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Annual report - Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075971/00009
 Material Information
Title: Annual report - Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
Publisher: Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Creation Date: 1981
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Wildlife management -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Fishery management -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000349325
oclc - 05513917
notis - ABY7045
lccn - 79644252
issn - 0195-6256
System ID: UF00075971:00009
 Related Items
Preceded by: Report - Florida, Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission

Full Text
























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79
F6r
1981/826J













Appropriations By Divisions
Fiscal Year 1981-82



$22,271,635


Appropriations By Category
Fiscal Year 1981-82

Landowner Payments
/ $400,000


Revenue Sources
Fiscal Year 1981-82


Cover Photograph by Lovett Williams























Administration


The Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission is
governed by a board of five members, appointed by the
Governor and confirmed by the Senate, who serve five-
year terms on a staggered basis. The Executive Director is
selected by the Commissioners and serves at their pleasure.
The organizational structure of the Commission includes the
Office of the Executive Director, Division of Law Enforcement,
Division of Wildlife, Division of Fisheries, Division of Admini-
strative Services, Office of Environmental Services and Office of
Informational Services. The Executive Director is aided in
administration through five regional offices in Panama City,
Lake City, Ocala, Lakeland and West Palm Beach. Each office is
staffed in such a manner as to resemble the central office in
Tallahassee on a smaller scale. The regional offices serve the
grassroots needs of the public and provide the capability to
administer and follow through with the programs and policies of
the Commission. Other field stations are located throughout the
state, including the Wildlife Research Laboratory in Gainesville
and the Fisheries Research Laboratory in Eustis.
The Commission was created as a constitutional agency on
January 1, 1943, and for three decades carried out its programs
with revenue from the sale of hunting and fishing licenses.
During the early years, this was appropriate because the
programs of the agency were primarily directed to benefit
hunters and fishermen. However, the Commission has become
increasingly involved in matters affecting and benefiting not
only the hunter and fisherman but also the general citizenry:
protection, research and management of nongame species of
wildlife; boating safety; civil emergencies and other general
police actions; pollution control and ecological systems; and
development of outdoor recreational programs.
As the agency's involvement in the outdoor world expanded
to benefit the general public rather than exclusively hunters and
fishermen, the Legislature appropriated General Revenue funds
to assist in the Commission's overall program. The funds were
first appropriated in 1973 and have been followed by other
appropriations each year. The 1981 Legislature appropriated
$9,590,900 for the continuation and expansion of outdoor
programs that would benefit all citizens in present and future


years. The funds have been put to good use, as can be ascertained
by a review of various programs and accomplishments set forth
in this report.
In general, the Commission accelerated its management of the
state's wildlife and freshwater fisheries resources to ensure
optimum wildlife and fish populations for the recreational and
aesthetic benefit of the public. Such management encompasses
the promulgation of codes and regulations for the protection of
the resource; enforcement of these codes and regulations and
those provided by Florida Statutes; habitat improvement;
development of an endangered species program; research di-
rected toward solving resource problems; regulation and inspec-
tion of wildlife importation and commercialization; regulation
and inspection of wildlife exhibitors; abatement of problems of
nuisance wildlife; use of fish as a biological control of aquatic
vegetation; biological inspection and reporting of construction
and development projects which could affect fish and wildlife
resources and their habitat; acquisition and development of
public recreation areas; and a conservation/information and
education program.
Florida's annually increasing human population, with at-
tendant development activities, results in increasing pressures
upon fish and wildlife resources, and necessitates restrictions
both to conserve the resources and to manage the growing
numbers'of outdoor users who are forced to share diminishing
suitable areas. Consequently, many of the rules are for regulating
user activity rather than direct management of the resources.
Care must be exercised to ensure that such restrictions are kept
to a minimum to prevent alienation of users by overregulation.
This year, a detailed review was conducted of all Commission
rules and regulations. The purpose was to simplify those rules
necessary for proper conservation and eliminate those which
unnecessarily restricted outdoor users. Forty-five sections were
repealed and replaced by 19 new sections, with other sections
shortened by revision. This represents the first revision in more
than 30 years.
The Commission appreciates the support of the Legislature,
sportsmen, and other citizens.














Division of

Administrative

Services


The Division of Administrative Services provides support
services to all program functions of the Commission.
These include planning and budgeting, finance and
accounting, personnel, property, maintenance and inventory,
purchasing, and general office operations such as printing, word
processing, central files, mailroom and store room.
The director's office provides overall management and admini-
stration of the division.
PROGRAM: PLANNING AND BUDGETING
In order for a state agency to operate from year to year, it must
be able to project both revenues and expenditures. These
projections are consolidated into the legislative budget process
for both operations and fixed capital outlay. During 1980-81,
new legislative budget requests for the 1981-83 biennium were
prepared for each division, plus one consolidated fixed capital
outlay request broken out by division.
PROGRESS:
During 1981-82, formal planning and budgeting work plans
were inaugurated which required the selection of specific goals
and the monitoring of progress made. Budget support data files
were improved during the 1981-82 fiscal year.
PROGRAM: PERSONNEL
The personnel office provides support and assistance for
employment, recruitment, equal opportunity/affirmative ac-
tion, pay administration, classifications, training, insurance,
leave maintenance, retirement processing, disciplinary and
promotional coordination, employee counseling, union con-
tract administration, and serves as a conduit between employees
and management.
PROGRESS:
A sick leave pool was developed and implemented whereby
employees can donate some of their sick leave to provide a
source of leave for critically ill employees to use without loss of
pay. A new computer terminal supplied by the Department of
Administration was installed and systems are being developed to
aid in personnel management. A new deferred compensation
plan developed by the State Treasurer was implemented which
permits employees to defer tax payments on earned income up
to $7,500 per year. As of June 30, 1982, the Commission had
743 authorized positions.
PROGRAM: PURCHASING
The primary goal of the purchasing office is to achieve the
greatest return for our dollar and provide the best equipment
delivered in a timely manner. The office has also been assigned
the responsibility of coordinating all fixed capital outlay pro-
jects, contracts and leases for the Commission.
PROGRESS:
The purchasing office issued 3,671 purchase orders, prepared


and processed 116 legal and formal bids, and processed 196
mobile equipment requests.
Four fixed capital outlay projects were completed in fiscal
year 1981-82. Eleven more projects were authorized by the
Legislature in July 1981, two of which have been completed.
The cost of the projects completed and ongoing work totaled
more than $1,100,000.
PROGRAM: OFFICE OPERATIONS
The following offices report to the Office Operations Super-
visor: property, records management, word processing center,
office services (mailroom, supply room and print shop) and
maintenance. Office Operations also operates the Tallahaseee
motor pool and switchboard functions, administers security and
custodial contracts for the Tallahassee office, and acts as
coordinator for interagency programs such as energy and safety.
PROGRESS:
As reported last year, the Commission's property records
were converted to an on-line computer system called MAPPER.
The computer system allowed reconciliation of property addi-
tions and deletions to financial records maintained by Finance
and Accounting. The entire 1981-82 fiscal year's activity was
reconciled making this the first year this has been achieved.
From a management standpoint, the records are now totally
reliable.
The supply room, mailroom and print shop were reorganized
into one section referred to as Office Services under one
supervisor. The reorganization has allowed more efficient use of
manpower as a result of cross-training, resulting in faster and
more reliable service.
Willam A. Greer





PROGRAM: FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING
The Finance and Accounting office has the responsibility to
maintain documentation of Commission revenue and disburse-
ment activities.
Financial records are maintained on the State Automated
Management Accounting System (SAMAS). SAMAS is de-
signed to produce accounting information to assist in the
monitoring of financial activities and to control the operating
budget.
The Commission maintains restricted trust funds to pay
rewards for the arrest and conviction of endangered and
threatened species law violators and to finance the acquisition
and improvement of land for wildlife habitat.


PROGRESS:
Through the use of improved procedures to identify and
minimize idle cash balances, the Commission's interest earnings
in the State Game Trust Fund exceeded $800,000 in fiscal year
1981-82. These essential funds remain in the Commission's
operating trust fund and will be utilized for future program
activities.
In the recently released audit report of the Auditor General's
office for the Commission's 1980-81 fiscal year, all previously
noted audit criticisms have been corrected and no significant
new problems were reported.


GENERAL OPERATING FUNDS
FINANCIAL STATEMENT
July 1, 1981-June 30, 1982
(Preliminary Year-end Amounts)


Cash Available on July 1, 1982
Adjusted After Certifications
Revenue Received:
General Revenue Fund
Licenses and Permits
Intergovernmental Revenue
Charges for Services
Miscellaneous Revenue

Total Funds Available


$ 3,640,596

$ 9,597,449
8,812,367
3,755,096
784,551
1,427,139

$ 28,017,198


Expenditures and Commitments:
Law Enforcement
Communications
Wildlife Management
Fisheries Management
Administration
Informational Services
Environmental Services
Fixed Capital Outlay Projects
Non-operating Transfers

Total Expenditures & Commitments

Unencumbered Cash, June 30, 1982


$ 9,987,072
1,266,039
4,250,645
3,510,124
2,192,280
1,421,043
431,922
263,759
972,224

$ 24,295,108

$ 3,722,090


Division of Fisheries


The Division of Fisheries is charged with managing the
freshwater resources of the state for continued optimum
use. A primary division objective is to maintain compat-
ible, high quality sport and commercial fisheries in Florida's
public inland waters. The vast freshwater resources of the state
annually provide hundreds of thousands of hours of recreational
enjoyment through sport and commercial fisheries which gene-
rate millions of dollars of revenue for the state. Much of
Florida's aquatic resources have been lost and those that remain
are constantly threatened by poor land and water management
practices. To offset losses resulting from deteriorating water
quality and destruction of habitat, the Division of Fisheries
maintains a diverse assemblage of projects utilizing innovative,
tested fisheries management strategies.


PROGRAM: REGIONAL FISH MANAGEMENT
Five regional fish management teams throughout the state
implement management strategies to improve sport fishing in
their respective areas. They also perform such services as
investigating and reporting fish kills, stocking public waters,
providing technical services to private pond owners, main-
taining public boat ramps and piers, and making presentations to
citizen and sportsmen groups.
PROGRESS:
Approximately 200,000 sunshine bass were stocked in 24
lakes in the South region. Two additional lakes (Morton and
Beulah) were stocked with tagged sunshines to compare growth
and survival of original and reciprocal hybrids. Interviews with
fish camp operators and area fishermen as well as sampling of the







lakes have documented several excellent sunshine bass fisheries.
Harvest in Lake Parker amounted to approximately 4,000
sunshines. Comparison of successive first year classes of sun-
shine bass in several lakes indicated possible overstocking.
Otolith aging in Lake Morton showed good survival of Age VI
and VII sunshines where stocking has been discontinued for
seven years.
Evaluation of the effects of hydrilla in Lakes Parker and
Hunter was concluded. Both study sites revealed benefits to
water quality, invertebrates, and sportfish due to hydrilla.
Hydrilla is still under control and desirable native vegetation
has returned in Fox Lake (Brevard County) after an experi-
mental multiple drawdown program. South Lake, which adjoins
Fox Lake, was drawn down naturally during a severe drought,
which demonstrated the potential for a planned restoration
program.
A peak season creel survey of sunshine bass fishing in Lake
Osborne (Palm Beach County) documented 2,223 fish taken
during 7,214 man-hours of angling in the 126-day fall-winter
creel period. Creel survey data substantiated a high rate of return
of stocked fish. In 1980-81, the return was 21 percent and in
1981-82 it was 14 percent. Although the sunshine bass stocking
rate was increased from 24,000 (1981) to 48,000 (1982), angler
catch rates did not increase significantly above those of the
previous year. A tagging study revealed the majority of intro-
duced sunshine bass remain in Lake Osborne while some
migrate to adjoining bodies of water.
Intensive management continued on eight ponds totaling 113
acres in the Jacksonville urban pond management program. Five
ponds are presently open to the public and two more will be by
the fall of 1982. One has been mechanically deepened and limed.
The liming and liquid fertilization program on Karick Lake
has resulted in increased fishing pressure and improved harvest
and has been expanded to Stone Lake this past year. Fish
population samples taken in both Dead Lakes and Stone Lake
indicated an increase in standing crop and numbers of harvest-
able sport fish subsequent to treatment. The Stone Lake fish
population has expanded in response to both the 1979 draw-
down and the liming and fertilization program.
PROGRAM: STATE FISH HATCHERIES
The Richloam and Blackwater fish hatcheries located in the
Withlacoochee and Blackwater state forests mainly produce
fingerling game fish for stocking statewide waters. Hatchery
personnel also participate in research projects and the develop-
ment of culture techniques for various fishes.
PROGRESS:
The hatcheries stocked more than 4.5 million juvenile fishes
into 478 water bodies in 60 counties of the state. This was the
highest production ever accomplished by the hatcheries. The
Welaka National Fish Hatchery assisted by cooperatively grow-
ing out 36 percent of the fish produced. A new well replacing
impounded surface runoff as a water source at Blackwater
enabled that hatchery to double its sunshine bass production.
Striped and sunshine bass comprised 69 percent of this year's
production with 1,062,800 stripers being divided between Lake
Talquin, the St. Johns, St. Marys and Nassau rivers, and
1,848,200 sunshine bass were put into the Escambia, Yellow,
Choctawhatchee, Apalachicola and Ochlockonee rivers, and 80
public lakes.
Two-day-old walleye pike were obtained from Kansas and
Nebraska and reared for the first time in Florida. These fish
reached three inches by five weeks of age and 61,000 were


stocked in Lake Julianna (Polk County). Another 155,000
walleye fingerlings from Kentucky were stocked directly into 12
lakes for research evaluations.
Approximately 19,000 hybrid grass carp were reared to eight-
to 11-inch sizes and stocked into 20 lakes and ponds for
vegetation control. Methodology for culture of these sterile
triploid hybrids was refined, permitting them to be produced in
quantity for the first time in Florida. Better design of culture
apparatus nearly eliminated mortality among eggs and larvae.
Public stocking services to small pond owners is performed
annually to encourage fishing opportunities. This year, 95,000
largemouth bass and 350,000 bream were stocked.
Projects being undertaken by the hatcheries have reached the
point of straining present capabilities. This is a result of a
growing human population putting more pressure on natural
fisheries. In addition, some deteriorating waters are less able to
provide quality sport fishing. Looking ahead, $450,000 has
been budgeted for hatchery expansions at Richloam. Fish
culture space will be increased in the egg hatching area and a
number of new production ponds will be constructed during late
1982 and early 1983.
PROGRAM: COMMERCIAL FISHERIES INVESTI-
GATIONS
Information on the scope and trends in commercial fisheries
of the St. Johns River is being collected to better manage fish-
eries resources of the river. The program includes: assessment of
commercial and game fish species, documentation of the impact
of commercial fishing devices presently in use, and evaluation of
alternative gear types.
PROGRESS:
A questionnaire was mailed to all commercial fishing license
holders from 12 counties bordering the St. Johns River to
determine areas fished, amount and type of gear used, and
various economic factors associated with the fishery. To obtain
data on commercial harvest, wholesale fish dealers were asked to
report monthly volume and species harvested. In addition,
biologists made monthly trips to fish houses to determine
species composition and average lengths and weights of com-
mercial catches. Results indicate that catfish were the most
important commercial species in the St. Johns River. Of the
catfish species sampled, white catfish comprised 75 percent;
channel catfish, 20 percent; and bullheads, five percent.
Quarterly trawl samples were taken in the St. Johns River
from Jacksonville to Lake Harney to determine distribution,
abundance and species composition of commercial fish stocks.
Early results indicate a very strong 1982 year class of catfish in
conjunction with very high water levels.
Observation continued on commercial fishermen using
pound and hoop nets. Commercially important species com-
prised 80 percent of the catch in hoop nets and 94 percent of the
catch in pound nets, while game fish (released) comprised 18
and four percent, respectively. These observations indicated
little adverse biological impact on game fish species of the St.
Johns River.
PROGRAM: WATER LEVEL MANIPULATION
The water level manipulation program was designed to
expand our knowledge of lake management and extend the
productive recreational and aesthetic life span of selected lakes.
It has been implemented on Lakes Tohopekaliga and Kis-
simmee. This technique is most effective in combating adverse
effects brought about by stabilized water levels and increased
watershed development.






PROGRESS:
Largemouth bass continued a strong positive response to the
1979 Lake Tohopekaliga drawdown. In 1981, the bass also had
good reproduction and survival. The standing crop of large-
mouth bass was 67 pounds/acre including more than 40 bass of
harvestable size. Creel survey results during fall of 1981
indicated a total bass harvest of 19,700 fish and a total catch
success rate of .60 fish/hour.
Project personnel worked on abatement alternatives for
sewage effluent entering Lake Tohopekaliga from Orlando.
Progress was slow but with a firm commitment from the public,
positive changes have occurred.
Quality habitat continues to be the key to success on Lake
Kissimmee. Annual sampling documented an excellent sport
fish population and creel data reflected the good harvest sport
fishermen are enjoying. Lake Kissimmee will soon be one of the
best largemouth bass fishing lakes in the Southeast.
Dredge and fill activities in marshes associated with Lake
Kissimmee have caused serious environmental damage and
much public concern. A cooperative effort among state agencies
to establish the ordinary high water line on Lake Kissimmee
should provide future protection for these wetlands.
PROGRAM: FISHERIES RESEARCH
Fisheries research provides the scientific technology to en-
hance management of our freshwater fisheries resources for
future generations. The program is staffed with 32 professional
research biologists plus support personnel dedicated to ad-
vancing fisheries science for better fishing. Presently, the Bureau
maintains 12 statewide research projects on sport fish improve-
ment, development of new species, habitat restoration and
environmental studies, plus basic research.
PROGRESS:
To improve fishing success, increase creel diversity and utilize
overabundant forage fishes, the walleye is being evaluated as an
introductory species. Cooperative agreements were made with
game and fish agencies from Kansas, Nebraska and Kentucky to
obtain walleye for stocking. An estimated two million fry and
210,000 walleye fingerlings were obtained from these sources.
Fry survival at both Blackwater and Richloam hatchery ponds
varied, but improved with handling experience and ranged as
high as 50 percent in one pond after a 23-day grow-out period.
Hauling mortality of walleye fingerlings transported from
Kentucky was much less than anticipated, and overall survival to
the stocking sites was estimated at 70 percent. Upon completion
of stocking, more than 215,000 walleye fingerlings and 50,000
fry were released in nearly 3,200 acres of Florida waters at
experimental stocking rates ranging between 35 and 200 finger-
lings per acre. One 6.14-inch walleye was recovered from Lake


~WL
-44- A -,A


Julianna in late July. Growth averaged 1.4 mm per day and was
consistent with the growth of a 7.6-inch walleye sampled at
Richloam hatchery in late August. Survival through August in
control ponds at Richloam Hatchery and Boca Raton Research
Laboratory appeared good with water temperatures up to 850F.
Growth of walleyes at Boca Raton was somewhat slower at
slightly over 1 mm per day.
In an effort to develop an aging technique, otoliths (ear
stones) were examined from 135 largemouth bass collected
from 27 farm ponds and one state hatchery pond which
contained known-age fish. Overall, 91.1 percent of fish sampled
were determined to have the expected number of annual rings.
The remaining 8.9 percent were believed to be fast-growing
progeny. None of the fish removed from the ponds were found
to be older than anticipated. These results indicate that Florida
largemouth bass can be accurately aged using otoliths.
Population estimates of harvestable-size bass in Starke Lake
(236 acres) were conducted in the spring of 1981 and 1982. In
1981, the harvestable bass population was 3,467 with upper and
lower limits of 3,769 and 3,205. The population remained
relatively stable with a 1982 estimate of 2,909 with upper and
lower limits of 3,212 and 2,647. There was no significant change
in the largemouth bass length frequency distribution between
the two years. Results of creel data revealed bass fishermen
expended 7,097 man-hours (30.1 hours/acre/year) to harvest
1,162 bass (4.9/acre) during 1981.
Non-native fish research biologists discovered an established
population of Midas cichlids, bringing the total number of
established exotic fishes in Florida to 16. Lower lethal tempera-
tures were identified for Midas cichlids and winter-kill infor-
mation was collected on eight exotic fishes. Hybrid grass carp
feeding studies were performed including consumption rates of
hydrilla and efficacy tests in ponds. Early results indicate the
hybrid is about 50 percent as effective as the parent grass carp.
The recently implemented five-year Apalachicola River in-
vestigation will define ecological aspects of the fisheries and
identify the effects of maintenance dredging disposal on the
river. Funding for the first two years is by a contract with the
Corps of Engineers to collect fish population data from selected
spoil disposal and control sites throughout the 106-mile length
of the river. River habitat types have been mapped to provide the
generalized habitats which exist in the river and their relative
frequency of occurrence. A creel census was conducted in the
tailrace below Jim Woodruff Dam during the peak fishing
season to analyze sport fishing quality in this area. Bream and
catfish were the dominant species harvested. Water quality
samples of the river and its major tributaries have been collected
monthly to assess effects of land use, urbanization and industri-
alization. Invertebrate and fish samples were conducted on rock
areas in the upper river to assess effects of a proposed project by
the Corps to remove rock shoal areas from the river. These areas
were determined to be extremely valuable habitat for river biota.
Investigations in the Oklawaha Chain of Lakes include studies
on Lakes Apopka, Dora and Griffin. Population estimates for
young-of-the-year largemouth bass in Lake Dora peaked in May
at a mean of 61/acre, 43 percent less than May 1980. Further
study indicated a substantially weaker year class in 1981
compared to 1980. The major mortality period, as measured
fiom the May population peak, was between May and June (83
percent decline). Greatest densities of young-of-the-year bass
were collected from cattails from April through August. Bass







collected at the end of their first year of growth attained an
average size of 6.7 inches. Food habit studies indicated the
percent occurrence of fish in young-of-the-year bass stomachs
was generally higher, especially in fall months, when compared
to the 1980 year class.
Sampling in Lake Apopka indicated that the largemouth bass
population was functionally nonexistent. Few adults and native
young-of-the-year were collected from the lake. As a research
project, Lake Apopka was stocked with approximately 500,000
largemouth bass fingerlings in the spring of 1982. Largemouth
bass fingerlings captured following stocking have shown good
growth and have a high occurrence of small fish in their
stomachs.
The St. Johns River project is composed of two separate
studies. The upper river study is designed to determine the
impact of fluctuating water levels on selected game fishes, while
the lower river study focuses on the relationships of fish
populations to habitat types. Man's influence on the St. Johns
River, in the form of encroachment on the floodplain, and the
influx of urban sewage and runoff, create major problems for the
fishery. To document these deleterious effects, water quality has
been monitored at 37 stations throughout the basin on a
bimonthly schedule. The 1982 creel survey recorded good sport
fishing on the upper river, especially for bass (success est. 0.4
bass/hr.).
Project biologists in the lower St. Johns are working to
determine composition and abundance of zooplankton, macro-
invertebrates, forage fishes and sport fishes in major aquatic
vegetation communities. Six sampling stations were selected
throughout the lower river based on habitat type. Eel grass
(Vallisneria sp.) was the dominant aquatic vegetation type in
abundance and importance in supporting both sport and forage
fishes, and plant-associated macroinvertebrates. No significant
difference in bottom-dwelling macroinvertebrate densities was
found among differing vegetation types, but zooplankton densi-
ties were significantly higher in bulrush (Scripus sp.) commu-
nities. A creel survey in the Lake George area indicated excellent
bass fishing this past spring. Bass catch rates approached one
fish/hr. during peak success periods.
Lake Jackson is currently undergoing a natural drawdown
with water levels the lowest recorded since 1956. In the fall of
1983, Lake Talquin will undergo a man-made drawdown of at
least 14 feet for dam repair. Current data will be used to assess
drawdown benefits and impacts on sport fisheries. This year,
250,000 striped bass fingerlings will be stocked into Talquin.
Present data on the age and growth of Lake Talquin striped bass
indicate an extremely fast-growing but short-lived population
with adult fish rarely exceeding 15 to 17 pounds. A tagging
program has been implemented to better assess this fishery in
Talquin and its future potential. Efforts to establish a sunshine
bass fishery in the lower Ochlockonee River were initiated this
spring when 145,000 were stocked.
For the past two years, personnel of the North Florida
Streams Research Project have been evaluating the sunshine bass
stocking program in the Escambia River. Sunshine bass have
been tagged with ultrasonic transmitters and Floy spaghetti tags
to determine movement, distribution and areas of fish concen-
tration in the river system. Monthly fish samples have also been
taken to determine food habits and growth of this new sport fish.
More than 2.1 million sunshine bass have been stocked in the
Escambia River since 1978. Telemetry studies indicate fish
movements are apparently dependent on water level fluctua-
tions. Tagged sunshines congregate in brackish waters of the


Jim Fanrr-or
lower river during normal and low water periods and move into
the bay during periods of high water. Growth and survival of
bass have been excellent. Food habit studies indicate that they
feed on menhaden during most of the year and on blue crab on a
seasonal basis. The creel census on the river demonstrated they
were providing an excellent fishery (caught at a rate of 0.70 and
0.55 fish per hour) for the summer and fall periods of 1981,
with an overall harvest estimate of 4,637 fish for these periods.
Endangered fish research biologists collected brown darters
from two streams formerly occupied by the endangered Oka-
loosa darter. These were examined to determine food habits,
fecundity and spawning seasonality of this invading species. It is
hoped that a means can be found to reverse this displacement
trend and restore healthy populations of Okaloosa darters to
their native streams.
The elusive blackmouth shiner, an undescribed species, was
successfully collected this year with 1,592 specimens examined
and valuable information compiled on their food habits, sex
ratio, fecundity, condition factor and other life history factors.
Prior to these collections, only about 100 specimens of this
enigmatic species had been collected during the past 43 years.
PROGRAM: HYBRID GRASS CARP INVESTIGA-
TIONS
Investigations on hybrid grass carp were conducted to deter-
mine: (1) changes in aquatic vegetation composition in urban
lakes stocked with hybrids for vegetation control; (2) changes in
phytoplankton, zooplankton, benthic invertebrates and water
quality for each site; (3) relative amounts of food consumed by
hybrid grass carp; (4) hybrid growth rates; and (5) optimum
stocking rates for hybrid grass carp.
PROGRESS:
The integrated approach of reducing aquatic vegetation was
evaluated by applying a "heavy shock treatment" of EPA-
approved herbicides prior to and in conjunction with stocking
hybrids in Lake Dianne, Palm Lake and Lake Wildemere.
Control of hydrilla was completely successful in Lake Diane. It
was determined that 10 hybrids per acre, averaging three
pounds, were present after hydrilla control was achieved. As
expected, hydrilla control resulted in large increases in phyto-
plankton and zooplankton. Water clarity also decreased signifi-
cantly.






In Lake Wildemere, successful hydrilla control was also
achieved using a combination of chemicals and hybrid grass
carp. Native vegetation was not adversely affected and the
presence of hybrid grass carp did not result in lowered water
quality. Other successes were documented in Lake Irma, in a
one-acre golf course pond at Dubsdred Golf Course in Orlando
and 20-acre Lake Helen near Deland. In addition, 15 private
pond owners have also indicated that they achieved success in
controlling aquatic vegetation with hybrid grass carp.
Pool studies indicated hydrids 10 inches or larger readily
consumed up to one-half their body weight in hydrilla on a daily
basis. Similar feeding tests indicated that the 1980 year class fish,
from 14 to 16 inches in length, consumed between one-third and
one-half their body weight per day in hydrilla.
In May 1982, five additional small ponds were stocked at
different rates following an herbicide treatment. These ponds
are also being monitored for vegetation control, hydrid growth
rate and mortality rate.
PROGRAM: LAKE OKEECHOBEE FISHERIES UTILI-
ZATION AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
Since 1976, the Commission has closely monitored the
liberalized commercial fishery on Lake Okeechobee. This
program has provided for the commercial harvest and sale of
certain species of game fish and the use of haul seines and otter
trawls in addition to traditional commercial gear. The major
objective is wise utilization of a renewable fishery resource
which also results in nutrient removal from the system and
improved growth rates of fish populations in the lake.
PROGRESS:
On May 1, 1981, in response to Division of Fisheries staff
recommendations, the Commission enacted an order prohi-
biting the use of haul seines and trawls and the harvest and sale of
game fish on Lake Okeechobee. Subsequently, the level of Lake
Okeechobee reached the lowest level on record on July 22, 1981
(9.76 feet above mean sea level). As a result, the entire littoral
zone lake bottom, approximately 100,000 acres, was exposed.
Heavy rains this past spring and summer flooded substantial
portions of the marsh. Biologists on Lake Okeechobee are
studying the response of fish populations to marsh flooding. The
results will be used to formulate recommendations for reimple-
mentation of a management program on Lake Okeechobee. In
addition, as a result of this "natural" drawdown, excellent sport
fishing is expected on Lake Okeechobee for the next several
years.
More than three million pounds of catfish were harvested
commercially during the past year. Trotlines accounted for 88
percent of the catfish harvest. Total dockside value of com-
mercial landings decreased from 2.1 million dollars in 1980-81
to 1.2 million dollars in 1981-82.
Creel surveys during the winter sport fishing season docu-
mented approximately 497,000 hours of sport fishing effort,
with a resulting harvest of 660,000 fish. Black crappie remained
the most harvested species on Lake Okeechobee. Creel results
also indicated that 94,000 bass were caught this season, the
highest on record. Age composition of black crappie, deter-
mined by otolith readings, indicated that 80 percent of the creel
was comprised of three-, four- and five-year-old fish. The
success rate for black crappie was very respectable, up almost
four times from the previous year's record low.
Trawl sampling results indicated that the growth rate of black
crappie declined to preprogram levels as a result of an extremely
strong 1980 year class and environmental stress resulting from
the drought. For the first time, experimental sampling gear


collected young-of-the-year black crappie. Fish collected were
between one and four months old. If this new experimental
trawling technique continues to prove effective, the capability to
evaluate relative year class strength and recruitment of black
crappie will be increased by six to nine months.
PROGRAM: AQUACULTURE INVESTIGATIONS
The aquaculture investigation team documents changes in the
aquaculture industry in Florida. Existing aquaculture problems
are also researched. In addition, technical information and
expertise are made available to the industry to assist fish farmers
in solving problems associated with fish culture and compliance
with Commission regulations.
PROGRESS:
A statewide survey was conducted to determine the scope and
status of the industry in Florida. An estimated 223 fish farms
produced a crop valued in excess of $32 million. Eighty-nine
percent of the farms in Florida produced ornamental fish for the
United States aquarium industry. The remaining farms pro-
duced gamefish, fingerlings for stocking, or food fish. The
average farm surveyed consisted of 127 ponds totaling six acres
of water.
Facilities representing all phases of aquaculture in Florida
were visited to provide first-hand contact with a cross section of
the industry. Project personnel responded to 366 requests for
assistance from commercial interests and the general public.
Mail-out information sheets and the development of an aqua-
culture library have added a substantial capability for providing
information to the industry. Slide presentations have been
assembled depicting several types of aquaculture and the
supporting industry. Facilities whose owners had requested
restricted fish permits were inspected for compliance with
Commission regulations.
Bird predation in net-covered ponds was evaluated in a
project at the Richloam Hatchery. Survival rates were 50 percent
greater in ponds covered with netting. By prorating expenditures
for netting over a three-year lifespan, considering the value of
prevented losses in ponds covered by netting, $10,700 in
additional revenue was realized in the first year. Efforts to
document the cost effectiveness of nonlethal bird predation
techniques will continue.
PROGRAM: AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT
SECTION
The Aquatic Plant Management Section reviews and com-
ments on permits issued by the Department of Natural Re-
sources for aquatic plant control operations on all Class I and III
waters. The Commission also inspects, approves, or disapproves
requests for the use of fish as biological control agents for
vegetation management. Section personnel are continuing to
monitor several small lakes and ponds from 0.1 acres to 90 acres
in size, to document the success of triploid hybrid grass carp for
controlling undesirable submersed aquatic vegetation.
PROGRESS:
More than 300 applications for aquatic plant control permits
were reviewed by section personnel during this reporting period.
Several Commission concerns over spraying activities in Class I
and III waters have been satisfactorily resolved by the Depart-
ment of Natural Resources. A total of 136 applications to
import, possess and stock triploid hybrid grass carp were pro-
cessed by section personnel 20 permits were disapproved fol-
lowing on-site inspections. Sixty of the 116 applicants receiving
hybrid grass carp permits, stocked 14,086 fish for aquatic vege-
tation control in accordance with Rule 39-8 of the Commission.





















Division of Wildlife a "
Stan KrklIand


The Division of Wildlife is charged with the development
and implementation of wildlife management practices to
ensure the perpetuation of Florida's diverse wildlife.
Degradation and loss of habitat and growing demands for access
to wildlife resources dictate that the Division undertake its
responsibilities with a firm base of scientific facts. Inventories of
wildlife populations, basic and applied wildlife research and
monitoring of wildlife harvests are some of the means employed.
The Division administers the largest system of public hunting
areas in the United States. It also devoted increased attention to
endangered and other nongame wildlife species during the 1981-
82 year, including negotiations with The Nature Conservancy to
acquire critical habitat for the endangered gray bat.
PROGRAM: PUBLIC HUNTING OPPORTUNITIES
ON WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREAS
In a continuing effort to provide public hunting, the Division
administers Types I and II wildlife management areas. The
Type I program comprises 4,645,898 acres in 50 areas. A
permit is required for these areas; funds from the sale of the
permits are used for habitat management and other maintenance
activities. In addition, the Division cooperates with five land-
owners in the 1,301,285-acre Type II system. These lands
belong to Buckeye Cellulose Corporation, Southwest Forest
Industries, Inc., Gilman Paper Company, the St. Johns River
Water Management District, and the U.S. Air Force. The
landowners require permits for hunting; the Commission offers
law enforcement and technical assistance. The Type II program
is designed to encourage landowners to open their lands to
public hunting.
PROGRESS:
During the 1981-82 season, hunters spent 1,432,872 man-
days hunting on lands of the Type I system. A total of $400,000
was distributed to private landowners participating in the
program. More than one-third of the Type I lands is in private
ownership, with the balance state and federal lands. More than
45,000 hunters also purchased permits from private landowners
to hunt on Type II wildlife management areas. The white-tailed
deer is the most popular wildlife species sought by hunters who
harvested 25,620 deer on Type I WMAs.
PROGRAM: WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA
DEVELOPMENT AND MAINTENANCE
The Division has responsibility for the management of nearly
five million acres of land in 50 wildlife management areas
(WMAs).
PROGRESS:
Twenty biologists, two wildlife management specialist super-
visors and 24 wildlife management specialists devote the


majority of their time to the maintenance, development and
administration of wildlife management areas (WMA).
Habitat management this year included control burning
105,525 acres and planting 24,000 mast-producing tree seed-
lings and 1,073 acres of wildlife food plots. Waterfowl impound-
ments at Aucilla and Avon Park wildlife management areas were
maintained and managed for public hunting and fishing. The
International Minerals and Chemical WMA, comprising 320
acres, was opened for waterfowl hunting this year in Polk
County. A total of 342 quail feeders were maintained on the
Webb WMA. Four hundred and fifty-five wood duck nesting
boxes were maintained and checked for productivity and 50 new
nesting boxes were constructed and erected.
Bird dog field trials were conducted on the Cecil M. Webb,
Citrus and Blackwater WMAs as part of a continuing program
to provide field trial facilities around the state.
The abomasal parasite sampling project continued with 453
samples collected from deer harvested on 39 WMAs. The count
is utilized to determine the population status of a herd in relation
to the carrying capacity for an area. It played a major part in
antlerless deer hunts on the St. Regis, G.U. Parker, La Floresta
Perdida, Joe Budd, Camp Blanding, Osceola, Citrus, Three
Lakes, Bull Creek, Salt Springs unit of Ocala and Avon Park
WMAs during the year. The Division anticipates continuing
development of a sound program of deer management utilizing
either-sex hunts to control population levels and herd pro-
ductivity.
Work continued on the preparation of management plans for
the Corbett, Webb and Joe Budd WMAs. These plans will
provide guidance on wildlife, timber and water management,
and regulation of recreational activities on the areas.
PROGRAM: WHITE-TAILED DEER MANAGEMENT
ON PRIVATE LANDS
White-tailed deer are the most popular big game animal in
Florida, with Florida's deer population now standing at probably
more than 600,000 animals. The Division has responded with a
program to assist private landowners and lessees by providing
guidelines on sound deer management. Private landowners
holding 1,025,177 acres are cooperators in the program and the
landowners were issued 5,651 tags for antlerless deer since
proper management of a growing deer population requires the
reduction of female (doe) deer in order to maintain a herd within
the natural carrying capacity of the particular deer range.
PROGRESS:
Three thousand and ninety-two antlerless deer were harvested,
denoting a 67 percent success rate; 92 percent were doe deer and
8 percent were antlerless bucks. The minimum acreage for a






landowner to be eligible for consideration in the program was
reduced from 640 acres to 150 acres which brought about an
increase in participation in the program and particularly helped
to reduce crop damage on small farms.
The total deer harvest for Florida in 1981-82, on both private
property and public hunting areas, was estimated at 66,489.
This estimate is based on returns from the statewide mail survey
reported on in the hunter survey portion of this report.
PROGRAM: NUISANCE WILDLIFE
Bureau of Wildlife Resources biologists investigate numerous
requests from farmers and citrus grove owners regarding
damages inflicted by white-tailed deer. Division staff also handle
a constant flow of requests and complaints from the public
concerning blackbirds, treefrog choruses, woodpeckers on
houses, snakes, raccoons, foxes, and others. Complaints re-
quiring further action or immediate involvement are handled
personally by Division staff.
PROGRESS:
During 1981-82, biologists from the Bureau of Wildlife
Resources investigated and handled various nuisance animal
complaints throughout the state. A majority of the complaints
originate from people in the Everglades and South regions. The
Division also received many requests from farmers and grove
owners in the Northwest, Northeast and Central regions with
regard to crop depredation by deer. Most of these requests were
resolved by recommending a harvest of a segment of the doe
population in that particular area during the regular hunting
season. However, 31 permits were issued to destroy deer causing
severe crop depredation outside the established deer hunting
season.
An information packet dealing with nuisance wildlife has been
prepared by the Division for distribution to the public.


PROGRAM: ALLIGATOR MANAGEMENT
The large population of American alligators in Florida has
resulted in human safety concerns, loss of domestic animals and
reduction of recreational use of areas where large alligators are
present. The Commission conducted an experimental alligator
control program during 1977 and 1978 in the Northeast Region
to test a control method using contracted trappers to capture
nuisance alligators. Information from this experimental pro-
gram was used to establish a statewide nuisance alligator
program in 1978 using contracted trapper-agents.
PROGRESS:
There are now 50 contracted alligator-agents working under
special agreement with the Commission. During 1981-82, 4,024
complaints were received and 1,824 nuisance alligators were
harvested.

PROGRAM: WATERFOWL MANAGEMENT
Florida, with its vast wetland acreage, is on its way to
becoming a more prominent waterfowl state. Efforts are under
way to develop existing waterfowl areas through impoundment
management, including controlled burning, water quality and
quantity fluctuations, and hunter management (hunting only on
certain days). These activities as well as new waterfowl area
acquisition efforts are the result of Florida waterfowl stamp
monies.
PROGRESS:
During 1981-82, extensive waterfowl surveys were conducted
to document migration patterns and populations of wintering
waterfowl throughout Florida.
Phosphate settling ponds belonging to International Minerals
and Chemical Corporation in Polk County were acquired
through a lease agreement which resulted in the highly popular
IMC WMA. A large rice-farming operation in Gulf County
(M-K Ranch) is indicating a willingness to allow limited
Commission-controlled waterfowl hunting on its fields. Limited
public waterfowl hunting is very likely on these lands for the
1982-83 season. New areas are continually being assessed for
public waterfowl hunting.
PROGRAM: WILDLIFE RESEARCH
Wildlife research addresses problems associated with the
management of Florida wildlife, with emphasis on life history
studies, to provide essential knowledge for effective manage-
ment and development of management techniques, including
harvest methods. Bureau of Wildlife Research staff at the
Wildlife Research Laboratory in Gainesville and the Fisheating
Creek Field Research Station study alligators, gopher tortoises
and other reptiles; waterfowl; feral hogs; black bears; Florida
panthers and numerous other endangered wildlife; wood storks;
and many other important wildlife species. Although many
studies are long term and often complex, it is the goal of the
Bureau to provide research information to management opera-
tions of the agency in a timely manner.
PROGRESS:
A waterfowl gizzard survey concentrated on the areas des-
ignated as steel shot zones. Total shot (lead and steel) ingestion
rates remained high on most areas (average 16.5% incidence)
with the highest rates occurring in Dade (27.9%) and Leon
(25.5%) counties. Encouraging, however, was the increase in
occurrence of non-toxic steel pellets in the total shot com-
ponent. The average incidence of steel shot ingestion statewide
was 3.4%, with Alachua County exhibiting a high of 11.1% in
ducks examined. The increasing occurrence of steel shot in
waterfowl gizzards is strong evidence that steel shot regulations







can work to lower lead shot ingestion rates in Florida wetlands.
In addition, the assessment of the effects of lead on ring-necked
ducks continued.
The wood duck study initiated in 1980 continued. The work
involves using blood parasites as natural biological tags to
distinguish migratory northern wood ducks from residents. The
technique was used to estimate the proportion of migrants that
were killed in Florida during the 1980-81 hunting season. Most
migrants arrive in December and stay during January. Florida
opened an experimental wood duck season the last week of
September 1981. Blood smears from this season indicated that
only 10% of the wood ducks harvested were migrants; this
harvest did not have an adverse effect upon the heavily hunted
northern populations.
Furbearer research activity this year has been concentrated on
completion of otter and bobcat data collections and the early
stages of data processing. Final analysis of the bobcat scent
station population index method indicated that statewide pop-
ulations of fox, raccoon and bobcat appear to be stable.
Black bear studies have concentrated on developing methods
for reducing bear-beekeeper conflicts and determining black
bear distribution and habitat preference. A pilot study revealed
that beeyards protected by electric fences were much less likely
to incur bear damage than unprotected beeyards. An aversion to
beeyards may be induced in bears by trapping them, even when
the animal is released at the same site. The trap-and-release
procedure provides a means of dealing with depredating bears
without costly relocation. Reports show bears are widespread in
Florida with greatest numbers in the Apalachicola and Osceola
national forests, Marion, Lake and Collier counties.
Two clutches of eggs from captive, migratory greater sandhill
cranes were provided by the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center.
Both clutches were placed under incubating Florida sandhill
cranes-whose natural clutches were removed. One nest was
abandoned; one apparently hatched and the chick will be banded
when it is big enough to retain a band. Twelve Florida sandhill
cranes have been fitted with radio transmitters and are being
monitored to determine normal activity patterns for com-
parison with the experimental greater crane raised by foster
Florida crane parents.
Five hundred bald eagle nesting sites were checked this year.
There were 340 active nests with 240 successful ones producing
356 young at a rate of 1.48 young per successful nest and 1.04
young per active territory. This is a slight decrease over the figure
for last year, but the population remains stable.
The 1981-82 pelican survey was conducted in late April and
revealed a nesting population of 8,546 pairs. There were four
new nesting sites (all less than 50 pairs) detected this year. This
year looked to be slightly above average for the pelican.
Four adult male and two adult female Florida panthers were
captured in January and February. These animals were radio-
instrumented and are being monitored from the air 15 days each
month on an every-other-week basis. During this period the
ranges of movements were 70, 95 and 150 square miles for the
males and 40 square miles for each female. One of the males died
of unknown causes a month and a half after being radio-tagged.
This year the Florida Panther Record Clearinghouse received,
categorized and filed 134 panther records. This brings to 1,239
the records filed there. Twenty-three reports (15%) provided
conclusive evidence of panthers. During this investigation, valid
panther sign has been consistently confirmed in an area of
southern Florida made up of the Big Cypress Preserve, Fak-
ahatchee Strand, and Everglades National Park.


From August 1 through September 29, 1981, an attempt was
made to capture every hog on the Fisheating Creek Study Area.
Root-door hog traps caught 407 individuals. This represents
60% to 70% of the population. Of the 407 hogs captured, 141
were released back into the study area and 266 were removed to
simulate the effects of a hunter harvest.
Gopher tortoise research during the year focused on impacts
of harvest and forestry site preparation. North Florida tortoise
hunters were accompanied by project personnel to determine
harvest success per trip. Studies involving harvest simulations,
population dynamics and hatchling survival were initiated in
Alachua and Putnam counties. Over 100 tortoises were marked
and measured during a seven-week trapping effort on two study
areas. All female tortoises were X-rayed to determine clutch size.
Radio-telemetry was used to investigate tortoise response to
forest site preparation in Suwannee County. Three instrumented
tortoises emerged from their collapsed burrows eight weeks
after a February chopping treatment.
The annual Everglade kite census was conducted during
December. Only 110 kites were observed, mostly in Conserva-
tion Areas 3A and 3B, and on Lakes Kissimmee and Toho-
pekaliga. Severe drought conditions probably caused significant
mortality among the kites, although lack of water in marshes
used by kites during past years (Lake Okeechobee) resulted in
widespread dispersal.
Twelve wood stork colonies were monitored in central and
north Florida for productivity during 1982. Three colonies did
not initiate breeding; a fourth colony at Merritt Island failed
during the incubation period probably due to an unusually large
amount of rainfall dispersing prey at their feeding site. Average
clutch size ranged from 2.2 to 2.8 eggs/nest, while the fledgling
rate ranged from 0 to 2.2 fledglings/nest. Colony size, clutch
sizes and fledgling rates were lower than in 1981. In addition, 40
stork eggs were collected from eight colonies for pesticide
residue analysis. A total of 129 fledglings were marked with
colored dyes at several colonies to determine post-breeding
dispersal patterns.
American crocodile nesting on Key Largo declined to three
active sites in 1981, none of which was successful. Nest surveys
in 1982 disclosed activity at five sites. Growth rates and survival
in young crocodiles tagged in previous years were monitored.
Despite the relatively mild winters in the Keys, crocodiles show
little growth from November-March; however, they grow
rapidly during the remainder of the year and reach lengths of
3-312 feet by the end of their second year. A minimum hatchling
survival of 50% through the first year was determined for Key
Largo animals. Nine young crocodiles have been recaptured four
to eight miles from the nests where they were first marked, again
indicating the importance of the Key Largo nesting concen-
tration to the entire Barnes Sound-Card Sound population.
Efforts to document the distribution of the eastern indigo
snake in Florida produced reliable records from throughout
Florida, including the entire Panhandle. Previous accounts had
reported indigo snakes in the Panhandle from only two disjunct
populations. Indigo snakes probably occur in every county in
Florida. Five indigo snakes in Gulf Hammock Wildlife Man-
agement Area were implanted with radio transmitters and
tracked for five to seven months. Through the winter months,
these snakes used rodent burrows, armadillo burrows or seepage
holes as retreats. In most cases, winter (January-March) range
consisted of no more than five acres. Activity increased greatly
in mid-March, and for the period April-June, activity ranges
varied from 35 to 325 acres.
























Willam A. Greer


Florida grasshopper sparrow surveys continued in Highlands,
Osceola, Glades and Charlotte counties, and one new breeding
area was found on the Avon Park WMA. Forty territorial males
were located and females were seen with 16 of them. Vegetation
measurements were made to determine and characterize habitat
used. Most birds were found in low scrub pastures dominated by
saw palmetto and dwarf oak.
During the winter count (January 3-30) 181 kestrels were
observed during a census along 48 ten-mile transects throughout
Florida with location, sex, activity and habitat used recorded for
each. Significant differences were found in geographical distri-
bution, sex ratios and habitat use. Results of a census conducted
during the breeding season will be used to determine the relative
abundance and distribution of the resident subspecies classified
as threatened in Florida.
Alligator research during the year was directed towards
developing a management system that will utilize the Florida
alligator population as a commercially valuable natural resource.
Research was grouped into two major studies, experimental
harvest and farm supplement.
The experimental harvest study was to determine the harvest
regime needed to produce optimum sustained revenue in
alligator hides and meat. Research centered around understand-
ing the population dynamics of alligators. Growth rates, sur-
vivorship, reproductive effort, physical condition, size distribu-
tion and population density were monitored on four study areas:
Orange Lake, Lochloosa Lake, Paynes Prairie and Lake Wood-
ruff. A mathematical population m6del was developed to
describe the dynamics of the Orange Lake alligator population.
Various harvest regimes were then computer-simulated to
determine the regime that would produce the optimum sustained
yield in revenue. Preliminary results indicated that 20% of the
harvestable-size population could be removed on a sustained
basis if 80% or more of the harvest consisted of males. An
experimental harvest was then conducted on Orange and
Lochloosa lakes. The response in these areas will now be
compared with those on the no-harvest areas, Paynes Prairie and
Lake Woodruff.
The experimental harvest on Orange and Lochloosa lakes
resulted in the removal of 350 alligators, or 15% of the
estimated harvestable population (animals four feet or larger).
Males comprised 69% of the harvest. The average size of the
alligators harvested was six feet, three inches. The wholesale
value of the harvest was $101,774 with the hides bringing
$59,474 at $25 per foot and the meat drawing $42,300 at $4.75
per pound. The Commission received $17,842 for its 30% share


of the sale of the hides. Individual agent-trappers participating in
the sale grossed an average of $5,995 each.
The other major alligator research emphasis was a farm
supplement study to determine the impact of removing wild
alligator eggs and hatchlings from alligator populations. Various
populations were monitored on three study areas: Lake Griffin,
Lake Apopka and Lake Jessup to determine response to a
"harvest" of hatchlings. Some 2,031 hatchlings (about 30% of
the estimated production) were removed and placed on alligator
farms. The response of these populations to the removals will be
monitored for at least five years.
The alligator research team in cooperation with the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service began developing a proposal to delist the
Florida population of the American alligator from the threatened
species list. As part of the proposal, a habitat and population
status assessment is required. Preliminary data indicated that
Florida contains 6,748,652 acres of fair to excellent alligator
habitat. Alligator population densities on these wetlands range
from one alligator per 20 acres to one alligator per two acres.
PROGRAM: HUNTER MANAGEMENT
A quota hunt system has been established to manage hunter
pressure in Florida's wildlife management areas during the first
nine days of the hunting season and during special hunt periods.
PROGRESS:
During 1981-82, 80,850 quota hunt permits were available.
Of this number, 69,098 (86%) were issued. A total of 12,150
special permits were available and 95% or 11,529 were issued.
In addition, 68,750 regular nine-day permits were available and
57,569 (84%) were issued.
Most applicants received permits within a week of receipt of
their applications in the quota hunt office. A primary objective
of quota hunt personnel is to process a day's mail and send out
permits and rejected applications the same day requests are
received. Correspondence and information disbursements re-
garding hunting on management areas are handled in a systematic
way so as to improve hunter understanding.
Antlerless deer permits continued as an addition to the quota
program during the 1981-82 period. Some 2,620 antlerless deer
permits for 11 wildlife management areas were issued by a
random drawing from hunters who were issued a quota permit
for one of the areas.
Three additional quota programs were operated in addition to
the regular nine-day and special hunt programs. One of these
was the Rotenberger/Holey Land and Everglades programs.
This program controlled the number of tracked or wheeled
vehicles, airboats and walk hunters using the Rotenberger/
Holey Land and Everglades WMAs with permits issued by
random drawing. The second program was used to limit the
number of hunters using the Lykes Bros. Fisheating Creek
WMA during the spring turkey season.
The third program was a random drawing to issue permits for
the Hillsborough WMA and the Tosohatchee State Environ-
mental Preserve.
PROGRAM: HUNTER SURVEYS
The growing demands for access to wildlife resources dictate
that this Division undertake its responsibilities from a firm base
of information. To attain this goal, two types of mail surveys are
conducted annually to gather data from Florida hunters on
hunting success and attitudes, the hunting pressure on lands and
the harvest of all species, both statewide and on management
areas.







PROGRESS:
The two mail surveys and a one-time deer hunter survey were
conducted during 1981-82. The statewide mail survey utilized a
five percent random sample of licensed hunters and provided
estimates on hunter pressure and wildlife harvest on a statewide
basis. There were 180,740 licenses available at the time of this
survey or about 71% of the total licenses sold in 1981-82.
The management area mail survey utilized a 25% random
sample of hunters purchasing a management area hunting stamp.
At the time of the management area survey random sample
selection there were 85,200 management area stamps available
or about 71% of the total management area stamps sold in
1981-82. Landowner lease payments are derived from the
results of this survey.
The deer hunt survey sampled four percent of the licensed
hunting public and included questions designed to determine
attitudes, management practices, possible regulatory or statu-
tory changes and the economic importance of deer hunting.
The statewide mail survey achieved a 50% response from the
hunting public while the management area and deer hunter
surveys were returned by 63% of the people selected.
PROGRAM: ENDANGERED SPECIES
Much of the endangered species program is funded through an
Endangered Species Cooperative Agreement between the
Commission and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and
consists of research, technical guidance, information/education
and program coordination.
PROGRESS:
Research continued on the bald eagle, Everglade kite, Amer-
ican crocodile, indigo snake, Okaloosa darter, blackmouth
shiner, Florida panther, Pine Barrens treefrog, southeastern
kestrel, Florida grasshopper sparrow, wood stork, manatee,
brown pelican, whooping crane and Cape Sable sparrow.
Significant results included a rediscovery of the blackmouth
shiner (it had been collected only twice previously-once in
1977 and once in the 1930's), counts of more than 8,000 nesting
pairs of brown pelicans and nearly 250 successfully nesting pairs
of bald eagles, the capture and radio-instrumenting of six Florida
panthers, the discovery of a population of approximately 50
pairs of Florida grasshopper sparrows (fewer than 20 individuals
were previously known to exist), and a confirmation that
manatees occur in Lake Okeechobee and the St. Lucie and
Caloosahatchee canals.
A comprehensive, 228-page bibliography on endangered
species was published, as was Volume 6, dealing with inverte-


brates, in the Rare and Endangered Biota of Florida series.
However, federal grants-in-aid to states for endangered species
were terminated by the current administration in Washington,
necessitating a severe curtailment in the Commission's program
for FY 1982-83.
PROGRAM: EVERGLADES RECREATION PROJECT
The Everglades Recreation staff concentrates its efforts on
developing, operating and maintaining the Everglades for the
use, enjoyment, appreciation and learning by the public. This
ranges from habitat preservation and improvement to planning
and construction of recreational facilities in keeping with the
heritage of the area.
PROGRESS:
The target range on Markham Park in Broward County is
completed and provides a 40-position-50-yard range, a 60-
position-100-yard range, and space for four combination
(trap/skeet) ranges. The Commission is now working on
installation of a safety fence around the range and has secured an
agreement with Broward County for the county to provide
additional buildings, paved parking areas and lighting for
nighttime activities to the range.
Recreation Project personnel have completed an access
facility on Alligator Alley that provides boat and all-terrain
vehicle access to Conservation Area 3, both north and south of
Alligator Alley. The project includes a boat ramp, a large parking
area and a deceleration lane.
Everglades Recreation staff, working with the Florida Division
of Forestry, control-burned approximately 50,000 acres in
Conservation Area 3. The benefits of this burning include the
reduction of harmful wildfires during periods of drought, and
the stimulation of growth of desirable wildlife food plants.
Work continued on monitoring wading bird populations in
Conservation Area 3.
Research was completed on the movements and survivability
of stocked wild hogs in Conservation Area 3. Work is con-
tinuing on trapping and radio-instrumenting resident hogs, with
15 animals being captured, fitted with radio-collars and released.
Field work was completed on the monitoring of melaleuca
"heads" to determine the degree of utilization by wildlife.
Significant utilization was observed by wading and marsh birds,
including nesting activity by Everglade kites and wood storks
and several species of herons and egrets. In spite of this
utilization, however, melaleuca is still considered to be a great
threat to the entire Everglades ecosystem.



























Division of


Law Enforcement


Florida is blessed with an unique and abundant array of
wildlife and freshwater aquatic life. Because of our climate
and geography, this precious heritage is very vulnerable to
environmental damage and illegal taking. The Division of Law
Enforcement is responsible for protecting our wildlife and
freshwater aquatic life from those who would selfishly abuse it.
The division's responsibilities include the enforcement of
conservation laws as well as the regulation of Florida's commer-
cial wildlife and freshwater fisheries industries. Other work-
loads include the protection of endangered wildlife and environ-
mentally sensitive lands, the enforcement of laws dealing with
boating safety, and the maintenance of public order during
natural and civil emergencies.
In order to protect Florida's wildlife, wildlife officers must be
effective in the prevention of illegal activities and the appre-
hension of offenders. Protection is accomplished primarily
through preventive patrol of Florida's 35 million acres of land
and water.
Five million acres of wildlife management areas which are
open to public recreation must also be protected so these lands
may be maintained for public access. Intensive patrols, as
mandated by landowner agreements, are conducted in these
areas which are managed for the benefit of all wildlife species.
The division also assists other public agencies directly and
indirectly concerned with the conservation and enforcement of
Florida laws.
PROGRAM: PREVENTIVE WILDLIFE LAW
ENFORCEMENT PATROL
Patrolling Florida's vast land and water areas makes a wildlife
officer's job one of the toughest in the nation. This specially
trained select force of men and women is responsible for high
visibility patrol 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Being seen at
the right place at the right time is the key to successful wildlife
protection and forms the basis for the Division's high visibility
patrol effort.
Although primarily charged with the enforcement of conser-
vation and environmental laws, because of their full peace
officer powers, wildlife officers offer general law enforcement


protection to citizens and landowners of rural and wilderness
areas.
PROGRESS:
Because of a wildlife officer's myriad of duties, the division
began a study last year to determine where they were spending
their time. The results have been used to develop a method for
computing division manpower needs. Although the Florida
wildlife officers' work is extremely diversified, the primary tasks
are: preventive patrol, apprehension of offenders, boating
safety, specialized equipment maintenance, administrative tasks,
responding to citizen wildlife complaints and in-service training.
Since preventive patrol may be the single most important
function of a wildlife officer, activities which reduce patrol must
be identified to determine the division's level of service. With
our present force, only 43.6 percent of a wildlife officer's time is
available for preventive patrol. Other time is spent in mainte-
nance of equipment (3.9 percent); meetings and administrative
duties (8.3 percent); responding to complaints (3.2 percent);
court appearances, apprehensions and related time (10.6
percent); committed management area patrol (22.8 percent);
boating safety (4.3 percent); training (2 percent); and assistance
to other agencies (3.3 percent).
In order to provide sufficient wildlife law enforcement
coverage for 24-hour service to each county, it was determined
that at least 70 additional wildlife officer positions would be
required. This year, the Florida Legislature authorized 20,
bringing the complement to 221 wildlife officers.
The Division of Law Enforcement places special emphasis on
protection of endangered and threatened wildlife. This fiscal
year, 242 arrests were made and 97 written warnings issued for
violations of laws protecting such wildlife. The majority of these
arrests involved manatee law violations while others involved
the illegal taking of bald eagles, indigo snakes and other
endangered species.
Numerous illegally possessed endangered species were seized
by wildlife officers this year including sandhill cranes, pelicans,
Barbour's map turtles and Eastern indigo snakes. Special patrols
continue for the protection of species such as the Florida







panther, peregrine falcon and American crocodile. Endangered
species enforcement plans are being finalized for all listed
species.
During the 1981-82 fiscal year, wildlife officers made 15,779
arrests and issued 6,939 written warnings covering a diverse
spectrum of violations. Although the majority of the cases were
wildlife- and environmentally-related, also included were arrests
for larceny, auto theft, possession of explosives, traffic viola-
tions, trespass, arson and narcotics.
Wildlife officers are still encountering drug-related violations
during routine wilderness patrol. The Commission's philosophy
on narcotics is to arrest those persons found in violation during
the course of normal patrol, but to refer to local sheriffs' offices
and other agencies suspicious drug activities requiring investi-
gation.
The Florida criminal justice system and judges continue to
support wildlife law enforcement and conviction rates remain
high for those arrested for violating conservation laws.
PROGRAM: COMMUNICATIONS
Communications provide the "lifeline" for wildlife officers
patrolling Florida's vast wilderness areas. The division's
Communications Section provides the entire Commission with
telephone, teletype and two-way radio communications that are
vital to effectiveness and safety. This system operates around the
clock with dispatchers available to handle incoming toll-free
"WATS" lines as well as citizens reporting violations and
wildlife-related problems. Complaints and other information
are promptly relayed by radio directly to wildlife officers in the
field.
PROGRESS:
The nature of wildlife officers' duties demand that they spend
much of their time patrolling relatively inaccessible areas with
various types of specialized equipment. Since radio equipment is
designed primarily for use in automobiles, adaptation to rough-
duty airboats and trail motorcycles has proven difficult. To date,
a radio has been designed and is presently undergoing testing for
use on trail bikes. An improved boat radio is also being
developed. In addition, a new crystal will be installed for car-to-
car transmissions to allow vehicles working with Commission
aircraft to switch to an alternate radio channel. This will also
reduce illegal monitoring of Commission patrol aircraft by
wildlife violators.
A new microwave radio system will soon be operational,
featuring many improvements over our present transmission
equipment. The new microwave circuits will especially enhance
the reliability of the system during periods of inclimate weather.
The Commission's radio equipment inventory includes 592
mobile radios, 180 portable radios, 32 relay stations and nine
dispatch stations. This equipment is kept in constant repair by
nine technicians who are responsible for maintaining approxi-
mately 1,200 items of law enforcement emergency equipment.
PROGRAM: WILDLIFE INSPECTIONS
Wildlife inspectors are charged with ensuring compliance
with state and federal laws governing the operation of Florida's
wildlife and exotic fish industry. The sale, exhibition and
propagation of wildlife and freshwater fish is big business with
estimates exceeding $75 million annually. Wildlife inspectors'
responsibilities include the monitoring of zoos, game farms,
tropical fish farms, wildlife importers, alligator farms and other
establishments where fish and wildlife are held. Inspectors
provide Florida's primary enforcement thrust against the illegal


importation, possession, sale and release of potentially dan-
gerous exotic wildlife and fish.
PROGRESS:
In 1981, wildlife inspectors were responsible for checking
450 licensed exotic fish dealers in Florida, including pet shops
and fish farmers. This included on-site inspections of approxi-
mately 20,000 tropical fish culture ponds in Florida, covering
some 8,000 acres. Inspectors also checked approximately
15,000 boxes of live ornamental fish weekly, which were
exported from the state. During 1981-82, wildlifeinspectors
seized 50 "prohibited" freshwater fishes and confiscated 102
wildlife specimens including venomous reptiles, cougars, foxes,
birds of prey, monkeys, alligators and other illegally possessed
exotic and native creatures.
The wildlife inspections section issues permits and works with
several thousand wildlife attractions, pet shops and private
animal keepers in a cooperative effort to continually upgrade the
quality of life for captive wildlife. This fiscal year, wildlife
inspectors conducted 300 wildlife exhibit inspections, checked
288 individuals possessing personal wildlife pets and inspected
1,938 pet shops to ensure that these individuals were properly
licensed and maintaining their wildlife and fish in accordance
with Florida law. Inspectors also handled 708 wildlife com-
plaints and made 207 inspection-related arrests, along with 385
written warnings.
PROGRAM: INVESTIGATIONS
Specialized plainclothes wildlife officers make up the statewide
investigations unit and the unique undercover investigations
team. Investigators provide the capabilities for conducting
lengthy and complex plainclothes operations.
PROGRESS:
During the last year, 22 covert investigations were conducted
by undercover and regional investigators. Wildlife law violations
documented during these investigations totaled 156. There were
also 576 "miscellaneous" investigations conducted which did
not involve commercialization of wildlife.
PROGRAM: AVIATION
It is hard to overemphasize the important role that aircraft
play in modern wildlife law enforcement. While used primarily
for patrol, aircraft are also invaluable for search and rescue


_i


Jerry Lora






operations, environmental surveys and wildlife and fisheries
management.
PROGRESS:
Our aircraft contributes significantly to the efficiency of
operations by supplementing officer patrol time and reducing
vehicle mileage. During the 1981-82 fiscal year, each aircraft cut
ground patrol mileage by approximately 20 percent. This
represents quite a savings in fuel consumption, repairs and
maintenance, and also extends the replacement interval for
patrol vehicles.
We have increased our aviation capabilities and now have
qualified pilots and well-equipped aircraft available for use
throughout the State's 67 counties, 24 hours a day throughout
the year.
PROGRAM: TRAINING
Training is an integral part of an efficient and effective
organization and a required function of the Division of Law
Enforcement. The Division's training staff furnishes the
Commission with seminars, workshops and new employee
orientation. Wildlife officers receive the basic recruit training,
firearms qualification, water rescue techniques, precision and
pursuit driving and police standards certification at the State


Wildlife Officer Academy located in Quincy, during the 500-
hour program.
In-service field training is conducted in the regions in the areas
of physical fitness, driving improvement, firearms and criminal
law. The Academy annually prepares the supervisory seminar
for all law enforcement supervisors and a dispatcher program for
radio-teletype operators.
PROGRESS:
During fiscal year 1981-82, Commission employees partici-
pated in more than 23,000 hours of training. The training staff
spent 3,750 man-hours preparing for presenting these programs.
Two 40-hour in-service training programs were conducted at
the Academy for veteran wildlife officers this fiscal year. The
first session was for those with 10 or more years of service, and
had 38 officers with 576 years of cumulative service.
The second session was for officers with 5 to 10 years and had
34 participants with 256 years cumulative service. The program
consisted of updates on search and seizure, threatened and
endangered species enforcement, rules of evidence, officer stress
and stress resolution, forensic investigation techniques, and a
patrol efficiency workshop.


Office of

Environmental Services


As Florida continues to experience a high growth rate,
development pressures increase, creating additional
strain on stressed natural ecosystems and the fish and
wildlife they support. The Office of Environmental Services,
through its programs of habitat assessment, technical assistance,
and environmental research, is dedicated to ensuring that this
inevitable growth occurs without unnecessarily impacting fish
and wildlife resources. Environmental Services biologists partici-
pate in the various environmental regulatory processes reviewing
development proposals and recommending that projects destruc-
tive to fish and wildlife habitat be redesigned or rejected. By
conducting environmental research to answer critical questions
regarding the impacts of certain land uses on fish and wildlife
resources and providing this information and other technical
assistance to developers and land managers, fish and wildlife
considerations can be incorporated into the planning of projects
thereby avoiding problems before plans are finalized. By moni-
toring and reacting to a wide range of development and resource
management problems, the Office of Environmental Services
seeks to reduce human cultural impacts to fish and wildlife
resources of Florida.


PROGRAM: HABITAT ASSESSMENT
The Office of Environmental Services reviews projects requir-
ing dredge and fill permits from the Florida Department of
Environmental Regulation and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,
federally funded projects through the A-95 Clearinghouse, and
development approval through the Development of Regional
Impact review process. These reviews, which often require field
inspections of project sites, assess the impacts of proposed
projects on fish and wildlife habitat so that projects destructive
to fish and wildlife habitat can be redesigned.
PROGRESS:
Workload in this program increased considerably over last
year, particularly in the number of Developments of Regional
Impact (DRIs) and public works projects handled. The office
received 67 DRIs, 87 public works projects, in excess of 400
clearinghouse projects, and over 3,000 dredge and fill applica-
tions this year. Of the dredge and fill applications, 208 were
standard form Department of Environmental Regulation appli-
cations which represent large projects of considerable potential
environmental impact.






The completed Loxahatchee Slough-C-18 Basin Habitat
Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Baseline Report was submitted to
the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The three-member HEP
team, including a biologist from the Vero Beach Office, has
begun analyzing anticipated environmental impacts of project
alternatives utilizing this baseline data. The C-18 study provided
management alternatives for improvement of flood control
capability, fish and wildlife habitat values, and restoration of
historic hydroperiods in the 106-square-mile C-18 basin; and to
enhance water quality, flood control and habitat values of the
Northwest Fork of the Loxahatchee River and adjacent estuary.
Work also continued on the Kissimmee River Restoration
HEP Study to evaluate proposed alternatives for the restoration
of the Kissimmee River from a fish and wildlife habitat
perspective. Environmental Services biologists contributed to
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's final report to be published
in the near future.
Significant DRIs evaluated in the field included the Black
Point,Homestead Bayfront Park, and Chapman Field marinas in
South Biscayne Bay; Georgia-Pacific's proposal to mine peat
from Santa Fe Swamp in Bradford County at the headwaters of
the Santa Fe River; and Owens-Illinois' proposal to locate a
20,000-acre residential development in the Lochloosa Wildlife
Management Area adjacent to Lochloosa and Orange lakes.
Habitat assessments were also conducted on several Corps
navigation maintenance projects including the Gulf Intracoastal
Waterway, the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, and the Apalach-
icola River. The project on the Apalachicola River to remove
portions of rock shoals at four points along the river south of
Chattahoochee provided an interesting example of the power
afforded local governments by Florida law in certain cases.
Despite strong opposition by the Commission, the Department
of Environmental Regulation indicated that a permit would be
issued to the Corps for the project, pending approval by the
three Florida counties involved. However, the Gadsden and
Jackson county commissions voted not to approve the project
and no permit could be issued.
PROGRAM: TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
The Office of Environmental Services provides fish and
wildlife related technical assistance to other state agencies,
regional planning councils, water management districts, county
commissions, zoning boards, consultants and developers to
ensure that fish and wildlife resources are adequately considered
in the planning of developmental projects and in land manage-
ment decisions. By working with developers, land planners, and
regulators at the early stages of project planning, fish and wildlife
considerations can be worked into development or land man-
agement plans at minimum cost or inconvenience to the
developer while impacts to wildlife populations are avoided.
PROGRESS:
The area of technical assistance in phosphate-mined land
reclamation continued to expand this year through our role on
the Phosphate Reclamation Advisory Committee. Environ-
mental Services biologists reviewed 28 conceptual reclamation
plans for phosphate mines covering over 200,000 acres, as well
as 189 special reclamation plans, to ensure the maximum
restoration of fish and wildlife habitats under the state reclama-
tion rules.
Our expertise in phosphate reclamation research was of
particular value in providing technical assistance to the Office of
the Attorney General and to Senator Lawton Chiles in their
refuting claims by industry that the habitats of the Osceola


National Forest (ONF) could be easily restored following
phosphate mining.
A comprehensive review of the fish and wildlife resources,
native vegetative communities, existing land uses, and develop-
ment trends of the Sebastian Inlet Fort Pierce Inlet barrier
island is nearing completion. The upcoming publication will
provide guidelines for management of barrier island ecosystems,
and will be used by Indian River County and the Treasure Coast
Regional Planning Council in their planning programs.
This year the office provided technical assistance in the review
of several power plant sites and transmission line corridors. One
power plant site proposed by Seminole Electric Cooperative at
Alum Bluff on the Apalachicola River caused considerable
concern because of the severe impacts it could have on the
Apalachicola River and Bay, but this site was abandoned in favor
of a less sensitive site near Perry. Two large power transmission
lines also received extensive scrutiny because of our responsibil-
ities under the Transmission Line Siting Act. One corridor,
Florida Power Corporation's Central Florida-Kathleen power
line, is to extend through the Green Swamp and could impact the
Little Gator Creek Woodstork Rookery. The other line, Florida
Power and Light Company's Duval-Poinsett line, required
extensive review for possible impacts to unique terrestrial
habitats, wetlands, and endangered species, and required an
appearance by an Environmental Services biologist as an expert
witness in a related court case.
Biologists also appeared in federal district court giving
testimony regarding an illegal dredge and fill case against a New
Port Richey developer. The judge ordered the largest court-
mandated restoration to date in Florida. The developer must






remove 17 acres of fill and replant wetland vegetation, plus pay a
$100,000 fine.
The Conservation and Recreation Lands (CARL) Selection
Committee formulated a new land acquisition list consisting of
43 projects and submitted it for approval to the Governor and
Cabinet. Environmental Services personnel spent considerable
time reviewing in excess of 100 projects submitted for conside-
ration, and advising the Executive Director, who is a member of
the CARL Selection Committee. Projects of particular interest
to the Commission included the MacArthur Tract in Sarasota
County, M-K Ranch along the Apalachicola River, Chassaho-
witzka Swamp in Hernando County, the Lake Arbuckle Tract in
Polk County, and the East Everglades Aerojet Tract adjacent to
the Everglades National Park in Dade County.
Other technical assistance included continuing our input to
the Kissimmee Coordinating Council, providing assistance to
the Big Cypress Advisory Committee and the Department of
Natural Resources in dealing with oil exploration in the Raccoon
Point area of the Big Cypress, assisting the Department of
Environmental Regulation in the identification of potentially
hazardous open dump sites in Calhoun County, representing the
Commission on the Governor's Working Group for Mosquito
Control, and providing staff support for the Commission's
involvement as a member of the Suwannee River Resources
Planning and Management Committee.
PROGRAM: ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH, RESTO-
RATION, AND MANAGEMENT
As the Commission has become more active in providing
technical assistance, there has arisen a need for up-to-date
research information in several areas. This program answers this
need by providing for research on particular environmental
problems where adequate information is lacking, and applying
this information in restoring, protecting and managing lands for
increased fish and wildlife value.
PROGRESS:
Following completion of three years of field work on a study
in conjunction with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to
determine the feasibility of establishing wetland habitat on
phosphate mined lands, the report An Assessment of Wetland
Habitat Establishment at a Central Florida Phosphate Mine Site
was published in September 1981. The report, which details the
results of studies on succession and wildlife utilization of five
clay settling ponds and a 49-acre test site, is becoming recognized



Tl-If''


as the definitive work in this field, and is already influencing the
formulation of new reclamation plans by the phosphate industry.
Despite the completion of the three-year study, biologists
continued to explore new research ideas that could be applied to
the problems associated with the loss of fish and wildlife habitat
through phosphate mining. In association with Mobil, Agrico,
and Brewster Phosphate, a preliminary study was initiated to test
the efficacy of direct tree seeding as an alternative to hand
planting of tree seedlings in land reclamation. Additional
research involving more phosphate companies will be con-
ducted in this area. Additionally, a research proposal for a
five-year comprehensive assessment of fish and wildlife use of
phosphate mined lands was prepared with the University of
Florida and submitted to the Florida Institute of Phosphate
Research for funding.
At the request of the St. Johns Drainage District, a chapter
298 district in Indian River County, the Vero Beach Office
performed a fisheries survey of its 1,700-acre water supply and
flood control reservoir. This reservoir is of particular environ-
mental importance because it provides an important prototype
of the marsh reservoir concept proposed by the St. Johns River
Water Management District.
After completing our study on the fish and wildlife aspects of
restoring the Kissimmee River, the Kissimmee Basin Wetlands
Investigation Section published A Report on Fish and Wildlife
Studies in the Kissimmee River Basin and Recommendations for
Restoration. This report was submitted to the Kissimmee
Coordinating Council and the Corps for their review and
consideration in choosing a restoration alternative.
Other activities of the Kissimmee Basin Wetlands Investiga-
tion Section included continuation of reduced levels of wildlife
surveys to provide better baseline information to use in
comparing restoration alternatives, and an inventory of lands in
the Kissimmee Basin that should be acquired by the state for
habitat protection. A contract between the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service and the Commission was signed and work was
begun on a new research project concerning Everglades wetlands
management. The Holey Land Biological Baseline Study is
intended to examine the Holey Land tract in Palm Beach County
to determine existing wildlife values compared to historic
Everglades wildlife values, and to determine a management plan
for the tract to maximize the historic Everglades conditions.


















Office ofWh

Informational

Services
Mike White


Commission personnel work throughout the state to
enhance wildlife and freshwater fishery resources. These
efforts, however, would not succeed without public
understanding and support. The primary objective of the Office
of Informational Services is to strengthen that public interaction
concept.
Working through the mass media and with special public
contacts, OIS communicates word of the rich abundance of
wildlife and freshwater fishery resources in Florida and the role
of the citizen to best benefit from these valuable resources. In
addition, OIS works specifically on a variety of missions includ-
ing encouraging volunteer support services, protecting wildlife
and fisheries resources, promoting conservation mindness by
outdoorsmen and seeking safer outings by citizens in the Florida
wilderness.
Besides serving as legislative coordinator for the Commission,
OIS implements and maintains programs such as Wildlife Alert,
the Wildlife Reserve, Hunter Education, Endangered Species
Education, and the widely acclaimed Florida Wildlife magazine.
PROGRAM: NEWS AND INFORMATION SERVICES
The news and information section of OIS has been active in
relaying word concerning activities within the state's wilderness
setting.
PROGRESS:
During this report period, OIS has been responsible for the
preparation and distribution of 93 statewide news releases from
the headquarters of the Commission on matters related to wild-
life and freshwater fish resources of the state.
While the state headquarters is active in handling inquiries
from the constituency of the Commission, five regional field
offices also have continual responsibilities in working with the
public in relaying word of game and fresh water fish resources in
the state. It is estimated that during the fiscal year, these
information and education sections of these field offices handled
some 136,000 telephoned inquiries. In addition, these regional
offices also prepared and distributed a total of 348 news releases.
The breakdown, showing the region, the number of telephone
calls and the number of news releases prepared for each of these
five areas of the state is: Everglades, 32,750, 84; South 60,000,
106; Central, 11,500, 59; Northwest, 10,000, 74; and North-
east, 22,000, 51.
OIS received 1,644 requests for pre-printed information
which was sent out by staff members. Also answered were 665
letters written by OIS staff members when a special answer to an
inquiry was required.


This section also provided administrative assistance for spe-
cial projects including Wildlife Alert, National Hunting and
Fishing Day and compiling the latest directory of sportsmen and
conservation clubs.
Regional education officers and other OIS staff maintained
close contact with sportsmen and conservation clubs through-
out the state with 340 public speaking engagements. This is an
increase over the previous year's total of 290.
Some 29 exhibits in high traffic areas, such as shopping malls,
were prepared and manned (with assistance from reservists).
Fairs throughout the state also received exhibits, including the
traditional exhibit hall at the state fair in Tampa.
Radio interviews, or talks shows, remained constant this year
with some 277 live or taped appearances with the number of
television appearances rising from 190 last year to 238 this fiscal
year.
PROGRAM: AUDIO VISUAL
In order to effectively reach the public with information
concerning Florida's fishery and wildlife resources, a variety of
both audio and visual means is used. Special efforts have been
made to utilize one of the most effective available-the elec-
tronic media.
PROGRESS:
Radio public service announcements were produced on
numerous topics and distributed to 197 radio stations in Flor-
ida. This represents 46 more stations using Commission mate-
rial than last year. One of these radio PSAs on Wildlife Alert
won first place in the Association for Conservation Information
competition. This represents the only state in the Southeast to
win a first place award. Scripts were prepared for four outdoor
ethics PSAs that were recorded by Marlin Perkins for use by
member states of the Southeastern Association of Fish and
Wildlife Agencies. News actualities for radio were produced on
hunting license requirements, hunting ethics, steel shot, and
striped and sunshine bass.
Since beginning the use of television public service an-
nouncements in late 1979, OIS has distributed 11 PSAs that
were used by 33 of the 48 stations in Florida including four cable
stations. Estimates are that each PSA reaches several million
viewers with conservation messages. Television PSAs on litter-
ing and the Florida outdoors are currently in use by stations in all
regions.
Special television coverage was obtained for the Commis-
sion's panther project through coordination with the Sports
Afield program which resulted in national television exposure.






Additional efforts were directed toward publicizing the plight of
the Florida panther. This involved the production of a slide
series, supplying video material to television stations, feature
photographs to newspapers and magazines, and the coordination
of a special school presentation. To further utilize this medium,
cable television stations in each region have been contacted to air
hunting and fishing information on their continuous weather
and community announcement formats.
Slide series have remained a highly effective tool for the
dissemination of information. New series produced this year
were "Florida's White-tailed Deer," "Everglades Deer Herd,"
and "Florida's Youth Conservation Camps." Technical assist-
ance was provided for the production of "Steel Shot: Our Only
Alternative," a cooperative effort by the Southeastern Associa-
tion of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.
Photographic and related services were provided for use by
Commission personnel and for use by outside publications.
Special photographs were taken to illustrate Florida Wildlife
articles.
PROGRAM: FLORIDA WILDLIFE/PUBLICATIONS
Florida Wildlife continues to be at the forefront of the Com-
mission's endeavors to provide the public with a general format
of information concerning wildlife and fisheries resources
within the state. The magazine, which is published every other
month, highlights understanding and appreciation of the out-
doors of Florida.
PROGRESS:
For the third year in a row, Florida Wildlife has been ranked
among the top 10 conservation magazines in the nation. But not
content with that standing, magazine staffers worked with the
Division of Wildlife in a STAR grant proposal on determining
the readership of the publication. A questionnaire to subscrib-
ers, which appeared in theJanuary-February issue, requested not
only information on readership preferences but also a survey of
who is the typical Florida Wildlife subscriber. This information
may be used to direct further magazine efforts.
Responsibility for the print shop operations was transferred
from this section to the Division of Administrative Services but
the coordination of publications remained a major function of
OIS. Under the supervision of the Publications Production
Coordinator, a streamlined program of producing all publica-
tions, internal and external, was developed and instituted. A
close relationship continues with the production of all regula-
tory brochures including the code book.
Personnel of this section have worked closely with other
divisions in producing special magazine' articles for reprint.


Wdlhrn A iGrm


Among them are the "Florida Deer Story," "Nuisance Wildlife"
and the "Everglades Deer Herd." Assistance and guidance was
given and will continue with the Word Processing Center which
have taken over responsibility for typesetting the magazine and
other brochures previously done by personnel of this section.
The much-needed computerization of all magazine circulation
activities was accomplished with no small amount of hair-
pulling. In addition to computerization of subscription lists, this
section developed and initiated procedures resulting in compu-
terization of most standard mailing lists for the entire agency.
Plans are proceeding for the installation of a computer terminal
in the offices of Florida Wildlife which will tie directly into the
Administrative Management Information Center. There has
been a slight increase in subscriptions, now running approxi-
mately 26,500 with the circulation office able to update records
daily under the new system.
PROGRAM: WILDLIFE ALERT
In this day of increased need for greater interaction between
citizens and government, the Wildlife Alert reward program
stands as strong testimony to the cooperative spirit that can be
generated to encourage citizen involvement in the government
process. Organized in November 1979, it is fast becoming one of
the strongest in the apprehension of wildlife law violators.
PROGRESS:
OIS has been continually involved with the Wildlife Alert
program since it was organized, specifically the production and
distribution of public relations materials. During the past fiscal
year, OIS was responsible for coordinating the printing of an
additional 50,000 Wildlife Alert bumper stickers. That means
150,000 bumper stickers have been printed and distributed by
OIS statewide since the program began.
Two radio tapes were produced by OIS and distributed to the
respective electronic media outlets for use during the fiscal year.
OIS, through the Tallahassee headquarters office and regional
field offices, issued 18 news releases which dealt primarily with
the Wildlife Alert program during this reporting period.
Regional Education Officer Supervisors were also available to
tape comments for radio news programs and appear before
television cameras promoting the program during special pro-
grams or times of fast-breaking news concerning arrests resulting
from the program. Additionally, these officers routinely ap-
peared before school and civic groups throughout the state to
promote the program.
Florida Wildlife magazine has continued to include promotion
of the program in each edition, with inclusion of public service
announcements, advertisements and also articles in the "Con-
servation Scene" section of the magazine.
The Division of Law Enforcment and OIS worked closely in
the preparation of statistical data for use by the Association in
payment of rewards to qualified concerned citizens, reports for
quarterly meetings of the Association, and permanent record
retention in the headquarters office.
Four meetings of the Association were held around the state
during the fiscal year with OIS handling all details for those
meetings. Minutes of all meetings of the Association were pre-
pared by OIS for Association members and appropriate staff
members of the Commission.
During this fiscal year, through fines made payable to the
Wildlife Alert fund by the judicial branch and from contribu-
tions of concerned citizens, the reward fund increased by
$14,124.


PPP_ -Iq


























PROGRAM: HUNTER EDUCATION
The Hunter Education program seeks to help outdoor enthu-
siasts more safely enjoy Florida's wildlife bounty and to better
understand, appreciate and practice the code of good sports-
manship. Primary purpose of the course is to teach firearm and
hunter safety and conservation practices.
PROGRESS:
During this fiscal year, 11,543 people participated in the
program. Of these, 7,756 students completed the course and
were certified. The difference in participation and certification is
that the course is taught in a number of schools where the
students are not allowed to leave the campus to participate in the
live-firing portion of the program, which is required for certifi-
cation. At this time, we are looking into a diploma or a card
attesting to the students' classroom participation in the pro-
gram. This would be for a student who completes the course and
passes the written test, but does not fire a gun. However, the
student would not receive the hunter safety certificate.
Hunter Education students participated in 447 classes
throughout the state taught by approximately 550 active volun-
teer instructors. These instructors donated 17,396 hours that
could count toward in-kind services. Using this donated time at
the allowed rate of $8.09 for part of the year and $8.76 for the
rest, this time has a dollar value of $144,973. Thus, through the
in-kind service arrangement with the feds, everything spent for
Hunter Education was reimbursed by the U.S.F.W.S.
The Hunter Education instructor manual was revised and
printed as was the student manual. Needed supplies and equip-
ment were purchased and distributed to our instructors.
PROGRAM: WILDLIFE RESERVE
The Wildlife Reserve program continues to increase partici-
pation of citizens in varied Commission activities. This not only
helps where manpower shortages occur but also increases direct
citizen interest in the goals of the Commission.
PROGRESS:
As of June 30, 1982, there were 204 active reservists state-
wide. Membership fluctuates between 190 and 210.
In general, reservists, statewide, participated in major regional
activities for all divisions, ending the fiscal year statewide with
42,263 hours, an increase over last year of 8,945 hours. This is
an average of 3,938.6 hours per month.
Hours donated by reservists to the Commission equate to
$224,929.07 worth of time to Commission activities. That fig-
ure is based on $5.87 per hour, the hourly wage of a game/fish
management specialist. This does not take into consideration the
additional personal expenses incurred by reservists.


To assist the Commission better, each GFC division on the
regional level has presented its needs for additional projects to
the volunteers at monthly training sessions. The program in the
past year has started to stabilize in this, its second year of full
statewide staffing. Training has intensified and is dealing more
in specific now rather than general information as in previous
years.
PROGRAM: YOUTH CONSERVATION CAMPS
The Commission strongly endorses the two youth conserva-
tion camps as important means of familiarizing hundreds of
young people to the natural environment. Helping these young
people understand their natural world, practice sportmanship
within it and enhance their understanding of conservation mea-
sures remain the objectives of the programs.
PROGRESS:
Efforts continue to provide the best camping experience pos-
sible in the facilities. Increased emphasis was placed this year on
advanced curriculum with plans made to limit the number of
weeks campers could stay to two, allowing more youngsters the
opportunity to participate.
In addition, the two camps would be assisted this summer by
volunteer employees from within the agency. These employees
would spend a week at one of the facilities and assist the regular
camp staff as needed. If successful, the proposed project would
be expanded next sessions.
Repairs and remodeling of the facilities are never ending, but
increased public support for the camps is evident by the dona-
tions of some much needed labor and materials for both facili-
ties. Both camps continue to be popular spots throughout the
year with many rental groups, including the Army Reserve,
utilizing them in the "off" months.
PROGRAM:
As wildlife and freshwater resources diminish from increased
urbanization, the people must be informed of possible conse-
quences. The plight of wildlife species, which had been desig-
nated as endangered, must be brought to the attention of the
public.
PROGRESS:
Through the endangered species education program, some
154 presentations were made regarding Florida's endangered
wildlife. In most of them, endangered species and their respec-
tive habitats were depicted in 35mm slides synchronized to
original lyrics and narrative by Florida artists.
Presentations were made at the requests of schools, colleges,
churches, clubs and other organizations. A reproduced version
of the program "Songs of Florida's Endangered Wildlife" has
been duplicated in 100 sets now available under the sponsorship
of Florida 4-H clubs, the University of Florida Extension Service
and the Commission.
In addition, five radio appearances were made, including two
30-minute interviews in Tampa, three television appearances
and seven public television stations covered the interview on
Florida's troubled waters. A new project was initiated, an annual
outdoor adventure workshop for teachers.



REPORT WILDLIFE LAW VIOLATORS...

SWILDLEIFE ALERT!
THEY ARE STEALING FROM YOU!





STATE OF FLORIDA

GAME & FRESH WATER I

FISH COMMISSION 3 1262 04206 7578



Commissioners

C. TOM RAINEY D.V.M.
Chairman
Miami
WILLIAM G. BOSTICK JR.
Vice-Chairman
Winter Haven
CECIL C. BAILEY
Jacksonville
THOMAS L. HIRES SR.
Tampa
W.D. "Don" BAXTER
Marianna


Administration
ROBERT M. BRANTLY
Executive Director
620 S. Meridian St.
Tallahassee, Florida 32301
(904) 488-1960
F.G. BANKS
Assistant Executive Director
WILLIAM C. SUMNER, Director
Division of Administrative Services
BRANTLEY GOODSON, Director
Division of Law Enforcement
FRED W. STANBERRY, Director
Division of Wildlife
SMOKIE HOLCOMB, Director
Division of Fisheries
BRADLEY J. HARTMAN, Director
Environmental Services
KENNETH L. STIVERS, Director
Informational Services

Regional Offices

Northwest Region
T.L. GARRISON, Manager
Route 4, Box 759
Panama City, FL 32405
(904) 265-3676
Northeast Region
LARRY MARTIN, Manager
Route 7, Box 102
Lake City, FL 32055
(904) 752-0353
Central Region
WILLIAM H. KING, Manager
1239 S.W. 10th St.
Ocala, FL 32670
(904) 629-8162
South Region
J.O. BROWN, Manager
2202 Lakeland Hills Blvd.
Lakeland, FL 33801
(813) 686-8157
Everglades Region
O.G. KELLEY, Manager
551 North Military Trail
West Palm Beach, FL 33406
(305) 683-0748















































































This public document was promulgated at an annual cost of $438.40,
or $0.876 per copy, to inform the public of Commission activities.




U. OF F. LIBRARY
FLORIDA GAME &
FRESH WATER FISH
C O M M I S S I O N
1982-83 ANNUAL REPORT







TABLE OF CONTENTS

i Fiscal Year 1982-83 13 Division of Fisheries
1 Administration 18 Office of Informational Services
2 Division of Administrative Services 21 Commissioners
3 Division of Law Enforcement Administrative Staff
6 Office of Environmental Services Regional Offices
8 Division of Wildlife Cover photo by Leonard Rue III.



I I


FISCAL YEAR 1982-83:



Appropriations by Division

Percent
Division Amount of Total
Law Enforcement $12,082,911 49.0%
Fisheries 3,673,491 14.9%
Executive Director &
Administrative Services 4,521,125 18.3%
Wildlife 4,399,310 17.8%


Total Funding


$24,676,837


Appropriations by Category

Category Amount
Salaries $15,427,665
Expenses 5,792,530
OCO 1,786,432
Other Personal Services 707,027
Landowner Payments 366,000
Longevity Bonus 212,016
Salary Incentive 192,744
Data Processing 187,423
Payment of Rewards 5,000


Revenue Sources

Percent
Source Amount of Total
General Revenue $10,789,799 43.7%
License & Permit Revenue 9,311,579 37.8%
Federal Aid 3,307,576 13.4%
Other Revenue 1,267,883 5.1%







ADMINISTRATION











he Florida Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission is governed by a
board of five members, appointed by
the Governor and confirmed by the Senate,
who serve five-year terms on a staggered
basis. The Executive Director is selected by
the Commissioners and serves at their
pleasure.
The organizational structure of the Com-
mission includes the Office of the Executive
Director, Division of Law Enforcement, Divi-
sion of Wildlife, Division of Fisheries, Divi-
sion of Administrative Services, Office of
Environmental Services and Office of Infor-
mational Services. The Executive Director is
aided in administration through five regional
offices in Panama City, Lake City, Ocala,
Lakeland and West Palm Beach. Each office
is staffed in such a manner as to resemble the
central office in Tallahassee on a smaller
scale. The regional offices serve the grass-
roots needs of the public and provide the
capability to administer and follow through
with the programs and policies of the Com-
mission. Other field stations are located
throughout the state, including the Wildlife
Research Laboratory in Gainesville and the
Fisheries Research Laboratory in Eustis.
The Commission was created as a consti-
tutional agency on January 1, 1943, and for
three decades carried out its programs with
revenue from the sale of hunting and fishing
licenses. During the early years, this was
appropriate because the programs of the
agency were primarily directed to benefit
hunters and fishermen. However, the Com-
mission has become increasingly involved in
matters affecting and benefiting not only the
hunter and fisherman but also the general
citizenry: protection, research and manage-
ment of nongame species of wildlife; boating
safety; civil emergencies and other general
police actions; pollution control and envi-
ronmental systems; and development of out-
door recreational programs.
As the agency's involvement in the out-
door world expanded to benefit the general
public rather than exclusively hunters and
fishermen, the Legislature appropriated
General Revenue funds to assist in the Com-
mission's overall program. The funds were
first appropriated in 1973 and have been
followed by other appropriations each year.
The 1982 Legislature appropriated
$10,800,000 for the continuation and expan-
sion of outdoor programs that would benefit


all citizens in present and future years. The
funds have been put to good use, as can be
ascertained by a review of various programs
and accomplishments set forth in this report.
In general, the Commission accelerated its
management of the state's wildlife and fresh-
water fisheries resources to ensure optimum
wildlife and fish populations for the recrea-
tional and aesthetic benefit of the public.
Such management encompasses the promul-
gation of codes and regulations for the pro-
tection of the resources; enforcement of
these codes and regulations and those pro-
vided by Florida Statutes; habitat improve-
ment; development of an endangered species
program; research directed toward solving
resource problems; regulation and inspec-
tion of wildlife importation and commercial-
ization; regulation and inspection of wildlife
exhibitors; abatement of problems of nui-
sance wildlife; use of fish as a biological con-
trol of aquatic vegetation; biological inspec-
tion and reporting of construction and devel-
opment projects which could affect fish and
wildlife resources and their habitat; acquisi-
tion and development of public recreation
areas; and a conservation/information and
education program.


Florida's annually increasing human popu-
lation, with attendant development activi-
ties, results in increasing pressures upon fish
and wildlife resources, and necessitates re-
strictions both to conserve the resources and
to manage the growing numbers of outdoor
users who are forced to share diminishing
suitable areas. Consequently, many of the
rules are for regulating user activity rather
than direct management of the resources.
Care must be exercised to ensure that such
restrictions are kept to a minimum to pre-
vent alienation of users by overregulation.
During this report period, the Commis-
sion initiated a three-year comprehensive
planning effort that will develop and imple-
ment a strategic and operational plan for the
agency. This system will be composed of a
five-year strategic plan that states objectives
and strategies for each Commission pro-
gram, an annual operational plan that allo-
cates money and manpower to Commission
activities, and an annual evaluation that mon-
itors progress toward program goals and
measures the efficiency and effectiveness of
our progress.
The Everglades deer crisis, resulting from
extremely high water levels, prompted Com-
mission action in July 1982 to schedule
emergency deer hunts in Conservation Area
3A on July 16-17 and 18-19.
The Commission action was based on pre-
vious high water level experiences with deer
herds under stressed conditions. Deer food
supplies were reduced drastically because of
high water levels. There was an immediate
need to reduce the deer herd correspond-
ingly to a point that the available food sup-
plies could sustain the remaining deer over
an extended period of one to two months. A
major controversy developed when a Miami
attorney filed suit to block the proposed
emergency hunts and other animal rights
groups joined in the suit.
Details of the Everglades emergency deer
hunt controversy are documented in a report
on file at the Florida Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission in Tallahassee.
During the period January 17-28, 1983,
the Commission held 18 public meetings
throughout the state to receive public input
on proposed regulations for the 1983-84
season. A total of 1,244 members of the
public and 18 media personnel attended
these meetings. In addition, six Commission
meetings, also open to the public for input,
were held during the year to act on various
freshwater fish and wildlife issues.
The Commission hosted the 36th Annual
Conference of the Southeastern Association
of Fish and Wildlife Agencies in Jackson-
ville, Florida, during the period October 31-
November 3, 1982.
The Commission appreciates the support
of the Legislature, sportsmen, and other
citizens. 4

1






- -_I -I a *'


DIVISION OF

ADMINISTRATIVE

SERVICES


The Division of Administrative Ser-
vices provides support services to all
program functions of the Commis-
sion. These services include planning and
budgeting, finance and accounting, person-
nel, property, maintenance and inventory,
purchasing, and general office operations
such as printing, word processing, central
files, mailroom and storeroom.
The director's office provides overall man-
agement and administration of the division.
PLANNING AND BUDGETING
In order for a state agency to operate from
year to year, it must be able to project
revenues and expenditures. These projec-
tions are consolidated into the legislative
budget process for both operations and fixed
capital outlay. During 1982-83, new legisla-
tive budget requests for the 1983-85 bien-
nium were prepared for each division, plus
one consolidated fixed capital outlay request
broken out by division.
Progress: The Governor's Office of Plan-
ning and Budgeting selected the Commission
as the pilot agency to test the new comput-
erized Planning and Budgeting System (PBS).
Consequently, 1983-85 budget requests
were prepared using a computer terminal,
and the resulting schedules and exhibits were
produced in hard copy on a high-speed laser
printer. The data was available for review by
the Governor's office using its computer
terminals before the hard copy budgets were
even printed. The success of this pilot pro-
gram was instrumental in getting $1,000,000
appropriated to the Governor's office to
fund the PBS statewide in fiscal year
1983-84.
PERSONNEL
The personnel office provides support and
assistance in employment, recruitment,
equal opportunity/affirmative action, pay
administration, position classification, train-
ing, employee insurance, leave maintenance,
retirement processing, disciplinary and pro-
motional coordination, employee coun-
seling, union contract administration, and
human relations.
Progress: Group payroll deduction auto-
mobile insurance has been implemented.
This will permit premium payments to be
made biweekly rather than the normal semi-
annual payments by our employees. In addi-
tion, group rates should provide the same or
better coverage at a reduced rate. The leave/
attendance form has been revised to comply
with the Department of Administration's
2


|m m l-m I nI
It_ l i i i 'III


M al.i


requirements. A program of bringing in guest
speakers to speak on items of employee
interest such as time management and
investment strategies was initiated and will
expand in the future.
PURCHASING
The primary goal of the purchasing office
is to achieve the greatest return for the dollar
and provide the best equipment delivered in
a timely manner. The office has also been
assigned the responsibility of coordinating
all fixed capital outlay projects, contracts and
leases for the Commission.
Progress: The purchasing office issued


2,346 purchase orders, prepared and pro-
cessed 92 legal and formal bids, and pro-
cessed 211 mobile equipment requests.
Four fixed capital outlay projects were
completed in fiscal year 1982-83. One more
project was authorized by the Legislature in
July 1982.
Budgets of the projects completed and
ongoing work totaled more than $1,400,000.
OFFICE OPERATIONS
The following offices report to the Office
Operations Supervisor: property, records
management, word processing center, office
services (mailroom, supply room and print
shop) and maintenance. Office Operations


GENERAL OPERATING FUNDS
FINANCIAL STATEMENT
July 1, 1982 -June 30, 1983
(Preliminary Year-end Amounts)
Cash Available on July 1, 1982,
Adjusted After Certifications $ 3,244,202
Revenue Received:
General Revenue Fund $10,763,039
Licenses and Permits 9,289,950
Intergovernmental Revenue 3,220,122
Charges for Services 706,681
Miscellaneous Revenue 996,865
Total Funds Available $28,220,859
Expenditures and Commitments:
Law Enforcement $10,557,061
Communications 1,204,151
Wildlife Management 4,155,753
Fisheries Management 3,626,334
Administration 2,402,494
Informational Services 1,547,761
Environmental Services 477,163
Fixed Capital Outlay Projects 582,600
Non-operating Transfers 1,008,035
Total Expenditures & Commitments $25,561,352
Unencumbered Cash June 30, 1983 $ 2,659,507


tr _


1"Few,







also operates the Tallahassee motor pool and
switchboard functions, administers security
and custodial contracts for the Tallahassee
office, and acts as coordinator for inter-
agency programs such as energy and safety.
Progress: Program changes continued to be
made to the Commission's computerized
property record system which improved the
accuracy of records and allowed more useful
management information to be generated.
The Commission's records management
system continued to be implemented with
structural filing systems developed for each
office and division. Records retention and
disposal schedules were also established.
FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING
The finance and accounting office is
responsible for the maintenance of internal
accounting controls over all revenue and
expenditure activities of the Commission.
The Commission's accounting records are
updated nightly through the use of the State
Automated Management Accounting System
(SAMAS). Periodic reports are generated
from SAMAS to inform management of
financial activities and to assist in budgetary
control.
The State Game Trust Fund, General
Revenue appropriations, and Federal Aid
receipts provide the funds to finance Com-
mission operations. Restricted trust funds
exist to acquire and improve lands for wild-
life and fisheries habitat and to pay rewards
for the arrest and conviction of endangered
species law violators.
Progress: Preparations were made during
the fiscal year for the July 1, 1983 implemen-
tation of a new computerized accounting sys-
tem called SAMAS 2. This new version gives
Commission personnel control of the secu-
rity, programming, records and reports pro-
duced by the system.
No significant negative findings were pre-
sented during the preliminary audit confer-
ence by the Auditor General's office for the
Commission's 1981-82 fiscal year. The final
audit report is expected in the near future.





i ---


DIVISION OF

LAW ENFORCEMENT


treasure of wildlife and freshwater
aquatic life thrives on Florida's 35
million acres of land and water. The
Division of Law Enforcement is charged with
protecting this wealth of resources for the
enjoyment of present and future generations.
Protection is accomplished through
preventive patrol of woodlands, lakes and
rivers, and by apprehension and arrest of
persons violating conservation and environ-
mental laws. The division's responsibilities
include the enforcement of hunting, fishing,
and littering laws; regulation of commercial
trade in the ever-expanding wildlife industry;
enforcement of endangered species laws and
boating safety regulations; maintenance of
public order during natural and civil emer-
gencies; assistance to local sheriffs and the
Florida Department of Law Enforcement in
drug enforcement and general law enforce-
ment protection to citizens and landowners
of rural and wilderness areas. More than five
million acres of wildlife management areas
are open to public hunting, hiking, fishing,
camping, bird watching and picnicking and
the division patrols these lands ensuring that
they are adequately protected. The division
also protects environmentally endangered
lands and assists other public agencies
directly or indirectly concerned with conser-
vation and the enforcement of Florida's laws.


PREVENTIVE WILDLIFE LAW
ENFORCEMENT PATROL
Wildlife officers are the most visible sym-
bol of conservation-in-action. From the
islands of the Florida Keys to the hardwood
hammocks of northwest Florida, wildlife
officers may be found patrolling with water-
craft, swamp buggies and other specialized
equipment to protect Florida's natural re-
sources. This highly trained select force is
responsible for uniformed patrol of Florida's
35 million acres of land and water 24 hours a
day, seven days a week. The basis of preven-
tive patrol is the use of high visibility vehicles
and uniformed officers being seen at the right
place and time by the public. This serves to
generate the idea of an omnipresent force
which deters criminal activity.
Progress: During this year, 13 wildlife
officer positions were added, bringing the
wildlife officer complement to 221.
Officers responded to 5,176 complaints
from the public, issued 7,279 written warn-
ings, and made 14,825 arrests. They worked
500,271 hours, patrolled 5,732,212 miles
and checked 672,747 individuals.
The division places special emphasis on
protection of endangered and threatened
species, and species of special concern. This
year 602 arrests were made and 224 written
warnings were issued for violations of laws
3










































protecting such wildlife. These arrests
involved the illegal taking of Florida panther,
black bear, bald eagles, indigo snakes, mana-
tee and other endangered species violations.
Also, 227 alligator-related arrests were made.
With the complement of officers, the
Commission presently provides 18 hours of
law enforcement coverage each 24-hour
period. Ideally, we would like to have suffi-
cient manpower in each county to provide
around-the-clock (three 8-hour shifts) cov-
erage. It would take 315 wildlife officers to
meet this goal. With 221 officers to patrol
our vast wilderness areas, we must make
every minute count. In an effort to help
supervisors more effectively manage the
officers' time, we devised a computerized
system which graphically illustrates an
officer's daily work record. A bar graph was
selected to show at a glance an officer's in-
service and out-of-service times at a glance.
Each officer is delegated the responsibility of
choosing the best eight hours out of each
24-hour workday. This graph indicates how
well the officer is handling this responsi-
bility. Detailed information for each day's
patrol activities is summarized and analyzed
to show each officer and his supervisors how
effective his overall work has been for the
past 28 days.
Another major objective this year was to
provide greater protection to wildlife on
selected high-use wildlife management areas.
Saturated patrols of uniformed and plain-
clothes officers were dispersed throughout


these areas. Law enforcement efforts were
directed primarily toward protection of the
resource itself, resulting in the arrests of
many wildlife law violators. More plain-
clothes officers and unmarked vehicles will
be utilized in the future on high-use areas
where conventional "high visibility" patrol
has not been effective in eliminating
violations.

AVIATION
Seven aircraft patrol the state, on call 24
hours a day, seven days a week, in all types of
weather. Aircraft are used for wildlife en-
forcement surveillance, for the apprehension
of offenders, and for wildlife, fisheries and
environmental surveys. Aircraft provide
needed effectiveness in the patrol of inaccess-
ible wilderness areas.
Progress: During this fiscal year, a Bell Jet
Ranger 206B helicopter was acquired to
replace the Bell G-47-B. In addition, a 1967
Cessna-150 was replaced with a Cessna-172.
Aircraft contributed significantly to the
efficiency of operation by supplementing
officer patrol time and reducing vehicle
mileage. Several hundred aircraft flights were
logged this year.
INVESTIGATIONS
Highly trained and specialized plainclothes
law enforcement officers make up the state-
wide investigations unit. They are strategi-
cally located around the state and have


become integral parts of the law enforcement
community. They maintain professional rela-
tionships with detectives, enforcement
officers, and administrators of other law
enforcement departments to provide addi-
tional eyes and ears to the conservation
effort. The investigators provide the capabil-
ity for undercover investigations and operate
in areas where a uniformed officer and vehi-
cle would be at a disadvantage.
Progress: This year, 20 covert investigations
were conducted to thwart the commercializa-
tion of game and non-game species. Several
investigations involved endangered and
threatened wildlife. Regional investigators
also made 297 investigations involving gen-
eral wildlife law violations. Investigators
assisted uniformed personnel with specialized
tasks such as photography, ouchterlony
analysis, evidence handling and surveillance.
WILDLIFE INSPECTIONS
Wildlife inspectors provide a special law
enforcement effort to curtail the illegal
importation and release of non-native spe-
cies of fish and wildlife which could have a
devastating effect on Florida's environment
if released into the wild. Inspectors ensure
compliance with state and federal laws gov-
erning the operation of Florida's fish and
exotic wildlife industry. The sale, exhibition
and propagation of wildlife and freshwater
fish is big business in Florida-generating
revenues exceeding $100 million annually.
Inspectors work with zoos, game farms, trop-
ical fish farms, wildlife importers, alligator
farms and other establishments where fish
and wildlife are held.
Progress: This year 1,900 inspections on
private and commercial fish and wildlife
establishments were made. Eighty-two pro-
hibited freshwater fishes were seized and 247
specimens of illegally held wildlife were con-
fiscated, including venomous reptiles, lions,
foxes, monkeys, birds of prey, alligators, and
other exotic and native creatures.
This program issues permits and works
with several thousand wildlife attractions,
pet shops and private animal keepers in a
cooperative effort to continually upgrade the
quality of life for captive wildlife. This fiscal
year, wildlife inspectors conducted 162 wild-
life exhibit inspections, 311 inspections of
exotic bird dealers, checked 600 pet shops
and performed 671 inspections of game
farms, hunting preserves, fish farms and
other establishments. These inspections are
performed to ensure that individuals are
properly licensed and that captive fish and
wildlife are maintained in a safe and humane
manner. Inspectors also handled 263 wildlife
complaints, made 132 inspection-related
arrests, and issued 220 written warnings.


4












TRAINING
The training of recruits, career employees
and officers is the cornerstone of an effective
work force. The division's training staff fur-
nishes the Commission with seminars, work-
shops and orientation schools for new em-
ployees. Officers must undergo 320 hours of
intensive training which includes criminal
law, arrest laws, search and seizure, firearms,
water rescue techniques, precision and pur-
suit driving, first aid, and other skills. In
addition to basic training, several hundred
hours of specialized subjects including woods-
manship, alligator handling, wilderness sur-
vival and wildlife identification must be
passed. This comprehensive training results
in full Police Standards certification from the
State Wildlife Officer Training Academy.
Progress: This year, 13,200 hours were
spent in basic law enforcement recruit train-
ing, and 4,640 hours were spent specifically
updating and training law enforcement super-
visors. Managers were taught the compre-
hensive aspects of dealing with collective
bargaining agreements, improving interper-
sonal communications skills and upgrading
formal written communications.
The new field training officer program is in
the final stages of planning and will be opera-
tional this fall. Some 100 qualified and expe-
rienced field training officers will continue


the training of wildlife officer recruits once
they reach the field.
The research and development of new
training techniques have always been prim-
ary objectives. The annual in-service fire-
arms training was decentralized to the re-
gional level on an experimental basis, to
introduce the new survival firearms training
course. Presently, work is under way on a
firearms training course titled "Alternatives
to the Use of Deadly Force." This course
includes, not only the shoot/don't shoot
decision, but the training of officers in the
powers of persuasion to avoid unneccesarily
taking a human life when confronted with a
potential life-threatening situation.
Physical fitness has continued to be a
priority as part of the Commission's com-
mitment to a physically sound and healthy
force.


COMMUNICATIONS
Communications provide the lifeline for
wildlife officers patrolling Florida's vast wil-
derness areas. The division's communica-
tions section provides the entire Commis-
sion with telephone, teletype and two-way
radio communications vital to effectiveness
and safety. This system operates around the
clock with dispatchers available to handle
incoming toll-free telephone lines as citizens
report violations and wildlife-related prob-
lems. Wildlife crime reports and other infor-
mation are quickly relayed by radio directly
to officers in the field.
Progress: The effectiveness of our commun-
ications water patrol equipment has been
increased by a new process developed to sal-
vage submerged radios. This new radio sal-
vage process resulted in a cost-savings of
$7,000 this year.
A radio tactical frequency was added this
year which can be used in air-to-ground
communications during aircraft patrol oper-
ations. Thus, it enables officers to transmit
vital information from car-to-car and from
car-to-aircraft without causing interference
to base channel communications.
This year additional hand-held radios were
purchased which brings our total to 170.
These radios are important to effective motor-
cycle, boat and foot patrol in wilderness
areas. *







he basic function of the Office of
Environmental Services is to protect
fish and wildlife habitat since quality
habitat is essential for the maintenance of
Florida's diverse fish and wildlife heritage.
The office accomplishes this function
through its programs of habitat assessment,
technical assistance, and environmental
research, restoration and management.


OFFICE OF

ENVIRONMENTAL

SERVICES


HABITAT ASSESSMENT
The Office of Environmental Services pro-
vides comments to various agencies on the
potential impacts of development projects
on fish and wildlife resources. In reviewing
projects requiring dredge and fill permits
from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and
the Florida Department of Environmental
Regulation (DER), federally funded projects
through the A-95 Clearinghouse, and devel-
opment approval through the Development
of Regional Impact (DRI) review process,
field inspections of project sites are often
conducted and assessments prepared on the
probable impacts on fish and wildlife habi-
tats. By providing these assessments to the
regulatory and planning agencies, the Office
of Environmental Services can recommend
that projects destructive to fish and wildlife
resources not be permitted, or that they be
redesigned to avoid or mitigate habitat losses.
Progress: Due to an increase in the number
of Development of Regional Impact (DRI)
projects and dredge and fill projects, the


office shifted its emphasis to conducting hab-
itat assessments on larger projects to most
efficiently utilize limited manpower. The
office provided comments to the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers on 77 projects requiring
federal permits and involving potentially sig-
nificant impacts to fish and wildlife
resources, and reviewed approximately 200
A-95 Clearinghouse projects, 162 DRIs, and
226 standard form dredge and fill projects
received from DER. The number of DRIs
received increased over last year by nearly
250 percent while the number of standard
form projects increased by nine percent.
DRIs of particular significance included a
6,000-acre development on the Weeki
Wachee River in Hernando County that
would impact habitat known to support
black bears; a large condominium develop-
ment along the Atlantic Ocean in Flagler
County with potential endangered species
impacts; and a large resort development on
Fort George Island near Jacksonville. The
Fort George Island DRI required extensive


work and was illustrative of the reliance that
regional planning officials place on habitat
assessments prepared by this office. Envi-
ronmental Services biologists were heavily
involved in every stage of review of this DRI.
They provided the nucleus of the stipula-
tions incorporated into the proposed devel-
opment order to protect the environmental
quality of the island and surrounding waters.
A good example of how habitat assess-
ments prepared by this office can influence
dredge and fill permitting occurred during
the review of a large project in Monroe
County. A developer proposed to construct
a marina at Key Largo that entailed extensive
alterations to mangrove shorelines and sub-
merged bottoms of Barnes Sound. Review
and field inspection revealed that the project
would cause extensive destruction of biolog-
ically important mangrove and seagrass vege-
tation, and would specifically impact habitat
valuable to the American crocodile. Based on
the Commission's comments, DER has indi-
cated that the project permit will be denied.


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TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE ;- \ ; .:--- .
The Office of Environmental Services
works with developers and land planners to
incorporate fish and wildlife considerations
into development or land management plans
before they become finalized so that impacts
to wildlife populations are prevented or min- r'
imized. Technical assistance is provided to
other state agencies, developers, consultants,
regional planning councils, county commis-
sions, water management districts, zoning
boards, and others concerning such topics as
the impact of certain land uses on wildlife,
techniques to mitigate habitat losses, or pro-
ject designs which would avoid or minimize
adverse effects on fish and wildlife resources.
The Office of Environmental Services also
represents the Commission on or partici-
pates in a number of decision-making or
land-use advisory committees.


Progress: Technical assistance in the area of
phosphate reclamation again received con-
siderable emphasis this year. Biologists
reviewed 65 land reclamation programs in
central and northern Florida; provided tech-
nical assistance on reclamation planning to
over a dozen phosphate mining companies
for projects dealing with stream restoration,
scrub restoration, and wetland landscape
design; and provided fish and wildlife
recommendations to DNR concerning a
proposed new rule governing the reclama-
tion of phosphate-mined lands.
The Conservation and Recreation Lands
(CARL) Selection Committee, chaired this
year by the Executive Director, formulated a
new land acquisition list consisting of 27
projects. Personnel reviewed 93 projects
submitted for consideration, advised the
Executive Director on land acquisition pro-
grams, and handled additional logistical
responsibilities in support of the CARL
Selection Committee chairman.
Other technical assistance activities
included: reviewing the Environmental Pro-
tection Agency's proposed changes to the
Clean Water Act; providing input to DER on
a proposed nutrient rule for Florida lakes
and on designation of the Upper Apalachi-
cola and Crystal rivers as Outstanding
Florida Waters; serving on several technical
committees such as the Technical Review
Committee of the Apalachee Regional Plan-
ning Council, the Technical Subcommittee
on Mosquito Impoundment Management,
and the Technical Advisory Committee for
the Keys Area of Critical State Concern
Review; reviewing power plant and transmis-
sion line siting proposals by Florida Power
and Light Company for their Midway-Jensen-
Crane line, and Seminole Electric Coopera-
tive for their power plant in Taylor County;
and continuing review of such issues as water
management in the Holey Land and oil drill-
ing in the Big Cypress and Blackwater State
Forest.


ENVIRONMENTAL
RESEARCH, RESTORATION
AND MANAGEMENT
This program evolved directly from the
technical assistance program to satisfy the
need for up-to-date information in several
areas where the Commission was becoming
increasingly involved. Only through the
application of continuing practical research
can past land use problems affecting fish and
wildlife resources be corrected and future
problems be avoided.
Progress: In the area of phosphate reclama-
tion research, biologists published a report
based on past research projects. A paper,
"Fish and Wildlife Habitat Reclamation on
Phosphate-Mined Land," was prepared and
presented at the Florida Institute of Phos-
phate Research Conference inJanuary, 1983.
A five-year research proposal, to be carried
out in association with the University of
Florida, titled "An Evaluation of Fish and
Wildlife Use of Reclaimed Mined Lands"
was formulated, although no funding for the
study could be obtained this year.
The Sebastian Inlet-Ft. Pierce Inlet Barrier
Island Study was also completed this year
and was published for the Treasure Coast


Regional Planning Council. A slide show was
prepared detailing the results of the study,
and was given to four audiences in the Vero
Beach-Ft. Pierce area.
The Kissimmee Wetlands Investigation
Section published a report on the findings of
some of their past research, titled "Fish and
Wildlife Populations on Two Upland Deten-
tion/Retention Sites," and started a biologi-
cal baseline study for the Holey Land to
determine the impacts of future water man-
agement actions on the area.
A work exchange project between the
office and M-K Ranch was completed this
year. The project consisted of restoring the
natural water flow across the forested flood-
plain of the Apalachicola River. The Com-
mission's work involved using explosives to
breach dikes and allow river flood waters to
move in a more natural flow through
forested swamplands. This difficult and
potentially dangerous task was accomplished
without incident through a coordinated
effort between the Commission's divisions
of Law Enforcement and Wildlife, and the
offices of Informational Services and Envi-
ronmental Services. 4






































IP\ AW I
The Division of Wildlife is charged
with developing and implementing
management practices to ensure the
perpetuation of Florida's diverse wildlife.
Degradation and loss of habitat, and increas-
ing demands for access to wildlife resources
dictate that the division undertake its respon-
sibilities with a firm base of scientific facts.
Inventories of wildlife populations, basic and
applied wildlife research and monitoring of
wildlife harvests are some of the means
employed. The division administers the
largest system of public hunting areas in the
United States.
In April 1983, legislation was enacted that
formally acknowledged the need for greater
consideration for nongame fish and wildlife.
The act, called the Florida Nongame Wildlife
Act, was sponsored by Senator Pat Neal and
Representative Jon Mills. The act directs the
Nongame Wildlife Adivsory Council, which
was created by the act, and the Commission
to submit by March 1, 1984, a plan of opera-
tion for a nongame fish and wildlife program.
The plan is to be submitted to the President
of the Senate, Speaker of the House, and the
Governor and Cabinet. The plan is to include
a proposed budget and a recommended fund-
ing source. The Legislature's stated intent
and purpose for the plan was to identify and
meet the needs of nongame wildlife as a first
priority with the ultimate goal of establishing
an integrated approach to the management
and conservation of all native fish, wildlife
and plants. The plan is to be developed
during the 1983-84 fiscal year.


DIVISION OF


WILDLIFE


WILDLIFE LAND
MANAGEMENT
In a continuing effort to provide public
hunting, the division administers Type I and
Type II wildlife management areas. The
Type I program comprises 4,402,648 acres
in 54 areas. A permit is required for use of
these areas. Funds from the sale of these
permits are used for habitat management and
other maintenance activities.
The division cooperates with seven land-
owners in the 1,646,905-acre Type II sys-
tem. The Type II program is designed to
encourage landowners to open their land to
public hunting with minor involvement by
the Commission. These lands belong to
Buckeye Cellulose Corporation, Southwest
Forest Industries, Inc., Gilman Paper Com-
pany, St. Regis Paper Company, St. Johns
River Water Management District, Jennings
Family Liquidating Trust and the U.S. Air
Force. These landowners require permits for
hunting; the Commission offers law enforce-
ment and technical assistance.
Progress: During the 1982-83 season,
hunters spent 1,648,280 man-days hunting
on the Type I system. A total of $400,000
was distributed to 17 private landowners
participating in the program. More than one-
third of the Type I lands is in private owner-
ship, with the balance state and federal lands.
More than 50,000 hunters purchased per-
mits from private landowners to hunt on
Type II wildlife management areas.
Habitat management completed this year
on wildlife management areas included con-
trol burning 62,490 acres, planting 100,275
mast-producing tree seedlings and 700 acres
of wildlife food plots. Waterfowl impound-
ments at the Aucilla and Avon Park wildlife
management areas were maintained and man-
aged for public hunting and fishing. The
Occidental and IMC wildlife management
areas, comprising 3,320 acres, were managed
for public waterfowl hunting in Hamilton
and Polk counties. A total of 250 quail
feeders were maintained. Some 265 wood
duck nesting boxes were maintained and
checked for productivity, and 35 new nesting
boxes were constructed and erected.


Bird dog field trials were conducted on the
Cecil M. Webb, Citrus and Blackwater wild-
life management areas as part of a continuing
program to provide field trial facilities
around the state.
During the past year, unusually deep water
on the Everglades Wildlife Management Area
necessitated an emergency deer hunt in July
1982. Water rose rapidly as a result of heavy
rains, forcing deer onto limited high ground.
Deer were quickly put under severe stress
from parasitism and starvation, and heavy
mortality was imminent.
An emergency deer hunt was quickly
planned; however, a court action delayed the
hunt for several days and resulted in a change
in hunt plans. The portion of Conservation
Area 3 north of Alligator Alley was closed to
the harvest of deer and designated as a rescue
area where humane groups were allowed to
attempt to catch deer alive and transport
them to pens for rehabilitation and eventual
release. These groups were able to catch 18
deer alive; 15 of these animals did not sur-
vive. The scheduled emergency hunt took
place in that portion of the area south of
Alligator Alley and deer were harvested by
hunters. Surveys taken before and after the
hunt indicated that far greater mortality
occurred north of Alligator Alley in the
"rescue" area than occurred south of Alli-
gator Alley in the portion that was hunted.
The comprehensive management plan for
the Cecil M. Webb Wildlife Management
Area was completed. The plan for the J.W.
Corbett Wildlife Management Area has been
partially completed. These plans will provide
guidance on wildlife, timber and water man-
agement, and regulation of recreational activ-
ities on the areas.
Hunt Management: During 1982-83, there
were 70,850 nine-day and 10,400 special
hunt permits available to the public. All spe-
cial hunt permits and 60,870 (86 percent) of
the nine-day permits were issued. Prior to the
1982-83 hunting season, several new proce-
dures were implemented to facilitate issu-
ance of quota hunt permits.
Antlerless deer permits were issued as part
of the quota program during the 1982-83
period. There were 2,560 antlerless deer
permits issued for 11 wildlife management
areas by random drawing from hunters who
were issued quota permits for one of the 11
selected management areas. Four additional








Ring-necked Ducks. About 300 ring-
necked ducks were banded during the win-
ter, as part of an effort headed by the Florida
Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
designed to learn more about wintering ring-
necked duck populations in Florida. Tissues
from captured birds were analyzed for lead
content and examined for changes caused by
lead toxicants. About three percent of the
birds examined contained new spent lead
pellets mixed with the food items that had
been ingested during their last meal prior to
collection. This represents a significant inci-
dence of lead ingestion by birds on central
Florida lakes.
A less expensive field technique for deter-
mining lead levels in the blood of ducks was
developed. The impact of lead ingestion
upon ring necks and mallards was compared.
It was found that mallards were initially more
susceptible to lead poisoning but most
recovered; ring-necks were initially resistant,
but many eventually succumbed to the toxic
effects of lead poisoning.
Gopher Tortoise. Gopher tortoise research
focused on population dynamics, harvest
impacts and relocation success. Over 120
tortoises were captured, marked and mea-
sured on study sites in Alachua and Putnam
counties. Female tortoises were x-rayed to
determine clutch size. This effort is the
second year in a long-term study to gather
data on reproductive trends, growth rates
and juvenile survival. A follow-up study was
also conducted to determine the success of a
1978 tortoise relocation on a mining
reclaimed site in Clay County. Data gen-
erated from these studies will be used to


update a computer population model and
implement management strategies for the
species.
Bald Eagle. The 1982-83 bald eagle nesting
survey located 326 active territories through-
out the state that produced 331 young from
215 successful nests. Data collected since
1973 have been entered into a computer and,
based on productivity over these years, the
25 best and 23 poorest nesting sites have
been identified. These sites are now being
evaluated to determine if any significant site
differences exist.
Brown Pelican. Brown pelican nesting was
monitored and 6,980 nests were located
during mid-April, substantially below recent
highs. Later inspection of some sites and
reports from other parts of the state indi-
cated that the nesting peak occurred this year
in late May or early June, almost two months
later than usual. Increases of up to 60 percent
over the April counts were seen at some sites.
Sandhill Cranes. This year, 121 sandhill
cranes were trapped this year on Paynes
Prairie in Alachua County. Four new radio
transmitters were placed on cranes this year.
Four radios were recovered either due to
death (one 12- and one 16-year-old bird died
during the year), removal or failure of the
harness. Monitoring of these radio-
instrumented birds continues. Four clutches
of migrant sandhill crane eggs were trans-
ferred into marked Florida sandhill crane
nests. Three of these are known to have
hatched and one was abandoned. Banding,
color-marking and monitoring of young
cranes will continue through next year.
Results from these studies will be used in


deciding whether or not it will be possible
and practical to produce a non-migratory
population of whooping cranes in Florida.
American Alligator. Work continued on
the experimental harvest study, designed to
determine the optimum harvest for alligators
and measure the impact of cropping on alli-
gator populations and took place on Orange,
Lochloosa and Newnans lakes. A harvest of
20 percent of four-foot and larger alligators
on these three lakes yielded 379 alligators.
This produced 2,709 feet of hides and
10,000 pounds of meat for a market value of
$66,000. The value of the 1982 harvest was
considerably lower than the 1981 harvest
due mainly to a drop in hide prices from $25
per foot to $9.60 per foot. Twenty hunters
participated in the harvest, taking an average
of 19 alligators for an income of $2,910 per
hunter.
An analysis of alligator night-light surveys
conducted by Commission biologists from
1974-82 indicated that population growth
leveled off in the late 1970s. In recent years,
changes in the numbers of alligators counted
have been due more to fluctuations in water
level than actual population changes.
The farm supplement study continued
through its second year of a five-year investi-
gation into the feasibility of ranching alli-
gators. Heavy rainfall in June 1982 caused a
complete loss of nesting on Lake Jessup.
High water levels reduced the effectiveness of
hatchling removal attempts on Lakes Griffin
and Apopka. There were 1,308 alligators (50
percent of the estimated production)
removed and placed in cooperating alligator
farms. This was substantially down from the
2,033 removed in 1981.


quota programs were operated during
1982-83 by the Tallahassee office.
Hunter Surveys: Two mail surveys were
conducted during 1982-83. The statewide
mail survey provided estimates on hunter
pressure and wildlife harvest on a statewide
basis. The management area mail survey uti-
lized a 25 percent random sample of hunters
purchasing management area stamps.
Everglades Recreation Project: Thousands
of man-hours were spent in Conservation
Area 3 as a result of the high water crisis
during the summer of 1982. The status of the
Everglades deer herd and other wildlife pop-
ulations of the area were ascertained and
reported. Recreation project personnel mon-
itored a system of water gauging stations
located throughout Conservation Area 3. As
a result of the high water crisis, personnel
have undertaken a project to map and com-
pute upland wildlife habitat available in
Conservation Area 3 under high water
regimes.


No prescribed burning was done during
the past year because of the high water condi-
tions that existed for almost the entire year.
Five feral hogs were trapped, fitted with
radio-telemetry transmitters and released in
Conservation Area 3 north of Alligator
Alley. These hogs, in addition to 11 other
radio-telemetered hogs, were tracked regu-
larly during the year to determine move-
ments, home ranges and reactions to chang-
ing water levels.
Artificial wildlife islands and spoil banks
along the Miami Canal were planted with
approximately 10,000 bare root seedlings
and approximately 200 potted seedlings
during 1983.


WILDLIFE RESOURCES
The Bureau of Wildlife Resources pro-
vides an array of public services. Technical
assistance is provided to landowners wanting
information and guidance on wildlife man-
agement practices. Animal damage com-
plaints and alligator control are responsibil-
ities of regional bureau staff representatives.
The bureau performs routine monitoring
and population surveys of game, nongame
and endangered species.
Wildlife Extension Services: White-tailed
deer are the most popular big game animal in
Florida, with Florida's deer population now
standing at probably more than 600,000
animals. The division assists private land-
owners and lessees by providing guidelines
on sound deer management.
Approximately 348 private landowners
holding 1,700,398 acres were issued 8,085
tags for antlerless deer. Proper management
of a growing deer population requires the
reduction of female (doe) deer to maintain a
herd within habitat carrying capacity.
The total deer harvest for Florida in
1982-83, on both private property and
public hunting areas, was estimated at
64,557.
Florida Buck Registry: The Registry was
established in the fall of 1982 to provide a
meaningful and understandable record of the
number and quality of white-tailed deer
taken in Florida. The scoring procedure
employed is based on the system developed
by the Boone and Crockett club. To date,
161 bucks have been scored. Of those, 131
have scored 100 or more points, which quali-
fied them for the Registry. The largest thus
far scored is 1537Y points.
Animal Damage Control: Bureau of
Wildlife Resources biologists investigate
numerous requests from farmers and citrus
grove owners regarding damages inflicted by
white-tailed deer. Division staff also handle a
constant flow of requests and complaints
from the public concerning blackbirds, tree-
frog choruses, woodpeckers on houses,
snakes, raccoons, foxes and others. The
majority of the complaints originate from
people in the Everglades and South regions.
Biologists also receive many contacts from
farmers and grove owners in the Northwest,
Northeast and Central regions concerning
crop depredations by deer. Most problems
were resolved by recommending a harvest of
part of the doe population in the immediate
area during the regular hunting season. How-
ever, 23 permits were issued outside the
established deer hunting season to remove
deer causing significant crop depredations.
This contrasts with 31 permits issued during
1981-82, indicating the harvest of antlerless
deer in high-density areas may be alleviating
some damage problems. Several citrus grove
owners have constructed deer-proof fencing






at the division's recommendation; a new deer
repellent made with raw eggs has met with
moderate success.
An information packet dealing with nui-
sance wildlife was prepared by the division
for distribution to the public.
Alligator Management: The large popula-
tion of American alligators in Florida has
resulted in human safety concerns, loss of
domestic animals, and a reduction of recrea-
tional use of areas where large alligators are
present. The Commission conducted an exper-
imental alligator control program during
1977 and 1978 in the Northeast Region to
test a control method using contracted
trappers to capture nuisance alligators. Infor-
mation from this experimental program was
used to establish a statewide nuisance alli-
gator program in 1978 using contracted
trapper-agents.
There are now 53 contracted alligator
agents working under special agreement with
the Commission. During 1982-83, there
were 5,971 complaints received and 2,215
nuisance alligators harvested.
Waterfowl Management: During 1982-83,
extensive surveys were conducted to docu-
ment migration patterns and populations of
wintering waterfowl throughout Florida.
Phosphate settling ponds belonging to
International Minerals and Chemical Corpo-
ration (IMC) in Polk County were opened to
public duck hunting during the 1982-83
duck season. A large rice-farming operation
in Gulf County (M-K Ranch) was contracted
to allow limited Commission-controlled
waterfowl hunting on its fields. Limited
public waterfowl hunting will take place on
these lands during the 1983-84 season. New
areas are continually being assessed for
public waterfowl hunting.
ENDANGERED SPECIES
COORDINATION
Research on various species continued but
at a much reduced rate due to the 1982 fed-
eral budget cuts. In addition to those species
mentioned in the "Wildlife Research" sec-
tion, the manatee, red-cockaded wood-
pecker and Cape Sable seaside sparrow are
receiving research attention, consisting prin-
cipally of status surveys.
Technical assistance concerning endan-
gered wildlife was provided state, federal and
local agencies, private consulting firms, con-
servation groups and the general public.
Recommendations were provided on ways to
avoid or mitigate potential adverse effects on
endangered species that a planned develop-
ment project might have. A separate endan-
gered species report was prepared and pres-
ented to the 1983 Legislature.
A red-cockaded woodpecker symposium
was organized and hosted under contract to
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at which
18 formal papers were presented.


IL


WILDLIFE RESEARCH
Wildlife research addresses problems asso-
ciated with management of Florida wildlife,
with emphasis on life history studies. The
research provides essential knowledge for
development of effective management prac-
tices. Bureau of Wildlife Research staff at the
Wildlife Research Laboratory in Gainesville
and the Fisheating Creek Field Research
Station study alligators and other reptiles,
waterfowl, feral hogs, black bears, Florida
panthers and other endangered wildlife,
wood storks and many other important wild-
life species. Although many studies are long


term and complex, it is the goal of the bureau
to provide research information to manage-
ment operations of the agency in a timely
manner.
Progress:
Everglade Kite. The annual Everglade kite
survey was completed during December
1982. The 302 kites observed represent a
177 percent increase over the previous year.
Most were seen in Conservation Area 3A
and Lake Kissimmee. Although water levels
were near or above normal, kites still have


not returned in large numbers to Lake Okee-
chobee and Conservation Area 2B as in past
years. This may be the result of mortality
associated with the 1981 drought and the
subsequent lack of adequate snail popula-
tions in these two regions.
Wood Stork. During 1983, 14 wood stork
colonies and 1,629 nests were monitored in
central and north Florida for productivity.
Two colonies did not initiate breeding (Plea-
sant Grove and Mulberry) and a third colony
at Brewster was abandoned during the incu-
bation period for unknown reasons.


Forty stork eggshells were taken from
eight colonies to be analyzed for pesticide
residues. Results indicate that DDE may be a
factor contributing to low hatching success
of stork eggs. Stork eggshell thickness is also
significantly thinner than the pre-1947 DDT
era, but has slightly increased since the 1970
ban on DDT use.
Black Bear. Studies of black bear depreda-
tion on beehives were completed this year.
Several reports were published and recom-
mendations for a Commission policy on


depredating bears were submitted. A state-
wide survey of bear distribution was com-
pleted and a new range map for the species
has been prepared. A radio-telemetry study
of bear movements and social behavior was
begun. Thus far, three bears have been cap-
tured in the Osceola National Forest and
instrumented with transmitters. Trapping
will continue in an effort to instrument 10
bears. An investigation of the food habits of
black bears was completed and several
reports were published. Florida bears were
found to eat plant materials mostly, relying
heavily on palmetto and oak mast. Findings
suggest that periodic failure of palmetto to
produce mast may significantly affect bear
reproduction.
American Crocodile. Hatchlings were pro-
duced from at least four American crocodile
nests on Key Largo in 1982. One additional
successful nest was located along U.S. High-
way 1 in Dade County. Forty hatchling croc-
odiles were tagged and released. Nest surveys
in 1982 disclosed completed nests at five
sites on Key Largo. Growth rates and survi-
val of tagged crocodiles were monitored.
Several crocodiles tagged as hatchlings in
1980 and one tagged 1978 hatchling were
recaptured in 1983.
Pine Barrens Treefrog. Of 123 previously
known Pine Barrens treefrog localities in
Florida, 74 were revisited during 1982-83
and calling activity was recorded at 43 (58
percent) of these. This compares with the 45
percent activity recorded during the much
drier summer of 1981. Incidental to the
monitoring of known sites and other survey
work in the area, 19 new Pine Barrens tree-
frog localities were found, bringing to 144
the total number of known Pine Barrens tree-
frog localities in Florida. During the course
of Pine Barrens treefrog monitoring activities
in 1982, a new species of frog was discovered
in Okaloosa and Santa Rosa counties.
Florida Panther. Three adult males and
one adult female Florida panther captured
and radio-instrumented during January and
February 1982 were recaptured and collared
this year. An adult female died during the
capture operation as a result of a reaction to
the drug used. No attempt was made to
recapture a second adult female panther
because she was with kittens. These animals
are being monitored from the air 15 days
each month on an every-other-week basis.
Radio contact was lost with one of the males
this May.
The Florida Panther Record Clearing-
house received, categorized and filed 212
panther records. The total number of records
filed is now 1,451. Eleven reports (five
percent) provided conclusive evidence of
panthers.


__








DIVISION OF

FISHERIES V


The Division of Fisheries is charged
with the responsibility of protecting
and enhancing the natural aquatic life
in Florida's fresh waters. A division goal is to
manage freshwater aquatic organisms for
optimum sustainable use by man. A more
specific objective is to produce and maintain
high quality sport fisheries and compatible
commercial fisheries in public waters. To
accomplish these objectives, the Division of
Fisheries maintains a wide assortment of
research and management projects designed
to test and improve alternative fisheries
management strategies.
REGIONAL FISH
MANAGEMENT
Fishery management programs are con-
ducted by five regional fish management
teams to improve sportfishing and associated
recreational activities. Each team has specific
long-term regional programs in addition to
ongoing public services such as fish stocking,
investigating and reporting pollution, inves-
tigating dredge and fill, evaluating fish kills,
and managing vegetation.
Progress: The first phase of a long-term
management program was completed at
Webb Lake in Charlotte County. Back-
ground data on sportfish abundance and
largemouth bass angling success were docu-
mented prior to the lake being opened to the
public in July 1984. The success rate for
largemouth bass was determined to be excep-
tionally high at 3.5 fish/hour of fishing.
These data will be compared to success rates
after the lake is opened to evaluate effective-
ness of special regulations designed to main-
tain a high catch rate and prevent overharvest
of the largemouth bass fishery.
The Little Manatee and Alafia River sys-
tems were sampled to collect background
data on fish populations, water quality, ben-
thic organisms and vegetation communities.
Urbanization and phosphate mining in this
region pose serious threats to these riverine
environments.
Giant bullrush colonies have been success-
fully transplanted in Blue Cypress, Thonoto-
sassa, Ocean Pond, Santa Fe, Okeeheelee and
numerous other lakes. This self-expanding
and maintaining fish attractor assists anglers
by concentrating sportfish. Lakes which
receive transplanted vegetation are generally
void of aquatic vegetation.
Approximately 500,000 sunshine bass
have been stocked in 28 different lakes as


additional sportfish. Current stocking prac-
tices are being investigated to improve exist-
ing populations. Reduced stocking rates and
alternating stocking years are techniques
being evaluated to improve growth rates.
A technique to age sunshine bass has been
developed. The otolith, a small bone in the
inner ear, can be removed, specially prepared
and mounted on a microscope slide. When
examined under magnification, dark rings
are visible which correspond to the age of the
fish, enabling managers to determine growth
rates of known-age fish. This provides a
bright future for sunshine bass stocking
requirements in a put-grow-and-take
program.
Intensive management continued on eight
ponds totaling 118 acres in the Jacksonville


urban pond program. Seven ponds are pres-
ently open for public fishing. One pond has
been renovated and mechanically deepened
and will reopen in spring 1984.
A liquid fertilization program on Karick
and Stone lakes has greatly improved the
fishery in these two Commission-managed
impoundments. Karick Lake has historically
supported less than 100 pounds of fish per
acre, but presently supports 272 pounds per
acre, of which 166 pounds are harvestable-
size sportfish. Similar responses are antici-
pated within the Lake Stone fish population.
A creel survey conducted on the Choctaw-
hatchee River revealed extremely high fishing
pressure, two to five times greater than on
other Panhandle rivers. Bream dominated
13








the harvest and anglers seeking them gen-
erated the majority of the fishing pressure.
Marine species, primarily mullet, were the
second most frequently harvested fish.
A 17-pound, 9-ounce largemouth bass
was taken from Hurricane Lake, a
Commission-managed impoundment in
Blackwater River State Forest. This fish was
the second largest bass recorded in Florida
and the largest taken during the past 22 years.
The 11-year-old fish was stocked as a finger-
ling in April 1972, when this new lake was
first flooded.
A peak season creel survey of sunshine
bass fishing in Lake Osborne in Palm Beach
County documented 1,486 sunshines taken
during 3,437 man-hours of angling in the
154-day fall/winter creel period. In addi-
tion, 19,062 man-hours of fishing effort for
other species resulted in the harvest of
18,755 bass, crappie and panfish.
Preliminary investigations on the status of
the Everglades fishery were initiated. Fish
population monitoring in the marsh areas
documented a large forage base of flag fish,
killifish, mosquitofish and sunfish. Large-
mouth bass fingerlings were abundant, indi-
cating a strong year-class potential. Canal
samples yielded larger specimens of bass,
bluegill, redear sunfish, gar and bowfin.
STATE FISH HATCHERIES
Richloam and Blackwater fish hatcheries,
in the Withlacoochee and Blackwater state
forests, produce fingerling game fish for
stocking public waters. Hatchery personnel
also participate in research projects and the
development of culture techniques for var-
ious fishes.
Progress: The hatcheries produced more
than four million juvenile fishes which were
stocked into 467 water bodies in 56 counties
of the state. The Welaka National Fish
Hatchery assisted by cooperatively growing
out 50 percent of the fish produced for state
stocking.
Striped and sunshine bass comprised 80
percent of this year's production, with 1.4
million stripers being divided between Lake
Talquin, the St. Johns, St. Marys and Nassau
rivers. Approximately 1.8 million sunshine
bass were stocked into the Escambia, Yellow,
Choctawhatchee, Apalachicola and Och-
lockonee rivers and 51 public lakes scattered
throughout the state.
Approximately 34,000 hybrid grass carp
were reared and stocked into 29 lakes and
ponds for vegetation control. Methodology
for culture of these sterile triploid hybrids
was refined, permitting them to be produced
in quantity. Better design of culture appa-
ratus was the single most important
improvement.
This year, 114,500 largemouth bass and
477,600 bream were stocked in small private
ponds to encourage fishing opportunities.


Projects being undertaken by the hatch-
eries reached the point of straining past
capabilities. A recent budget appropriation
of $450,000 has allowed expansion at Rich-
loam. Fish culture space has been doubled in
the egg hatching area and 15 new one-acre
production ponds are being constructed, a
50 percent increase.
ST. JOHNS RIVER
COMMERCIAL FISHERIES
INVESTIGATIONS
Progress: Information on the scope and
trends in commercial fisheries of the
St. Johns River is being collected to better
manage fisheries resources there.
To obtain data on commercial harvest,
wholesale dealers were asked to report
monthly volume and harvested species. In
addition, biologists made monthly trips to
fish houses to determine species composi-
tion and average lengths and weights of
commercial catches. FromJuly 1982 through
June 1983, commercial fishermen harvested
4.4 million pounds of fish valued at $1.8
million. Catfish were the most important
freshwater commercial species. Of the cat-
fish species sampled, white catfish comprised
73 percent, channel catfish 14 percent, and
bullheads 13 percent.
Quarterly trawl samples were taken from
Jacksonville to Lake Harney to determine
distribution, abundance and species compo-
sition of commercial fish stocks.
A tagging study to determine movement
patterns, commercial exploitation and popu-
lation parameters of catfish was initiated.
About 2,060 catfish were tagged and released
in the river. In two months, 126 tagged fish
were reported caught for a recapture rate of
six percent. No significant directional or dis-
tance movement was observed. The longest
recorded distance traveled was 30 miles


upstream in 13 days.
During 1982-83, 379 river and lake hoop
nets and wire traps fished by commercial
fishermen were observed. Nets and traps
observed represented 3,002 days of fishing
effort. Nongame species comprised 89 and
90 percent of the catch in river and lake hoop
nets, respectively, and 70 percent of the
catch in wire traps.
LAKE OKEECHOBEE
Since 1976, the Commission has closely
monitored a liberalized commercial fishery
on Lake Okeechobee. This program has pro-
vided for the commercial harvest and sale of
certain species of game fish and has had as its
major objective the wise utilization of a
renewable fishery resource.
Progress: On May 1,1981, the Commission
enacted an order prohibiting the use of haul
seines and trawls, and the harvest and sale of
game fish on Lake Okeechobee. Subse-
quently, the level of Lake Okeechobee
reached its lowest level on record on July 22,
1981. Heavy rains during 1982 brought lake
levels back to "normal." Biologists on Lake
Okeechobee studied the response of the fish
population and recommendations were for-
mulated for reimplementation of a commer-
cial fishery on the lake. On November 1,
1982, the sale of bluegill and redear sunfish
from 10 permitted haul seines was
authorized.
Commercial harvest totaled 3.5 million
pounds during the period 1982-83. Catfish
represented 76.2 percent of the harvest,
while shad/gar and bluegill/redear sunfish
represented 16.9 and 6.9 percent, respec-
tively. Trotline harvest accounted for 59.5
percent of the commercial catch. Haul seine
and wire catfish trap harvests represented
29.6 and 10.9 percent of the total harvest,
respectively. Dockside value of commercial
landings decreased from $1.2 million in
1981-82 to $1 million in 1982-83.
Fish population response to flooding of
the marsh was tremendous. Reproduction of
game fish was heavy and forage fish were
recorded in large volumes. Fingerling black
crappie were found in record numbers in
spring block net samples.
Creel surveys during the winter sportfish-
ing season documented a record sportfish
harvest of 776,632 fish. Black crappie fisher-
men experienced the highest lakeside suc-
cess rate ever recorded on Lake Okeechobee
at 2.39 fish per hour. Sport fishermen har-
vested 692,313 crappie during 283,815
hours of effort. Age composition of this
catch, determined by otolith readings, indi-
cated that more than 85 percent of the creel
was composed of three-year-old fish. Bass
fishermen caught more than 45,000 bass
while fishing 144,391 hours. Economic data
collected during the creel survey was used to
compute average trip costs per angler. An
average of $8.65 was spent per trip by sport








fishermen fishing Lake Okeechobee. Cost
estimates varied depending upon species
sought. Bass fishermen spent an average of
$16.29 per trip while bream and crappie
fishermen expended $12.35 and $4.95 per
trip, respectively.
FISHERIES RESTORATION
The fisheries restoration program was
designed to expand knowledge of lake man-
agement and extend the productive recrea-
tional and aesthetic life span of selected
lakes. Under this program, drawdowns have
been conducted on Lakes Tohopekaliga and
Kissimmee.
Progress: All major sportfish in Lake Toho-
pekaliga have shown population increases
since an extreme drawdown in 1979. The
1982 average of 62 harvestable largemouth
bass and 32 harvestable black crappie per
litoral acre exceeded all similar estimates
since data collection began in 1970. The fall
creel survey indicated a total bass harvest of
19,400 fish and a total catch success rate of
.47 bass per hour, considered very good.
Quality aquatic habitat continues to be the
key to success on Lake Kissimmee. Fall fish
population sampling documented excellent
sportfish populations and creel data reflect a
similar trend. Angler harvest for all major
sportfish should remain high on Lake
Kissimmee.
Rapid progress has occurred in abatement
of sewage discharge into Lake Tohopekaliga.
Orange County and the cities of Orlando and
St. Cloud have made firm commitments to
remove their wastewaters, and should
achieve zero discharge before 1988.
A study is in progress to establish the
ordinary high water line on Lake Kissimmee.
This has been a cooperative effort between
several state agencies and potentially could
protect more than 8,000 acres of productive
aquatic habitat now threatened by
development.
A plan has been developed to restore Lake
Hunter, a 100-acre urban lake located in
Lakeland. Preliminary survey work has
begun on other lakes in Polk County, includ-
ing Banana Lake and lakes of the Winter
Haven Chain.
AQUATIC PLANT
MANAGEMENT
The Aquatic Plant Management Section
reviews and comments on permit applica-
tions received by the Department of Natural
Resources for aquatic plant control opera-
tions on all Class I and Class III waters. The
Commission also approves or disapproves
requests and conducts appropriate inspec-
tions for use of herbivorous fishes as biologi-
cal control agents for aquatic vegetation con-
trol. Section personnel continue to monitor
several ponds and small lakes ranging in size
from 0.1 acre to 90 acres in order to docu-
ment the progress of triploid hybrid grass


carp in managing undesirable submersed
aquatic vegetation.
Progress: Section personnel reviewed 584
applications for aquatic plant control per-
mits during this reporting period and for-
warded comments to the Department of
Natural Resources (DNR). Several concerns
regarding proposed spraying operations in
Class I and Class III waters have been satis-
factorily resolved through correspondence
between DNR and the Commission. Person-
nel processed 113 applications to import,
possess and stock triploid hybrid grass carp;
nine permits were disapproved and 104
approved following 159 on-site inspections.
Of the 104 applicants, 42 received permits
and stocked 5,751 fish for aquatic vegetation
control.


TRIPLOID HYBRID GRASS
CARP INVESTIGATIONS
Investigations are continuing to determine:
(1) effectiveness of triploid hybrid grass carp
in controlling problematic aquatic vegetation
in small urban lakes; (2) changes in water
quality in ponds where hybrid grass carp are
used for aquatic vegetation control; (3)
amount of vegetation control obtained when
using hybrid grass carp in conjunction with
different types of herbicides, and (4) opti-
mum stocking rates for triploid hybrid grass
carp.
Progress: The integrated approach of reduc-
ing aquatic vegetation by applying EPA
approved herbicides prior to and in conjunc-
tion with stocking hybrids, resulted in vary-
ing degrees of success in Lake Dianne, Lake









Wildmere, Palm Lake, Dubsdread Golf
Course Pond, Saddleback and Lakes
Minneola/Geneva.
Control of hydrilla in Lake Dianne (Pasco
County) has been maintained with 10 three
pound triploid hybrid grass carp per surface
acre. Hydrilla control has been achieved for
three years. It is a cost-effective treatment
that has saved at least $3,000 to the lake-
owners association.
Lake Wildmere in Seminole County has
had good hydrilla control for two years using
a stocking rate of 70 pounds of fish per
metric ton of hydrilla in conjunction with a
springtime herbicide treatment. Water qual-
ity has remained good due to stabilization of
nutrients by the spadderdock remaining in
this lake.
Palm Lake in Seminole County has also
been a successful test site for the past year,
but required a much higher stocking rate of
179 pounds of hybrid grass carp per metric
ton of vegetation. Dubsdread Golf Course
Pond in Orlando has also had successful
hydrilla treatment for two years. Control was
achieved using 184 pounds of fish per metric
ton of vegetation with an initial herbicide
treatment.
Lakes Minneola/Geneva in Pasco County
have been under successful hydrilla control
since July 1982 using herbicides in conjunc-
tion with hybrid grass carp. Lake Saddleback


in Hillsborough County has had good
hydrilla control since August 1982 using a
similar treatment.
Lake Sybelia in Orange County was
stocked with hybrid grass carp and treated
with a slower-acting, longer-lasting herbi-
cide. However, to date, positive results have
not been achieved and another herbicide
treatment will be required to bring aquatic
plant levels to a point where existing hybrid
grass carp can provide control.
AQUACULTURE
The Aquaculture Investigation team docu-
mented changes in the aquaculture industry
in Florida. Existing aquaculture problems
were also researched. In addition, technical
information and expertise are made available
to the industry to assist fish farmers in solv-
ing problems associated with fish culture and
to ensure compliance with Commission
regulations.
Progress: A second statewide survey was
conducted with 327 surveys mailed and 113
or 34.5 percent returned. Florida fish farms
produced a crop valued in excess of $35
million. The vast majority (73%) produced
ornamental fish for the aquarium industry
and the rest produced alligators, game fish,
food fish, or fingerlings for stocking. An
average farm consisted of 91 ponds, totaling
8.5 acres of water.


Personnel visited 25 facilities, represent-
ing all phases of aquaculture, to maintain a
first-hand contact with a cross-section of the
industry. Project personnel responded to
301 requests for aquaculture assistance from
the general public and commercial interests.
Slide presentations on catfish farming and
ornamental fish culture have been assembled
to depict these types of aquaculture opera-
tions, their support industries and their
problems. Personnel also inspected 14 facili-
ties, whose owners or managers had
requested restricted fish permits, for com-
pliance with Commission regulations.
FISHERIES RESEARCH
Fisheries research is performed in modern
research laboratories in Eustis and Boca
Raton and on water bodies in nearly every
major drainage basin. The main objective of
the Bureau of Fisheries Research is to develop
new technology to be used in the manage-
ment of the state's fishery resources.
Progress:
Largemouth Bass: Research is being con-
ducted to determine whether the size distri-
bution of a largemouth bass population can
be shifted to contain greater numbers of large
fish through implementation of slot limits. A
14- to 20-inch slot size limit on largemouth
bass was initiated on Starke Lake and adjoin-
ing Lake Prima Vista in January 1983. It


If







requires that all bass caught within this size
range be immediately returned to the water.
The goal is to increase the number of large
fish available to anglers.
Largemouth bass were collected from sev-
eral lakes in central Florida for age and
growth studies using otoliths (ear bones).
Although the bass populations were princi-
pally composed of the first 5 or 6 year
classes, 7- and 8-year-old bass were not
uncommon and older females up to 12 years
were collected.
Lake Apopka was stocked with approxi-
mately 500,000 largemouth bass fingerlings
in spring 1982 which have been monitored.
Growth and survival through the first year of
life was good. The average size attained in
February 1983 was 8.3 inches or about 1.6
inches greater than the native population in
Lake Dora. From June 1982 June 1983,
stocked bass have occurred in an average of
36 percent of the samples taken. For the
same time period, this year class has consti-
tuted an average of 95 percent of the total
largemouth bass sampled.
A study on the Upper St. Johns River
during the past year used biotelemetry to
determine the use of the overflow marshes by
largemouth bass during high water. All radio-
tagged fish left the river and went into marsh
areas, as far as a mile away. Telemetry studies
also documented the mobility of the bass
population with some fish traveling up to
12 miles. Bass appear to interbreed
throughout the entire area from Lake Wash-
ington to Lake Helen Blazes. Fish were forced
to move downstream to escape poor water
quality coming off agricultural lands. Many
fish remained permanently displaced. Food
habit studies indicate that changes in domi-
nant foods accompanied moves into the
marsh.
Lower St. Johns River: Acquisition of
heavy duty electrofishing equipment has
greatly improved sampling efficiency for
sport and forage fishes in the lower St. Johns
River. Eelgrass was the most extensive and
highly utilized vegetation type. Fish popula-
tions here were consistently higher in routine
samples taken during fall and spring. Utiliza-
tion of eelgrass as a spawning and nursery
area was much greater than for other vegeta-
tion communities, particularly in riverine
habitats. Sport varieties also showed a high
affinity for bulrush during fall samples, but
this vegetation was not as productive as other
areas during spring.
Completion of a year-long creel survey
provided vital insight into the sport fishery
of the lower St. Johns River. South Lake
George anglers caught more than 11,900
largemouth bass during the year for a success
rate of.33 fish/man-hour of effort. The Lake
Dexter to Deland section supported an excel-
lent black crappie and bass fishery with
approximately 85,000 and 21,000 harvested,
respectively. Lake Monroe and the adjacent


river downstream to Debary were surveyed
from July 1982 to July 1983. Total annual
effort in Lake Monroe was 300,481 man-
hours with 70 percent devoted to harvesting
approximately 270,000 crappie. Crappie
fishermen in Lake Monroe realized an annual
success rate of 1.35 fish/man-hour.
A statewide microcomputer network has
been implemented to facilitate the storage
and analysis of biological data collected by
the Division of Fisheries. One system has
been installed in Tallahassee and another is
scheduled for installation at the Eustis Labo-
ratory this fall. A program has been written
to allow creel survey data to be transmitted
by phone to North Carolina State University
for analysis. A program which measures and
stores information on otholith aging offish is
90 percent complete and will be field tested
in fall 1983.
River Research: Apalachicola River studies
are being conducted to determine the effects
of dredging and spoil disposal upon fish
communities. Results indicate 25 percent of
the river is composed of sand bars and spoil
disposal sites which are the poorest habitats
present. Continued disposal of dredged
material within the river banks will increase
the amount of this undesirable habitat. Other
investigations have demonstrated the value
of rocks as producers of small fish-food
organisms. The amount of remaining rock
habitat in the river is small and is continuing
to be removed for navigation enhancement.
A new study is demonstrating the value of
snags in the production of macroinvertebrate
fish food organisms. Submerged snags are
colonized by large numbers of small animals
used as food by fish.
Preliminary experiments on the Escambia
River indicate stocking of advanced finger-
ling sunshine bass, 5 to 7 inches in length,


will yield extremely good catch rates. This
fall, the Escambia River will be stocked with
several thousand tagged, advanced fingerlings
to evaluate this approach.
Non-native Fish: The possible establish-
ment of the South American redstriped earth-
eater was documented for the first time,
bringing to 22 the total number of estab-
lished and possibly established exotic fishes.
This is the second exotic fish species dis-
covered by project personnel in as many
years. Other major accomplishments of the
section included: development of effective
means of quantitatively sampling fish popu-
lations using explosives; documentation of
important life history information for
spotted and Mozambique tilapias; the deter-
mination that a stocking rate of 140 hybrid
grass carp per acre would control hydrilla in
experimental ponds; verification and appli-
cation of methods to determine triploidy in
hybrid grass carp; and documentation of
food habits for 11 exotic fishes.
In an attempt to improve fishing success,
increase creel diversity, and control over-
abundant forage fishes, both the walleye and
red drum were evaluated for introduction.
Sampling of the 1982 year class of walleye
proved to be difficult. Although sampling
effort was intensive in study lakes, less than
30 walleye were collected during the sample
period. Growth and condition of fish
sampled was excellent with one specimen
recorded at 13.3 inches and weighing 0.88
pounds by January 1983. Overall survival of
Florida walleye was apparently low, how-
ever, and is attributed primarily to suspected
predation by bass and crappie.


17




































OFFICE OF

INFORMATIONAL

SERVICES


As a rule-making body, the Commis-
sion is charged with the creation and
enforcement of wildlife and fishery
regulations. As a public trustee of Florida's
freshwater aquatic life and wildlife, the
Commission seeks a balance between main-
taining a healthy environment in which wild-
life may exist, and meeting the demands of
the public to enjoy and use these natural
resources.
The Office of Informational Services
(OIS) has several responsibilities in its role
of supporting Commission activities and
policies. Information about existing and new
regulations must be made available to the
public on a regular and timely basis. Through
the mass media, OIS promotes the use of the
outdoors by various segments of the public.
Although the delivery of information is the
most conspicuous activity, the underlying
theme of all programs is education. Through
education programs, OIS strives to increase
the level of awareness and understanding that
Florida citizens have about the Commis-
sion's programs and goals.
In addition to its overall public informa-
tion responsibilities, OIS also coordinates
several specific programs. These activities
include: acting as legislative liaison for the
Commission; coordinating programs such as
the Hunter Education program, Wildlife
Reserve, Endangered Species Education, and


the Wildlife Alert program; and publishing
Florida Wildlife magazine.
NEWS AND INFORMATION
SERVICES
The news and information portion of OIS
has continued to communicate wildlife and
hunting information to the public through
the print news media.
Progress: During this fiscal year, OIS, from
its Tallahassee headquarters and five regional
offices, continued to initiate and respond to
an increasing number of requests for infor-
mation from the media and general public.
Written news releases are the backbone of
OIS's public information program. More
than 400 separate news releases were dis-
tributed to the media and interested groups
and organizations. Topics ranged from hunt-
ing information and regulations, Commis-
sion policies and programs, to feature stories
about outdoor topics and Commission activ-
ities. Such news releases are used on a regular
basis by outdoor writers for daily and weekly
newspapers throughout the state.
Information officers also assisted
reporters and editors who were preparing
outdoor-related stories, by providing them
with information and materials. All six
offices continued to respond to hundreds of
telephone inquiries on a daily basis. A major-
ity of these telephone calls were for general
outdoor information; however, a portion of


such calls resulted in mailing information or
other follow up. In addition, OIS responded
to several thousand written requests for
information.
This section of OIS also handles special
and on-going projects including: coordinat-
ing the Wildlife Alert program; publicizing
National Hunting and Fishing Day; and pub-
lishing the annual Directory of Sportsmen
and Conservation Clubs.
Regional officers and other OIS staff main-
tained and increased contact with sportsmen
and conservation clubs, and other interested
organizations throughout the state. More
than 250 speeches and presentations were
delivered on a variety of outdoor topics and
Commission programs.
As another function of OIS's public out-
reach program, some 27 exhibits were pre-
pared and manned at fairs and events in the
state. Reserve officers assisted in staffing
many of the displays.
Radio interviews and television programs
were used extensively to publicize activities
and programs. Regional education officers
appeared in or coordinated 167 television
stories and 134 radio interviews and pro-
grams during the fiscal year.
AUDIO-VISUAL
Of the types of communication available
to the Commission for informing and edu-
cating the public, the electronic media, spe-
cifically television and radio, are the most
effective forms available.
Progress: Audio-Visual continues to trans-
late conservation information into a variety
of media to inform Floridians about the
state's fish and wildlife resources.
Radio public service announcements were
produced on subjects including the Hunter
Education program, steel shot, "Enjoy
Florida's Outdoors Together" and the Wild-
life Alert program. Twenty-one radio spots
were utilized by more than 58 percent of the
339 radio stations in Florida.
New television public service announce-
ments were produced on "Exotic Pets in
Florida" and "Enjoy Florida's Outdoors
Together." Copies of these PSAs were aired
by 33 of the 50 television stations in the
state.
This fiscal year, slide/tape presentations
were produced which featured the Florida
panther, the Everglades deer crisis, Wildlife
Reserve program and a sound track for a
presentation on the training academy dormi-
tory. The Lake Okeechobee series was
revised and updated.
Two special productions were completed
for showing at the annual meeting of the
Southeastern Association of Fish and Wild-
life Agencies. One, a video-tape production,
described the electronic media coverage of
the Everglades deer crisis. The other, an
automated slide series on the deer crisis, was
viewed by approximately 700 people at the










conference. This series was duplicated and
distributed to all Commission regional
offices and to 12 state fish and wildlife agen-
cies that had requested copies.
Photographic and related services were
provided to Florida Wildlife magazine, elec-
tronic and print news media, publications
and Commission programs and projects. A
new recording and public address system was
purchased to provide more efficient docu-
mentation of Commission meetings.
YOUTH CONSERVATION
CAMPS
The Commission operates two youth con-
servation camps in the state located in Ocala
and West Palm Beach. Florida youth, ages 8
to 14, attend one week sessions at the camps
during the summer months. The camps,
located in wilderness areas, allow youths to
experience and develop an interest in Florida
unique natural environment. Basic and
advanced educational programs stress out-
door skills, conservation practices, and
responsible use of natural resources.
Progress: Approximately 1,700 Florida
youth attended the camps during the 1983
summer sessions. Efforts continue to up-
grade the outdoor facilities and improve the
camper's experience.
Two measures instituted last year proved
to be very successful. An advanced curricu-
lum for youth who had passed the Hunter
Education program met the needs of these
campers with in-depth educational programs.
In addition to the curriculum, the two camps
received assistance from Commission volun-
teer employees. The volunteer program was a
cost-saving measure for the camps, and many
of the volunteers assisted with their special
expertise in the overall education program.
During the remainder of the year, the
camps are popular meeting spots for a variety
of conservation, civic and governmental orga-
nizations. Groups that use the camps include:
Boy and Girl Scout troops, Chapter of the
American Red Cross, local school boards,
the University of Florida, the Central Florida
Community College, Outdoor Adventure,
the Dade County Conservation and Half-
Track Club, and the Safari Club Interna-
tional Conservation Club.
To better evaluate our youth camp pro-
gram, surveys were sent to a cross-section of
campers to obtain their recommendations
and general camping impressions.
HUNTER EDUCATION
The Hunter Education program seeks to
help outdoor enthusiasts more safely enjoy
Florida's wildlife bounty and to better under-
stand, appreciate and practice the code of
good sportsmanship. The primary purpose
of the course is to teach firearm and hunter
safety and conservation practices.


Progress: During this fiscal year, 12,150
people were trained in our Hunter Education
program.
Hunter Education students participated in
450 classes throughout the state taught by
approximately 631 active volunteer instruc-
tors. These instructors donated 26,705
hours. Of these, 18,558 hours counted
toward in-kind services. Using this donated
time at the allowed rate of $8.77, this time
has a dollar value of $162,753. Thus, through
the in-kind service arrangement and the indi-
rect cost allowed, our Hunter Education
program cost was reimbursed by the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service.
Bow hunters are beginning to show an
active interest in the Advanced Bowhunting
course now offered with 14 classes held and
434 people participating.
One duck hunting seminar was presented
and Hunter Education instructors and staff
participated in two turkey hunting seminars.
ENDANGERED SPECIES
EDUCATION
Endangered species are a diminishing nat-
ural resource in our state. In many cases, the
key to preservation of these rare animals is
public understanding of the species' plight.
This program includes the creation of origi-
nal songs and lyrics about the animals, work-
shops and meetings with environmental edu-
cators, and programs in the state's school
system.
Progress: Some 120 endangered species
awareness presentations were made during
the year, ranging in format from musical pro-
grams and slide series to discussion events. In
addition, many interviews were conducted
with the media in the state. More than 1,400
pieces of literature or audio-visual materials
on Florida's vanishing wildlife were distrib-
uted at various meetings and functions.
Working with the educational systems,
eight teacher workshops were conducted
during the year. General wildlife education
information, as well as specific endangered
species education materials, were presented
and distributed at numerous meetings. There
was an increase in use of the "Florida's
Endangered Wildlife" slide/tape program
by 4-H, club leaders and groups, regional
hunter education offices and interested
organizations.
"PROJECT WILD," a national wildlife
education curriculum, was purchased for use
by the Commission. Plans are being finalized
regarding the introduction of the program
into the state's school system.


WILDLIFE RESERVE
As another example of government/
citizen cooperation, the Wildlife Reserve
program allows the involvement and assis-
tance of citizens in the Commission's enforce-
ment mission. The reserve volunteers allow
the Commission unusual flexibility in the
distribution of manpower, enforcement cov-
erage, and manning of special projects.
Progress: As of June 30, 1983, there were
211 active reservists statewide. Membership
fluctuated between 190 and 220.
In general, reservists participated in major
regional activities for all divisions, ending the
fiscal year statewide with 58,185 hours, an
increase over last year of 15,992 hours. This
is an average of 4,848.8 hours per month.
Hours donated by reservists to the Com-
mission equate to $405,549.95 worth of
time to Commission activities. That figure is
based on $6.97 per hour, the hourly wage of
a game/fish management specialist and a
wildlife officer.
To assist the Commission better, each
GFC division on the regional level has pres-
ented its needs for additional projects to the
volunteers at monthly training sessions. The
program in the past year has started to stabi-
lize in this, its third year of full statewide
staffing. Training has intensified and deals
with specific areas, rather than general infor-
mation as in previous years.
The reserve program has initiated a train-
ing procedure that utilizes videotapes for
instructional purposes. Two segments have
been developed: Deer Data Collection, and
Trapping. These training aids are also used
by other divisions and were made possible
through cooperative efforts among wildlife,
law enforcement and OIS. Reservists are
responsible for, and have received training
in, measuring bucks for the Florida Buck
Registry.





































WILDLIFE ALERT
The Wildlife Alert reward program is an
outstanding example of how cooperation
between government and its citizens can
result in the protection and enhancement of
wildlife and fishery resources. Established in
November 1979, the program has served as a
vital supplement to the Commission's regu-
lation enforcement responsibilities.
Progress: OIS continues to be involved in
the Wildlife Alert program. During the past
fiscal year, OIS handled the distribution of
20,000 newly printed Wildlife Alert bumper
stickers, raising to 170,000 the total distrib-
uted since the program began.
Two new public service announcements
for radio, and one PSA for television was
produced and distributed statewide during
the fiscal year.
OIS issued 22 news releases relating to
Wildlife Alert from its Tallahassee head-
quarters and regional offices. Regional edu-
cation officer supervisors also promoted the
Wildlife Alert program through 88 group
presentations, nine television appearances,
six radio appearances and six exhibits.
Florida Wildlife magazine continually
promotes Wildlife Alert in each edition via
public service advertising and articles in the
"Conservation Scene" section of the
magazine.
The Division of Law Enforcement and
OIS work together to maintain accurate
records of violations reported, arrests made,
rewards paid and other necessary informa-
tion. During the fiscal year, $15,325 in
rewards was paid to those whose reports of
violations resulted in 260 arrests. It is inter-
esting to note that an additional 604 arrests
resulted from callers who refused rewards.


Four meetings of the Wildlife Alert
Reward Association, a 13-member panel
overseeing the program, were held around
the state during the fiscal year, with OIS
handling the arrangements. Minutes of all
meetings of the Association were prepared
by OIS for Association and appropriate staff
members of the Commission.
During the fiscal year, through fines made
payable to the Wildlife Alert fund by the
judicial branch and from contributions of
concerned citizens, the reward fund increased
by $19,966.50.


FLORIDA
WILDLIFE/PUBLICATIONS
Florida Wildlife continues to be the flag-
ship of the Commission's public information
program and efforts. This award-winning
publication remains one of the primary
methods of communicating the Commis-
sion's activities and goals to the public.
There was a 5.11 percent increase in the
number of subscribers to Florida Wildlife
during 1982-83, from 24,638 for the July-
August 1982 issue to 25,898 for the July-
August 1983 issue. Net revenue for the fiscal
period was up 6.77 percent. Revenue for the
previous fiscal year were $111,934.58 and
for 1982-83 were $119,520.77.
Planning began for increasing the subscrip-
tion rates to the magazine, as well as the single
copy prices. The costs of printing and pro-
duction have risen, and the last increase was
effective in July of 1976.
On a annual basis, OIS prints and distrib-
utes materials such as the Florida Hunting
Handbook, a summary of regulations for
wildlife management area, and hunt maps for
the 54 wildlife management areas. Publica-
tions containing more general information
on aspects of wildlife and fisheries were also
produced and developed. These materials are
used on a regular basis in completing request
for information from the public.
The OIS also coordinates the publication
of materials with conservation and sports-
men's organizations. Brochures on specific
topics have been produced by organizations,
and distributed by the Commission as a
public service. This arrangement furthers the
Commission's goal of informing and educat-
ing Florida's citizens. 4


IV















STATE OF FLORIDA

GAME & FRESH WATER

FISH COMMISSION


Administration

ROBERT M. BRANTLY
Executive Director
620 S. Meridian St.
Tallahassee, Florida 32301
(904) 488-1960
F.G. BANKS
Assistant Executive Director
WILLIAM C. SUMNER, Director
Division of Administrative Services
BRANTLEY GOODSON, Director
Division of Law Enforcement
FRED W. STANBERRY, Director
Division of Wildlife
SMOKIE HOLCOMB, Director
Division of Fisheries
BRADLEY J. HARTMAN, Director
Environmental Services
KENNETH L. STIVERS, Director
Informational Services


Commissioners

WILLIAM G. BOSTICK, JR.
Chairman
Winter Haven
CECIL C. BAILEY
Vice-Chairman
Jacksonville
C. TOM RAINEY D.V.M.
Miami
THOMAS L. HIRES, SR.
Tampa
JIM BAROCO
Pensacola


Regional Offices

Northwest Region
T.L. GARRISON, Manager
Route 4, Box 759
Panama City, FL 32405
(904) 265-3676
Northeast Region
LARRY MARTIN, Manager
Route 7, Box 102
Lake City, FL 32055
(904) 752-0353
Central Region
WILLIAM H. KING, Manager
1239 S.W. 10th St.
Ocala, FL 32670
(904) 629-8162
South Region
J.O. BROWN, Manager
2202 Lakeland Hills Blvd.
Lakeland, FL 33801
(813) 686-8157
Everglades Region
O.G. KELLEY, Manager
551 North Military Trail
West Palm Beach, FL 33406
(305) 683-0748
























FLORIDA GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH COMMISSION



FARRIS BRYANT BUILDING
620 South Meridian Street
Tallahassee, Florida 32301
(904) 488-1960


This public document was promulgated at an annual cost of $1,183.18,
or $2.37 per copy, to inform the public of Commission activities.