also
received $30 for their first place award
from the Florida State Department of
Agriculture.
For amassing 940 points out of 1200 in
beef cattle and swine judging they will
represent Florida in national competi-
tion next October at the American Royal
Livestock Show in Kansas City, Missouri.
Nathan Mayo, state commissioner of agri-
culture, presented the team $350 to en-
able it to represent Florida at the Kansas
City event.
The second place team at Tampa and
winner of $25 in prize money was the


Umatilla FFA livestock judging team.
Third place and $20 went to the Winter
Garden chapter, and the Ocala chapter
won fourth place and $15.
The Ocala FFA livestock judging team
compiled 488 points out of a possible 6oo
to win the dairy cattle title and will
represent Florida in competition at the
National Dairy Congress in Waterloo,
Iowa, next October. This team is com-
posed of Mickey McGee, Duncan Wright
and Carl Magee, all students of vocational
agriculture in the Ocala High School
under M. C. Roche, teacher and local
chapter adviser.


Hints to the Wise!
As INFERTILE eggs keep better than fer-
tile ones, it is advisable to keep roosters
out of the flock that is laying eggs for
market. Unless hatching eggs are
wanted, there should be no rooster with
the laying flock.
APPLICATION OF 200 to 300 pounds of
o-8-24 fertilizer per acre in early spring
should stimulate growth and increase
yields of clover pastures.
WHEN PIGS are two weeks old, extra feed
should be provided for them in the
creep. Rolled oats and shelled or
cracked corn are good for this purpose.
A good commercial pellet starter is suit-
able also. Finely ground feeds are not
relished as much as coarser feeds by pigs,
so thev should be avoided.


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


PAGE FOURTEEN















1HOCJIE[H Iq



KA JIqN!



they just

can't seem to collectivize

hands that touch the soil







102^" **


.~ .^/' > -^ ^ ^


- .'- -


Behind the iron curtain today a lot of commissars are
saying, 3TO IIOCJIE1LUlqq KAIl.I" We would
say, "That's the last straw!"
You see, it has been the commissar's job to "collectivize"
the farmers ... to put the state between the man and the
land. But, reports tell us, the collectivizing job is going
badly. The muzhiks (little farmers) and the kulaks (big
farmers) are just not falling in line.
Even in curtain countries, folks who live by the land
have inherited the freedom of the soil. The knowledge
that a man should be free to make his own decisions
seems to rise from the furrows to make its indelible mark.
Throughout history, serfdom has never produced good
farmers. That's easy enough to understand ...


Can you imagine a farmer who no longer makes his own
decisions letting the moist, spring-warmed earth fall
through his fingers? Can you picture a state-controlled
farmer rubbing out kernels of wheat in the palm of his
hand... blowing away the chaff and sampling the grain?
Can you see a party farmer terracing his land, seeding
waterways, or walking through the "south 40" with his
sons? Can you picture such a farmer buying Modern
Machines to boost his production and better his lot, or
a farm-equipment dealer playing a prominent part in
community affairs, taking a real interest in modern
agriculture?
Hardly!
It takes free men to work the soil!


MANUFACTURERS OF MM VISIONLINED TRACTORS, THE UNI-FARMOR, MODERN MACHINERY FOR THE FARM



MINNEAPOLIS- MOLINE
MINNEAPOLIS 1, MINNESOTA


SPRING, 1954


PAGE FIFTEEN












Service Supplies

and Equipment


To the Dairy
Industry Whether
Dairy Farmer or
National Distribution


Servlin

Central Florida


Hardware Building Supplies
Plumbing Electric Supplies


* Radio


* Television


Automotive
* Outboard Motors


* Boats


Main Stores:
Jacksonville-Miami


Farm Stores:
Hollywood-Tallahassee


-BAIRD-
HARDWARE CO.


GAINESVILLE, FLA.
Phone 8531


The Model 1-48 F

SPREADD ALL FERTILIZER
SPRE-A DISTRIBUTOR






Will Make
Profits For The
Cattleman
In The Development Of Finer Pastures
Broadcast your seed or fertilizer, phosphate, slag, Dolomite, agricultural lime or
other soil conditioners, where and when you want it.
Will spread 25 to 30 foot swath with output as low as 50 pounds of fertilizer or
up to 5000 pounds of lime to the acre.
Write for free literature or have our representative call at your ranch.
Also available in the following models.
"SPRED-ALL BULKMASTER" "SPRED-ALL" JR. "SPRED-ALL" TRUCK
2 2 z Ton Capacity % Ton Capacity 2 4 Ton Capacity
Manufactured By
MEINCKE SPREADER WORKS, Inc., Astatula, Fla., Ph.: Tavares 11 Black


JOHNSON
Brothers, Inc.

111 South Main Street
Phones 4351 and 4352

GAINESVILLE,
FLORIDA

Wholesale and Retail

Complete Line of Garden
and Pet Supplies
Vegetable and Field Seeds
Tuxedo Feeds

MARICO
FERTILIZERS INSECTICIDES
FUNGICIDES


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


Miller Machinery &

Supply Co.


PAGE SIXTEEN









'I




insects
YOU SHOULD KNOW


Heliothis armigera (Hbn.)
A major cotton pest, the newly hatched boll-
worm feeds on leaves and then attacks squares
and bolls. Greatest loss is caused by tunneling
into and destroying bolls. Color varies from
pink, green, to almost black. The full-grown
worm is about 1 inches long. The female
lays about 1,000 eggs, particularly on growing
tips, squares and bolls.


POTATO LEAFHOPPER


This leafhopper is one of the alfalfa producer's
greatest enemies because all stages of the pest
suck juices from alfalfa plants, stunting growth
and reducing yield. They are also the cause of
"hopper burn" on potatoes. A tiny, pale-
greenish insect, this leafhopper is not found
in Northern states during winter, probably
flying in from the South, where they breed
during the entire year.




toxaphene

DUSTS SPRAYS
For full-color booklets showing
these and other insects write to Hercules


ARMYWORMS
Pseudaletia unipuncta (Haw.)
and Laphygma frugiperda (A. & S.)
Armyworms are a major pest of cereal
and forage crops, their damage some-
times totaling millions of dollars. Army-
worm invasions commonly follow cold,
wet springs. The tiny, newly hatched
caterpillars feed near the ground. Fully
grown, they have enormous appetites,
the noise of their feeding making a
rustling sound in the fields.


Naval Stores Department HERCULES POWDER COMPANY 905 King St., Wilmington 99, Del.


NX53-16


PAGE SEVENTEEN


SPRING, 1954













Enrollment
(Continued from page 9)
Bill in getting a college education. Many
of these men were married or getting into
the years, therefore they decided to go
straight through school, including sum-
mer sessions. Therefore we find this
enormous increase is due to the return
of the GI's and government aid, the GI
Bill. Another factor affecting this in-
crease is the increase in population.
The last period in this span of time
is from the peak, 1950, until the present.
As we have showed you 1950 was the
peak in the number of students graduat-


ing and then a decrease in graduates of
approximately 40% the very next year.
The answer to that is simply that the
"war mass" starting in 1945-46 graduated
in 1949-50. In 1951 we were returning to
normal again and have been on a level
since that time. The question may be
raised about Korean vets. Yes, we have
many Korean vets but they did not enroll
in masses like those following World
War II.
Thus far, we have been considering
those people working for and receiving
BSA degrees. Now let's briefly look into
the enrollment of graduate school in
Agriculture. Until 1952, anyone doing
graduate work in Agriculture or any field,


* a


TWENTY-THIRD PSALM

The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.
He maketh me to lie down in green pastures;
He leadeth me beside the still waters.
He restoreth my soul;
He leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for
his name's sake.
Yea, though I walk through the valley of the
shadow of death,
I will fear no evil: for thou art with me;
thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.
Thou prepares a table before me in the presence
of mine enemies:
Thou anointest my head with oil; my cup runneth over.
Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all
the days of my life,
And I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever.


registered in graduate school and Dr.
L. E. Grinter, Dean of graduate school
was their only Dean. All their records
were kept by Dr. Grinter's office and the
students directed their problems to him.
Since 1952 this system has been revised
and the records of the graduate students
are still kept in Dr. Grinter's office but
a copy is also kept in the College the
student is in. For example, a graduate
student in Agriculture now registers in
the College of Agriculture, a copy of his
records is kept in the College of Agricul-
ture and he will contact Dr. C. V. Noble,
Dean of the College of Agriculture, when
a problem in his work arises.
Frankly we do not know the reason for
:his, but our guess is because of the in-
creased enrollment in graduate school
from the various Colleges. There is cer-
tainly an increase of enrollment in grad-
uate school of Agriculture. Records for
the current year show 127 enrolled in
Agriculture graduate school. Why is
there such an increase? First of all it's
the "crying need for higher education."
Turning back the pages of history we
can see where that one time, if a person
had an elementary education he could
get a good job-at fairly high wages.
Then it rose to a high school standard
and in recent years a college education.
and now because of the increase in the
need of technical skills in this "educated
era" many are seeking master's degrees
or even Doctorate degrees. Another fac-
tor is the number of Korean vets who
already have their BSA degrees returning
to school to further their education.
Is enrollment in the College of Agri-
culture really decreasing or increasing?
We think it is definitely increasing in
undergraduate and graduate work, we
think that before too long the normal
enrollment of the College of Agriculture
will equal that of the "peak years" fol-
lowing World War II. We base this
prediction upon the following facts and
assumptions: (1) a continued increase in
population, (2) continuation of educa-
tion seekers in an "educational era," (3)
the new Agriculture building and in-
creased facilities to attract out-of-state
students as well as home-state students.
No matter what the trend may be we
must keep in mind that "agriculture is
the backbone of our nation" and educa-
tion is an important means in improving
it. We think this is realized in our in-
crease in enrollment in the College of
Agriculture.


INCREASED DEMAND for high protein feeds
for animals has resulted in a marked
reduction in amounts of cottonseed meal,
fish scrap, and good tankages used for
fertilizing crops.


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


PAGE EIGHTEEN












Salute
(Continued from page II)
won Grand Championship Showmanship
Award in the Little International Live-
stock Show sponsored by Block and
Bridle. She was a judge of the same
show a year later.
Financing a young, growing ranch re-
quires a good business mind. Jeannette
has helped meet the bills by teaching
Veterans Vocational Agriculture since
1947. She is the only woman agriculture
teacher in Florida. Henry Chitty ope-
rates a men's clothing store in Gainesville
from which a bulk of the profits are also
invested in "Stardust".
Jeannette added another first to her
credit when she was named superin-
tendent of the beef cattle barn at the
Florida State Fair and has filled that
position for the past two years.
One may gather from this article that
she is the most popular woman in the
field of agriculture in the state of Florida.
The reason for this not only lies in her
abilities but her personality as well.
Jeannette's smile has been her hallmark
since the first time she stepped into a
showing. Even cattle feel at home
around her. Her soft, kindly voice and
easy manner wins their confidence almost
immediately. This accounts for her many
firsts in showmanship classes and will play
a large part in the success of "Stardust".
Their future plans for "Stardust" in-
clude additions to their purebred Angus
herd, sale of their grade herd, enlarging
and improving their pastures, and the
completion of a rambling ranch style
home. Last summer's vacation was spent
planting Pangola and Pensacola Bahia
grass. Upon the death of Postelmere 5'
the Chittys purchased a Georgia-bred
bull, Lorraine Eileenmere 118, now two
years old. There are high hopes that he
will be a heavy contributor to Stardust.


"This new home," Jeannette says, "is
something I have wanted all my life. It
has been one of the big missing links in
my dream ranch."
With two people of this caliber work-
ing as a team, there is no set limit to
their success. It is an unbeatable combi-
nation that may well jar the very founda-
tions of the beef industry. You are
destined to see many Champions of the
Stardust Ranch in showrings throughout
the South and the prices will run high,
for if it's Stardust, it's got to be good.


Phone 6-1201


Pine Demonstration

TAVARES, FLA.-Three kinds of pines-
longleaf, slash, and Sanderegger-were
planted in a demonstration tract at Asta-
tula by the Lake County forestry com-
mittee recently, County Agent R. E.
Norris reports. Mr. Norris is chairman
of the committee, which includes Soil
Conservation Service, U. S. Forest Service,
and Florida Forest Service workers.


FRUIT


Phone L.D. 1


Run your hands down into the smooth,
mellow mixture and let it pour through
your fingers. V-C Fertilizer is mealy, loose
and dry...and it stays that way in all kinds
of weather. V-C Fertilizer stays in good con-
dition, when stored in a dry building.

When you distribute V-C Fertilizer, every
plant in your field gets its full share of V-C's
better plant foods. Your crop comes up to
a good stand...makes healthy growth...
develops a strong root system...has vigor to
resist disease and adverse weather...and
produces abundant yields.


Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation

In Florida: ORLANDO JACKSONVILLE NICHOLS


S u wHAINESr CITY ComFpan
HAINES CITY, FLORIDA


PROCESSORS OF FLORIDA


&"eeSt- wApy Mo fr
"They Moo for More"


HAINES CITY, FLORIDA


"Our family has been growing citrus in Florida continuously since 1908"


FREE-FLOWING


You can see the free-
flowing, easy drilling
quality of V-C Fertilizer as
soon as you open the
bag. V-C Fertilizer flows
through your distributor
smoothly and evenly.


FEERTiiLiZZERS


PAGE NINETEEN


SPRING, 1954










































Keeping your grove free of insects and diseases calls for 24-hour
duty from your sprayer. The John Bean Speed Sprayer, developed
among the citrus groves of Florida specifically for citrus spraying, is
a rugged, heavy-duty machine you can operate day and night with-
out excessive maintenance costs. No sprayer has ever outperformed
the Speed Sprayer, for the Speed Sprayer is the most modern of the
air-type spraying units.
Easily adapted to spray with any type material you wish-dilute or
concentrate-the Speed Sprayer spraying technique is to displace the
air around the tree and replace that air with spray material. Large
volumes of air, produced by the big Speed Sprayer fan, carry the
spray in a driving mist through the thickest foliage, to the top of the
tallest tree, and to the bottom of the lowest branches.


SPEED SPRAYER FACTORY, ORLANDO, FLORIDA g Al


LANSIN


,m ml


Index

to Advertisers

Allis-Chalm ers .................... 13
Baird Hardware Co. ................ 16
Bean Sprayer Co. ..................20
Deere & Company .................. 2
Flint River M ills .................. 5
Florida State Theatres .............. 20
Gulf Fertilizer Co. ................... 3
Hercules Powder Co. ...............17
International Harvester Co. ......... 24
Jackson Grain Co. ... ............... 2
J. I. Case Co. ...................... 23
Johnson Bros. ......................16
Lyons Fertilizer Co. ................. 5
Meincke Spreader Co................ 16
M iller M achinery .................. 16
Minneapolis Moline Co. ............. 15
Norris Cattle Co. .................. 3
Respress Grimes Engraving .......... 22
Sun Lake Ranch ................... 20
Suni Citrus .........................19
Trueman Fertilizer Co. .............21
Va. Carolina Chemical Co ........... 19
W ilson & Toomer .................. 14
W. A. Ames Co .................... .2


5 5. jm 1 J Sendfor this book-
At i /w DIVISION OF FOOD ltfor more in/or.
MACHINERY AND mati on on the cost
MACHINERY AND saving features o]
CHEMICAL CORPORATION then Bean
Sprayer
G 4, MICHIGAN* SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA


SBOX 57 LUTZ;FLOI


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


PAGE TWENTY











Cow College Clips

By CHARLES SONNEBORN

A EcONOMICs CLUB honored Dr. John
D. Black, Harvard professor of Agri-
cultural Economics, at club's first annual
banquet...installed Lehman Fletcher,
president; Ernest Brown, veep; Bill Bur-
ger, Sec.-treas.; and Lowell Teal, re-
porter...ALPHA ZETA still reaping praise
over best Ag Fair even without weather-
man's support...initiated Dr. Darrell Mc-
Cloud as an associate member...second
semester pledge class to be biggest in
many years... AMERICAN SOCIETY OF AGRON-
OMY still gloating over Fair award...elect
Bob Wallis, prexy; Dick Woodward, vice-
president; Bill Burger, scribe; Arthur
Sweat, treasurer; Charles Sonneborn, pub-
lic relations head... big affair coming up
soon with students and faculty.
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF Ao ENGINEERS at-
tended the annual state ASAE meeting in
Jacksonville.. .club membership at an all-
time high of twenty-eight.
CAMPUS POLITICS find Bob Freeman,
Larry Shakelford, and Bob Woodward
running against Charles Collins, Arthur
Kenfroe, and Phil O'Berry...ALL
SENIORS are out job hunting...and trying
to avoid their Uncle's pointed finger...
good luck...4-PoINTERS...only two last
semester says Miss Wise...the brains are
...Carlos Fernandez and Leon Garrard.
Dm You KNow...Ralph White having
a time with Taxonomy, Plant Physiology,
and Qualitative Analysis...Ed Saunders
is Historian of Phi Delta Theta...Alpha
Gamma Rho prexy is Pete Howell...Ag
Ec courses are pleasanter without Lauch-
lin Rozier.
Professor John R. Greenmen SAID IT...
professors are those who tell the students
what to avoid that they themselves avoid
by becoming professors.


Seedsmen's Journal Names G.
E. Ritchey"Man of the Month"
GEORGE E. RITCHEY, agronomist in charge
of the Suwannee Valley Experiment Sta-
tion at Live Oak, Fla., has been named
Man-of-the-Month by Seedsmen's Digest
Magazine.
While at the main station in Gaines-
ville from 1927 to 1950, Mr. Ritchey was
largely responsible for the introduction
of hairy indigo, bitter blue lupine, bitter
and sweet lupine, Pangola grass and
African squash into the agriculture of
Florida and the Southeast. He was in
charge of the plant introduction gardens
of the Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station and United States Department of
Agriculture at Gainesville from 1920 to


1950-
He is co-author of Farmers' Bulletin
1946, Lupines, New Legumes for the
South, and author of Press Bulletin 490,
A New Squash from Africa. He has done
extensive work in agronomy in China
and the Philippine Islands. While in
China he developed three strains of
wheat which have since become the out-
standing varieties of wheat in central
China.

As OLD birds may be carriers of disease
and show no outward signs of sickness, it
is advisable to segregate chickens by ages,
keeping young and growing birds away
from the older ones. This will prevent
spread of disease from old to young
stock.


SINCE 1910 THE STANDARD OF THE FIELD

THE AMES
BALL
OUPLER 0 F SPIK






L PE .O PROTO- I. P R RAIN
Revolving Sprinkler Low Pressure Sprilkler


TAMPA


Distributed by
THE CAMERON & BARKLEY COMPANY
* ORLANDO JACKSONVILLE MIAMI CHARLESTON, S. C.
"See the 'Cambar' Man"


ASK THE MAN WHO USES IT! --SEND FOR FREE FOLDER---i
SName
Addres
c- ity State--
I- - - --


Florida Growers Have Been Buying


TRUEMAN'S BETTER QUALITY


fertilizers for nearly a half century. If better ferti-
lizers could be obtained Trueman customers would
not continue to use these good, old brands.



TRUEMAN FERTILIZER CO.

Jacksonville, Florida


PAGE TWENTY-ONE


SPRING, 1954













LORID


S* .'



- '"* *
.
1k


t':.
r



ti~





S_


* ORMULATED

f ., .. .
Olt., .


ELO IN

EEDIN


Vr1


ii
r


X-CEL Feeds are proved


V profit-makers for Florida
farmers. Every bag is backed
by 45 years of experience. For best t
results in Florida ... feed X-CEL.


V


ARTISTS
-DESIGNERS
LITHO NEGATIVES
Phone 6-4831 36 S.Main


CHAPTER FLASHES


A T CHAPTERS located over the state of
Florida, several hundred boys met
this past month. Why did they come to
these meetings? Each FFA boy every-
where knows the answer to this question,
and has answered in these same words,
"To practice brotherhood, honor rural
opportunities and responsibilities, and to
develop those qualities of leadership
which a future farmer should possess."
I don't believe there ever was a time
when these words should have been taken
more seriously and had more meaning
than at the present time.
To practice brotherhood; to honor re-
sponsibility; to develop leadership quali-
ties. If every person could always keep
these three goals in mind, how much
greater would be our accomplishments?
To what extent would human friction be
reduced?
When we as Future Farmers of America
repeat these words at chapter meetings,
let us do so in all sincerity, and let us
practice them at every opportunity.
THREE MEMBERS of the DeLand F.F.A.
Chapter were guest speakers at a
recent luncheon meeting of the DeLand
Rotary Club. Paul Pounds, president of
the chapter, reviewed the history of
F.F.A. in DeLand. He stated that the
chapter now owns or leases, a lake, five
acres of woodland, 23 cultivated acres,
500 acres of grazing land at the air base,
and a large section off the New Smyrna
Beach Road. Their investment totals
$60,000.00, and includes 60 head of cattle.
Dale Partin told of a recent trip he made
as delegate to the National F.F.A. Con-
vention in Kansas City, and Billy Gould
reviewed his project, now in its fourth
year.
THE MELROSE F.F.A. members recently
began a campaign to raise funds for
their chapter treasury. The boys have
been cutting cypress fence posts on land
owned by Mr. Price of Melrose. Mr.
Price accepted payment by sharing equal-
ly the number of posts cut. They will
sell the posts for $1.35.
THE FORT PIERCE Chapter held a steak
barbecue at the Dan McCarty High
School on Wednesday evening, March io.


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


EEDS


n


S


I


;


PAGE TWENTY-TWO










tisthe


SOMISE


toTrained armYouth


Throughout the ages, a great and lasting faith has led men on. The
Shepherds were led by faith in a star. Faith in a belief that the world
was round brought Columbus to our shores. And faith that there
were new and better things beyond led hardy pioneers to cross the
sea, to live and fight for what they thought. But with faith must
come understanding, too, to live and learn from those about you-
to hear and see the things they've done-to read, and strive to sift
the good from bad, and save the best for future use. For you who
study well and learn to do, there's opportunity-and with faith and
understanding of what must be done, there's promise in the land.


4,


A~


- -1


On the farm, in research, in industry, wherever you go, men with
education and practical training are assets of untold worth. With
the tradition of more than a century in producing fine farm imple-
ments, Case constantly strives to provide new and better equipment
to make farming easy-to give added promise to your future in
farming. Economists, engineers, managers, salesmen-all are need-
ed to do the myriad parts of the job. To give youth the best, and
maintain a tradition, Case conducts each year a training program
for selected college graduates. From field work with equipment to
assembly lines in plant after plant, for as much as two years, these
men are trained-to help build better machines to give you a greater
future in farming. J. I. Case Co., Racine, Wis.


SERVING FARMERS SINCE 1842 .
13A96)


PAGE TWENTY-THREE


ik'f-
-^


SPRING, 1954


.~l*Yl `r

-Ca !j I
c ''I







PERIODICAL DEPTt
UNIVERSITY MAIN
QAINESVILLE, FLI
A report to you about the men and machines that help maintain International Harvester


NEW McCormick' combination carrier

for INTERNATIONAL CRAWLERS


... one frame for dozing

and tool bar tillage!


Simply
head in
for dozing


back in
for tillage!


Build ponds, clear land, make contours, move dirt-do any-
thing any farm dozer will do, with the big capacity blade for
the new McCormick combination carrier.


It's the new McCormick combination doz, -
bar, for International 6 and 9 series crawlers. Booms
are dozer push bars, also tool bar draft members.
This new way, a farmer can profitably use his
crawler tractor extra hundreds of hours per year. At
minimum cost, he can do both heavy-duty tillage and
farm dozing and thus increase earning power from
his crawler tractor investment.
The farmer buys the basic machines: booms,
mounting plates, hydraulic cylinders and hoses, and
turnbuckles. Then he can select blade, heavy or me-
dium duty tool bar, and ground-working tools, ac-
cording to need; pay only for what he wants.
By easy stages, he can equip his crawler for both
dozing and tillage work. He can take effective con-
servation steps employ modern soil-working meth-
ods, including deep and stubble-mulch tillage.


Ditch, subsoil, chisel, stubble-mulch, list, furrow, field culti-
vate, check, bed, with the McCormick combination carrier
equipped with tool bar.


International Harvester engineering teamwork produced the new McCormick combina-
tion carrier. International Harvester research, engineering and manufacturing men are
constantly pooling their time and talent to provide equipment that makes work easier
and the farmer's time more productive.



I INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER
International Harvester products pay for themselves in use-McCormick Farm Equipment and Farmall Tractors
...Motor Trucks... Crawler Tractors and Power Units... Refrigerators and Freezers-General Office, Chicago 1




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs