Title: Florida college farmer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075980/00035
 Material Information
Title: Florida college farmer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30cm.
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 1930)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1960?
Numbering Peculiarities: Suspended with v. 3, no. 5 (May 1932) and resumed with Dec. 1935 issue. Suspended with v. 9, no. 4 (may 1941) and resumed with New series v. 1 (summer 1948).
General Note: Published by Agricultural students at the University of Fla.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075980
Volume ID: VID00035
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01569450
lccn - 55047167

Full Text












ccu -JheI


V0L l -


Published by Agricultural Students at the University of Florida
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
NOVEMBER, 1940


4 '*


DIGGING IRISH POTATOES NEAR HOMESTEAD


zCivejloc

development

Specita


Dreamid 2o Come


SJim Bearde
By Jim BeardsIkey


I- --


gone, Lut Nlot

J-oro tten
By Bill Atwater

J('ow J(oIee

-Jkommenis
By Terry Drake

he Ja le of the

I tnigrant Jleorse
P I By Stewart Fowler
N 1II


DAIRY COWS APPRECIATE SHADE AND IMPROVED PASTURE


4M41E


No. 1











PAGE 2T


The Trend is
towards

Calcium

Nitrate
Nitrate Nitrogen and
Water-soluble Calcium
Two Plant- Foods
for the price of one

JACKSON GRAIN CO.
TAMPA, FLORIDA


COLES JEWELERS
Watches Jewelry
Diamonds
Watch & Jewelry Repairs
423 W. University Ave.
^^ss^^^s-- '^^^^^sff -:-**sa^! ~"'se1- ~~ sga--:-:*'^s
All advertisers in the College
Farmer are reliable. Patronize
them for better products.


Compliments

IDEAL LAUNDRY
Gainesville


Allen Printing Co.
on west side of postoffice
930 E. Main South-Phone 620
Gainesville, Florida

The
Anderson Studio
Photographers
Student Prices
Gainesville, Florida

For Good Food Try
THE

Co/ ee inn


Chesnut Office Equipment
Company
Complete Office Outfitters
STUDENT SUPPLIES
Gainesville, Florida


A "MUST" BOOK
George Dacy's Four
Centuries of Florida
Ranching
$3.00 postage prepaid anywhere.
Send for complete catalog. We can
get any book
Florida Book Co.
1924 W. University Ave.
Gainesville, Florida


SCHWOBILT
CLOTHES
A FAMOUS SUIT
AT A POPULAR PRICE!

$16.50

Otto F. Stock
Dry Cleaning Tailoring
104 E. University Ave.
Gainesville Florida


DIAMOND MERCHANTS
Silversmiths


WATCHES
Expert Repairing


LEWIS JEWELRY COMPANY
"Gainesville's Leading Jewelers"

305 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.


PHONE 455
Reliable Credit


Gainesville, Fla.
Silverware


-- FARMERS have
enough to worry
about without worry.
Sing about their fertil-
izer. NACO Fertilizers
give such uniformly
good results that farm-
en cross this worry off their list when
they apply NACO to their crops.
NACO Brands bring CONFIDENCE
and ease of mind...they bring results.





FERTILIZERS
FOR SALE IN THIS TERRITORY BY
NACO FERTILIZER CO.
Jacksonville. Florida


"Citizens, Wherever We Serve!"



SIDA rI


THEATRES OF FLORIDA

In Gainesville it's the "Florida" and "Lyric"


NOVEMBER-1940


PAGE 2


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER












NOVEMBER-1940


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


OW PLANTED, PLOWED
YYUJ t- S AND HARROWED.....


YOURS TO
COMMAND

The FLORIDA COLLEGE FARM-
ER is your magazine; the staff mem-
bers of the magazine are your rep-
resentatives, just as the Congressmen
of the State of Florida represent the
people of Florida in Washington. It
is the magazine of the students of the
College of Agriculture. One purpose
of the FLORIDA COLLEGE FARM-
ER is to afford a means of expression
of ideas for you, the agriculturists of
tomorrow; another is to link the ac-
tivities of the College of Agriculture
with the agriculturists of our State.
If all this is true, then you must co-
operate with your representatives,
the staff members of the FLORIDA
COLLEGE FARMER, by subscribing
to, and contributing to your magazine
in order that it can sincerely and
truly be representative of the College
of Agriculture. It is your duty to
make this magazine what its pur-
poses say it should be. Our goal is
99 per cent of the Ag students sub-
scribing, 51 per cent contributing.
Are YOU with us?


ke Jiloida


TO BE, OR
NOT TO BE

World events have progressed (or
rather, more accurately, regressed)
to the point where it is absolutely
necessary for us to 'Be Prepared"
in every sense of the phrase in order
to safeguard the interests and hopes
of our nation. The "New Order" in
Europe is going forward, but one
little mistake which has already been
made will eventually prove that no
"New Order" so constructed can per-
sist. The "New Order" is steadily
rising, brick by brick, victory by vic-
tory; but the error in construction
will be discovered when the straw
foundation, the moral and spiritual
quality of the present generation of
German people, rots and settles caus-
ing the magnificent superstructure to
topple to the ground like a house of
cards. Until such time, as only days
can decide, when the world shall be
free again to live as the conscience
and the reason of its people dictate,
we must unitedly prepare to meet any
exigency that might threaten our
freedom of thought, speech, or press.


Co e ae warmerr


Published by representatives of Student Organizations
College of Agriculture University of Florida
EDITORIAL STAFF
Joe Heitzman Editor
Robert C. Morris Managing Editor
Terry Drake Associate Editor
Arthur Ellis ... Associate Editor
BUSINESS STAFF
Clint Brando- Business Manager
Floyd Eubanks Assistant Business Manager
Eric Mills, Jr. Circulation Manager
Wilson Suggs Advertising Manager
EDITORIAL STAFF ASSISTANTS
Seth Plank, Clint Brandon, Eric Mills, Jr., Connie Mc-
Cormick, Floyd Eubanks, Frank Perry.
FACULTY ADVISORY COMMITTEE
H. S. Wolfe, Chairman
E. A. Ziegler E. L. Fouts C. H. Willoughby
Entered as second class mailing matter at the Post Office
at University Station, Gainesville, Florda, December 8,
1938, under Act of Congress of 1879. Advertising rates
furnished upon request. Published four times during the,
school year in November, January. March, and May.
Subscription Price Fifty Cents


ONLY MONUMENT
GLORIFYING PEST

"In profound appreciation of the
Boll Weevil and what it has done
as the herald of prosperity this monu-
ment was erected by the citizens of
Enterprise, Coffee County, Alabama."
In the center of this booming little
city of Enterprise, Alabama, there is
a dull gray monument erected in
honor of the great cotton pest, the
boll weevil.
The truth of the whole matter is
that it was a mistake; it was not to
be a monument. The city worker, who
was being annoyed by onlookers as he
did some wiring in the street, finally
became exasperated and told a trav-
eling salesman that it was going to
be a monument for the boll weevil.
The salesman, believing the tale,
spread the news to newspapers
throughout the country; soon it was
all over the nation. Enterprise had to
erect a monument to the boll weevil.

REAL PLEASURE
WOMAN: Well, I'll give you a
dime; not because you deserve it, but
because it pleases me.
PANHANDLER: Thank you, ma'-
me. Couldn't you make it a quarter
and thoroughly enjoy yourself?
-The Agricultural Student.

All things, even the most ordinary
ones, may have hidden meanings:
even the little red schoolhouse had
something behind it.
-Yale Record.

KNOW YOUR AG. COLLEGE
LEADERS

Agricultural Club
Harold Brewer

Alpha Tau Alpha
Herbert Simmons

Alpha Zeta
George Byrd

Block and Bridle Club
Bill Atwater

Collegiate Chapter F. F. A.
Wilson Suggs

Forestry Club
John Bethea

Newell Entomological Society
Jack Rogers

Thyrsus
Bill Fletcher


PAGE 3












THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


NOVEMBER-1940


2reami 0o



Come f rue


By Jim Beardsley, '41


Winner of 1940 Danforth Fellowship


Ever since I heard Sidney Mar-
shall tell the Ag. Club in 1937 ab'Jut
his experiences as Florida's Danforth
Fellow of '37 I dreamed that I, too,
might enjoy the many wonderful ex-
periences of which he spoke. I never
believed that I stood a chance, though
and continued on with my work as
though this dream was one which
would never come true. Imagine my
surprise when the final announcement
was made that I had won the 1940
fellowship. I could hardly believe that
this pet dream had come true. I'll
tell you about all of the things that
this realization of a dream brought
me.
Each spring one junior is selected
from each of 38 agricultural schools,
except Texas A. & M. which has two,
to receive expenses for one month as
a member of the Danforth Fellowship
Group. This includes two weeks in
St. Louis and two weeks in Camp
Miniwanca, Michigan. These students
are known as the Danforth Fellows
in honor of Mr. Wm. H. Danforth,
founder of the Ralston Purina Com-
pany and president of the American
Youth Foundation.
On the twenty-ninth of July I
learned what it was to be a member
of the Danforth Fellows. Hardly had
I walked into the lobby of the Down-
town Y. M. C. A. in St. Louis when
three boys rushed over, introduced
themselves as Massachusetts, Georgia,
and South Carolina, and began talk-
ing like old friends. That surety was
a grand way to start a montn of fel-
lowship together with boys who hail-
ed from all other this country and
one province of Canada.
Our first three days were spent on
the Experimental Farms of the Rals-
ton Purina Company, some forty mil-
es southwest of St. Louis. There we
donned work clothes to study and
handle chickens, turkeys, ducks, pig-
eons, cows, steers, calves, swine dogs,
silver foxes, mink, and rabbit. We
soon learned why they are able to
have ducks that lay better than the,
chickens in some of our home flocks,
to grow turkeys successfully, to de-
mand premium prices for their beef,
and to do many other things which
so often seen like far away dreams to
you and me, the average farmer. We


saw these things accomplished by a
program of good breeding, careful
sanitation, sound management and
good feeding. No, they are not fancy
here. They operate as any good, sensi-
ble, and practical farmer should. The
supervision is by conscientious college
trained men who are very practical
and who handle all of the research
with great efficiency and accuracy.
While on the farm the boys learned
to know each other so that everyone
soon became known by his first name
and home state. To enjoy true Sou-
thern home cooking is usually enough
but to enjoy it with 38 others is a
most unusual experience. Can you
think of any better way to play soft-
ball than to have Washington coatch-
ing, Texas and Maine pitching, Cana-
da ("King George") on first, Okla-
homa on second, Maryland on third
New York on short, and the outfield
stretching from New England to
Texas? This team defeated the Purina
Farm team after a practice game be-
tween the "East of the Mississippi"
and the "West of the Mississippi."
This stay on the farm really started
our month together off with a big
bang.
Returning to St. Louis, we spent
the following ten days doing some-
thing or seeing something new and
interesting every day. We studied
every phase of this big business from
the beginning to the end. Advertising,
price forecasting, credit, buying and
selling, legal, and personnel depart-
ments all opened their doors and pre-
sented us with a new and under-
standable conception of big business.
These lectures were interspersed with
trips thru the Purina feed mill itself.
The research laboratories were fas-
cinating to us all. There we held
chinchillas worth $3,200 a pair for a
brief minute and saw eggs with yolks
varying from black thru red and
green to white.
We did not spend all of our time in
the mill, however. One unforgettable
day we were the guests of Swift and
Company. There we had the oppor-
tunity to go with the livestock buyers


as they were working their trades in
the stock yards of East St. Louis.
Later that day we toured Swift's
packing plant quite extensively. We
all learned what actually happens to
our livestock when it goes to market.
One day we spent the morning in
the St. Louis Grain Exchange. There
we had opportunity to ask endless
questions on the grain situation in
general and marketing in particular.
The remainder of the day was spent
as guests of the Chamber of Com-
merce. As such, we toured the city
visiting the oldest court house west
of the Mississippi river, the Shaw
Botanical Gardens, the Lindbergh
trophies in the Jefferson Memorial,
and the St. Louis zoo. One night we
attended the open air municipal opera
to see Cole Porter's "Anything Goes."
Some also took in a big league base-
ball game as well as a cruise down
the Mississippi at night.
A most interesting highlight of our
St. Louis stay was the half hour
plane ride as guests of American Air-
lines. Just at dusk we flew over the
city and looked down on the conver-
gence of the Missouri and Mississippi
Rivers. To see the muddy waters of
the former flow into the clear curr-
ent of the latter is to see an unusual
sight.
All too soon were the two weeks
in St. Louis over and we started for
Chicago on the second half of our
month's fellowship. On the way we
stopped in Springfield to pay tribute
to that great leader of earlier days,
Abraham Lincoln. On a chartered bus
we rode thru the black belt of Illin-
ois where the corn continued to wave
as it had two weeks earlier when I
was on my way to St. Louis. I had
spent a week at the University of
Illinois shortly before going to St.
Louis, so Illinois was beginning to
become familiar now. In Chicago the
boys visited as many of the sights as
the one evening and part of the next
day allowed. They didn't miss any-
thing either; the Field Museum, the
Aquarium, the Planetarium, Soldier's
(Continued on page 5)


PAGE 4


- -


NOVEMBER-1940O













NOVEMBER-1940 THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER PAGE 5


Dreams Do Come True


(Continued from page 4)
Field, and other places of importance
were included in their visit.
The following night we stayed at
the Battle Creek Sanatorium. No,
the trip didn't have us down. We did
discover a wonderful place to go
should we ever have a breakdown,
tho. Before leaving for Camp Mini-
wanca, we turned the Ralston Purina
cereal plant there in Battle Creek.
Immediately upon our arrival in
Camp Miniwanca on the east shores
of Lake Michigan we met the man
responsible for our being there. Mr.
Wm. H. Danforth is truly a living
example of the camp's theme of "My
own self at my very best all of the
time." When Mr. Danforth dared each
of us to "stand tall, think tall, smile
tall, and live tall" everyone accepted
the challenge and determined to let
this camp be only a starter for great-
er living throughout life.
At Miniwanca there were some 350
boys and leaders, all of whom were
outstanding in some way or other;
they came from all corners of the
country as well as from England,
China, and Canada. Everyone in
camp had been selected for outstand-
ing merit in his respective town, col-
lege, organization, or state. So you
see there was an atmosphere of good
fellowship in camp from the very be-
ginning. We were divided into Indian
tribes and no tent had two boys of
similar background, nature, interest,
or personality in it. This added to our
ability to live with our fellow man.
Soon we were all friends.
The program for each day was
crowded with changing, purposeful
activities. Reveille at six brought us
up for flag raising, brief setting up
exercises on the beach and a dip in
Lake Michigan (the Artic Ocean to
some). Then came clean-up time, with
a fifteen minute quiet period pre-


ROAD PIG MEETS ROAD HOG
Uncle Elmer had a pig
Who loved to roam the roads-
Pavement underneath his feet
Was happiness in loads.

Silas Spratt was always drunk-
He never drove by rules;
The middle of the road for him!
The sides he left for fools.

Uncle's pig was unconcerned
As road-pigs us'ly are;
Silas swerved to miss the pig
And whammed a coming car.

Now, both are in the pen.
-Joe Heitzman.

Friendship is an alloy composed of
equal parts of give and take.


ceding breakfast for personal devoti-
onals and absolute quiet. Breakfast
at seven was followed by classes until
lunch. Another class after lunch com-
pleted the classes for the day and we
then took part in tribal games and
contests. Soccer, volley ball, soft ball,
ping pong, tennis, and horseshoes
were the principal games. One day
there was a field meet; some 4500
tries were made in one afternoon.
Swimming and sailing completed the
afternoon with supper at 5:30
After supper the day was climaxed
by the Vesper Service. Just before
sundown the entire camp would climb,
single file, up to the top of Vesper
Dune. There, with the lake and the
sunset as the back drop to the speak-
ers' platform of dune sand, we sang
familiar hymns, after which one of
the leaders added his bit to our four-
fold development.
Following vespers there was always
a surprise awaiting us. The evening's
program was never announced until
it started. One night half of the camp
dressed as girls and an old fashioned
barn dance was a great success. Beach
parties, games, flashlight relays,
camp songs, and council meetings
filled the other evenings. Taps bro-
ught the day to a close at ten.
These council meetings were very
reminiscent of the Indian days of
this country, as was so much of the
camp life. They opened and closed
with Indian ceremony and chant.
During these meetings amusement
and entertainment were always high.
All of the fun was put on by the
members themselves. Duels, skits,
readings, orations, and jokes were the
order of the evening at this time.
The classes included Techniques of
Leadership, Ethics, Building a Life's
Philisophy, Four-fold Development,
and Life's Essentials. It was in this
last class that we met Mr. P. G. Hol-
den, the man who made two ears of
corn grow where only one grew be-
fore; Dr. T. Z. Koo, good will am-


FOR MORE WINTER EGGS
1. Separate pullets according to
condition and production
2. Provide ample feed.
3. Use lights at night.


PEACH SCAB CONTROL
Peach scab can be controlled by
spraying the tree after the leaves
have fallen in the winter with a lime
sulfur solution of 1 to 20 strength. If
the new growth which begins after
the flowers have fallen is sprayed
three or four times at intervals of
two to three weeks, it can be kept
fairly free from scab.

A day is all over as soon as a dream;
It goes like a chip on a fast-flowing
stream.


bassador to U. S. from China; H. C.
Fruehauf, the "Trailer King;" John
Holms, president of Swift and Com-
pany; Albert Benjamin, associate ed-
itor of American magazine and many
others. These are men who worked
from the bottom up and so were men
of sound advice.
Thus you see the four-fold, physic-
al, mental, social, religious, program
of the camp being carried thru. We
learned that a person should be bal-
anced in his development and not lop-
sided. He should be a well rounded in-
dividual for such a person is the one
who contributes most to his com-
munity and to himself.
Two weeks of these associations
were soon over and we all regretted
the fact that probably never again
would all of us meet together. Undy-
ing friendships were made in this
month; ideals were renewed and lift-
ed; an inspiring philosophy was
created; and an "I dare you" spirit
was instilled in all of us. All these
and more, too, will remain with us as
results of this month's fellowship. I
wish that every college man could
have the same experience. I think
that he would be a much better man
as well as being better equipped to
face the world after going thru these
wonderful experiences to be had as
one of the Donforth Fellows. This is
one dream whose realization will
have everlasting effects upon my
life.
A CHALLENGE
Juniors of the Ag. College, I chal-
lenge you to win the 1941 Danforth
Summer Fellowship for this school.
Those who accept this challenge be
sure to keep a good record and to
look for announcements of the award
applications next spring.
Freshmen interested in agriculture,
I challenge you to win the half sch-
olarship to the two weeks at Camp
Miniwanca. These experiences can be
yours if you want them enough to
try for them.


In memory of
AARON W. LELAND
who had been connected with the
University of Florida College of
Agriculture since 1915 in the cap-
acity of farm manager. His all-
embracing optimism and his un-
failing good nature were an ex-
ample and an inspiration to all
who came in contact with him.

R. O. T. C. INSTRUCTOR: Jones,
what is a maneuver?
AG. SOPHOMORE: Something you
put on grass to make it green, sir.
-Iowa Agriculturalist.


I met a Jehovah's Witness the other
day; she was one of those women
with a permanent rave.


NOVEMBER-1940


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


PAGE 5












THE 'FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


NOVEMBER-1940


Just a few days ago on November 7
one of the most unusual trains in
Florida history left Gainesville for a
twenty-eight-day educational tour of
all parts of the State.
This train, operated by the Univ-
ersity of Florida College of Agricul-
ture in cooperation with the State
Department of Agriculture and the
Atlantic Coast Line and the Louisville
and Nashville railroads, will give
every interested Floridian an oppor-
tunity to see exhibits which portray
improved methods of raising and
managing Florida livestock, forage
crops, and forest trees.
It will not only mirror the trem-
endous progress which has been made


evelop menl


along these lines in recent years, but
will also point the way to still further
advancement.
'he exhibits will be of interest to
city residents as well as to farm
people. Officials in charge of the
Lrain have extended a very cordial
invitation to everyone to visit it, see
the exhibits, and hear and talk with
the specialists who will accompany it.
Dr. Wilmon Newell, provost for
agriculture at the University of Flor-
ida, says: "I not only invite but urge
everyone who can possibly do so to
visit the Florida livestock, forage and
forestry special train when it is in
some nearby city. I am confident that
a visit to this train will prove both
stimulating and profitable."


f Specia/-



The seven-car rolling fair will carry
four cars of exhibits featuring live-
stock (including beef cattle, dairy
cattle, swine, and poultry), forage
crops, and forestry. The displays will
include live animals and actual sam-
ples of feeds and mineral mixtures,
as well as growing young trees, forest
tree planting equipment, and educa-
tional charts on the various subjects.
Dr. A. L. Shealy, head of the ani-
mal husbandry department at the
University of Florida, has acted as
general chairman of the committee
in charge of arranging for the
train.
Xvith this introduction, let us begin
our educational trip through the four
cars which house the exhibits.


A FIELDD DAY IN FORESTRY AND PASTURE


Since the woods have taken on new
significance and added importance in
recent years with the erection of
several pulp mills in our State, the
forestry exhibit will be aimed parti-
cularly at helping landowners, especi-
ally farmers, to secure maximum re-
tins from their trees.
As we enter the first car, we find
that proper pulpwood cutting and
gum farming practices, as contrasted
with destructive methods, are featur-
ed. Then, as we look more closely, we
see that the combination of forestry
and grazing, desirable forest trees for
farm woodlands, and the benefits of


pruning forest trees have also been
portrayed. Taking into consideration
all that we have seen up until now
w,e feel that the forests of tomorrow
will be protected from fire and des-
tructive practices in order that a crop
of so great a potential worth may
not be depleted to the detriment of
our well-being.
But take a look, We haven't seen
all there is to be seen in this car. The
foundation of any profitable livestock
industry, wherever it may be, is an
abundance of cheap feed; however, it
is only in recent years that more im-
proved, more nutritious, and heavier
yielding forage plants have been


U. OF F. BEEF CATTLE TAKE


sown in large quantities in Florida.
,hese forage exhibits, the flats of
living plants of the principal pasture
materials, the miniature weevil-proof
cuin crio, and the miniature bales of
thie IIuse important hay crops, are
cunceLe examples of the value of
growing feed at home by improved
imehods. Now, over here, these other
exiiiblis which are also very practi-
cal, the crops used for silage and
silage itself, the crops grown for hog
feWd, the seeds of pasture and forage
crops, and the inoculation of legume
sees, are designed to be more speci-
fic and helpful in their information.
Now we can go on to the next car.

VACATION


These eight beef animals, which
have been selected as ideal represen-
tatives of their respective grades, are
now touring the State in order to ac-
tually demonstrate what Florida
cattle should or shouldn't be like. .
To those of you cattlemen who are
producers of native cattle, it is a
world of value for you to see for
yourselves these interesting animals
which are living animal husbandry
lessons.
Here are the vacationers: three
purebred cows-a Hereford, an Angus
and a Brahman; a Braford cow and
calf; and three grades-high, medium
and low-of steers. Over here, this


It's easy to see that the dairy ex-
hibit in this the third car centers a-
round the care, feeding, and manage-
ment of the family cow. Here again
we find living specimens: a register-
ed Jersey cow, a yearling heifer, and


Braford cow is due to receive a lot
of attention before she returns to the
University because her breed has
been developed only recently out of a
cross between the Hereford and Bra-
liman breeds of beef cattle. Never-
theless, tie rest of the exhibition ani-
iilals \won't lag far behind because
Lhey are tops in their respective
grades.
We haven't seen all of this car yet.
Here are other educational exhibits
which are inseparable from and dir-
ectly related to these eight beef cat-
tle; a parasite display furnished by
the United States Department of Ag-
riculLure; a short study of mineral
mixtures including a recommended


BOSSY;


a young calf. If that little, spindle-
legged tail-wagger doesn't steal Ma's
heart and persuade reluctant Pa to
part with some of his harvest glean-
ings to buy her a milk-cow, we just
miss our guess.


mixture, and specimens of minerally
deficient bones as compared with the
bones of animals which receive an
adequate supply of minerals; and
charts showing fattening rations,
wintering methods, and the improve-
ment in the grade of animals through
tile use of good bulls.
Just think, Florida was the first
State in the Union to be be blessed
w\i.h cattle, but if the Spaniards who
introduced cattle into Florida more
than 300 years ago could do a Rip
\ an Winkle and see the vast, steady
progress which has taken place since
their time, they would rub their eyes
at the unbelievable and go back to
sleep.

?IGS TOO
Speaking about calves, here's a
demonstration of bucket feeding of
the calf. When Ma gets that cow,
these milk scales and the dairy feed-
ing and milk record will give her an
(Continued on page 7)


PAGE 6


GOOD QUEEN












NOVEMBER 1940


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


-AricaluaraI Jtar On l/teehlt


(Continued from page 6)
idea of how she must keep track of
things, if the value of the cow to the
family is to stand out in black and
white, so that even Pa will be con-
verted.
These charts show the importance
of minerals in dairy cattle raising,
and the mineral box emphasizes the
use of common sense in distributing


the mineral combination. We had
miniatures in our first car; now we
have a clever scheme in this minia-
ture safety bull pen which eliminates
the disastrous results that usually oc-
cur when the bull and his handler dis-
agree.
Before we leave good Queen Bossy
let's look at the placards which por-
tray the rations which are desirable
for feeding dairy cows.
A smaller, but none the less im-


portant, section of this car is that
which is devoted to the "Starvation-
Buster," the perennial standby on
many a southern farm. This section
will feature a good sow, pigs which
have been selected for breeding pur-
poses, and a pen of feeder pigs of
three grades. Charts and posters illus-
trating various methods of feeding,
management, and parasite control in
relation to the swine herd are an
integral part of this fine exhibit.


SOMETHING TO CACKLE ABOUT


The last car of the four exhibition
cars has been devoted entirely to the
poultry industry of the State. Most
of us had expected live poultry before
we thought of the possibility of see-
ing live cattle and hogs; then, when
we saw live large stock, we were al-
most certain that live poultry would
be included. However, we were fooled
because, in contrast to the two cars
which we have just passed through,
there are no live poultry to be found
in this car.
The first thing that catches our eye
is an exhibit of cleverly constructed
models of recommended poultry eq-
uipment in the center of the car.
From feed hoppers on up these small
scale replicas of poultry devices,
which can be successfully used with
flocks of any size, satisfy the farmer's
need for tangible, concrete examples


of easily constructed equipment.
Another interesting exhibit is a
model farm depicting the ideal farm
layout for commercial egg farming,
breeding pen arrangement for the
poultry breeder, approved practices
in the management of young stock,
and various practical accepted rota-
tion systems as they have been de-
veloped in different sections of the
State.
Here's another feature explaining
the commercial production of pullets
and broilers in Florida. The costs
and returns from these enterprises, as
well as the factors affecting ccsts and
returns, is set forth in a clear-cut,
readily understandable fashion.
Still another division of the car
is devoted to the National Poultry
Improvement Plan. The purpose of
the organization, the location of co-
operating hatcheries and breeding
flocks, and the value of the program


to Florida's poultry industry is thoro-
ughly discussed.
A parasitic prevention display with
an original turn lists the most im-
portant poultry parasites, discusses
their effect upon the bird, and ex-
plains the methods of prevention.
Some of the many other subjects dis-
played and explained are Florida's
National Egg Laying Test, the Flor-
ida Egg Quality program, and results
of feeding trials at the University of
Florida.
This display is more than an ex-
hibit. It is a cross-section of the phy-
sical and economical factors which
are rapidly pushing Florida ahead as
a poultry producing State.
*
Now we have come to the end of a
perfect display, educational from stem
to stern, and oozing vigor, enthusiasm
and-hope from every crack in its
caulking.

CITRUS PROSPECTS

The probable size of the grapefruit
crop for the 1940-41 marketing sea-
son has been placed at 42,394,000 box-
es, 22 per cent over last season's crop.
'the U. S. D. A. reported that pros-
pective grapefruit production was
well above that of the last season in
Florida and Texas, but somewhat low-
er than it was last year in both Ariz-
ona and California.
Out of the total expected crop of
42,394,000 boxes of grapefruit, it was
estimated that about 54 per cent
would come from Florida and 35 per
cent from Texas.
The Department of Agriculture es-
timated the production of early and
mid-season oranges, excluding Calif-
ornia and Florida Valencias, at 44,-
011,000 boxes. The probable yield of
Florida Valencias was placed at 12,-
000 000 boxes, up 2,000 boxes.
Indicated production of all oranges
including tangerines, in Florida for
1940-41 was placed at 33,400,000
boxes.


A TRAIN VISITOR SEES THE CLOVER DISPLAY


PAG.E 7













PAGE 8 THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER NOVEMBER-1940


SUTURE


FARMERS OF


A MERICA


To Kansas City

Accompanied by Mr. H. E. Wood
and Mr. J. F. Williams, the following
eighteen F. F. A. boys and teachers
left for the National Convention in
Kansas City which is to extend over
a period of five days, November 111
14:
Candidates for the American
Farmers Degree
Boyd Williams, Ocala
John Folks, Williston
Earl Haynesworth, Alachua
State Officers
I. D. Pittman, Marianna
C. M. Lawrence, Jr., Wauchula
Louis Larson, Jr., Dania
I. L. Bishop, Jr., Aucilla
Claude Lee, Baker
Donald Cason, Lake City
Lawrence Owens, DeLand
Master Teachers
J. F. Higgins, Ft. Meade
T. L. Barrineau, Gonzalez
Livestock and Poultry
Judging
L. J. Larson, Winter Haven, Advisor
Raymond Daniel, Winter Haven
R. J. Brown, Winter Haven
Paul Daniel, Winter Haven
Meat Judging
Donald Cason, Lake City
Byron Clark, Greensboro
Claude Lee, Baker
Milk and Dairy Cattle
Judging
Warren Trotter, Largo
Lawrence Owens, DeLand
Louis Larson, Jr., Dania
Official Delegates
I. D. Pittman, Marianna
John Folks, Williston

I. L. Bishop, Jr., Third Vice-Presi-
dent of the State Association, F. F.
A., and Secretary of th Aucilla Chap-
ter, was presented thirty dollars by
the Jefferson County School Board
with which to make the trip to the
National Convention in Kansas City.

Edwin Herring, a member of the
Havana Chapter who exhibited cattle
in the livestock show held in con-
nection with the Tobacco Festival,
won $21.00 in prizes on beef cattle
shown in the Future Farmer division.

A lot of drivers who drive lickety-
split, also drive likkerty-split.


Spears and Pate Win

F. F. A. and 4-H Club boys again
took the cream of theprizes at Holmes
County's second annual Fat Hog
Show on October 12.
Hampton Spears, an F. F. A. boy
from the class of P. A. Browning,
teacher of vocational agriculture at
Leonia, won the grand championship
with a 247-pound beauty, while Juni-
or Pate, a 4-H Club boy from Boni-
fay, came through for the reserve
championship with a "pig" that tipped
the scales at 207 pounds.
These lads did well financially. Due
to the generosity of the Bank of
Bonifay, Hampton Spears received
16 1-2 cents a pound for his grand
champion. This figures $40.75 for the
animal, which, with the addition of
$17.00 in prize money, gave him a
total of $57.75 on the deal.
Junior Pate did not do so bad for
himself either. Evans' Grocery forced
the bid up to 15 cents a pound, and
made the reserve champion bring the
near sum of $31.05, which along with
premiums amounting to $17.00, made
a total of $48.05 for his bank account.
Other F. F. A. and 4-H Club boys
made substantial winnings.

Alachua Chapters Exhibit

An F. F. A. Exhibit, the cooperative
work of the seven Alachua County
F. F. A. Chapters, at the Community
Fain in Gainesville on November 4-9
was a great success.
The exhibit included (among many
other things): different varieties of
corn, hay, sweet potatoes, peanuts,
peas, pumpkins, tobacco, citrus fruit,
sugar cane, treating fence posts, and
farm shop accomplishments.

The Reddick Chapter, F. F. A. has
recently bought a 400-egg electric
incubator to use in hatching eggs for
members of the Chapter. The chapter-
owned sow farrowed eleven pigs last
July; the pigs are now "making
pork" on peanuts grown by tne
Chapter.

The Quincy Chapter of the F. F. A.
plans to pay for its Texas-Mexico
tour in the summer by raising co-
operatively four acres of carrots and
two acres of potatoes.


First Chapters To
Pay Dues

The Turkey Creek Chapter, F. F.
A., R. M. Fagile, Advisor, was the
first chapter in the State to pay State
and National Future Farmer dues at
fifty cents per member for 1940-41.
The next three chapters were Jasper
and Jennings, A. L. Lastinger, Advi-
sor, and Chiefland, A. G. Driggers.
Advisor.

The Greensboro-Mt. Pleasant and
the Quincy-Havana Future Farmer
Chapters sponsored a "Spill the Milk
Game" at the Gadsden County Toba-
cco Festival held in Quincy October
2-5. Acharge of five cents was made
for each three balls thrown. A total
of $129.95 was taken in. One-half of
this amount was given to the Junior
Chamber of Commerce in charge of
the festival; the other half ($64.87)
Iwas divided among the chapters.

Warren Trotter, a members of the
Largo Future Farmer Chapter, who
holds the State Planter degree, was
awarded an agricultural scholarship
to the University of Florida by Sears,
Roebuck and Company; he was also
awarded the County Agricultural
Scholarship by the Board of County
Commissioners of Pinellas County.

The Baker Chapter of the F. F. A.
sponsored a show at the Baker High
School auditorium on September 25.
Tex Dunn and his Hill-Billies were
the center of attraction and their ef-
forts were well received. Although
the weather was rainy and too bad
for some of the people who wanted to
come, a large number attended. The
amount netted the Chapter, $13.98,
was almost clear profit.

Slate Planter Contest

The Chilean Nitrate Educational
Bureau, Inc., which sponsors this con-
test each year, has awarded each of
the following F. F. A. boys thirty
dollars which is to be used in defray-
ing their expenses in connection with
attending the National Convention in
Kansas City: Claude Lee, Baker:
Byron Clark, Greensboro; Donald
Cason, Lake City; Lawrence Owens,
DeLand; Warren Trotter, Largo;
Louis Larson, Dania.


PAGE 8


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


NOVEMBER-1940










NOVEMBER-1940


NEW FACES

Dr. E. L. Fouts came to the Univ-
ersity of Florida College of Agricul-
Lure from Oklahoma A. & M. College
v.hcre he had taught, dairy manufac-
tuling for thirteen years. In addition
to these thirteen years of teaching he
i.'anage to broaden his experience in
his clusen field by interspersing five
ears of commercial work between
periods of teaching. He received his
bachelor of Science degree from
Purdue University, his Master of
Science degree from Oklahoma A. &
M. College, and his Ph. D. degree from
Iowa S&ate University. Dr. Fouts has
taken over the work of Dr. L. M.
Thurston, whose untimely death last
February was regretted by all who
knew him. Since he has already made
a great many friends among the stu-
dents and the faculty of the College
of Agriculture, we feel sure that he
will more than fill the position of
dairy technologist here at the Univ-
ersity of Florida.
Dr. Richard E. Moody came from
Plattesville Teachers' College (Wis-
consin) where, since 1933, he had
taught farm management, farm re-
cords, and agricultural economics. He
earned his Bachelor of Science de-
gree at Rutgers University in 1925,
and his Ph. D. degree at the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin just this year. Dr.
Moody will fill the vacancy created
by the resignation of Mr. John R.
Greenman; he will handle the teach-
ing work of Professor J. Wayne
Reitz.
Mr. Leon E. Mull came to us from
Coppin Creamery in Streator, Illinois.
He obtained his Bachelor of Science
degree from the University of Ill-
inois, and his Master of Science de-
gree from the University of Missouri
He is assistant to Dr. Fouts in dairy
manufacturing. Mr. Mull intimates
that he will eventually earn his Ph.
D.; that is, unless Uncle Sam decides
that he needs an able "milk-man"
worse than does the University of
Florida.
The face of Douglas J. Smith is
not exactly new to us, but it is in a
way; prior to this year, he was a
student-now he is an instructor. He
graduated from our College of Agri-
culture last year with high honors;
this year he has replaced Mr. Ray-
mond Crown who recently resigned
his position as assistant animal hus-
bandman and professor of animal
husbandry. During his undergraduate
years, Mr. Smith was active in the
work of the Block and Bridle Club;
he was recently elected faculty ad-
visor for this club. We have known
the hard-working student; we are
certain that he will remain a hard-
working instructor.


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


Has anyone ever compared his
summer vacation to a week-end?
'toward the end of any week the
tendency is to become more lax
choiasLically and to fall into better
(or worse) social habits. The point is,
the summer vacation seems so short
that we haven't had quite enough
.,me yet to get back on the straight
and narrow. Perhaps by the next
issue it will be possible to report pro-
gress in a few isolated cases.
The opinion seems to be that the
greatest. single addition to our physi-
cal plant this year has been the
drinking fountain. Could it be that
Boyles called the right person,
"Gentlemen." ?
Along this same line most of the
Ag chemists will tell you that their
department has the finest equipment
and more of it than other chemical
departments. This has seemed to be
so to your writer, but the encouraging
thing is that everytime he notices they
have something even better.
This column would like to pay tri-
bute to the memory of a man of
serling character, profound sympa-
thy, deep understanding, and superb
wit. Brother Raymond is lost and
gone-but, we hope, not forever.
Amen.
The University is now offering a
major in Plant Path. to anyone who
thinks he could stand the gaff.
Undoubtedly you've all heard tales
such as this one, but this one is so
close to home that you should know
about it. How many of you have
heard of Starvation Hill? It lies be-
tween three and four miles out on
the Palatka Road. The story goes
that an old couple who lived there a
long time ago starved to death for
unknown reasons, this is where the
original name came from. The latest
angle to it is this one. A man who
compelled his family to stand on their
heads for fifteen minutes and talk in
an "unknown tongue" as a blessing
proceeding each meal, finally decided


that he and his tribe would move to
this hill. The idea was a build a very
scanty shelter of palmettos and any
other thing readily available, and set
out to erase the name Starvation Hill.
This would be accomplished by letting
the ravens feed he and his disciples.
In other words he was a raven mani-
ac.
Found-somewhere in the Ag
Building-
A bug there was, a bug there
be
A livin' on my peach tree.
I bit a peach, and what'd I
see?
A bug there was, a bug there
be.
-Anonymous.
If this isn't some sort of surrealism,
it SHOULD be anonymous.
"Yeah, I can just see myself on
Graduation Day-Dr. Tigert handing
me a sheepskin in one hand and Uncle
Sam giving me a French Seventy-
five in the other." We think that that
statement says a greal deal. It certa-
inly isn't unpatriotic. It certainly isn't
inviting a fighting spirit. It does show
the way a great many of us do feel
and that is this. We consider it the
inconvenience that it is but we also
accept its responsibility without mis-
givings. It is a sort of passive sub-
mssion borne of necessity. That is it
is passive until someone makes us
mad. Then come hell and hitler-it
don't make no difference, cause they
is going' to get part of their anatomy
full of hot lead.
The Jax. week-end brings to mind
the Floridians blitzkrieg of last year.
We tip our collective rat cap to those
battle-scarred heroes. We hear dis-
tant drum beats as we pass this Mon-
astery of the Incarcerated. Head-
hunting, George?
All this column lacks is the mush-
rooms that usually grow in this sort
of stuff.
Notice to Editor: Please omit the
by-line.


3 SO TH MAIN ST.


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PAGE 9


KOW COLLEGE COMMENTS

By Terry Drake


I














PAE 0 HEFODACLEEARR NOVMBR-94


Fair Offers Scholarship
The Central Florida Fair, opening
in Bushnell on November 8 for a
three-day show is again offering a
$100 scholarship to the outstanding
4-H Club boy in Sumter County.
Leadership qualities, merit of the ex-
hibit at the Fair, and a top-notch 4-H
Club record will win for some boy
the scholarship to the University of
Florida College of Agriculture.
Other 4-H Club awards to be made
at the Fair will include eight schol-
arships to the annual short course at
the University of Florida and several
scholarships to the summer 4-H Club
camp.
Last year the $100 scholarship was
awarded to Billy Sharp who is now a
freshman at the University of Flor-
ida.


4-H Pig Show, Tallahassee

4-H Club pig feeders and breeders
will meet again in Tallahassee at the
State 4-H Club Pig Show, wh:ch is
being held in connection with the
Leon County Fair, to show their
choice pork in competition with each
other.
R. W. Blacklock, State Boys' Club
Agent with the Agricultural Exten-
sion Service, and Kenneth McMullen,
Leon County Agent, will have charge
of the show. Mr. Blacklock and the
lucky owner of the grand champion
barrow will leave on November 28
for Chicago to attend the National
Club Congress which is to be held
in connection with the International
Livestock Exposition.


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Dunedin, Florida


4-H Club Booths At Fair
Alachua County's thirteen 4-H
Clubs were the first exhibitors in the
Community Fair (held November 4-9)
to begin building booths for the Fair,
which was sponsored by the Haisley
Lynch Post of the American Legion.
The 4-H Club Exhibit, prepared by
the 225 4-H members of the County,
included handicrafts, general crops,
forage and hay, canned goods produc-
ed from 4-H Club gardens, poultry,
hogs, and cattle (the cattle were ex-
hibited on the last day of the Fair.)

The Newell Entomological Society
is striving to publish this year an
entomological journal, the material
for which is to be furnished almost
exclusively by members of the Soci-
ety. Definite plans and finer details
have not yet been decided upon, but
the first issue will probably appear
just before the Christmas holidays.

Southern Hatcheries
BLOOD TESTED
HIGH GRADE CHICKS
Jacksonville, Florida
-write for prices-


Phone 257
N. W. LAUNDRY
Dry Cleaning
614 W. University Ave.
Gainesville, Florida


The Next
Three Issues
of the
FLORIDA
COLLEGE
FARMER
for only

$.40

Subscribe Now!
Address:
Florida College Farmer
Florida Union Bldg.. U. of F.
Gainesville, Florida


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


NOVEMBER-1940


PAGE 10












NOVEMBER-1940 THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER PAGE 11


Class of '40
0. C. "Strawberry" SYFRETT is a
feed salesman for the Howard Grain
Company of Jacksonville; during the
recent livestock show in Gainesville,
he was in charge of a display of
Howard Grain Company feeds.
JOEL P. KEEN is teacher of voca-
tional agriculture at Clewiston High
School; he certainly must have a
"sweet" job down there in the sugar
cane section of the State.
WOODROW O'STEEN operates a
feed supply store, selling Hales and
Hunter feeds, in partnership with a
friend of his; if you're ever in the
vicinity of West Bay Street in Jack-
sonville, stop in at the sign of Everett
and O'Steen and see how good a
salesman he is.
J. LESTER POUCHER is assistant
manager in South Carolina for the
Chilean Nitrate Educational Bureau,
Inc.; his present address is 3610 Cas-
siva Road, Columbia, S. C.
Class of '39
GILBERT A. TUCKER helps op-
erate the family livestock ranch at
Bunnell in Flagler County; he may
be frequently seen at Snow's Live-
stock Market in Gainesville where
livestock business commands him.
THOMAS F. HAMMETT was mar-
ried on November 2 to Miss Ada Ly-
barker at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, where
he is stationed; and what's more, he
is a lieutenant in the United States


Army.
DONALD F. MAY is associated
with his grandfather in the shade to-
bacco business in Gadsden County
near Quincy.
Class of '38
SIDNEY P. MARSHALL is work-
ing on his doctor's degree at the Uni-
versity of Minnesota, if our informa-
tion is correct; he will be remembered
as president of Alpha Zeta during
the school year 1937-38.
JULIET CARRINGTON is connec-
ted with the insect pest survey of the
world which is being carried on by
the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine of Washington, D. C.; on
November 4 she was on the campus
for a brief visit.
Class of '35
WILLIAM A. McGRIFF was mar-
ried on October 26 to Miss Jacqueline
Texada of Gainesville; he is located
in Orlando where he is connected with
the Howard Grain Company as sales-
man.
JOHN G. HENTZ, JR. is Okaloosa
County Agent with base of operations
at Crestview; he is the proud father
of a son born on July 28, 1940.
Class of '27
THOMAS L. BARRINEAU is
teacher of vocational agriculture at
Tate Agricultural School in Gonzalez,
Florida; he recently won the North
Florida Master Teacher award and
will go to the Kansas City F. F. A.
Convention all expenses paid.


BEYOND THE CAMPUS

WITH FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL ALUMNI


THE TALE OF THE IMMIGRANT HORSE By Stewart Fowler, '44


The horse found in America today
has a history that can be traced
back about three thousand years to
the plains of Arabia and Barb ary.
These horses were carried to Spain
in Phoenician galleys along with
spices, dyes, and fruits. In turn, it
was the Spaniards that introduced the
first horses to the New World.
It is a strange fact that until the
Spanish expeditions to the New World
occurred there was not so much as
one horse in the whole vast new land
of America. When Hernando Cortez
the Spanish conqueror, landed in
Mexico in the year 1519, he had with
him the first horses that ever set
foot on the continent of North Am-
erica. Throughout North America
followed other Spanish explorers --
over rolling western plains and
through thick tropical forests of Flor-
ida.
From these Spanish expeditions
many horses were lost, and the large


herds of wild horses on our western
plains developed from these few
strays. Wild grasses grew in pro-
fusion, the climate did not reach bad
extremes, in most regions sufficient
water could be found, and there were
few enemies other thon the mountain
lion. In this almost ideal environment
the horses that had become separated
from their Spanish masters thrived
and increased in numbers that were
astounding. One estimate places the
number of wild horses that existed
on our early western plains at about
fifty million.

The Indian's were the first to break
and ride these wild horses. Until
horses were brought to America by
the Spaniards, the Indians' modes of
transportation were limited to travel
by foot on land and by canoe on the
water. Now that horses were to be
seen everywhere, it was only a short
time before practically every Indian


warrior west of the Mississippi had
from one to a dozen horses.
After many generations on the
western plains, these horses lost
beauty and size until the mustang of
the American cowboy evolved. There
were, however, individual "throw-
backs" in these wild herds. A throw
back was a colt that would revert to
his ancestors and have the character-
istics of the early Spanish horses.
These throw backs would develop in-
to large, handsome, swift stallions
v which would be the subject of many
wild horse hunts. These stallions were
very famous, and many movies have
been filmed and many books have
been written, basing their plot around
these stallions.
In the West only about ten thou-
sand of these wild horses are left.
They can be found in small bands in
Arizona and Utah and in certain
parts of Washington, Oregon, Mont-
ana, and Colorado.


Gone, But Not Forgotten

By Bill Atwater
Back in the days before the jook-
organ and the screw-worm, there
came to this campus one plain ole
country boy, Raymond Merchant
Crown, whose greatest assets were a
knowledge of livestock and a love for
them. Under the able guidance of
Professor Willoughby and others, he
progressed in the arts and sciences of
animal husband, and completed his
work on his bachelor's degree in
1926. As a result of his many ac-
complishments as an undergraduate,
he became associated with the Quin-
cy branch of the Experiment Station.
In 1938 he received his master's
degree, and joined the animal hus-
bandry department as assistant ani-
mal husbandman and professor of
animal husbandry.
Mr. Crown is dear to the heart of
practically every boy who ever had
the guts to straddle a frantic steer or
a bucking horse in the animal rodeo
and livestock show because he served
as faculty advisor to the Block and
Bridle Club which sponsors this event
each spring.
He recently resigned his position
here at the University to become ex-
tension animal husbandman at Louis-
iana State University in Baton Rouge.
If any promotion ever was deserved,
his was. We wish him luck in his
chosen field, and hope that he will
come down and see us sometime.

HUBIE HOUSTON: This liniment
makes my arm smart.
COACH LIEB: Rub some of it on
your head.


0 = -M I


NOVEMBER-1940


THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


PAGE 11








M mPAGElE 12 THEFLRIACOLEE AMER NO
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taining the PRODUCTIVE
HEALTH of groves and farms.


For everything that
grows in Florida.


The Gulf Fertilizer Company
36th Street, South of East Broadway, Tampa, Fla.
East Coast Factory-PORT EVERGLADES, Fla.


PAGE 12





THE FLORIDA COLLEGE FARMER


NOVEMBER-1940


F RTILIZE




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