Title: Annual report - Florida. Dept. of Game and Fish
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075970/00001
 Material Information
Title: Annual report - Florida. Dept. of Game and Fish
Physical Description: 2 v. : port. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Game and Fish
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: [1914-15]
 Subjects
Subject: Game and game-birds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Fishes -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1st-2d; 1913/14-1914/15.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075970
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001031030
oclc - 01330499
notis - AFB3163
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Succeeded by: Report

Full Text









FIRST ANNUAL REPORT


-OF DEPARTMENT OF



GAME AND FISH


TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA





DEPARTMENT CREATED 1913





E. Z. JONES
COMMISSIONER




T. J. Appleynrd, State Printer, Tallainssee, Floridn.


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UNIVERSITY
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E. Z. JONES






















I was appointed first Game and Fish Commissioner of
Florida by Gov. Park Trammell, August 5th, 1913, and
assumed the duties of the office as provided by law Sep-
tember 1st, following. I have given the work the most
efficient services possible for me to render with the pro-
visions at my command. I desire personally to thank
each and every one who has contributed any assistance
to me.
Yours very truly,










FIRST ANNUAL REPORT


OF DEPARTMENT OF



GAME AND FISH











TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA




DEPARTMENT CREATED 1913




E. Z. JONES
COMMISSIONER



T. J. Appleyard, State Printer. Tallahasse.', torida.
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CONSERVE YOUR BIRTHRIGHT.
The most vital question now before the American
people is that of the conservation of our natural resources.
Perhaps no other nation has ever been so abundantly
endowed with wealth of mine and forest as are the people
of the United States, and probably the citizens of no other
nation have ever been so careless with their treasures-
so prodigal of their birthright.
The next generation of men and women will be made
up of the boys and girls now in the public schools of our
country, and upon them will devolve the solution of the
vital problem of saving from destruction the treasures
with which our country is so bountifully blessed.
The. young American whose birthright includes the
birds of the air, the game of the forest, and the fishes of
the stream, may be compared to a young man coming
into his inheritance. If he cares for his fortunes and is
not a spendthrift, his wealth will increase till he can live
in comfort or even luxury, and still have enough remain-
ing to transmit to his children. But on the other hand,
if he proves improvident and wasteful, he will not only
be impoverished during his own lifetime, but will leave
his children paupers.
The American people have long been wasteful of their
splendid treasures; great forests have been set on fire,
while the careless lumberman has destroyed the young
and growing trees which should have been left to take
the place in the future of the great forest trees he fells
for the use of men; birds and other game have been ruth-
lessly destroyed in the mating season; and fish, wantonly
dynamited by the thousands.
The American people have wasted their inherited
wealth of mine, stream and forest for more than a cen-
tury, and only recently have they come face to face with
the fact that if this great country of ours is to continue
to be a land of plenty, we must conserve our birthright.
If we draw from the national bank of our natural re-
sources only just as much as will provide for our com-
forts, we can enjoy the blessings of a happy life, and still
leave ample wealth for those who are to come after us.

JbJ

















REPORT.

Jacksonville, Fla., June 1st, 1914.
To His Excellency,
Park Trammell,
Governor of Florida,
Tallahassee, Florida.
My dear Sir:-
Conforming with Section 9 of Chapter 6535 of the Gen-
eral Statutes of the State of Florida, I have the honor
of submitting to you a general report of the conditions
of the Game and Fish Department of the State of Flor-
ida up to and including February 28th. While I am not
required to make any recommendation as to changes in
the laws governing this Department, I trust it will not
be amiss for me to take the liberty of making some sug-
gestions and recommendations as I see the conditions
will warrant.

LAWS DISREGARDED AND RIGHTS ABUSED.

Of all the laws of the State government, the laws per-
taining to Game, Birds and Fish have in the past re-
ceived the least consideration by our Legislative and Exe-
cutive bodies, and the most abuse by the citizens, of any
laws ever printed upon the pages of the statute books of
any State. In fact there had never been sufficient care
and consideration elicited to create this Department until
the session of the Legislature of 1913. There had been
prior to that time some "Local" or "Special" laws enact-
ed applying to some certain counties and there were a
few chapters of General Laws, but the most important
of the latter were pertaining to fish only, and all of
which, as stated before had been disregarded and abused.
Had the mental eyes of our Legislature of a few years
ago only scanned the distance which now lies between












our woods which were at that time teeming with such a
sort of bird and wild game life and those same woods now
practically denuded of the wealth they once possessed,
what a blessing to Florida it would have been. It has
been scarcely a child's life since our coastal and interior
waters produced the teeming millions of fish as any like
waters of the world and yet today a man with a hook
and line or even a net may work sometimes for days
without securing a catch worth his labors. Not one thing
but many have contributed to the destruction of our
game, birds and fish.


GREAT INTEREST AND CONSIDERATION SHOWN
BY THE LEGISLATORS IN CREATING THIS DE-
PARTMENT.

In the enactment of the laws creating this Department
our Legislators exhibited a great interest in the subject
matter at their hands. Such interest which existed was
not expected to accomplish as much good as was accom-
plished as most of them were dealing with a subject un-
familiar to them (as is often the case with Legislators)
and a subject to which they had not given the least
thought and were therefore unable to see any distance
beyond their own personal interest without very serious
consideration. I presume that here and there some un-
sdlfish person would offer a suggestion, but such person's
influence, if any, was weakened by his being placed in
the class with the "lobbyists" who are so ridicuously
despised by the law makers of any State. However, re-
sponding to the demand of a few persons for the pro-
tection of our Game, Birds and Fish the Legislators made
laws of which in their text at that time there could be no
serious complaint as a basis for a beginning, which was,
in their opinion, advisable. But as all men know it is one
thing to enact laws and another thing to enforce them.












LEGISLATURE FAILS TO MAKE SUFFICIENT
PROVISIONS FOR THE ENFORCEMENT OF THE
LAWS WHICH IT ENACTED, AS PROTECTION
WAS THE PRIMARY PURPOSE OF THE GAME
AND FISH LAWS.

The Legislature unfortunately overlooked the necessity
of providing means for the enforcement of the laws they
enacted to govern this Department, although the laws
enacted will bring a large net revenue to the State, and
from the fact that there is not sufficient provision for the
enforcement of the laws one can easily believe that the
laws were passed in their present form more for revenue
to the State than for protecting the Game, Birds and
Fish, which as a matter of course is not correct as the
primary purpose of the laws is protection. The Legis-
lators of 1913 can congratulate themselves for enacting
laws which are a basis from which to work to enact
such laws as will be the means of accomplishing their
good intent. Thousands of people of this State have
looked upon the protection of Game, Birds and Fish as
an insignificant matter, when as a matter of fact next to
the agricultural assets of the State, nothing will exceed
in value its Game, Birds and Fish, if proper protection
is provided. For the information of those who read this
report I will give the two main Chapters as enacted by
the Legislature of 1913 creating and governing this De-
partment.
CHAPTER 6534-(No. 114).

AN ACT to Protect Game and Birds in the State of
Florida.

Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:

Section 1. Ownership and Title to Wild Birds and
Game Vested in State.-The title and ownership to all













wild birds and game in the State of Florida are vested
in the State for the purpose of regulating the use and
disposition of the same in accordance with the laws of
this State.
Sec. 2. Birds, Plumage, Skin, Eggs, and Nests Pro-
tected; Penalty for Catching, Killing or Taking.-Any
person who shall catch or kill, or have in his possession,
living or dead, or who shall purchase, offer, or expose
for sale, transport, or ship without the State any such
wild bird after it has been killed or caught; or who shall
sell or have in his possession for sale any part of the
plumage, skin, or body of any bird protected by the game
laws; or who shall take or wilfully destroy the nests of
any wild bird, or who shall have such nests of any wild
bird, or who shall have such nests or eggs in his or her
possession, except as permitted by the game laws of this
State shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon convic-
tion, shall be punished by a fine of not less than ten nor
more than twenty-five dollars for each offence.
Sec. 3. Game Birds Denominated and Enumerated.-
The following only shall be considered game birds: The
Anatidae, commonly known as swans, geese, brant and
river and sea ducks; Rallidae, commonly known as rail,
coots, mud hens and gallinulas; Limicolae, commonly
known as shore birds, plovers, surf birds, snipe, woodcock,
sandpipers, tattlers, and curlews; Gallinae, commonly
known as wild turkeys, grouse, pheasants, and quails;
and the species of Columbae, commonly known as turtle
doves.
Sec. 4. No person or persons shall injure, kill or hunt
or destroy by any. means whatever, or have, or be in pos-
session of, except 'as expressly permitted by the provi-
sions of this Act, the following named game birds, ex-
cept between the following dates: Wild turkey gobblers,
quail (bob white partridges), turtle doves, swans, geese,
brant, ducks, rails, coots, mud hens, sandpipers, curlews,
snipe and plover, November 20th to February 20th fol-












lowing. Any person who violates any of the provisions
of this Section shall be deemed quilty of a misdemeanor,
and upon conviction thereof, shall be punished by a fine
of not less than ten dollars, nor more than twenty-five
dollars for each offence.
Sec. 5. Pheasants Protected.-Any person who takes,
captures, or kills, except under permit, any ruffled
grouse, (pheasant), Mongolian, Chinese or English pheas-
ant, or other imported game birds, before December 1st,
1915, and thereafter, only from November 20th to De-
cember 20th following, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor,
and upon conviction, shall be punished by a fine of not
less than ten dollars nor more than twenty-five dollars
for each offence.
Sec. 6. Trap, Snare, Dead-Fall, Baiting, Etc., Pro-
hibited.-Any person who shall at any time make use of
any pitfall, dead-fall, scaffold, cage, snare, trap, net, salt-
lick, blind pen, baited hook, or baited field, or any other
similar device, or any drug, poison, chemical, or explo-
sives for the purpose of injuring, capturing or killing
birds or animals, protected by the game laws of this
State, except upon his or her own enclosed lands, shall
be guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction, shall be
punished by a fine of not less than twenty nor more than
fifty dollars for each offence.
Sec. 7. Night Hunting Prohibited.-Any person who
shall pursue, catch, take, or kill any birds, deer, wild tur-
key, wild ducks, wild geese, brant or other aquatic bird
or fowl, between dark or daylight the following day,
shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction, shall
be punished by a fine of not less than ten dollars, nor
more than twenty-five dollars for each offence.
Sec. 8. Hunting Wild Hogs.-Any person who, with-
out first giving notice to at least three freeholders in the
neighborhood, hunts, catches, or kills wild hogs unmark-
ed, with dog or gun, must, on conviction, be fined not less
than ten, nor more than one hundred dollars.












Sec. 9. Deer Protection; Open and Closed Season as
To.-Any person who shall kill or attempt to kill any
doe or female deer or fawn in spotted coat, or wild tur-
key hen in this State; or who shall kill any deer be-
tween February 20th and the 20th of November, in each
year, or'who shall use any artificial light in hunting or
killing deer, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and on
conviction, shall be punished by a fine of not less than
twenty-five dollars, nor more than fifty dollars; and the
having of such lights on the head or any part of the
body while hunting shall be prima facie evidence of the
violation of the last sub-division.
Section 10. Squirrels, Open and Closed Season as to.
-Any person who shall pursue, injure, capture, kill or
destroy any fox squirrel, black squirrel, or gray squirrel,
except on and from November 20th in each year to the
following February 20th, when they may be killed; or
who shall pursue, injure, capture or destroy any squirrel
at any time in any public or private park, shall be guilty
of a misdemeanor, and on conviction, shall be punished
by a fine of not less than ten nor more than twenty-five
dollars; Provided, That any person may protect his
premises from the ravages and depredations of these
animals at any time, and in any way.
Sec. 11. Any person who takes or kills more than
one deer, two turkey gobblers, twenty quail or twenty-
five birds of any other species in one day, or who has such
birds or game in his possession for more than five days
after the close of the season for killing the same, shall
be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction, shall
be punished by a fine of not less than ten nor more than
twenty-five dollars for each offence. Any person who
takes or kills more than three buck deer, five turkey
gobblers or five hundred of any other game bird species
during one open season, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor,
and upon conviction shall be punished by a fine of not
more than five hundred dollars for each offence, or im-












prisonment in the County jail not exceeding six months,
or by both such fine and imprisonment.
Sec. 12. Selling Game Prohibited.-Any person, firm
or corporation, who, at any time of the year, shall barter,
sell, or order for sale, any of the game birds or animals
protected by the Laws of Florida, either under the name
used in the Laws of Florida, or under any other name
or guise whatsoever, whether lawfully or unlawfully
taken, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and, upon con-
viction shall be fined not less than $10.00 nor more than
$25.00 for each offence.
Sec. 13. Hunting Without License Prohibited.-Any
person who hunts outside of the limits of the voting
precinct, ward or beat in which he actually resides with-
out first obtaining a license permitting him or her to
do so; or who hunts outside of the County 'in which he
actually resides without obtaining a State license per-
mitting,him or her to do so; or any non-resident of the
State who hunts in this State without a non-resident's
license; or who lends or transfers his hunting license
to another, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and, upon
conviction, shall be punished by a fine of not less than
ten, nor more than fifty dollars; but any resident may
hunt upon his own lands in season without obtaining a
hunting license.
Sec. 14. False Statement As to Procuring License.-
Any person who shall make to any officer authorized to
issue a hunting license a false statement, or change or
alter his or her license in any manner, shall be punished
by a fine of not less than ten, nor more than twenty-
five dollars.
Sec. 15. Shipping or Transporting Game.-Any person
who takes, ships or transports out of, or .within this
State any of the birds or game protected by the laws of
this State, unless the same be in personal possession of,
or carried openly by the owner thereof, or persons killing
the same who has in his possession a non-resident's












license, if the same is to be carried out of this State, or
a resident's license if the game is to be transported
within the State, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and
on conviction, shall be punished by a fine of not less
than ten nor more than fifty dollars.
Sec. 16. Common Carrier Shipping Game.-Any per-
son, company, corporation, or common carrier who shall
ship or transport any birds or game without ascertain-
ing if the person offering for shipment or transportation
such birds or game is in possession of a hunting license
duly issued to him and covering the period when such
shipment is offered, and without requiring such person
to accompany the shipment, shall be guilty of a misde-
meanor, and, upon conviction thereof, shall be punished
by a fine of not less than fifty, nor more than one
hundred dollars.
Sec. 17. Corporation, Service of Warrant of Arrest
Upon.-In cases of violation of the game laws of Florida
by a corporation, the warrant of arrest may be read to
the president, secretary or manager in this State, or to
any general or local agent thereof in any County where
the action or indictment is pending, and upon the return
of such warrant so served, corporation shall be deemed
in Court, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, and
any fine imposed may be collected by execution against
the property of said corporation, but this Section shall
not be considered to exempt any agent or employee from
prosecution.
Sec. 18. Officer Failing to Perform Duty.-Any of-
ficial, officer, or warden, who shall fail to perform any
act, duty, or obligation enjoined upon him by the .provi-
sions of the game laws of this State, shall be punished by
a fine of not less than $50.00 nor more than $100.00.
Sec. 19. Report of Prosecutions to State Commis-
sioners.-Every Court or clerk of any Court, before whom
any prosecution under this chapter is commenced or shall
go on appeal, and within twenty days after trial or dis.











missal thereof, shall report in writing the result thereof
and the amount of the fine collected, if any, and the dis-
position thereof to the State Game and Fish Commis-
sioner.
Sec. 20. Pleading and Practice, Rules of Under This
Chapter.-Two or more offenses may be charged in the
same affidavit, complaint, or indictment, and proof as to
a part of a game bird or animal shall be sufficient to sus-
tain a charge of the whole of it; and the violation as to a
number of animals or birds of the same kind may be
charged in the same count and punished as a separate
offence as to each animal, bird, or game.
Sec. 21. Costs of Prosecution, How Taxed.-When an
arrest for a violation of the game law is made by the
SState Game and Fish Commissioner, or by any warden,
and the defendant is convicted, there shall be taxed as
costs in favor of such warden making the arrest the same
*fee as a constable is entitled to in misdemeanor cases,
and if collected from the defendant, shall be paid over
to such warden, and shall be his personal prequisite. No
fee shall be allowed in cases of acquittal.
Sec. 22. All moneys collected from fines, penalties or
forfeitures under this law shall go into the fine and for-
feiture fund of the County where such convictions are
had, and the County Commissioners of such County shall
pay to the witnesses furnishing the evidence in such con-
victions an amount equal to one-half of such fine or pen-
alty which shall be paid by warrant upon the fine and
forfeiture fund of such County.
Sec. 23. Fines To be Paid in Currency.-All fines im-
posed under the provisions of this Chapter shall be paid
ifi lawful money, that is to say, in currency of United
States of America.
Sec. 24. Judge's Special Charges As to Game Laws.-
The Circuit Judges and the Judges of concurrent juris-
diction shall give the grand juries when organized the











provisions of the Game and Fish Laws strictly in charge
and shall urge strict inquiry into infractions thereof.
Sec. 25. Terms Defined.-As used in the Game Laws
of this State, unless otherwise specially restricted or en-
larged, the words "herein" or hereoff" refer to the whole
of the game laws of this law, and the words "person,"
"owner," "proprietor," granteee," "lessee," or "licensee,"
include a firm, association, corporation or municipality,
and the word "warden" means the State Game and Fish
Commissioner, County Game Warden, and Deputy Game
Warden, provided for in the game laws. The word "of-
ficers" includes every person authorized to enforce the
provisions of the game laws, and whenever the possession.
use, importation, transportation, storage, sale, offering,
or exposing for sale of game birds is prohibited or re-
stricted, the prohibition or restriction shall extend to
and include every part of such game, and a violation as
to each animal or bird or part thereof shall be a separate
offense.
Sec. 26. Extent and Construction of Game Laws -
The provisions of the game laws shall not apply to per-
sons hunting any of the birds or animals of this State
which are not protected by the provisions of such laws.
Sec. 261/. Any person convicted by the courts under
Sthe provisions of this Act who fails to pay the fines im-
posed herein, shall be imprisoned as for a misdemeanor.
Sec. 27. All general and local laws, and parts of gen-
eral laws, in conflict with the provisions of this Act are
hereby repealed.
Became a law without the approval of the Governor.



CHAPTER 6535-(No. 115).

AN ACT Creating a Department of Game and Fish of
the State of Florida and Creating the Office of State
Game and Fish Commissioner.









17

Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:

Section 1. The Department of Game and Fish of the
State of Florida is hereby established, and shall be known
and termed as such. The office of State Game and Fish
Commissioner is hereby established and it shall be the
duty of the Governor immediately upon the passage of
this Act to appoint a State Game and Fish Commissioner,
who shall hold office from September 1st, 1913, and until
his successor is appointed and qualified. His successor
shall be appointed during the last ten days of April, 1915,
and every two years thereafter and shall assume the
duties of the office on the first day of June next following.
Sec. 2. Salary and Expenses of State Commissioner.-
The State Game and Fish Commissioner shall receive the
sum of twenty-five hundred dollars per annum as his sal-
ary, and he shall be allowed a maximum of five hundred
dollars per annum for actual expenses in traveling over
the State in the discharge of the duties of his office, said
traveling expenses to be set forth in itemized statement
under oath to the Governor, and both the salary and
traveling expenses shall be payable monthly out of the
Game and Fish Protection Fund in the same manner as
other.State officers are paid.
Sec. 3. Office of State Commissioner.-The State
Game and Fish Commissioner shall be provided with a
suitable office in the State capitol, or may, with approval
of the Governor, have his office elsewhere in the State,
and upon the approval of the Governor, may employ a
clerk when necessary.
Sec. 4. Before entering upon the discharge of his of-
ficial duties, the State Game and Fish Commissioner shall
give bond in the sum of five thousand dollars to the State
of Florida, with two or more sureties, to be approved by
the Secretary of State, conditioned that he will well and
truly account for and apply all moneys which may come
into; his hands in his official capacity, and that he will
2 Game












faithfully perform the duties enjoined on him by law,
and he shall also take and subscribe the oath or affirma-
tion required by the Constitution of the State, and be
commissioned by the Secretary of State.
Sec. 5. The State Game and Fish Commissioner shall
keep a seal of office, which shall be used to authenticate
all papers and documents issued and executed by him as
such officer.
Sec. 6. At the end of each calendar month, said Game
and Fish Commissioner shall file with the Governor an
itemized statement under oath of all sums of money re-
ceived or expended by him in the discharge of his official
duty, including clerical services, salaries and expenses
while traveling under special order as herein provided,
postage, stationery, and other necessary incidental ex-
penses; such clerk shall receive $2.00 per day while en-
gaged in such service.
Sec. 7. Upon the approval of such accounts by the
Governor, the Comptroller shall draw his warrant for
such amount, which shall be paid monthly out of the
Game and Fish protection fund.
Sec. 8. The office and accounts of the State Game
and Fish Commissioner shall be audited by the direc-
tion of the Governor in the same manner as the office
and accounts of other State officers are audited.
Sec. 9. In the month of March, in the year 1914, and.
during the month of March of every year thereafter, the
State Game and Fish Commissioner shall make a report
to the Governor showing the official business transacted
by him. Such report shall show the number of hunter's
licenses issued, together with all fees collected. It shall
show what moneys have been received by the Game and
Fish department from fees and other sources. It shall
show the number of wardens employed under special
instructions, and shall give all necessary information
concerning the affairs of the department of game and
fish. Such reports to be published in pamphlet form.












Sec. 10. The State Game and Fish Commissioner
shall enforce all laws now enacted or that may be enacted
for the protection, propagation and preservation of
game animals, birds and fish in this State, and
shall prosecute all persons who violate such law;
and he shall at any and all times seize any and all
birds, animals, and fish that have been caught or killed
at any time, in a manner, or for a purpose, or in pos-
session, or which have been shipped, contrary to the
Game laws of this State.
Sec. 11. The blanks and other printed matter neces-
sary to carry out the provisions of the Game laws,
upon the approval by the Governor, shall be printed under
the direction of the State Game and Fish Commissioner,
and shall be paid for in like manner and upon the same
terms as other public printing. This expense shall be
chargeable to the first money covered into the Game and
Fish Protection Fund.
Sec. 12. The State Game and Fish Commissioner, by
and with the consent of the Governor, shall publish in
pamphlet form for general distribution, the laws relat-
ing to Game, birds and fish.
Sec. 13. The State Game and Fish Commissioner and
his deputies may serve criminal process as sheriffs and
constables, or may arrest without warrant any person
or persons violating the Game and Fish laws of this
State.
Sec. 14. The State Game and Fish Commissioner shall
appoint, by and with the consent and approval by the
Governor, Game and Fish Wardens in each County in
this State and such persons so appointed shall be known
as County Game and Fish Wardens, and shall hold
office for the term of the State Game and Fish Commis-
sioner appointing them, and until their successors are
duly appointed.
Sec. 15. The County wardens shall assist the State
Game and Fish Commissioner in the discharge of his












official duties, and said warden shall have like power
and authority as is provided in this Chapter for the
State Game and Fish Commissioner, relative to the en-
forcement of this law.
Sec. 16. Said deputies and wardens shall be subject
to the supervision and direction of the State Game and
Fish Commissioner, and subject to removal for cause
by him.
Sec. 17. Before entering upon the discharge of their
official duties, each County Game and Fish Warden
shall give bond in the sum of $500.00, payable to the
State of Florida, with two or more sure'ties to be ap-
proved of by the Local Board of County Commissioners
conditioned that he will well and truly account for and
legally, apply all moneys which may come into his hand
in his official capacity, and that he will faithfully per-
form all the duties enjoined upon him by law.
Sec. 18. All Sheriffs, Deputy Sheriffs, Marshals, Con-
stables, and Policemen, or other peace officers of this
State, are exofficio deputy game and fish wardens.
Sec. 19. Game and Fish Wardens acting under spe-
cial instructions shall receive $3.00 per day for their
services.
Sec. 20. The Game and Fish Wardens shall, while in
and about the woods, caution all sportsmen of the danger
from fires and extinguish all fires left burning by anyone'
if within their power, and shall give notice to any and
all persons interested, when possible, of fires raging be-
yond their control, to the end that same may be extin-
guished.
Sec. 21. Each County Warden shall receive an amount
equal to one-fourth of all fines and penalties collected in
the County in which he holds office, imposed for violation
of any game and fish laws of this State where he does not
furnish the evidence necessary to convict; and in all
cases in which the County Warden furnished the evidence
to convict, he shall receive an amount equal to three-











fourths of all fines and penalties collected in the County
in which he holds office, imposed for violation of any
game and fish laws of this State. Said sums of money
shall be paid out of the fine and forfeiture funds of such
County by warrant to be issued' by the Board of County
Commissioners of such County.
Sec. 22. Certificates may be granted by the State
Game and Fish Commissioner, upon the payment of $1.00
to defray the necessary expenses attending the granting
of such certificates, to any properly accredited person,
permitting the holder thereof to collect birds, their nest
or eggs, for strictly scientific purposes only. In order
to obtain such certificates the applicant for the same
must present to the State Game and Fish Commissioner
written testimonials from two well known ornithologists,
one of whom shall be a resident of this State, certifying
to the good character and fitness of said applicant to
be entrusted with such privileges, such certificates shall
expire on the 31st day of December of the year in which
it is issued.
Sec. 23. The State Game and Fish Commissioner,
upon the payment of $1.00, may issue permits to any per-
son to take, capture, or transport not more than ten
pairs of any one species of game, birds, or fish within
or without this State, when satisfied that such persons
applying for said permit desires the same exclusively for
scientific or propagating purposes.
Sec. 24. All licenses shall be dated when issued, and
when issued in the open season shall authorize the per-
son named therein to hunt during the remainder of the
then open season, and when license is issued in the closed
season, the person named therein shall be authorized to
hunt only during the open season next following, and
then only within the regulations and restrictions provided
by law. All hunting licenses shall be numbered consecu-
tively at the time they are printed, and resident and non-
resident blanks shall be of distinctive colors and shall











be furnished by the State Game and Fish Commissioner
to the Probate Judges of the various Counties. All
licenses shall have a synopsis of the Game Laws printed
on the back thereof.
Sec. 25. Any person who has been a bona fide resi-
dent of this State for one year then passed, may procure
a County hunter's license for himself or herself by filing
his or her affidavit with the County Judge in the County
in which he or she resides, stating his or her age, place
of residence, postoffice address, color, color of his or her
hair and eyes, and the fact whether he or she can write
his or her name, and by paying the said County Judge
the sum of $1.00.
Sec. 26. Any person who has been a bona fide resident
of the State for one year then passed may procure a State
hunter's license for himself or herself by filing with the
County Judge of the County to whom he or she applies
for license the affidavit provided by the .preceding sec-
tions, and by paying to the said Probate Judge the sum .
of $3.00 which shall entitle him or her to a State hunter's
license, and shall authorize him or her to hunt in any
County in this State.
Sec. 27. Any non-resident or alien of this State may
procure a license for hunting by filing his or her affidavit
with the County Judge of any County in this State in
which he or she desires to hunt, stating his or her age,
place of residence, postoffice address, color, color of eyes.
and hair, and the facts whether he or she can write his
or her name and by paying to the said Judge the sum
of $15.00 which shall entitle him or her to a hunter's
license to be known as a non-resident hunter's license,
which shall authorize him or her to hunt only in the
County in which the same is issued.
Sec. 28. The County Judge shall issue all hunting
licenses, resident and non-resident, under the seal of his
office, to all persons complying with the provisions of
this chapter, and shall sign the same and shall require












the person to whom the license is issued to sign his or
her name on the margin thereof. He shall keep a cor-
rect and complete record of all licenses issued in a book
to be furnished by the State Game and Fish Commis-
sioner, which record shall remain in his office and be
open to the inspection of the public at all reasonable
times.
Sec. 29. County Judges shall retain of the money re-
ceived of each license issued the sum of $.25, which shall
cover the swearing of the applicant to the affidavit re-
ferred to in this chapter and all other services under this
chapter, and shall pay the County game warden $.25 for
each County license and $.50 for each State license and
$3.00 for each non-resident license issued and shall pay
the balance to the State Treasurer on the first day of
each month, which amount shall be covered into the Game
and Fish Protection Fund, and said County Judges shall
report to the State Game and Fish Commissioner on the
first day of each month the number of licenses issued,
and the amount of money remitted to the State Treasurer.
Sec. 30. All owners and landlords and members of
their families may hunt upon their land .without license;
and tenants and members of their families may hunt
upon the lease holds without license.
Sec. 31. The State Game and Fish Commissioner
shall deliver to each County Judge in the State ten days
before the first day of November in each year, as many
licenses as may be required, and shall charge said County
Judge with the number issued to him. On the first day
of March in each year, and within ten days thereafter,
each County Judge shall return to the State Game and
Fish Commissioner, all unused licenses and stubs of the
licenses issued.
Sec. 32. All moneys sent to the State Treasurer in
payment of hunting licenses, fines, penalties, and for-
feitures arising from the Game Laws of this State, shall
be set aside by the State Treasurer and shall constitute












a fund known as the Game Fish Protection Fund for the
payment of the salary of the State Game and Fish Com-
missioner and his necessary incidental expenses as herein-
before provided. Also the payment of the expenses of the
Game and Fish Wardens when acting under special in-
structions. The expenses incurred for any purpose or in
consequence of this Chapter shall be limited to the
amount of money in the Game and Fish Protection Fund,
and in no event shall the State pay any such salary or
expenses, or be liable in any manner therefore, except to
the extent of such Game and Fish Protection Fund, and
the State Comptroller shall not issue any voucher for any
services or expenses of any kind, unless the money to
pay such voucher shall at the time be on hand in the
State Treasury to the credit of the Game and Fish Pro-
tection Fund.
Sec. 33. On the first day of March, 1914, and on the
first day of March each year thereafter, all funds, in
excess of $5,000.00, in the Game and Fish Protection
Fund, shall be transferred and paid into the State School
Fund.
Sec. 34. This law shall take effect immediately upon
its passage and approval by the Governor.
Sec. 35. All laws or parts of laws in conflict with this
law are hereby repealed.
Became a law without the approval of the Governor.



OWNERSHIP OF FISH NOT FIXED.

It will be seen by the preceding chapters that while no
revenue comes to this Department from the daily slaugh-
tering of fish it falls upon this Department as a duty to
enforce the Fish Laws, which, if properly done, will
incur almost unlimited expense. In my opinion the value
of the fish to the State warrants this necessary expense












for protection, and the State can easily realize a sufficient
revenue from the fishing industry to enforce the Fish
Laws and besides give a large NET revenue to the Stilte.
It will be seen by Section 1 of Chapter 6534, that the
ownership of all wild birds and game in the State are
vested in the State of Florida for "protection," and regu-
lating the use and disposition of the same in accordance
with the laws of the State. Nothing is said regarding
the OWNERSHIP OF FISH. In Section 3 of the
same Chapter is denominated game birds. Chapter 6535
fixes the manner in which the State can dispose of those
denominated. While Chapter 6534 names the Game
Birds and fixes the disposition of same it does not name
the Game animals nor does it fix the disposition of them.
Both chapters above referred to fix the regulations for
some certain birds and some certain animals to be killed
at certain times, but there is no provision for the killing
or disposition of the animals and birds not named in
those two chapters. Therefore it is causing a great deal
of confusion as to whether the animals or birds not
named in those chapters can or can not be killed at any
time of the year AND WITHOUT HUNTER'S LICENSE.
It is my opinion that the Legislature intended that all
the Game and Birds not denominated in those chapters
could be killed at any time without Hunter's License,
but the question is not clearly answered in those chapters,
neither do those chapters repeal chapters 3759 and 3761
of 1905 and 1906, which protect nearly every known
species of birds in the State.
The sections referred to are as follows:
3759. Protection of Birds, Their Eggs and Nests.-No
person shall within the State of Florida kill or catch or
have in his possession, living or dead, any wild bird other
than a game bird, nor shall purchase, offer or expose for
sale any such wild bird after it has been killed or caught.
No part of the plumage, skin or body, of any bird pro-
tected by this sectiioll'shall b(f:'old- or had in possession

.. ...... .....
.. .'. : '** ......
** S *.*












for sale. For the purpose of this Act, the following shall
be considered game birds: The Anatidae, commonly
known as swans, geese, brant, and river and sea ducks;
the Rallidae, commonly known as rails, coots, mud-hens,
and gallinules; the Semicolae, commonly known as shore
birds, plovers, surf birds, snipe, woodcock, sand-pipers,
tatlers and curlews; the Gallinae, commonly known as
wild turkeys, grouse, prairie chickens, pheasants, par-
tridges and quails; also turtle doves, tame and wild
pigeons and robins. No person shall within the State of
Florida take or needlessly destroy the nests or eggs of
any wild bird, nor shall have such nests or eggs in his
or her possession. Any person violating the provisions of
this section shall be liable to a fine of five dollars for
each bird, living or dead, or part of bird, or nest and
eggs possesed in violation of this section, or to imprison-
ment for ten days.


3761. Birds Not Included in Preceding Sections.-The
English sparrow, sharp-skinned hawk (commonly known
as the little blue darter), cooper's hawk (commonly
known as the big blue darter), great horned owl, crow,
ricebird, meadowlark, jackdaw and butcher-bird are not
included among the birds protected by the two preceding
sections. Nothing in said sections shall prevent any citi-
zen of the State of Florida from destroying birds which
are found injuring grapes, fruits, garden or farm prod-
ucts on his premises, or from taking and keeping in a
cage any cardinal red-bird or mocking-bird for his own
pleasure or amusement; Provided, That same shall not
be sold or shipped out of the State.
Section 26 of Chapter 6534 states that the provision of
the game laws shall not apply to persons hunting any of
the birds and animals of this State which are not pro-
tected by the provisions of such laws, but Chapters 3759
and 3761 have never been repealed by actual intent of the
Legislature, and theyprotec)'a,s stated before nearly every


.'..''... ..... ..
.,.. .. ...: .:..
*












known species of-birds in the State. Why should not
practically all of the birds be protected? Why should
not practically all the animals be protected? It is esti-
mated that the birds of Massachusetts devour 21,000
bushels of insects in one day, and in Nebraska 170 car-
loads each day, and that the sparrows alone of Iowa eat
875 tons of weed seeds annually.

PROTECTION OF ALL WILD ANIMALS.

I see the importance to the State that all wild animals
be protected and none killed except at fixed seasons and
by hunters with Hunter's Licenses. Within another five
to ten years a pair of our foxes will sell at from $100.00
to $200.00. They have no protection now. The skunk
(polecat) at not a distant date will also bring a hand-
some price, but they neither have protection now.

DATES OF OPEN SEASON ARE WRONG.

I am not assuming the position of knowing the natural
life of Game, Birds and Fish, but from the meager in-
formation which I have been able to gather it appears
to me that the open season fixed by Chapters 6534 and
6535 for killing Game and Birds and nearly all laws
pertaining to catching fish are contrary to the laws of
nature. Provision should have been made for obtaining
data necessary to ascertain when Game, Birds and Fish
can be killed not to interfere with the mating seasons and
not to destroy them during the period of breeding.

DATES CONFLICT.

Again referring to Chapter 6534, it will be seen by Sec-
tions 4 and 9, that the open season for killing game-
birds and deer was fixed BETWEEN the date of Febru-
ary 20th and November 20th following, which does not
include those dates, but Section 10 fixes the open season











for killing squirrels FROM AND INCLUDING Novem-
ber 20th TO AND INCLUDING February 20th follow-
ing, making the season for killing game-birds and deer
open one day later and close one day earlier than the
season for killing squirrels, when, as a matter of fact, the
natural presumption is it was intended the season should
be the same.

ENFORCING FISH LAWS.

Again, as to the provisions made for enforcing the
Fish Laws. Public opinion does not DECRY the viola-
tions of such laws, but on the contrary, UPHOLDS them.
This is a fact well worth mentioning as it is calculated
to make the officers of the State slow to rigidly enforce
the laws. There is no moral turpitude attached to viola-
tions of laws protecting the existence of animals, birds
and fish, and this condition will exist to a certain extent
until civilization and education wipes it out, during
which time, there must be provisions, and enforcement of
the laws to aid growing civilization to do this work. It
is true the Legislature did not know, nor could not guess
the amount of revenue that would be realized from the
enactment of the law creating this Department, but
surely they will readily see now that the compensation
fixed for the Wardens in Chapter 6535 for their services
in enforcing the laws is not sufficient to warrant them to
take an active interest in protecting the existence of the
Game, Birds and Fish, or to give the work sufficient study
to create within themselves or others the proper interest
to the extent of realizing the value as an asset to the
State, of the Game, Birds and Fish. There was not even
an appropriation for the opening of an office or for
expenses of operating this Department until hinting
licenses were put on the market and sold, and at stated
before, not sufficient provision then to do things that need
to be done, which, if done, would result in the strictest
enforcement of the present laws.












CRITICISMS FOR NOT COMPLYING STRICTLY TO
THE LAW.

THE CRITIC.

"It is easy to sit in the sunshine
And talk to the man in the shade;
It is easy to floaf in a well-trimmed boat
And point out the places to wade.

,It is easy to sit in your carriage
And counsel the man on foot;
But get down and walk, and you'll change your talk
As you feel the nail in your boot.

It is easy to tell the toiler
How best he can carry his pack;
But no one can rate a burden's weight
Until it has been on his back.

The upcurled mouth of pleasure
Can preach of sorrow's worth;
But give it a sip, and a wryer lip
Was never made on earth."
-Selected.

I have been more or less criticised by people who do
not know the difficulties which existed in handling this
Department for the first few months. Chapter 6535 pro-
vides that the Commissioner should take office Septem-
ber 1st, 1913, which I did, but it did not provide one
dollar operating expenses upon which to begin work.
Certain sections of that chapter provide that applicants
for Hunter's Licenses shall make a statement UNDER
OATH in applying for same. To make a statement UN-
DER OATH it is necessary, of course, to appear before
an officer authorized to take oaths. That chapter pro-












vides also that the open season for hunting would begin
November 20th, 1913, which gave the Commissioner only
about eighty days before the hunting season opened in
which to get all printed matter such as books for the
County Judges, Application Blanks and necessary adver-
tising printed and distributed and sell licenses before the
season opened. In having Application Blanks printed I
omitted having the oath except in such cases where the
County Judges absolutely required it and in pleading
guilty for not complying strictly to the law I will say
that if I had conformed strictly to the law there would
not have been more than 25% of the Hunter's Licenses
sold as were sold under that plan. In some counties at
first the County Judges required the applicant to appear
personally before them to make application for Hunter's
License, but I finally obtained adjustment on this. An-
other instance where I did not conform strictly to the
law is that in some cases county residents thought and so
did some of the County Judges, that the applicant could
buy a County License in his resident county and in event
he decided to hunt in some other county, go into the
other county and there buy another County License per-
mitting him to hunt in that county, which, of course, is
contrary to the laws. It necessitated therefore, in justice
to the applicant, an exchange of the County License first
issued to him for a State License permitting him t6 hunt
anywhere in the State, and in such cases I requested the
County Judges where the first license had not been re-
ported to this Department and remitted for to the State
Treasurer, to make the necessary exchange, collecting the
difference in the amount paid for the County License
and the fee charged for the State License. I later ad-
vised the County Judges to make no more exchanges, as
I soon saw it might cause complications in their accounts
and statements, as well as requiring a County Judge's
fee for each of the licenses issued, which, of course, is
incorrect from a practical standpoint.











In this connection I wish to say that it is absolutely
unnecessary to require an applicant to make application
for Hunter's License UNDER OATH. In the first place,
where time permits, most of the applicants apply person-
ally to the County Judge, who issues the license, and the
County Judges are too busy with their other work to
take up the time necessary with the applicant to take
his application UNDER OATH, make the proper entries
upon his books, records, etc. I have received a great
many complaints from the County Judges as to the small
fee allowed them for the work, which in my opinion is not
sufficient. If the oath be omitted from the applications
it will eliminate great inconvenience to the applicants
who would remain bound under Section 14 of Chapter
6534, which reads as follows:

"False Statement as to Procuring License.-Any per-
son who shall make to any officer authorized to issue a
Hunting License a false statement, or change or alter his
or her license in any manner, shall be punished by a fine
of not less than ten, or more than twenty-five dollars."

In my opinion the fine in such a case should be fixed at
not less than $100 or more than $500, which would give
better protection.

RECEIPTS OF 1914-15 COMPARED WITH THAT
OF 1913-14.

It is an evident fact that public interest is increasing
daily as to protection of Game, Fish and Birds, and
respect to the Game and Fish Laws, and the receipts from
the sale of licenses for the season of 1914-15 should almost
double that of the past and first season, the only obstruc-
tion to this in my opinion, can be that the requirement
whereby the applications are to be signed under oath.
Florida is noted for its Wild Game, Birds and Fish,
and while some species of game and birds are almost











extinct, there yet remains a bountiful supply to bona-fide
hunters. The most common of our wild game is Deer,
and with the exception of about two or three counties,
one can be seen occasionally. Twenty to thirty years ago
they were found in herds like cattle. Squirrels, while
not so plentiful as a few years ago, we have a good many
left yet. We have in a good many sections of Florida
good Bear hunting. Our entire State is more or less in-
habited with wild animals which give good sport for
hunters, such as the Fox, Raccoon, Black Bear, Wild
Cat, Catamount, Tigers, Panthers, etc. Our most common
game bird is the Quail (Bob-White). While not so plen-
tiful as a few years ago, they can be found in every county
in the State. We also have plenty of Doves in the winter
as also Ducks and other water fowls, and different species
of pond birds, including the Ironheads, Curlews, Herons
and Cranes. Wild Turkey are numerous in some sections
of the State, and while several years ago they were plen-
tiful in every county, now in some sections the supply
is depleted. Dr. W. F. Blackman of the Audubon Socie-
ties has recently made a trip into Lee County. He writes
that to his surprise 55 species of our most common birds
were not seen at all, yet he did see about 57 species of
birds in that county. This is worthy of note, as it evi-
dences depletion.

THE EGRET.

I have been greatly criticised by some of the members
of the Audubon Societies and other for not endeavoring
to enforce the laws pertaining to the plumes of Egrets
as well as the destruction of these birds in this State.
I have been told in a good many instances that it was
my duty to instruct the County Wardens to arrest and
punish any person wearing the aigrettes from these birds.
This, of course, is contrary to the meaning of the law.
These birds are protected by the Federal Migratory Bird
Law and are intended to be protected under the General












Laws of this State, but they are not specifically named.
I have, however, recently issued instructions for the
arrest of persons in this State who afe selling and Jffer-
ing for sale the aigrettes from these birds, with the hopz
that the results will satisfy the minds of those who are
severely criticising me. I have been further criticised
from practically the same sources for not arresting and
prosecuting those who have in their possession any wild
birds of this State which are -protected. The purpose of
protection of certain birds was to prevent the destruction
of them, but the law provides that anyone might have
any wild bird in their possession for amusement. I have,
therefore, declined to make arrests in such instances.

FORM OF STATEMENT BLANKS THAT SHOULD
BE USED BY COUNTY JUDGES REPORT-
ING TO THIS DEPARTMENT.

The law requires that on the first day of each month
each County Judge shall report to the State Game and
Fish Commissioner the number of licenses sold, etc.,
remitting to the State Treasurer the net amount due for
the same. I immediately planned when I entered upon
the duties of the office, a form of statement and had
printed and furnished to the County Judges, which will
be found on another page herein and by reference to
which it will be seen that it gives the date the license is
issued, name of applicant, his color, postoffice address,
the fee charged for the license, Judge's Fee, Warden's
Fee, and the amount remitted to the Treasurer. The
meaning of the law, if questioned technically, does not
require that the County Judges furnish me with such
report, but the necessity of such a report is apparent
and as you know has been a saving to the State in the
first season of about $400.00, as I have kept you apprised
of the nature of my correspondence with the County
Judges regarding this.
3 Game












As stated before, some of the County Judges have been
under the impression that a county resident could buy a
County License in his county and should he desire to hunt
enter some other county and purchase a County License
in that county, and in a good many counties of the State,
Hunter's Licenses have been issued in this way. For in-
stance, four residents of this city (Jacksonville), among
the most prominent of the State, went into Bradford
County and purchased County License for that county
and hunted. Had the County Judge not furnished me
with the statement above referred to I would have never
known the residence of those applicants, but in examin-
ing the statement and knowing all of them personally I
immediately discovered that they had hunted upon a
County License in Bradford County, and being residents
of Duval County, should have had a State License, and
I immediately took it up with them, collecting the dif-
ference in the fee from each of them. This condition ex-
isted in some counties which was not corrected from the
fact that I did not discover early enough to make the
correction without fear of complications, and the atten-
tion of the County Judges have been called to it which
will prevent such a condition in the future. Again, some
of the County Judges take the position that a Winter
resident who spends his Winters in the State and his
Summers North (tourists), are entitled to a State License
and should be termed as bona fide residents of the State,
especially so where they own property. This is contrary
to the law and should be corrected.

GENERAL FINANCIAL REPORT.

A general and full report of sale of Licenses is given
on another page herein and is about the only form which
could be used to give such information as would satisfy
the public. There is also given other statements for in-
formation and I desire to call special attention to the









35

statement showing receipts and disbursements of this
Department. I would not at all certify under oath that
this statement is correct from the fact that no remit-
tances are made directly,to me and the only information
I have to go by in making this statement is the monthly
reports received from the County Judges, which are not
made under oath.












GENERAL AND FULL REPORT OF SALES OF LICENSES.



I 3.









Alachua 34 280 684 $ 2,034.00 $ 249.50 ,$ 413.50 $ 1,371.50
S Baker 22 5 116.00 ]8.00 23.50 74.50
Bradford 93 114 393.00 51.75 75.00 266.25






.Bevard 56 114 329 ],511.00 124.75 175.75 1,210.50
Columbia 3 43 115 289.00 40.25 59.25 189.50






.Cla 23 51 2.4 792.00 92.00 168.00 532.00
Citrus 47 68 202 1,111.00 7.25 225.50 806.25





Dual 712 853 2,989.00 31.25 569.25 2,028.50 -





1Dade 1 38 151 280.00 47.50 59.75 172.75
'DeSoto 10 257 561 1,482.00 207.00 298.75 976.25



SEscambia .2 236 579 1,314.00 204.00 261.25 848.75
'Franklin .. 2 71 731 316.00 36.50 59.75 219.75



Gadsden ...... 4 97 246 597.00 81.75 122.00 388.25
S Hillsboro .596 ,134 3,222.00 457.50 631.50 2,13.00
0i ""3 3. 43 o1 290 40.250







Holmes .......... 116 418.00 4.50 75.50 296.00
Samilton ........ 43 71 215.00 28.75 42.25 144.00


Hbernando .. .. 5 74 332 635.20 14037.50 135.75 305.75
.. .. Jackson ......... 7 81 284 632.00 93.00 132.50 406.50
* l4 7 1 2 1 5.0 0 '0.2 8.7 4 2.2 5 1 40 0
- 0a d o 5 7 4 3 26 20 3 0 .5 0 1 3 5.7 5 3 9 5.7 5
C) *0 C a0 0** 70 82 46 2.0 0 9 3.00 12) .50 40 6 .2 5
Citrs............47 8 22 1,11.0 7.25 25.0 86.2










Jefferson ........ I
Lake ............
Lee ............
Liberty ..........
Leion ............
Levy ............
Lafayette ........
Manatee .........
Monroe ..........
Madison .........
Marion ..........
Nassau ..........
'. r,. ....... ...
.. ..I . . .
4 Polk ............
Pasco ...........
Pinellas .........
Palm Beaclh......
1 Putnam .........
1 St. Johns.........
Santa Rosa .......
Suwannee .......
1 Seminole ........
Su rmtr ..........
St. Luci .........
Taylor ......
Volusia .. ......
W alton ..........
1 Washington ......
S 1 1 Wakulla ........
14 I 50


41
218
43
43
144
58
26
174
4
31
243
18
297
113
441
154
Hion
28
156
44
14
44
149
67
38
15
227
94
61
33
6.367


273
308
416
135
268
281
137
514
40
35
774
162
395
333
960
245
303
268
260
554
179
109
205
147
302
237
779
472
85
82
15.665


*3


1,266.00
1,987.00
1,625.00
294.00
1,885.00
620.00
215.00
1,216.00
52.00
293.00
1,899.00
216.00
1,586.00
972.00
2,411.00
707.00
921.00
622.00
850.25
793.00
251.00
436.00
789.00
378.00
551.00
312.00
2,135.00
829.00
328.00
494.00
$45,800.25


93.00
160.25
132.75
45.00
122.75
87.50
40.75
175.00
11.00
19.25
2(0.75
45.00
178.00
116.50
352.25
99.75
119.25
78.50
106.25
151.50
48.75
41.50
91.00
54.00
87.25
63.50
262.75
142.75
37.50
3:3.50
$5.692.50


262.75 910.25
393.50 1,433.25
341.50 1,150.75
61.25 187.75
376.00 1,386.25
132.25 400.25
47.25 127.00
251.50 789.50
12.00 29.00
57.25 216.50
393.75 1,204.50
49.50 121.50
307.25 1,100.75
199.75 655.75
485.50 1,573.25
138.25 469.00
182.75 619.00
135.00 408.50
167.25 576.75
181.75 459.75
57.75 144.50
46.00 348.50
153.00 545.00
76.25 247.75
121.50 342.25
72.75 175.75
443.25 1,429.00
180.00 506.25
63.75 226.75
99.50 361.00
$9.102.25 1 $31,005.50


UU I- .


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BOND OF STATE GAME AND FISH COMMIS-
SIONER.

The law provides that the State Game and Fish Com-
missioner shall furnish bond in the sum of $5,000.00 and
all remittances be made direct to the State Treasurer on
the .first of each month by the County Judges, who issue
and collect for Hunter's Licenses sold in their respective
counties, while the bond for the County Judges who
handle all the money is fixed at a minimum of $1,000.00
and a maximum of $5,000.00. This is inconsistent and in
my opinion the bond of the 'County Judges should be
from $3,000.00 to $10,000.00 each, provided the law re-
mains as it is at present regarding the issuance of
licenses by them.

REPORTS OF VIOLATIONS, ARRESTS, ETC.

In making the report of violations, arrests and results
of the same I have given notice of a number of arrests
made since February 28th, for information only. There
are at this time a number of violators of the Game and
Fish Laws under arrest awaiting trial and which are not
mentioned in this statement.














ARRESTS, VIOLATIONS, FINES, ETC.


COUNTY. Name of Violator.
Alachua ..............J. P. Wright ........
M. Smoke ..........
Will Wagner ........
Dave Powell .........
Jacob Hart .........
Dick Gooding .........
Dick Gooding .........
Dick Godwin .........


SCharge. Verdict.
Killing Squirrels ........................ Guilty .....................
Killing Quail ........................ Guilty ....................
Killing Squirrels ........................ Guilty ......................
II..r,r ,_' without License ................ Guilty ......................
lin .r.-. without License ................ Guilty ......................
..hr. .- Wild Duck ........................ .ppealed.
'.il]r. Wild Duck ....................... Appealed.
. 11I- : W ild Duck...................... Guilty ......................


Baker ............... T. om Bennett ......... Killing Squirrels ........................ Guilty .....................
I). L. Thrift .......... Killing Squirrels ...................... Guilty ....................
J. Herndon ........... Killing Squirrels ........................ Guilty ....................


Bradfnd .............. Herman Lewis .....
Mack Sutherland.....
Semore Sutherland....
A. W. Sawyer.........


Hunting out of season ...................
Hunting out of season ...................
Hunting out of season ...................
Hunting out of season...................


G uilty ....................
G guilty ....................
G uilly ......................
Guilty ... ..................


Fine.
5.00
10.00
15.00
10.00
10.00

15.00

10.00
22.50
22.50

10.00 M
10.00 to
10.00
10.00


B* revard .............. Iob Jones ............ -. ,r ............... ... .. ......... Guilty ...................... 29.43
W W hitlock ......... rii.-................. ....... ..... Guilty ...................... 29.43
Columbia .............John Hayes .......... Selling Game .......................... Guilty .................. 10.00

Clay ..................S. E. Brooker........ Killed 2 Coots........................ Suspended.
C. R. Schultz........ Hunting without License ................ Guilty .................... 10.00
DeSoto ...............J. E. Adams.......... Hunting Quail .......................... Guilty .................... 25.00
Charles Oliver......... Hunting without License................ Guilty .................... 25.00
L. Barwick ........... Hunting without License............... Guilty .................... 25.00
L. M. Fouts........... Hunting without License............... Guilty .................... 25.00
J. Waldron .......... Hunting without License .............. Discharged on payment costs.
William Grisby ....... Shipping Mullet in closed season........ Guilty ...................... 100.00
Franklin ..............G. C. Neal............ Killing Doves .......................... Not gully.
11. G. Bradley........ 1'sing*unlawful net-fined $200.......... Under bond.












ARRESTS, VIOLATIONS, FINES, ETC.-Continued.
COUNTY. Name of Violator. Charge. Verdict.
Jackson ..............II. Brown ............ Violating Game Law.................. Guilty .....................
Edgar Barefield ....... Violating Game Law................... Nolle-prossed.
C. M. Carter......... Violating Game Law.................... Continued.
(Geo. E. Stone......... Violating Game Law.................. Continued.
C. Canedy ............ .i... ira Game Law................ Guilty ....................
A. Trawick .......... '. iu. Game Law .................... Guilty ....................

Lake ................. J. Green & J. Johnson. Killing Squirrels ........................ Guilty ....................
J. J. Hawkins......... Deer in possession during closed season.. Guilty ....................

Liberty .............. enry Hodges ....... Hunting without License................. Guilty ....................
William Law ......... Hunting without License................. Guilty ......................
W Miller ............ Hunting without License................. Guilty ......................
G. H. Miller.......... Hunting without License................. Guilty ......................
.7. II. Miller.......... Hunting without License ................. Guilty ......................

Leon ....... :......... W Collins......... Violation ................................ Guilty ......................
M M M cCord........ Violation ................................ Guilty ......................
E. L. Browner........ Violation ................................ Guilty ....................

Lnfayette .............Dave McCullers ...... Killing Turkey ........................ Guilty ................... ...
Ike Baker ............ Killing Squirrels ...................... Guilty ....................

Manalee .............. 1. J. King............ In possession River Ducks................ Guilty ......................


Marion .............. .Thomas Hill ......... Hunting without License................ Guilty...................
'[' omas Murry ........ Hunting without License................. Not Guilty.
W W atson ......... Killing a Dove .......................... Guilty ....................
C. Brown ........... Killing Squirrel ....................... Guilty ....................
lHugo McIntosh ....... Hunting without License............... Guilty ....................
1). E. McIver.......... Hunting without License................ Guilty ....................
Martha Perkins ...... Hunting without License............... Guilty ....................
R. White........... Killing 2 Deer in 1 day.................. Guilty ....................

Osceola ............... D. J. Dykes.... ...... Use of Fire-nrms on Sunday.............. Guilty ....................
\. Cahoon ............ Use of Fire-arms on Sunday.............. Guilty ...................
A. Beck .............. Use of Fire-arms on Sunday.............. Guilty ..................

Pinellas ..............Jessie Latham ....... Hunting without License ................ Guilty ....................
W. L. Stanley......... Hunting Ducks out of season............. Guilty ....................
W. L. Stanley......... Hunting without License ............... Guilty ....................


Fine.
10.00


10.00
10.00
20.00
15.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
25.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00

10.00
10.00
25.00
25.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
25.00
25.00
25.00

10.00
10.00
10.00











W ill Bozier ..........
BIen Fulford ..........
Palm Beach............Roby Schlappi ........
W. T. Damson........
i. Ilinson, Jr.........
I. Hinson, Sr ........
Klen Eris ...........
J. C. Staples..........
Esbom Danville .......
Andy Maltoon ........
IE. Danville ..........
G. Sanders ...........
F. E. Colebrook.......
S. Finder ............
L. Danville ..........
I. Danville ...........
C. Danville ...........
I. Francis ...........
I. Finder .............
C. Harden ............
i. M orton ...........
A. Griffin ...........
A. Moree ............
P. M oree .............
T. Ralle ..............
II. Sm ith ............
A Ralle ..............
WVm. B. Young........
C. Ralle ..............
.1. Moultrie ...........
A. Morrison .........


.....Oscar Olson ..........
Jack Kelly ............
A. Jacob .............
Ilass Thompson ......
Ed. Edge ............


Taylor ............... J. E. Patrick .........
W. B. Olliff ..........
A. I). Dykes...........
J. W. Cannon.........
.Tohn Miller ..........


Slot Netting ......................... Guilty
Slot Netting ......................... Guilty
.l,,i.iiu. .tt of season.................... Guilty
* .r,. !;,.1 in possession............. .. Guilty
N'I! : Game Bird out of season........ Guilty
kili.r.: Game Bird out of season....... Guilty
,, Bird in possession ................. Guilty
*-.u*ii Gill Net within 1 mile of Inlet.. Guilty
-. ri,. Gill Net within 1 mile of Inlet.. Guilty
ii-t,. Gill Net within 1 mile of Inlet.. Guilty
-. i,: Gill Net within 1 mile of Inlet.. Guilty
Fishing without License.................. Guilty
Fishing without License.................. Guilty
Fishing without License.................. Guilty
Fishing without License.................. Gu Ity
Fishing without License.................. Gu Ity
Fishing without License................. Gu ty
Fishing without License ............... Gu Ity
Fishing without License................. Gu Ity
i;",. without License................. Gu Ity
i .. without License................. Gu Ity
'.:i. without License .................. Gultr
s I. ,r. .1 ... ,r License.................. G u Ity
S, .,,,. ,ri, .,, License .................. Gu lty
Si i,,, -., I,..I License.................. Guilty
Fishing without License................. Gu Ity
Fishing without License................... Gu ty
Fishing without License.................. Gu ty
Fishing without License................. Gu Ity
Firhnijn without License.... ..... ..... Gu Ity
I .. it. without License................. Guilty


i 1 ; ...................... ...
II l i! . . . . . .......
Illegal Fishing ..........................
Illegal Fishing ........................ .
Hunting Quail out of season ............

\ !i ,r..:- Game Laws ............... ..
\ ,-llrihl: Game Laws..................
\i..i, ii,. Game Laws....... ..........
1\ "i iI Game Laws............... ...
X i ii,. Game Laws...................


Guilty
Guilty
Guilty
Guilty
Guilty

Guilty
Guilty
Guilty
Guilty
Guilty


... ... ... ... .. ..







***'* '" '*" ...........'
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.......... ..........
......................
.....................

.....................


5.00
5.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
1.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
20.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00

75.00
75.00
75.00
75.00
15.00

10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00


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THE STATE CONSTABULARY.

In as much as sufficient provision was not made as
to compensating the Wardens for active and regular
work, there should have been a provision specially fixing
the duties of the Sheriffs, Deputy Sheriffs and Constables
to assist in the enforcement of the Game and Fish Laws.
As it is, however, the entire constabulary of the State
seem to think that the entire responsibility of enforcing
the Game and Fish Laws rests with the State Game and
Fish Commissioner and the County Wardens, and that
they are relieved of any responsibility of the same absol-
utely. This condition applies to nearly all the counties
in the State. Generally court officials such as Justices
of the Peace, County Judges, Criminal Court Judges and
Prosecuting Attorneys are very slow in giving this De-
partment proper co-operation, although they have ren-
dered to some extent valuable aid. Arrests have been
made and the violators convicted but in a great many
instances nominal fines placed upon the violators. In
fact in some cases about half of what the law fixes the
fine, and in a good many cases, sentences suspended. I
desire to thank these officials for such services as they
have given me, in the enforcement of the law, and I
hope, since receiving your advices that these officials are
supposed to and should co-operate in the enforcement ot
these laws the same as all other criminal laws, to get
even more assistance from them than I have been able to
get in the past. In most counties the officials will not
prosecute unless the violator is arrested under issuance
of a warrant and commitment by a Justice of the Peace,
and in most cases not then until the Warden gives bond
or arranges satisfactory to them for the Court costs.
This is contrary to the intent of the law. By investiga-
tion, it will be seen that I have endeavored to get a class
of men for Wardens, who are not seeking to prosecute
without violations, and unless they can obtain diligent












services of the Court officials they cannot enforce the
laws.
NO REVENUE FROM FISHING.

Again referring to the revenue from fishing. As stated
before, the fish of the State is one of its most valuable
assets and food products and they are being caught and
shipped by thousands of tons almost daily, free of revenue
to the State. The fish within the State's borders should
be owned by the State the same as its animals and birds
and revenue should be given the State for their destruc-
tion, regardless of protection, but with the revenue from
destruction, proper protection could be given. Can the
reader imagine what it would mean to the State of Flor-
ida if all the fishing within the State's borders was stop-
ped for five or ten years? Florida with its more than
1600 miles of seacoast saying nothing of its thousands of
miles of rivers and millions of acres of lakes, could fur-
nish the fish food to the teeming millions of this country
for years. In the State of California, I am informed, that
a license fee is charged for fishing even with a hook and
line and that the State owns all the hooks and lines used
and the uses of them are charged for and included in the
license fee.
OFFICE EXPENSES UP TO AND INCLUDING
FEBRUARY 28TH, 1914.

Clerical W ork ........................... $ 335.50
Extra Office Help ........................... 130.25
Office Supplies and Fixtures ................. 136.78
Telegram s .................................. 31.29
Postage ................................... 171.12
Express .................................... 22.11
Traveling Expenses ......................... 84.30
Salary as Commissioner ..................... 1,250.01
Printing ................................... 1,020.90

Total ................................. $3,182.26









46

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS UP TO ANI)
INCLUDING FEBRUARY 28TH, 1914.

County. Amount.
Alachua ........................ 2,034.00
Baker .......................... 116.00
Bradford ....................... 393.00
Bay ........................... 297.00
Brevard ........................ 1,511.00
Calhoun ........................ 224.00
Columbia ....................... 289.00
Clay ........................... 792.00
Citrus ......................... 1,111.00
D uval ......................... 2,989.00
Dade ......................... 280.00
DeSoto ......................... 1,482.00
Escambia ...................... 1,314.00
Franklin ....................... 316.00
Gadkden ....................... 597100
Hillsboro ....................... 3,222.00
Holmes ........................ 418.00
Hamilton ....................... 215.00
Hernando ...................... 635.00
Jackson ........................ 632.00
Jefferson ....................... 1,266.00
Lake ........................... 1,987.00
Lee ........................... 1,625.00
Liberty ........................ 294.00
Leon ........................... 1,885.00
Levy ........................... 620.00
Lafayette ....................... 215.00
M anatee ....................... 1,216.00
Monroe ......................... 52.00
M adison ....................... 293.00
Marion ........................ 1,899.00
Nassau ......................... 216.00
Orange ......................... 1,586.00
Osceola ........................ 972.00












County. Amount.
Polk ........................... 2,411.00
Pasco .......................... 707.00
Pinellas ........................ 921.00
Palm Beach .................... 622.00
Putnam ......................... 850.25
St. Johns ....................... 793.00
Santa Rosa ..................... 251.00
Suwannee ...................... 436.00
Seminole ....................... 789.00
Sumter ......................... 378.00
St. Lucie ....................... 551.00
Taylor ......................... 312.00
Volusia ......................... 2,135.00
W alton ......................... 829.00
Washington ................... 328.00
W akulla ........................ 494.00

Receipts from sale of licenses.$45,800.25
Receipts from sale of permits.. 14.00

Total receipts ..............


DISBURSEMENTS.


Office Expenses, up to and includ-
ing February 28th, 1914. includ-
ing salaries ...................$
Wardens' Fees, from licenses sold.
Judges' Fees, from licenses sold...
Special Duty Services ...........
Secret Service Work ............
Court Costs ................... .

Balance to the credit of Depart-
m ent .........................


3,182.26
9,102.25
5,692.50
589.65
71.50
39.45 $18,677.61


$27,136.64


$45,814.25













AMOUNTS PAID WARDENS UNDER "SPECIAL
SERVICE" INSTRUCTIONS.


County.
Alachua ............
Bradford ............
B ay ................
Brevard .............
Clay .................
Citrus ..............
D uval ..............
D ade ...............
Franklin ............
Hillsboro ............
Jackson .. ......
Lake ...............
Leon ...............
L ee .................
Levy ...............
Manatee ............
M arion .............
Nassau .............
Osceola .............
Polk ................
Palm Beach .........
Putnam .............
St. Johns ...........
Taylor ..............
Volusia .............
W alton .............


No. of Days.
16-$48.00


13- 39.00
3- 9.00
8- 24.00
3- 9.00
10- 30.00
19-- 52.00
3- 9.00
3- 9.00
8- 24.00
3- 9.00
3- 9.00
3- 9.00
3- 9.00
3- 9.00
3- 9.00
3-- 9.00
3- 9.00
3- 9.00
3- 9.00
3- 9.00
11- 33.00
3- 9.00
3- 9.00
6- 18.00
3- 9.00


Total .................................. $589.65


Expenses.
.$23.50
19.50
3.25
7.50


4.40
4.50
8.90
4.50
4.50
7.50
6.00
3.00
4.50
7.50
3.00
3.15
6.00
2.20
16.50
6.25
4.50
6.00
3.00


Total.
$ 71.50
S58.50
12.25
31.50
9.00
30.00
52.00
13.40
13.50
'. in
13.50
13.50
16.50
15.00
12.00
13.50
16.50
12.00
12.15
15.00
11.20
49.50
15.25
13.50
24.00
12.00












NO PLANTING OF FISH FOR PROPAGATION
PROVIDED.

There has been no provision made under the Game and
Fish Laws of this State for the planting of fish for propa-
gation purposes and unless a check is made in catching
them or more strenuous laws enacted and enforced for
their protection, the supply, without question can not
last very long.

FOOD FISH NOT DEFINED.

Again it is well known that nearly all species of fish
caught for commercial purposes are used for food pur-
poses and yet, while some of the species .which furnish the
larger number of fish and which are used for food, are
not protected in the laws nor defined as food fish. If a
fish that is caught purely and simply for commercial pur-
poses and used for food only, is not a food fish, then in
my opinion, food fish cannot be defined. For instance,
there is no end to the amount of Cat Fish that are caught
from the rivers and lakes of this State for commercial
purposes and used absolutely for food, yet they have no
protection whatever under the laws of the State as they
are not defined as food fish.

DEPARTMENTS OF GAME AND FISH AND SHELL
FISH COMMISSION.

There is no doubt in my mind as to the value of the
Shell Fish of this State. What I have been unable to
see, however, is why the Shell Fish Department and,this
Department be operated separate and distinct when as a
matter of fact the work of the two Departments could
be made one and the same and operated at a small in-
crease to the present expense of this Department. Those
whose duty it would be to supervise the protection and
disposition of Shell Fish could render most valuable ser-
4 Game












vice to this Department without increased expense,
efforts, or responsibility if the two departments were con-
solidated. In my opinion the enactment and most rigid
enforcement of more strenuous laws pertaining to the
protection of fish is of more importance to the State
than any other law pertaining to this Department, and
with the consolidation of these two Departments the
present work of protection to fish and Shell Fish now
being done could be continued as stated before at a small
increase of expenses to this Department.

LEGAL ADVICE TO THE STATE GAME AND FISH
COMMISSIONER BY THE ATTORNEY GENERAL
OF THE STATE.

It will be seen that there are no laws requiring the
Attorney General of the State to furnish to the Commis-
sioner his written opinion upon any legal question that
might arise pertaining to this Department, neither is
there any provision for the Commissioner to employ legal
counsel for the prosecution of the violators of the Game
and Fish Laws or otherwise. Soon after entering upon
the duties of this office the Attorney General practically
declined to advise this Department, and rightfully so, as
his advices would not have been authorative, button the
other hand the Attorney General has undertaken to
advise different citizens of the State and rendered his
opinion on certain sections of the law governing this De-
partment which in some instances have been contrary
to my construction of the law and my advices to the
Wardens in enforcing the law.

GAME AND BIRDS DESTROYED BY DOGS.

There are numerous reasons for and ways of great
destruction of game and birds. One of the most destruc-
tive things to animal and bird life are the roaming or











wild dogs of the State. If an accurate count could be
made I venture to say that there are not less than 25,000
dogs that do not know where home is that are roaming
the State today destroying every young animal and bird
and bird-nest they can find. Dogs that are absolutely of
no value on earth to anyone. Each of them is more
destructive than a pot hunter who hunts in and out of
season and who exceeds the bag limit every day. Laws
should be enacted whereby these worthless and dangerous
varmints, called dogs, should be done away with and in-
asmuch as the present Fish Laws do not provide suffi-
cient revenue to the State for their enforcement, a rea-
sonable dog tax imposed upon each dog to be paid to
this Department would be sufficient revenue alone to
rigidly enforce more strenuous Game and Fish Laws.

NATURE'S STUDY.

The work of the Aubudon Societies of the State should
be appreciated very much, not only by the officers of this
Department, but by every citizen of the State. By co-
operating with them this Department can obtain valua-
ble assistance and information pertaining to the nature,
protection, and value of wild life. The time is long past
when nature study in its. various phases was one of the
so-called "fads" of the day, for in this age of progressive
education we are coming to realize that no subject is
more far-reaching and practical in its results than the
subject pertaining to and covered by the study of nature.
We believe in this day of specialization, that the con-
centrating of forces is, after all, the important thing.
From all of the various phases of nature study, then,
which one shall be chosen as most worthy of special
attention? After careful consideration I am convinced
that we may choose the study of wild life at the head of
the list and that the first of this is the life of the birds
for various reasons: 1st. From an esthetic standpoint,
for no other form of life or nature combines so much












grace, beauty and melody. 2nd. Because of the child's
natural interest in the subject, birds, due to their active
life which in a great measure corresponds to that of a
child's with their home life, joys and sorrows of their
daily work. 3rd. Because this subject trains the child's
powers of observation, thought and accuracy and great-
est of all, teaches the child gentleness, kindness, love and
perfection.
During the study and teaching of wild life, it takes
the mind of the child or pupil, as well as the teacher,
away from the daily thoughts and studies of life and
sometimes will take the pupil into active and beneficial
recreation in seeking to satisfy their interest in the actual
existence and life of wild Game, and Birds, which is of
great necessity to the present city or town life.

RECOMMENDATIONS.

To properly enforce the Game and Fish Laws for pro-
tection, and do the things needed to be done, more funds
must be provided for this purpose. I would therefore
recommend:
That the Hunting License fee be made as follows:
County Hunter's License ....................... $ 1.50
State Hunter's License ......................... 4.00
Non-Resident Hunter's License for one county.... 25.00
Non-Resident Hunter's License for entire State... 35.00
(Of the entire number of Non-Resident Hunter's
Licenses sold during the past season no one Non-Resident
purchased a license for more than one county. None will
object to paying $35.00 for the entire State.)
That each County Warden receive from the Hunter's
License sold as follows:
County Hunter's License ........................$ .50
State Hunter's License ........................ 1.00
Non-Resident County License .................... 4.00
Non-Resident State License ..................... 5.00












That a State License Tax be fixed on each dog in the
State according to its breed and value, the minimum dog
license tax to be 50c per annum and the maximum $5.00
per annum, and the payment of such taxes to be evidenced
by a metal tag of some form to be furnished by this De-
partment to each County Warden and said taxes shall be
payable annually.
That the Warden shall collect all dog taxes in his
county and shall retain one-half of the money so collect-
ed and shall remit the other one-half to this Department.
That it shall be the duty of each Warden to enforce
the license tax fixed upon dogs in his county and that
any dog found by him without the proper tag and collar
four months from date that the law is enacted shall be
disposed of as the Warden sees fit, but not held in cus-
tody by the Warden at the expense of the State.
That the ownership of all fish in the waters of the
State be vested in the State for protection and disposi-
tion according to the General Laws of the State. (This
is necessary in order to receive a revenue from the dispo-
sition of fish and in order to rigidly enforce the fish
laws. At present the fish are being sold by tons and the
revenue collected from Hunter's Licenses is being partly
spent in an effort to enforce the fish laws which do not
give protection. If more strenuous fish laws are intro-
duced you will readily see the amount of money and
time that will be spent by Florida fishermen or their
representatives, to defeat the same.)
That Food Fish be defined and to include Cat Fish.
That no fish shall be caught with any fixed stationery
device whatsoever, either dynamited or shot for any pur-
pose.
That all Special or Local laws of the several different
counties of the State pertaining to Game, Birds and Fish
be repealed.
That a fixed and high license fee be charged for fish-
ing for commercial purposes according to the length and












size of mesh of nets used and that no fish of any species
be caught or shipped for commercial purposes in any
of the waters of the State smaller than 10 inches in
length from the fork of its tail to the tip of its nose.
That no person shall be allowed to fish for commercial
purposes in any of the waters of the State except with
hook and line, without first securing a fishing license to
be issued by the County Judge under written application
which shall set forth the purpose for which the fish are
to be caught, description of the seine, net or device to
be used and the said license to have printed on the back
thereof a synopsis of the fish laws from the General
Statutes of the State and the license shall be counter-
signed by the State Game and Fish Commissioner, and if
for any reason the State Game and Fish Commissioner
refuses to sign said license the same shall be returned
to the County Judge who issued it and in turn said
County Judge shall return same to the applicant, to-
gether with his application and the fee paid for the
same, setting forth the reason given by the State Game
and Fish Commissioner for his refusal to countersign
same.
That the County Warden shall receive one-half of all
the collections made by the County Judge from the
issuance of fishing licenses and the County Judge shall
retain of the collection from the issuance of fishing
licenses 25% for his fee and shall remit the other 25%
to this Department.
That all collections from the sale of Hunter's Licenses,
Fishing Licenses and otherwise made by the County
Judges shall be remitted direct to the State Game and
Fish Commissioner between the first and fifth day of each
month for the month prior, less the amount paid the
Warden and retained by himself, thereby eliminating the
possibility of complications of financial accounts between
the County Judge, State Game and Fish Commissioner
and the State Treasurer, and that on the 15th day of each









55


month following the remittances to the State Game and
Fish Commissioner by the County Judges, the State Game
and Fish Commissioner shall remit to the State Treas-
urer the amount collected by him for the previous month.
That each County Warden be vested with authority
to make arrests of violators of the Game and Fish Laws
in any county of the State in order that the Wardens
may work jointly in the enforcement of the Game and
Fish Laws where the dividing line of two counties are
rivers, creeks or lakes and where the exact county lines
may not be thoroughly established in the minds of the
Wardens.
That the oath necessary to be made under the present
law by the applicant for Hunter's License be eliminated,
but that the Application Blanks shall contain a state-
ment by the applicant similar to that now in use and
that such statement shall be signed before two witnesses'
and in any case where a false statement is made the appli-
cant shall be subject to prosecution.
That fines collected from violations of the Game and
Fish Laws shall be paid one-half to the Game and Fish
Warden of the county in which the fine is imposed and
the other one-half shall be paid to this Department, and
that each county shall pay the witness fee in all cases
of prosecution, unless the sole witness be the Game and
Fish Warden for the county who shall receive no witness
.fee in any case.
That each Game and Fish Warden shall be allowed the
authority to appoint in any section of his county Deputy
Game and Fish Wardens whose compensation shall be
mutually fixed between the Warden and Deputy Warden
so appointed and to be paid from the compensations
which the Game and Fish Warden for the county receives.
That the State Game and Fish Commissioner have
authority to deputize any Deputy Game and Fish War-
den to work under "Special Service" duty for the same











compensation allowed the County Game and Fish War-
den.
That the State Game and Fish Commissioner be vested
with authority to expend such money as in his opinion
is necessary for the formation and reports for correct
information as to the natural life of wild game, birds
and fish in this State.
That the headquarters of the State Game and Fish
Commissioner shall be in the City of Jacksonville, Flor-
ida. (More people can be seen in Jacksonville from
whom information of value to this Department may be
had than can be in Tallahassee, thereby eliminating con-
siderable traveling expenses.)
That the State Game and Fish Commissioner be
authorized and required to purchase for the use of the
Department of Game and Fish, a suitable launch for the
work of protecting fish and gathering information for
the Department, the same when fully equipped to cost
not more than $2,500.00. (For the protection of fish a
launch is absolutely necessary in order to go to such
places where the main violations of the fish laws are
being committed.)
That the State Game and Fish Commissioner be
authorized and required to make a complete tour or in-
spection of all the navigable waters of the State and
gather such information necessary and possible to the
interest of this Department and that said tour and in-
spection be made if possible, between July 15th, 1915;
and October 1st, 1916, and that the State Game and Fish
Commissioner shall be allowed the necessary expenses
for food and otherwise and to engage the services of not
more than one person to accompany him as his assistant
at an expense of not more than $3.00 per day and ex-
penses for such time actually engaged, together with his
office stenographer 'and his expenses.
That the State Game and Fish Commissioner be
authorized to go to such expense as in his judgment is












reasonable and necessary to get and assist the Depart-
ment of Fisheries of the United States Government to
plant fish in such waters of the State of Florida as the
information obtained on his tour of inspection discloses
a scarcity of fish and the possibility of successful plant-
ing.
That the State Game and Fish Commissioner be
authorized to appoint any bona fide resident of the State
and who is willing to serve "Special Deputy Game and
Fish Commissioner" who shall have full authority to
enforce the Game and Fish Laws of the State and arrest
violators anywhere in the State of Florida, and who shall
be allowed $3.00 per day and expenses for such time
actually in the service of the Department.
That the State Game and Fish Commissioner shall be
authorized to appoint any bona fide resident of the State
(by a complimentary commission) Honorary Deputy
Game and Fish Commissioner, who is willing to serve
without compensation and who will have authority to
make arrests of any violators of the Game and Fish Laws.
That the State Game and Fish Commissioner be
authorized and requested to visit all the fisheries of the
State of California for the purpose of securing such
data as is possible to obtain with reference to propagat-
ing, protection and planting of fish which will be of
special benefit to him in the duties of his office and that
said visit shall be made, if possible, between June 1st
and July 1st, 1915, and that said trip shall include a trip
to two or more fisheries of the United States Govern-
ment.
That the State Game and Fish Commissioner shall de-
vote all of his time to the interest of the Department
of Game and Fish.
That for the convenience of the State Game and Fish
Commissioner $1,000.00 shall be set aside from the Game
and Fish Protection Fund of the State to his credit as
Game and Fish Commissioner, the same to be subject












to his check, but to remain the property of the State, and
no part of same shall be spent by him except in actual
expenses while performing the duties of his office and
that all checks given on said amount shall be signed by
him as State Game and Fish Commissioner and that he
shall be held legally bound for the return of same to the
Game and Fish Protection Fund of the State at the ex-
piration of his term of office.
That the salary of the State Game and Fish Commis-
sioner be increased to $3,000.00 per annum and necessary
office expenses, including a salary of $150.00 per month
for a clerk and a maximum traveling expense account of
$1,000.00 annually. (The allowance for traveling ex-
penses under the present law is not sufficient for the
Commissioner to obtain the true conditions that exist
in the entire State.)
That the Bond for the State Game and Fish Commis-
sioner be increased to $25,000.00 and if a Surety Bond
be given the premium on the same shall be chargeable
to his expense account and be borne by the State, pro-
vided all remittances are made to him direct.
That the County Judge's Bond be increased.
That $7,500.00 remain in the Game and Fish Protection
Fund on March 1st, when the Treasurer transfers the
balance of the net revenue from this Department to the.
General School Fund.
That a reasonable amount of monies shall be furnish-
ed to the State Superintendent of Public Instruction
from the funds created by this Department for the proper
education and teaching in the public schools of the State
the natural life of wild game, birds and fish of this
State, and that it devolve upon said Superintendent as
a duty to furnish such data pertaining to same to each
school as is obtainable. (There is nothing in my mind
that will soften or sweeten a lasting disposition of a
child more than the proper teaching of natural life.)
That the State Game and Fish Commissioner shall be











vested with authority to assist and co-operate with the
Aubudon Societies of the State in their work for the
protection of wild life wherever he deems it beneficial
to the Department.

That the State Game and Fish Commissioner be vested
with authority to have "Secret Service" work done for
the Department when in his judgment it will be beneficial
to the State, at an expense of not to exceed $5.00 per
day and expenses of such person or persons and for such
time as they are actually employed.
That the duties of assisting in the enforcement of the
Game and Fish Laws of the State shall also fall upon
the entire constabulary of the State and that by reason
of the creation of this Department the Sheriffs and
Deputy Sheriffs are not relieved of their duties to enforce
the Game and Fish Laws in their county.
That the Department of the Shell Fish Commission be
abolished and the work of the present Shell Fish Com-
mission be placed under the supervision and jointly with
this Department.
That the State Game and Fish Commissioner be vested
with authority to appoint a Deputy Game and Fish Com-
missioner whose main duty it will be to generally direct
and supervise the Shell Fish and commercial fishing in-
dustries and who shall be required to assist in the en-
forcement of the Game and Fish Laws of the State at
a salary of not more than $2,000.00 per annum with
necessary traveling and incidental expenses and who
shall at all times be under the supervision of the State
Game and Fish Commissioner.
That the State Game and Fish Commissioner shall be
vested with authority in such instances as he deemed
proper and necessary to employ legal counsel either for
advice to the Department, including himself, Deputy
Game and Fish Commissioner, Wardens and Deputy War-
dens, and also to prosecute violators when necessary or











to defend the action of anyone'connected with the De-
partment where defense is proper.
That the Attorney General of the State be authorized
and required to furnish the State Game and Fish Com-
missioner, upon written request from him, his written
opinion on any section of the laws pertaining to Game,
Birds and Fish.
I have not the least idea that the larger percent of
these recommendations will be provided, but if our Rep-
sentatives-elect and Senators-elect investigate the true
conditions that exist in this State pertaining to wild life
and compare it with the present laws, I will get their
support in practically every request that I have made.
It was not the intent of the Legislators who created
this Department that it be for revenue only, but the pri-
mary purpose of the Department was protection and
proper disposition of the Game, Birds and Fish of the
State, and proper protection cannot be given and proper
disposition cannot be made under the present laws.
I appreciate the cooperation you have given me in the
interest of this Department, which has been of great
assistance to me in discharging the duties of the office.
I desire to thank the Wardens for the services they have
rendered, and while the public generally does not know
it, considering the conditions that exist, I feel their serv-
ices have been extremely good.
I thank those whose interest in the success of this work
has been manifested, and I especially desire to thank
Hon. Charles Willis Ward, who has so liberally offered
to contribute to the work in the protection of the birds
of Lee County. I desire to make special mention of my
appreciation of the work that has been and is now being
accomplished by the many members of the Audubon
Societies. Their work is very valuable to this Depart-
ment, and I have no doubt that the creation of the De-
partment was founded upon their past activity in the
protection of wild life.












I desire that this be accepted as a personal appeal to
all who are interested in the success of this Department
to cooperate with me in the work in order that success
will be the ending.
I would respectfully ask each and everyone interested
in the protection of wild life to ask the careful consider-
ation of each and every Representative in the next Legis-
lature and ask them to write the addresses given herein
and obtain information from Departments similar to
this in other States and countries and see what great
good they can do for their State by enacting laws at the
next session of the Legislature that will protect our
Game, Birds and Fish, and making proper provision for
the enforcement of the laws that they enact.
I shall be very glad to answer any questions, if possi-
ble, that the reader of this report might feel sufficiently
interested to ask regarding the subjects it deals with.
I have the honor to remain,
Very truly yours,
E. Z. JONES,
Commissioner.













The following is the form of Application required under the present law, for Hunter's License:
"APPLICATION FOR HUNTER'S LICENSE
ORIGINAL. ................................ Fla .......................... 19 ....
County Judge of ............................ County, Florida.
Please issue to me.................................................... .. ............. Hunter's License for
(State kind wanted.)
............ .... .. .................... for which I hand you herewith $ ................................ I
(County or State.)
hereby declare under oath, that I am ........ years old; my sex is. ................... Race is. ..........................
height is .........................., my eyes are .................., my hair is................, and that I can ........
write my name and that I am a resident of ............................. County and State of ..........................

(Applicant.)
I, ................... ..........................., hereby certify that ..........................................
(Applicant.)
the above applicant personally appeared before me, who being duly sworn, says under oath that the declarations set out
in the foregoing are true, and being further sworn, says he has been a resident of the State of ............................
for .................... years.

The following is the form for Application for Hunter's License which I have recommended to be used, and which eliminates
the oath:
"APPLICATION FOR HUNTER'S LICENSE
ORIGINAL. .............................. Fla., ................. ...... 19....
County Judge of ........................... County, Florida.
Please issue to m e........................... .. ... ......................... ......... Hunter's License for
(State kind wanted.)
........ .......................... for which I hand you herewith .......................
(County or State.)
I hereby certify that I am ................. years old; my sex is .................... my race is. .................
my height is ...................... ; my eyes are .................... ; my hair is ......................... and that I
can.......... write my name, and that I have been a resident of........................................ in the County of
(Postoffice address.)
............ ........... State o .,. ................. for ................. years.

(Applicant.)












63


NAMES AND ADDRESSES OF COUNTY WARDENS.


NAME.


COUNTY.

Alachua,
Baker,
Bradford,
Bay,
Brevard,
Calhoun,
Columbia,
Clay,
Citrus.
Duval,
Dade,
DeSoto,
Escambia,
Franklin,
Gadsden,
Hillsboro,
Holmes,
Hamilton,
Hcrnando,
Jackson,
Jefferson,
Lake,
Lee,
Liberty,
Leon,
Levy,
Lafayette,
Manatee,
Monroe,
Madison,
Marion,
Nassau,
Orange,
Osceola,
Polk,
Pasco,
Pinellas,
Palm Beach,
Putnam,
St. Johns,
Santa Rosa,
Suwannee,
Seminole,
Sumter,
St. Lucie,
Taylor,
Volusia,
Walton,
Washington,
Wakulla,


ADDRESS.


L. W. Jackson,
J. T. Dorman,
A. A. Hazen,
J. A. Thomas,
S. E. Rice,
E. Henderson,
J. T. Morris,
O. T. Blltch,
J. M. Hodges,
D. J. Herrin,
W. N. Hull,
T. S. Carlton,
J. F. Davis,
A. S. Campo,
J. D. Clark,
T. Q. Jones,
John W. Hawkins,
A. A. Avariett,
I. R. Lisk,
E. G. Kilpatrick,
J. H. Girardeau,
S. P. Kirkland,
G. R. Jones,
J. J. Parrish,
T. H. Cromartie,
W. B. Mozo,
John S. Bodiford,
Chas. F. McCall,
BenJ. R. Hart,
S. B. Mays,
C. W. Smith,
A. B. Jones,
E. C. McDowell,
M. B. Carson,
R. S. Cheatham,
E. J. Gasque,
L. N. Hendry,
G. B. Snell.
J. R. Cannon,
W. J. Williams.
D. Q. Hurst,
None.
A. T. Rossiter,
I. P. Rainey,
J. W. Knight,
H. C. Vick,
S. D. Peacock,
T. J. McKee,
F. B. Calloway,
J. E. Forbes,


Gainesville.
Macclenny,
Brooker.
Panama City.
Titusville.
Blountstown.
Lake City.
Peoria.
Crystal River.
Jacksonville.
Miami.
Arcadia.
Pensacola.
Apalachicola.
Mt. Pleasant.
Edison, Junction.
Westville.
Jennings.
Riggola.
Marianna.
Monticello.
Altoona.
Marco.
Wilma.
Miccosukie.
Rosewood.
Eugene.
Manatee.
Key West.
Madison.
Ocala.
Yulee.
Orlando.
Kissimmee.
Bartow.
Dade City.
Clearwater.
West Palm Beach.
Palatka.
St. Augustine.
Iolley.
Sanford.
Oxford.
Vero.
Perry.
DeLand.
DeFunlak Springs.
Chipley.
Crawfordville.












64


FOR INFORMATION REGARDING HUNTING AND FISHING

IN DIFFERENT COUNTRIES AND STATES.


STATE.

Alabama,
Arizona,
Arkansas,
California,
Colorado,
Connecticut,
Delaware,
District of Columbia,
Florida,
Georgia,
Idaho,
Illinois,
Indiana,
Iowa,
Kansas,
Kentucky,
Louisiana,
Maine,
Maryland,
Massachusetts,
Michigan,
Minnesota,
Mississippi,
Missouri,
Montana,
Nebraska,
Nevada,
New Hampshire,
New Jersey,
New Mexico,
New York,
North Carolina,
North Dakota,
North Dakota,
Ohio,
Oklahoma,
Oregon,
Pennsylvania,
Rhode Island,
South Carolina,
South Dakota,
Tennessee,
Texas,
Utah,
Vermont,
Virginia,
Washington,
West Virginia,
Wisconsin,
Wyoming,
COUNTRIES.
Alaska,
Alberta,
British Columbia,
Manitoba,
New Brunswick,
Newfoundland,
Nova Scotia,
Ontario,
Quebec,
Saskatchewan.
U. S. Federal Laws,


NAME.

J. H. Wallace, Jr.,
Board of G. & F. Com.,
E. V. Visart,
Board of G. & F. Com.,
Jas. A. Shinn,
C. II. Pease,
Board of G. & F. Com.,
Richard Sylvester,
E. Z. Jones,
J. E. Mercer,
O. H. Barber,
J. A. Wheeler,
Geo. W. Mills,
E. C. Hinshaw,
L. L. Dyche,
J. Quincy Ward,
Conservation Com.,
J. S. P. I-. Wilson,
Franklin E. Cox,
Dept. Fisher's & Game,
Wm. R. Oates,
Board of G. & F. Com..
Miles Carroll,
Jesse A. Tolerton,
J. L. DeHart,
Gust Rutenbeck,
I;...r-. Brodigan,
I'1b & Game Coms.,
Board of G. & F. Com.,
Trinidad C. DeBaca,
N. Y. Conservat'n Com.
J. Q. Cheshire,
E. B. McCutcheon,
W. F. Reko,
John C. Speaks,
John B. Doolin,
Wm. L. Finley,
Dr. Jas. Kalbfus,
C. H. Pierce.
A. A. Richardson,
II. S. IIedrick,
W. D. Howser,
J. D. Cox,
F. W. Chambers,
John W. Titcomb,
L. T. Christian,
L. H. Darwin,
J. A. Viquesney,
John A. Sholts,
D. F. Hudson,

NAME.
Dept. of Agr. of U. S.,
Benj. Lawton,
A. Bryan Williams,
Charles Barber,
Crown Land Dept.,
A. W. Piccott,
J. A. Knight.
Edward Tinsley,
Sector Caron,
Fred Bradshaw,
Henry W. Henshaw,


ADDRESS.

Montgomery, Ala.
Phoenix, Ariz.
Little Rock, Ark.
San Francisco, Cal.
Denver, Colo.
Canaan, Conn.
Wilmington, Del.
Washington, D. C.
Jacksonville, Fla.
Atlanta, Ga.
Boise, Idaho.
Springfield, Ill.
Indianapolis, Ind.
Spirit Lake, Iowa.
Pratt, Kan.
Frankfort, Ky.
New Orleans, La.
Auburn, Me.
Baltimore, Md.
Boston, Mass.
Lansing, Mich.
St. Paul, Minn.
Yazoo City, Miss.
Jefferson City, Mo.
Helena, Mont.
Lincoln, Neb.
Carson City, Nev.
Concord, N. H.
Trenton, N. J.
Santa Fe, New Mex.
Albany, N. Y.
Raleigh, N. C.
Minot, N. D.
Mandan, N. D.
Columbus, Ohio.
Oklahoma City, Okla.
Portland, Ore.
IIarrisburg. Pa.
Rumford, R. I.
Columbia, S. C.
Pierre, S. Dak.
Nashville, Tenn.
Austin, Texas.
Salt Lake City, Utah.
Lyndonville, Vt.
Richmond, Va.
Billingham, Wash.
Bellington, W. Va.
Madison, Wis.
Lander, Wyo.
ADDRESS.
Washington, D. C.
Edmondton, Alta, Can.
Vancouver, B. C.
Winnipeg, Man., Can.
Fredericton, N. B.
St. John, N. F.
Halifax, N. S., Can.
Toronto, Ont.
Quebec, Can.
Regina, Sask. Can.
Washington, D. C.











THE WHIPPOOR WILL.

The Whippoorwill needs no introduction: It is more than a
bird-it is a national favorite.' When the mantle of night has
fallen, and the busy world is still, we who are in the country in
summer often hear a loud, clear, melodious whistle from some-
where near the barn. As plainly as print, it exclaims, "Whip-
Poor-Will !" and repeats it, again and again. Before each regular
call, there is a faint "chuck," or catching of the breath, strong
emphasis on the "whip," and at the end a piercing whistle which
is positively thrilling.

Sometimes the bird will come and perch within thirty feet of
your tent-door, and whistle at the rate of forty whippoorwills to
the minute. Its call awakens sentimental reflections, and upon
most persons exercises a peculiar, soothing influence. It has been
celebrated in several beautiful poems and songs.

The range of this interesting bird Is the same as that of the
nighthawk. In the South, both are replaced by another goat-
sucker called, from its whistle, the Chuck-Will's Widow. Until
actually hearing it, one can scarely believe that any bird of this
order can say things as plainly as this bird says "Chuck Will's
Widow!" The Pacific States, from British Columbia to Mexico.
and eastward to Nebraska, have the Whippoorwill.
-Selected.


IN THE HEART OF THE WOODS.
Such beautiful things in the heart of the woods!
Flowers and ferns and the soft green moss;
Such love of .the birds in the solitudes,
Where the swift wings glance, and the tree-tops toss;
Space of silence, swept with song
Which nobdy hears but the God above;
Spaces where myriad creatures throng,
Sunning themselves in his Guardian love.

Such safety and peace in the heart of the woods,
Far from the city's dust and din,
Where passion nor hate of man intrudes,
Nor fashion nor folly has entered in.
Deeper than hunter's trail hath gone
Glimmers the tarn where the wild deer drink;
And fearless and free comes the gentle fawn
To peep at herself o'er the grassy brink.

5 Game












Such pledge of love in the heart of the woods.
For the Maker all things keeps the least,
And over the tiny owlet broods
With care that for ages has never ceased.
If he care for this will he not for thee-
Thee, whatever thou art today?
Child of an infinite Father see;
And safe in such gentlest keeping stay.

-Margaret E. Sangster.

(Selected from Hon. John H. Wallace's Alabama "Bird Day
Book).




SPRING.

I hear the wild geese honking
From out the misty night-
A sound of moving armies
'On-sweeping in their might;
The river ice is drifting
Beneath their northward flight.

I hear the bluebird plaintive
From out the morning sky,
Or see his wings a-twinkle
That with the azure vie;
No other bird more welcome,
No more prophetic cry.

I hear the sparrow's ditty
Anear my study door;
A simple song of gladness
That winter days are o'er;
My heart is singing with him,
I love him more and more.

I hear the startling fluting
His liquid "O-ka-lee;"
I hear the downy drumming
His vernal reveille;
From out the maple orchard
The nuthatch calls to me.
















0, spring is surely coming-
Her courtiers fill the air;
Each morn are new arrivals;
Each night her ways prepare;
I scent her fragrant garments,
Her foot is on the stair.
-Joh burroughs.


THE BIRDS IN CHURCH.

God's happy children of the air
On leafy boughs are swaying,
While beings fair with forms divine
Are in the churches praying.

Cathedral grand with vaulted skies,
The songs of birds are filling;
The wide extended plains of heaven
Are with their rapture thrilling.

They chant the anthems of their King
And worship Him with singing;
Who listens to their songs may hear
The chimes of heaven a-ringing.

We bow before the Lord in prayer,
Our love to Him expressing;
The prayer is said, we rise, and lo!
We see a sight distressing.

From bough to bough, from tree to tree,
The birds, no longer flitting,
All bruised and crushed and cold and dead.
On ladies' hats are sitting.

And now no chirping music wild
On airy wings is swelling;
The voiceless birds to church have gone
To find an alien dwelling.

Within, the sinners, vain with pride,
Believe that God is hearing
While on their shapeless hats, in truth.
Five million birds they're wearing.













68

Methinks could all. those lifeless birds
Our hearts with songs be filling,
A plaintive voice to us would say,
"Why don't you stop this killing?"

'An answer bold in haste is made,
"What cares a bird for living?"
Just this, kind friend, to live the life
That God to it is giving.

No tearful voice, no whispered song,
Can end without His knowing;
Spare, then, the birds whose songs do set
The world to music going.
-Selected.


THE LITTLE BIRD TELLS.

It's strange how little boys' mothers
Can find it all out as they do,
If a fellow does anything naughty,
Or says anything that's not true.
They'll look at you just for a moment,
Till your heart in your bosom swells,
And then they know all about it,
For a little bird tells.

Now where the little bird comes from,
Or where the little bird goes;
If he's covered with beautiful plumage
Or black as the king of crows;
If his voice is as hoarse as the raven's,
Or clear as the ringing of bells,
I know not, but this I am sure of-
A little bird tells.

And the only contrivance to stop him
Is just to be sure what you say-
Sure of facts and your fancies,
Sure of your facts and your fancies,
Be honest, he brave and be kindly ;
Be gentle and loving as well,
And then you can laugh at the stories
The little bird tells. -Selected.
















THE RED BIRD.
I watch his wings in thickets dim,
For sunset seems to follow him-
Sunset from some mysterious West
Whose crimson glory girds his breast,
A winged ruby wrought of fame,
Whence comes his beauty? whence his name?
Clear as a bright awakening beam
Through the vague vista of a dream,
An answer comes. I seem to feel
The flash of armor, glint of steel,
The whirr of arrows quick and keen,
The battle-axe's baleful sheen,
The long, relentless spear whose thrust
Makes the mad foeman writhe in dust;
The din of conflict and the stress
Of war's incarnate angriness; *
A wavering mass; a panic wrough
Swift'as some stormy burst of thought;
Then distance hides a vanquished host,
And sound becomes a wandering ghost.
But soon I see. half-poised in air,
And stricken by a nameless fear,
A small, brown-breasted bird, whose eyes
Are clouded with a deep surprise-
The earliest bird with terror rife
At wild waste of human life.
How soon his dread to wonder turns,
As downward where a life-stream burns
He darts and dips his quivering wings.
While o'er his heart the crimson clings!
With ruthful eyes and reverent face
He hovers slowly o'er the place;
And when at last his wings are spread.
A lurid luster crowns his head,
And his bright body soars afar,
Red as autumnal sunsets are. -Selected.

THE BIND OF OMEN.
When summer suns are blazing down.
And stifling heat hangs o'er the town;
When brooks are stilled and fields are sere,
And corn is popping on the ear;
When collars wilt and breezes shirk.
















And soda squirts get in their work-
What bird is he whose cheery voice
Awakens hope and bids rejoice?
A bird whose Tetrazinni note
Wells from an inconsistent throat,
For hearts oppressed with heat and woe?
The Rain Crow!

When clouds sag heavy in the sky,
And woodland paths are far from dry;
When wayside brooklets, like the lark,
Arise, above high-water mark;
When picnic grounds are drenched clear through,
And tennis courts run in a slough-
What bird is he whose raucous croak
Falls on the heart like leaden stroke
Of doom, and makes the outdoor man
Give utt'rance to a fervent "damn!"
As he searches for a stone to throw?-
The Rain Crow! -Selected.

BOBOLINK.
This bird is about seven inches in length; it breeds from Ohio
northeast to Nova Scotia, north to Manitoba. and northwest to
British Columbia, and winters in South America.
When American writers awoke to the beauty and attractiveness
of our native birds, among the first to be enshrined in song and
story was the bobolink. Few species show such striking contrasts
in the color of the sexes, and few have songs more unique and
whimsical. In its northern home the bird is loved for its beauty
and its rich melody; in the South it earns deserved hatred by its
destructiveness. Bobolinks reach the southeastern coast of the
United States the last half of April just as rice is sprouting and
at once begin to pull up and devour the sprouting kernels. Soon
they move on to their northern breeding grounds, where they feed
upon insects, weed seeds and a little grain. When the young are
well on the wing, they gather in flocks with the parent birds and
gradually move southward, being then generally known as reed
birds. They reach the rice fields of the Carolinas about August
when the rice is in the milk. Then until the birds depart for
South America planters and birds fight for the crop, and in spite
of constant watchfulness and innumerable devices for scaring the
birds a loss often per cent of the rice is the usual result.
(From hon. John Wallace's "Bird Day Book.")












NIGHTINGALE.
Widely heralded in song and story as the producer of the highest
and most perfect type of bird music is the celebrated Nightingale.
This is a small, plain bird, being only a trifle over six inches
long, uniform brown tinged with rufous above and grayish white
beneath. It is a migratory species, coming in April from its winter
home in Africa to southern and central Europe, returning year
after year to the same localities. It is ordinarily a rather shy
bird, frequently woodlands, groves, bramble thickets and hedges.
especially along streams where it secures its food, which consists
exclusively of insects, mainly on the ground, in general habits
and appearance much resembling the Robin. It has the habit of
hopping rapidly by fits and starts, standing erect and motionless
at intervals as if to listen, and occasionally throwingup the tail
and lowering the head and wings, just as the Robin does. It com-
mences to sing a few days after its arrival, keeping it up until
the young are hatched in June, singing in fine weather at intervals
during the day and often late into the night. The Nightingale
makes a rather large, loose nest of dead leaves and grasses, lined
with finer grasses, rootlets, and occasionally horse-hair, placing it
on or near the ground u-der a hedge or in a dense thicket. The
female is solicitous for the care of the eggs and young, and at
this season often permits of a close approach. -Selected.
(From Hon. John Wallace's Alabama "Bird Day Book.")


BEAUTIFUL ISLE.
Somewhere the sun is shining,
Somewhere the song-birds dwell;
Hush, then, thy sad repining,
God lives and all is well.

Somewhere the day is longer,
Somewhere the task is done;
Somewhere the heart is stronger,
Somewhere the guerdon won.

Somewhere the load is lifted,
Close by an open gate;
Somewhere the clouds are rifted,
Somewhere the angels wait.

Somewhere, Somewhere, Beautiful Isle of Somewhere!
Land of the true where we live anew,
Beautiful Isle of Somewhere! -Selected.











NIGHTHAWK.

Length. 10 inches. Not to be confused with the whippoorwill.
The latter lives in woodland and is chiefly nocturnal. The night-
hawk often flies by day, when the white bar across the wing and
its nasal cry are distinguishing.
Range: Breeds throughout most of the United States and
Canada; winters in South America.
Habits and economic status: The skillful evolutions of a com-
pany of nighthawks as the birds gracefully cleave the air in inter-
secting circles is a sight to be remembered. So expert are they on
the wing that no insect is safe from them, even the swift dragon-
fly being captured with ease. Unfortunately their erratic flight
tempts men to use them for targets, and this inexcusable practice
is seriously diminishing their numbers, which is deplorable, since
no birds are more useful. This species makes no nest, but lays Its
two spotted eggs on the bare ground, sometimes on the gravel
roof of the city house. The nighthawk is a voracious feeder and
is almost exclusively insectivorous. Some stomachs contained
from 30 to 50 different kinds of insects, and more than 600 kinds
have been identified from the stomachs thus far examined. From
500 to 1,000 ants are often found in a stomach. Several species
of mosquitoes, including Anopheles, the transmitter of malaria, are
eaten. Other well-known pests destroyed by the nighthawk are
the Colorado potato beetle, cucumber beetles, chestnut, rice, clover-
leaf and cotton-boll-weevils, billbugs, bark beetles, squash bugs.
and moths of the cotton worm.
(From Hon. John Wallace's Alabama "Bird Day Book.")




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