<%BANNER%>
Annual report - Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075971/00018
 Material Information
Title: Annual report - Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
Publisher: Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Creation Date: 1995
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Wildlife management -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Fishery management -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000349325
oclc - 05513917
notis - ABY7045
lccn - 79644252
issn - 0195-6256
System ID: UF00075971:00018
 Related Items
Preceded by: Report - Florida, Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission

Full Text















4r


FLORIDA STATE
DEPOSITORY

DEC 19998

UNIV. OF FLORIDA
LIBRARIES il


5M
..TJ












he mea r 0 4
.!O is etth






'M ng 4ivsin' eecac and aiaqpint i


hIoii: -s f five C missioners, appoi ted by the goy"".
IH-



inu u~ th Suae A EKihens o
and 0 fir cal year 1911
II Itr~ re A T Wi g!~a ~ ~ ~
are in this report . . ....aaa













-;r i! s~ r -s l I i .3 II =-












-0,I








M11 n








glades. OES biologists participated in the Central and South Florida Project
Comprehensive Review Study, development of the Lower East Coast Regional
Water Supply Plan, the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force's
Working Group and efforts to restore the historic path of Shark River through
water conservation areas and the Everglades National Park. OES staff began the
process of developing guidance to water managers for establishment of water
level regimes that would most benefit fish and wildlife while IA W providing
a variety of recreational opportunities. or '
In furtherance of the recovery efforts for several ,
endemic wildlife species in the Florida Keys, the
Nongame Section of OES completed the final report -
to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service titled, "Recov- ',
ery Actions for the Lower Keys Marsh Rabbit, Silver rl# 6'o "
Rice Rat, and Stock Island Tree Snail." This project
documented the distribution and abundance of these
species, determined their specific habitat requirements
and identified specific action needed to facilitate their
recovery.
OES biologists completed a two-year partnering
effort with the Florida Department of Transportation b
providing technical assistance in planning the new, 41-
mile Suncoast 1 Expressway through Hillsborough,
Pasco and Hernando counties. As a result, plans now
include bridge extensions over the Anclote and
Pithlachascotee river floodplains and an upland wildlife
underpass in the area of the proposed Annutteilga
Hammock CARL Project to maintain regional habitat
connectivity. As mitigation for unavoidable impacts to upland and wetland
wildlife habitats, the Department of Transportation purchased 10,160 acres of
land in Pasco County, containing sandhills, oak scrub, pine flatwoods, oak
hammocks and wooded and herbaceous wetlands, supporting many listed
wildlife species.
OES personnel assisted in developing plans to protect natural resources in
southern Lee County, in association with the construction of Florida Gulf Coast
University. Emphasis was on identifying habitat for protected wildlife and
addressing the most desirable methods to protect the wildlife, particularly with
regard to land acquisition.


OFFICE OF INFORMATIONAL SERVICES
The Office of Informational Services (OIS), in addition to serving as the
Commission's central source of information to the public and news media, is the
spearhead of the agency's educational outreach efforts.
The Education Section expanded during this fiscal year to include addition
of the Watchable Wildlife Program to provide wildlife viewing information for
resident wildlife enthusiasts and ecotourists. The first Watchable Wildlife
conference took place at Ft. Myers and drew 150 participants.
Staff worked with Falcon Press to reprint 3,000 copies of the Florida
Wildlife Viewing Guide and worked with the Division of Wildlife to prepare an
interpretive plan for the Chassahowitzka Wildlife Management Area.
Other activities included working with the Division of Wildlife to expand
activities of the Wading Bird Protection Network, developing the Moss Park
Wading Bird Festival, and conducting the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge
"Welcome Back Songbirds" event.
Project WILD's 290 active facilitators trained 2,332 educators to use
wildlife themes in classroom studies. As a result, the new trainees reached


approximately 80,000 students through classroom activities which incorporate
wildlife themes into math, language skills, art and other subjects.
Other education efforts included the Scrub Habitat Project, Schoolyard
Wildlife Project, conservation networking, producing The Skimmer newsletter
about nongame wildlife, and updating educational publications.
Education staff continued to operate the Everglades Youth Camp this fiscal
year and continued operation of the Ocala Youth Camp in a partnership with the
Silver Springs attraction.
The Media Services Section issued 85 statewide and
roughly 300 regional news releases reaching 700 news media,
outdoor writers and other sources.
Media Services frequently provides spokesmen to news
media for live or on-camera interviews. This section also
produces and maintains a library of video tapes, photographs,
*slide presentations and public service announcements.
FLORIDA WILDLIFE magazine maintained its
N circulation base while at the same time cuining printing
expenses. The magazine published 84 articles in addition to
the popular wildlife photo contest and the annual cover art
contest.
The Publications Section producJed appro.inimte1\ 130
S publications, including huntimni m.ps and brochures about
S recreational opportunities.
The agency also established a presence on the Worldwide
Web during 1995-96 at www.state.fl.us/gfc/ and OIS
maintains the site which includes news and information about
agency prog L.irmr and activities.
The agency's new Marketing Section became a reality during the fiscal year.


DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES
The Division of Administrative Services provides hud eli in .. accounting,
information resource management support, licensing, federal aid coordination,
land acquisition services and office operations functions, such as property
control, purchasing, building maintenance and mail handling.
Since January 1992, the Land Acquisition Section has negotiated, con-
tracted or closed on $32,651,210 in agreements using the Preservation 2000 land
purchase program to acquire 28,885 acres.
The Office of Information Resource Management supports all Commission
personnel in the use of technology and information management systems. Over
630 employees use the electronic mail system daily for message and file transfer,
with up to 1,000 messages passed daily through the computer system. Fourteen
billion characters of on-line data storage are used throughout the Commission
file servers, and the volume is growing by 40-50 percent yearly as the need for
access to data banks grows.
The GFC's budget for 1995-96 was $58.6 million.



EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
The Office of the Executive Director includes the director, assistant director,
five regional directors, legal counsel, internal auditor and agency planner. In
addition to agency administration, the executive director serves as a representa-
tive on various private, federal and state committees, councils and boards.


IJI


L ii


I I


LI I


I I

L2I


Where The Money Comes From
$59,860,053


General Revenue 34.0 %

License Sales 23.9 %

Federal Aid 11.1 %

Nongame & Panther 12.9 %
Other Sources 18.0 %



Revenue From License Sales
$14,336,377


Resident Hunting 31.6 %

Resident Fishing 41.7 %

Nonresident Hunting 1.1 %
Nonresident Fishing 17.9 %

Commercial 7.7 %

Where The Money Goes
$56,047,440


Hunting 16.9 %

Fishing 18.3 %

Law Enforcement 43.0 %

Nongame Wildlife 10.0 %

AdminJOther 11.7 %


COMMISSIONERS, 1995-96
Chairman: Mrs. Gilbert W Humphrey Miecosukee
Vice Chairman: Quinto L. Hedgepeth. D.D.S, Miami
Julie K Morris Sarasoa
Thomas B. Kbler Lakeland


Regional Offices
Northwest Region
Panama City FL
(850) 265-3676
Norheast Region
Lake City. FL
(904) 758-0525


Central Region
ADMINISTRATION Ocala. F
(352) 732-1225
ii .1 South Region
Sandra L. Parter Admnistrative Services Lakeland. FL
Bob Edwards- Law Enforeement (941) 648-3203
Frank Monialbano Wildlife
Jerome V Shireman Fisheres Everglades Region
Bradley JS Hamlan Environmental Services West Pal Beach. FL
L. Ross Morell Infourmatlonal Services (561) 625-5132
Headquarters Tallahssee, FL (850) 488-1960 (850) 488-9542 (TDD)
hii aeusyu aa the Deparom,l ofIintei preoihbia d ~iaiinnai b) .rra, v o- anil.ah, ag, ur
handicap If y .i bliee you have l n dii nmerad again ise m iany progrl, aml, y o tothis agency,
wri to: Flda Game and Fih Water Fish Commiion, 620 South Mniriial Street Tallahais FL 32399- i600;
io: o.Wce nf Human Reniaut, USIWS, Depanmnl uonn Washington. D C., 240


License Revenue
Under
License Sales
A^^^^^^^