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Title: Annual report of the Florida Citrus Exchange.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075941/00030
 Material Information
Title: Annual report of the Florida Citrus Exchange.
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Florida Citrus Exchange
Publisher: The Exchange,
Publication Date: 1957-1958
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075941
Volume ID: VID00030
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ajg6778 - LTUF
46798761 - OCLC
001753794 - AlephBibNum

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Back Cover
        Page 16
Full Text










JUL 1

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FLORIDA


CITRUS


EXCHANGE


ANNUAL REPORT


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Independence and voluntary teamwork in the growing and
marketing of quality citrus was the foundation upon which the
Florida Citrus Exchange was established nearly fifty years
ago as a federated agricultural cooperative.
That the plan of its founders was sound has been shown through
its continued growth and increased strength despite war, depression and
freaks of nature. The Florida Citrus Exchange is proud of its thirty-five
members and despite the influx of other sales organizations, it
is our belief that the grower-owned cooperatives, both
cannery and fresh, are on the threshold of
an even more profitable future.
This, then, is the Seald-Sweet Story -













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W. H. CLARK FRUIT CO.,
Jacksonville
LAKE REGION PACKING ASSN.,
Tavares
MT. DORA GROWERS COOP.,
Mt. Dora
McLEOD FRUIT COMPANY,
Citra
ORLANDO C. G. A.,
Orlando
PLYMOUTH C. G. A.,
Plymouth
THEODORE STRAWN, INC.,
DeLeon Springs
UMATILLA C. G. A.,
Umatilla
WEST ORANGE C. G. A.,
Tildenville
WINTER GARDEN C. G. A.,
Winter Garden
ALCOMA PACKING CO., INC.,
Lake Wales
LAKE GARFIELD CITRUS COOP.,
Lake Garfield
DUNDEE C. G. A.,
Dundee


FLORENCE C. G. A.,
Florence Villa
HUNT BROS. COOPERATIVE,
Lake Wales
WINTER HAVEN C. G. A.,
Winter Haven
BROOKSVILLE C. G. A.,
Brooksville
CLEARWATER GROWERS ASSN.,
Clearwater
ELFERS C. G. A.,
Elfers
PALM HARBOR C. G. A.,
Palm Harbor
FLAMINGO GROVES, INC.,
Ft. Lauderdale
COCOA-MERRITT ISLAND
CITRUS ASSN.,
Cocoa
FT. PIERCE GROWERS ASSN.,
Ft. Pierce
GRAVES BROS. CO.,
Wabasso
INDIAN RIVER ASSOCIATES, INC.,
Vero Beach
MIMS C. G. A.,
Mims


OAK HILL C. G. A.,
Oak Hill
OSLO C. G. A.,
Vero Beach
LOXAHATCHEE GROVES,
West Palm Beach
E. P. PORCHER ESTATE,
Cocoa
TUXEDO FRUIT CO., INC.,
Ft. Pierce
VERO-INDIAN RIVER
PRODUCERS ASSN.,
Vero Beach
INDIAN RIVER EXCHANGE
PACKERS, INC.,
Vero Beach
INDIAN RIVER GROWERS SERVICE,
Vero Beach
SEBRING PACKING GO.. INC.,
Sebring
DISTRICT OFFICES
Harold Worden, District Manager,
Winter Haven
C. M. Seraphine, District Manager,
Vero Beach
























In distributing centers throughout the
United States and Canada and in foreign
countries, Seald-Sweet frsii )zen con-
centrate d jrength juice is recognized
e mark of quality.
Pictured on the map are the distribution
centers in these areas sales points making
dollars for all members of the Florida Citrus
Exchange.


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TELETYPE service supplements
the telephone in keeping pace
with orders.
Modern Western Union FAX
machines provide direct contact
with the Tampa
office. During the marketing
season your Citrus Exchange
has its own Western Union
office and operator.

to key distribution points around
the country, assure fast, efficient
handling of all marketing
problems. Teamwork is important
to turn citrus into dollars
for Exchange members.











I A

SALES are the ba one of any organization!
Citrus marketing is died by a trained staff
of more than 30 har rking, experienced
marketing experts. Their knowle ed to the
facts and figures received by telephone, t raph and
teletype assure fast handling of all orders with a
minimum of delay regardless of the distance
involved. The Florida Citrus Exchange sales
organization has behind it nearly a half century
of selling quality citrus.








THE STATISTICAL DEPARTMENT ...
is a very important team member. USDA
reports on other United States areas, plus
daily, weekly and annual reports to the
agricultural marketing service of
the USDA are but a few of the important
assignments handled by this department.
This Department can provide almost
immediately, weekly and "season to date"
reports, or an annual report for any year
giving auction sales data by cities, cars, and
averages, or any other statistical information
that helps do a better marketing and
selling job. Trained pers modern
equipment and years o ce
in reporting the movements and sa
of quality citrus have developed this
department into a key spot on
the Seald-Sweet team.







I.

















BILLING with speed and accuracy is an important part
of the service provided by the Exchange. Member-shippers
find assurance in the fact that the Exchange has never
lost a penny for any of its grower affiliates through a bad
account. Large and small orders, each ne specifically tailored
to the marketing requirements of the 'l'ributor who placed it,
must be quickly and accurately plac,! dn the record. A trained
staff of accountants and bookk gpers, plus the most modern
equipment available, $Ikes it possible to remit all
returns to merit r houses within 24 hours after
receipt at the Tampa office.
Last year we grossejj Tes approximately $30,000,000.00. The
billing deWF ent reported no uncollectables-proof of
gund and practical credit and collection policy.
iAnother reason for confidence in the Exchange
on behalf of the members-shippers.


I I I x;l- --_1











SALES
FRED S. JOHNSTON, General Sales Manager

The cooperative selling efforts of the Florida Citrus Exchange
in merchandising and marketing quality "SEALD-SWEET" citrus
represents experience, time, and effort, on behalf of a dedicated team
of men and women. These key people, who man important posts,
pictured on preceding pages, together with our northern salaried rep-
resentatives, are the backbone of an effective sales department.
While there are competitive sales organizations in our industry, it
is becoming more and more apparent that consolidation of personnel,
communications, promotion, and merchandising can result in sub-
stantial savings in selling costs and could very easily increase returns
to growers one dollar, or more, per box.
Due to the series of freezes we had during the past winter, which
were the most severe cold spells we have had in over sixty years, our
shipping season will close by June 1, with the exception of approxi-
mately 75,000 boxes of Pope Summer oranges that we will be shipping
from the Indian River section throughout the month of June. This
will be the earliest closing date that we have had in many years.
While some young groves were completely killed by the freezes,
many groves were severely injured and the fruit on them a total loss.
The over-all volume was reduced from 102 million boxes of oranges
to 84,000,000 boxes; the volume of grapefruit reduced from 38,000,000
boxes to 31,000,000; and the volume of tangerines reduced from
4,500,000 boxes to 2,300,000 boxes, a total reduction of 27,200,000
boxes, the industry as a whole will receive more money than had the
freezes not occurred due to increased prices.
Despite the freaks of nature to our prosperous industry, we can
well be proud of the fact that while the state average for fresh fruit
shipments has gone down during this past season, the average of our
members has shown an increase. As of May 10, 1958, the state had
had a loss in fresh fruit shipments of 14,124 cars, while our organization
had a gain of 138 cars over last season.
During the past season the sales department has sold Florida fresh
fruit in 44 of the 48 states and in 8 of the 10 Canadian provinces.
The sales department has done an excellent selling job, under
unprecedented conditions.
Personnel has been held intact and we are looking forward con-
fidently to next season's operation, when we expect continued good
volume and a continuation of good prices.














,-..- -- -
PRE-PACKAGING IN NEW JERSEY A PROFITABLE AND EFFICIENT OPERATION. Pictured above are
scenes from the pre-packaging plant showing the (1) citrus being unloaded from boxes, (2) packaged in polyethylene bags
and (3) examined before delivery to retail outlets. Another service of the Florida Citrus Exchange.







EXPORT
HOWARD N. BARON. Manager

This report marks the end of the fourth season of your Export
Division's activities and we feel that the year just past has been a
successful one.
A map on proceeding pages shows where the famous Seald-Sweet
quality citrus has been distributed overseas and we have increased our
exports of fresh single-strength and concentrated juices in these areas
as well.
Your Export Division visited the trade in Europe last summer. This
was also the first visit ever made to Iceland by executives of the Florida
Citrus Industry. We now supply 9ur of this remote market and feel
that we have a good chance to increase our sales to this country.
Your Export Division's aim is to continue to develop present mar-
kets and to find new ones for our increasing crops.


LEGAL
COUNTS JOHNSON, General Counsel

In addition to the ever-increasing routine legal matters handled
each year by the Legal Department, the Exchange's attorney spent
much time and effort this season on matters relating to wage and hour
rulings and regulations, trade-marks, claims and suits against carriers,
claims under the Federal Perishable Agricultural Commodities Act and
rules and regulations of the Florida Citrus Commission applicable to
fruit damaged by the successive freezes in Florida.
During the year, the Legal and Tax Committee of the National
Council of Farmer Cooperatives created a number of important sub-
committees. The Exchange's attorney was named chairman of the sub-
committee on Administrative Law.
In February, 1958, the Commissioner of Internal Revenue an-
nounced his acquiescence in certain Federal court decisions dealing
with the income tax status of patrons receiving non-cash patronage
dividends from cooperative associations. One important Legal Depart-
ment assignment was the complete re-vamping and modernization of
the Exchange's Charter and By-Laws.


TRAFFIC
PAUL C. SARRETT, Manager

The Traffic Departments again experienced an extremely heavy
workload during the 1957-58 citrus fruit season. Notwithstanding a
20 per cent decrease in the total State movement of fresh citrus, the
increase in the Exchange movement, up to May 10, amounted to slightly
less than 140 cars.
During the same period 50.4 per cent of our fresh citrus fruit
moved by truck, while 49.6 per cent moved by rail, which compares
with a state movement of 61.2 per cent by truck and 38.8 per cent
by rail.
From September 1, 1957, to May 20, 1958, the Traffic Department
processed a total of 966 rail and truck claims of all descriptions, amount-
ing to $86,211.59. Collections during the same period amount to
$62,870.17, the preponderance of which accrued to the benefit of the
growers.
Compared to previous seasons, there will be a time lapse between
the close of this season and the beginning of next season. This time will
be used to prepare new rate and route charts, schedule data, and pro-
cessing claims on late shipments.


1
















This has been indeed a critical year for our entire citrus
industry. It is gratifying to know, however, that all of our mem-
bers of the Florida Citrus Exchange have for the most part
fared better than the average during the freeze. The fast-moving
and efficient marketing and sales organization of the Exchange
coupled with our lines of communications have provided our
members with every advantage price-wise in a fast-changing
and rapidly moving market. It is logical to assume that out of
the past winter will come research in many fields to provide
greater cold tolerance plus better quality and production.

While our Florida Citrus crop will probably be much
smaller, we feel that the recent report of the USDA and their
figure of 62% of a "full crop" is fairly accurate. We all realize
that the winter freeze will probably result in lowered production
for the next two or three years, but we are confident that mem-
bers of the Florida Citrus Exchange will continue to enjoy
premium prices for their quality fruit because of our active and
experienced distribution organization in northern and Canadian
markets.



















In this year's Annual Report we have stressed teamwork-team-
work by all of the fine men and women who are working for you
year 'round to provide fast, efficient service in their respective jobs
consistent with sound management policies.
Despite the critical winter just past, we are confident that the
3,500 members of the various associations making up the Exchange
can look forward to intensifying efforts on behalf of all of us to get
quality Seald-Sweet products to the consumer at its full market price
and at the lowest possible cost.
Next year marks one-half century of service to the citrus industry.
All of us here at the Exchange feel confident that our members will
be able to see first-hand the effectiveness of this organization as their
crop matures and goes to market, guided, directed and sold by the
teamwork that has been built up through years of efforts, planning
and know-how.
More adequate and scientific marketing methods must be devised
to put a good quality product, both fresh and processed, before the
'4 consumer and at the same time assure the producer the top dollar for
his output. That too, is part of our program for the coming year.
The Florida Citrus Exchange-a federated agricultural cooperative
-has proved that the principle of voluntary teamwork and skilled
organization can, and will continue, to produce sales for its grower-
members.



HERE'S PROOF OF OUR FUTURE

FLORIDA CITRUS EXCHANGE MEMBERS
SHOWED AN INCREASE
IN CARS SHIPPED IN 1958






S80 101.2

100%






STATE FLORIDA CITRUS EXCHANGE
*May 10, 1958


















BUT LET'S LOOK AT THE FACTS!

The dates of December 1957 and January 1958 will long be
remembered in citrus history. Official estimates indicated that over 201,'
of the fruit unharvested was to,:, severely damaged to be utilized.
Beside the loss of fruit, trees were injured to the point that it will take
several years for them to come back to full production. Needed nursery
stock was severely damaged-some nurseries were even wiped out.
Beside substantial losses to growers, w age losses to fruit handling labor,
income for the freight carriers, and losses to the businesses which are
dependent on citrus industry, will long be felt. E\en the Federal Gov-
ernment came into our picture as it too lost out on tax revenue.
Already teams of experts arc at work to develop a hardier strain
of trees to withstand cold. \\e can be thankful that Florida has only
had one secure winter of the type lust experienced in nearly sixty
years. It has not had a maior freeze in over 20 years. We have fared
far better than some of the other citrus growing states.


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IN JUNE it looked like citrus growers throughout the
state were in for a banner year. Scenes like these were
not uncommon and talks of a freeze were of little interest.


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IN NOVEMBER everyone was optimistic and looking for-
ward to a profitable year. Substantial shipments of fresh
oranges and grapefruit to Europe had been made. Addi-
tional shipments were scheduled for the Christmas market.


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NUMBER OF CARLOTS SHIPPED*


35,654 CARS


ORANGES
1956.7


29,835 CARS


25,062 CARS


6,502 CARS


3,590 CARS


BASIS /


510 BOXES PER CAR
* AS OF MAY, 1958


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IN APRIL some of the trees previously thought damaged
with proper care could possibly begin to bear before the
three year period is up. It looks now like 62% of the full
crop will be available for the 1958-59 season despite the
freeze.


IN DECEMBER the worst freeze in the history of Florida
citrus took place. Scenes like these were not uncommon
all over the state, and the fruit crop in many groves was
a complete loss.


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GROWERS LOAN AND GUARANTY CO.


JAMES SAMSON, Executive Vice President and Treasurer
Forty-one years of continuous service to Citrus Exchange mem-
bers is an impressive record. Loans amounting to over $86,000,000.00
have been made. Despite the freeze and the increased activities of loans
to packing houses and grower members, we continue to be in excellent
financial shape. Last year alone (up to May 1st, 1958) Growers Loan
and Guaranty Company had advanced over $3,500,000.00 to its mem-
bers. Membership in the Exchange indeed has many advantages. This
affiliate is but one of them.




EXCHANGE SUPPLY AND SERVICE
COOPERATIVE

S GUY E. HOWERTON, General Manager

The Exchange Supply and Service Cooperative is the supply source
for Exchange members. A well-balanced line of packing house supplies
plus continued research and development in the search of better con-
tainers for citrus is but part of the day to day job of providing service
and quality supplies for members.
This year saw the elimination of the 1 3/5 bu. nailed standard
box. Indian River shippers now use the 4/5 bu. wirebound and the 4/5
bu. corrugated carton. This change in container usage effects economies
in packing costs, and adversely affects our dollar volume of sales as
nails are completely eliminated, and labels and nokuts are eliminated
with the cartons.




SEALD SWEET PACKERS, INC.


SE. H. WALES, Manager

Pre-packaging as outlined on Page 8 is moving along satisfactorily.
There is much to be done in terminal markets, but we are on the right
track and can increase the volume and production as our "shakedown"
ends. There is an ever-increasing need for terminal pre-packaging and
Exchange members can be assured of any price advantage due to this
type of operation.
Our sales for the fiscal year ending April 30, 1958, totaled
$2,471,873.17, a gain of $282,974.29 over 1957.


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Pictured here is a brief or-
ganization chart showing the
format of the Florida Citrus
Exchange.
An organization of this type
didn't just happen-it repre-.
sents nearly a half century of
study and constant improve-
ment to provide Exchange
members with the best in-
ternal and external direction
on all levels.


OFFICERS DEPARTMENT HEADS AND DIRECTORS

FLORIDA CITRUS EXCHANGE
1957-1958 SEASON


OFFICERS
President and Chairman
of the Board
First Vice-President
Second Vice-President
Third Vice-President
Fourth Vice-President
Assistant to the President
Treasurer-Comptroller
Secretary
Assistant Secretary
Assistant Secretary
DEPARTMENT HEADS
General Manager
General Sales Manager
Treasurer-Comptroller
General Counsel
Traffic Manager
SUB-EXCHANGE AND
Alcoma
Clark
Clearwater
Elfers
Florence
Fort Pierce
Graves Bros. Company
Hunt Bros. Cooperative
Indian River
Lake County
Lake Region
Lake Region Packing Assn.
North Indian River
Brooksville
Orange County
Pinellas
Plymouth
Polk County
Winter Haven


Phil C. Peters
C. G. Wilhoit
F. W. Moody
G. B. Hurlburt
Joe E. Keefe
Counts Johnson
J. Samson
Counts Johnson
E. F. Gudgen
L. C. (Luke) Johnson

John T. Lesley
Fred S. Johnston
J. Samson
Counts Johnson
Paul C. Sarrett
DIRECTORS
John C. Updike
I. J. Pemberton
E. S. Beeland
0. J. Harvey
R. K. Cooper
H. H. Willis
C. G. Wilhoit
D. A. Hunt
Jack A. N. Strong
G. B. Hurlburt
Joe E. Keefe
J. B. Prevatt
John C. Flake
A. A. McKethan
Phil C. Peters
F. W. Moody
A. C. Johnson
J. P. Ellis
E. S. Horton


Winter Garden
Vero Beach
Palm Harbor
Mount Dora
Dundee
Tampa
Tampa
Tampa
Tampa
Tampa

Tampa
Tampa
Tampa
Tampa
Tampa

Lake Wales
Jacksonville
Clearwater
Tampa
Florence Villa
Fort Pierce
Vero Beach
Lake Wales
Vero Beach
Mount Dora
Dundee
Tavares
Mims
Brooksville
Winter Garden
Palm Harbor
Mount Dora
Bartow
Winter Haven


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