• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Foreword
 Main














Title: Annual report of the Florida Citrus Exchange.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075941/00026
 Material Information
Title: Annual report of the Florida Citrus Exchange.
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Florida Citrus Exchange
Publisher: The Exchange,
Publication Date: 1952-1953
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075941
Volume ID: VID00026
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ajg6778 - LTUF
46798761 - OCLC
001753794 - AlephBibNum

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Foreword
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
Full Text














annual report
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Foreword -







Cooperation is the life blood of agriculture-the giving and receiving
of goods and services for mutual benefit.
The Florida Citrus Exchange, a true federated agricultural coop-
erative, provides vital services so that you, the grower and shipper, may
more profitably market your citrus crop. The providing of day-to-day
and even hour-to-hour market information is one of the most important
services which the Exchange furnishes its members.
Intelligent selling is only as successful as the information it is based
upon. Keeping a close watch on the citrus-buying pulse of the nation
are salaried Exchange representatives in all major terminal markets. This
network is supplemented by information received from representatives
in 97 other American and Canadian markets.
However, all functions of the Exchange revolve around the mar-
keting of our master brand, SEALD-SWEET, whether it be fresh,
canned, or quick frozen.
We wish to thank all factors in the industry and trade that con-
tributed toward filling the big SEALD-SWEET glass. As you turn
subsequent pages of this report, note how cooperative effort pours into
the SEALD-SWEET orange tumbler.
It's a living tribute to what well-directed mutual effort can ac-
complish.
-7--"





















OFFICERS


PRESIDENT AND
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD
FIRST VICE-PRESIDENT
SECOND VICE-PRESIDENT

THIRD VICE-PRESIDENT

FOURTH VICE-PRESIDENT


DEPARTMENT HEADS
GENERAL MANAGER
GENERAL SALES MANAGER
TREASURER-COMPTROLLER
TRAFFIC MANAGER
ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT,
SECRETARY AND GENERAL COUNSEL
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING
AND PUBLIC RELATIONS


J. B. Prevatt, Tavares
P. C. Peters, Winter Garden
C. G. Wilhoit, Wabasso

John L. Olson, Dundee
F. W. Moody, Palm Harbor



John T. Lesley, Tampa
Fred S. Johnston, Tampa
James Samson, Tampa

H. S. Weber, Tampa

Counts Johnson, Tampa

Walter J. Page, Tampa


Fl d C


OFFICERS
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRESIDENT
TREASURER-COMPTROLLER

SECRETARY AND GENERAL COUNSEL


J. B. Prevatt, Tavares
John T. Lesley, Tampa
A. R. Updike, Lake Wales
James Samson, Tampa
Counts Johnson, Tampa


















1g 41OLGO[S L

SUB-EXCHANGES AND DIRECTORS
ALCOMA
CLARK
ELFERS
FLORENCE
FORT PIERCE
INDIAN RIVER
LAKE BYRD
LAKE COUNTY
LAKE REGION
NORTH INDIAN RIVER
NORTH PINELLAS
ORANGE COUNTY
PINELLAS
PLYMOUTH
POLK COUNTY
SCENIC
WINTER HAVEN


A. R. Updike, Lake Wales
I. J. Pemberton, Jacksonville
O. J. Harvey, Tampa
Tom B. Swann, Winter Haven
H. H. Willis, Sr., Fort Pierce
Jack N. Strong, Vero Beach
J. P. Garber, Avon Park
J. B. Prevatt, Tavares
John L. Olson, Dundee
C. G. Wilhoit, Wabasso
Alfred A. McKethan, Brooksville
P. C. Peters, Winter Garden
F. W. Moody, Palm Harbor
Armer C. Johnson, Mount Dora
J. P. Ellis, Bartow
E. G. Todd, Avon Park
George B. Aycrigg, Winter Haven


Products Exchange


DEPARTMENT HEADS
SALES MANAGER,
FROZEN CONCENTRATE DIVISION
SALES MANAGER, CANNING DIVISION


Charles W. Metcalf, Clearwater
Frank J. Poitras, Tampa













Sale[sI1Departimenti


FRED S. JOHNSTON
General Sales Manager





An ambitious and far-reaching program-that of increasing private
sales by 80 per cent for the last two year period-was almost accom-
plished by the aggressive work of the sales department. But a short
orange crop dealt the selling miracle a cruel blow.
Last season, the sales department chalked up a flat 40 per cent gain
in f. o. b. sales throughout the nation. The sizzling pace was picked
up again this season and maintained until the first of the year. Sales
then began dropping off proportionately because of the curtailed crop
and the general industry feeling that the market would be stronger and
higher if the fruit were held back.
However, the Indian River segment of the Exchange reaped a 116
per cent private sales increase through May 1 of this year over that
made for the same period last year.
Meanwhile growers pocketed from 25 to 90 cents more per box for
oranges through April 28 than was earned last year in private sales
channels, if Statewide f. o. b. averages as reported by Florida Citrus Mu-
tual are accepted as fact. Their overall average, Mutual says, was 53
cents per box higher, the exact gain to the penny made by oranges in
the auctions also.
All auction averages have been verified by the Exchange.
White seeded grapefruit averaged 18 cents per box higher this season
through April 28 than last year Mutual reported, while white seedless
grapefruit made a 12 cents per box gain and Temples 8 cents per half-
box. On the other side of the ledger, Mutual says pink seedlesss grape-
fruit averaged 44 cents per box less while tangerines took a 36 cents per
half-box loss.






Grapefruit going to auction during the same period averaged 17
cents per box more for the seeded variety, 19 cents higher for seedless,
and 16 cents additional per four-fifths bushel box of Temples. Auc-
tioneers had to be satisfied with 13 cents per box less for pink seedless
grapefruit and 10 cents lower per four-fifths bushel box of tangerines.
Last season, approximately three million boxes of grapefruit were
"economically abandoned"due to poor demand and low prices. This
season, as of May 1, there was an estimated eight million fewer boxes
of grapefruit than last year with demand good and a strong advancing
market in sight. It would appear that grapefruit this season will wind
up a high priced fruit, especially for good quality.
Florida finished shipping early and mid-season oranges thirty days
or more earlier than usual this season. Valencia shipments were started
ahead of schedule and a quick trade reaction resulted. Florida Valencias
were passed up in favor of the more mature California Navels.
It was not until the last week in April that Florida Valencias reached
their usual goodness. Demand picked up almost immediately.
As the last early and mid-season oranges went North, shipments
dwindled to practically nothing until May 1. Shippers moved very
little fruit because they not only anticipated a stronger market by hold-
ing back, but were waiting for the opening of concentrate plants which
would provide a home for eliminations.
But a brighter picture may still lie ahead. During the months of
May and June, concentrate plants will probably be running at full
capacity and this should enable the sales department to gain ground on
lost f. o. b. sales caused by the long period of slack demand and fewer
shipments. It is expected that the Exchange will finish the season with
a satisfactory f. o. b. sales increase.
Our Northern salaried offices have functioned well throughout the
season. Top auction prices for our brands were again received.
Our brokers, too, have worked hard and long in promoting Exchange
brands in the various markets in the United States and Canada.
The sales department has functioned smoothly and efficiently
throughout the season in spite of considerable turnover in personnel.
Two salesmen will be replaced before the start of next season.
Our dealer service and sales promotion men have covered wide ter-
ritories and results have been gratifying. These men have been able
to open up new accounts and cement a closer relationship and under-
standing between the sales department and many accounts of long
standing.
An important adjunct to the sales department is the mailing room
which this season, disbursed 288,580 pieces of mail matter. This de-
partment expressed 150 packages of advertising and promotion material
in addition to printing 750,000 of the various forms, letterheads, etc.,
used by the Exchange yearly.
















WYl


Adetsn
and Pu b Relatio


WALTER J. PAGE
Director of Advertising
and Public Relations


SEALD-SWEET was publicized nationally by this
department this season, lending advertising strength to
local and countryside citrus promotions.
Such close working relations with the trade have been praised in many
quarters.
On the State level, SEALD-SWEET and the Florida Citrus Exchange
figured in much of the important citrus news written this season. A
close and amiable relationship between this department and the press
is directly attributable to the uncompromising policy of channeling
only "legitimate" news into the State's many editors.
SEALD-SWEET frozen orange concentrate appeared on television
for the first time this year. Radio spot commercials supplemented news-
paper advertising and featured many of the Exchange's premium citrus
products in various new markets.
Florigold and Flo, the Exchange's Indian River brands, were given
a big advertising boost in four major markets this season. Designed to
reach housewives in three big Eastern markets, Florigold and Flo adver-
tisements stressed freshness and juiciness of the fruit. Many of the ads
were geared to the local level by tieing in the "Careful Mother" theme,
so successful in the past.
New England was blanketed by Flo advertising for the first time
through the medium of a seven station radio network show covering
the larger cities in this region. Heretofore, advertising in this area had
been confined to Boston proper.
A total of 176,000 pieces of advertising and point-of-sale material
was distributed by this department to brokers, distributors, division
offices, and customers promoting the SEALD-SWEET brand.





















H. S. WEBER '
Traffic Manager


The Traffic Department filed 233 claims amounting to $23,839.23
during the period September 1, 1952 to May 1, 1953 with collections
running $48,204.05 for the same period.
Majority of these claims were for market decline on shipments
delayed in transit.
On April 11, 1952 the Interstate Commerce Commission granted
carriers an increase of 15 per cent with a maximum of 12 cents per CWT
on citrus fruit, which included increases of two per cent granted April
4, 1951 and four per cent granted on August 28, 1951. These increases
would expire February 28, 1954 unless modified sooner or eliminated.
The railroads, on March 27, 1953, filed a petition with the Interstate
Commerce Commission requesting as authorized in Ex-Parte 175, In-
creased Freight Rates, 1951, by order of April 11, 1952, be made per-
manent without further hearing.
This department during the past season has been expanded to include
the handling of traffic matters pertaining to frozen concentrates. 'In
cooperation with the frozen concentrate sales department, the most
economical and fastest modes of transportation are determined and
arrangements made for shipping the product. Rate and weight sched-
ules are compiled by this department which also handles rate adjust-
ments with transportation lines.
E. D. Dow, oldest employee from a point of service standpoint, re-
tired as manager of the Traffic Department on November 3, 1952.
H. S. Weber, a 32-year service employee of the Exchange, was named
manager to succeed Dow.


Trif f ic Deparitment^





















COUNTS JOHNSON
General Counsel







As the Florida Citrus Exchange continues to expand operations and
services, a greatly increased burden has been placed on the Legal De-
partment.
In addition to the usual multiplicity of routine items handled daily
by this department, a number of federal and state legislative matters
claimed much time.and effort. New federal income tax laws and reg-
ulations applicable to tax-exempt cooperatives have kept the Exchange's
legal counsel busy on many fronts. This situation is expected to con-
tinue.
Considerable time and effort have been spent by the Exchange's at-
torney, as co-counsel with former Governor Doyle E. Carlton, in hand-
ling the anti-trust complaint issued last December by the Federal Trade
Commission against Florida Citrus Mutual.
The Legal Department was fortunate in securing the capable and
experienced services of Miss Juanita McElhannon as secretary to the
Exchange's general counsel and assistant secretary of the Exchange.
The Exchange was honored this year by the appointment of its
attorney, Counts Johnson, to the vice-chairmanship of the important
Legal and Tax Committee of the National Council of Farmer Cooper-
atives. The appointment was announced by Frank W. Hussey of Pres-
que Isle, Maine, NCFL president.


Legal Departmen












Grwr Loan

an Gu ra t Company


JAMES SAMSON
Treasurer-Comptroller






The Growers Loan and Guaranty Company, in completing its thirty-
sixth year of operation on April 30, has loaned the staggering total of
$70,830,000 to associations and growers over its long period of existence.
The Company is an Exchange affiliated agricultural credit corpora-
tion whose main function is to extend seasonal operating credits to
Exchange associations and crop production credits to grower-members.
Losses can be compared most favorably with any similar corporation.
During the 1952-53 season, crop production loans to growers and
operating loans to associations amounted to approximately $3,330,-
746.73. The previous year they were $3,545,322.67.
Total loans outstanding as of April 30 were $1,260,530.41 as com-
pared with $1,680,499.70 on the same date last year.
The excellent performance record of the Company over this period
of thirty-six years has made it possible for it to maintain interest rates
on a competitive basis with like institutions. The close relationship
existing between this Company, the associations, and their members,
makes it possible for it to understand fully their operating problems and
to render a prompt and efficient service on a liberal but sound basis.
Because of this fact, many of the associations and their grower-mem-
bers have found it more advantageous to use the facilities of the Com-
pany when seeking credit.

























G. H. SOUTHWICK
Division Manager
Grand Rapids


P. W. ECONOMOS
Division Manager
Chicago o Seald-Sweet brokers

Seald-Sweet customers
10
Seald-Sweet division offices







DS 'S0

SEALD-SWEET SOLD IN 45 STAT ES


SealdSwee









WERT R. R. McNAMARA
manager Division Manager
Cleveland



H. MacCLARE JR.
isin ana THOMAS J. RICE
etroit Division Manager
Buffalo

OWEN E. FOLSOM
Division Manager
Boston







o *.



.- "' ,X R. C. MAUTER
Division Manager
New York









.*" R. E. McCANN
*Division Manager
Philadelphia










I V


Florida
Citrus 0 Prdctxcag


FRANK J. POITRAS -
Sales Manager



Canning Division

The Canning Division, established during the 1946-47 season, was
transferred this year into the Florida Citrus Products Exchange.
A new and lucrative sales outlet for single strength juices and sec-
tions was added this year through the opening up of new markets in
Belgium and France. These shipments to countries outside the Iron
Curtain were made possible by the United States Government's export
subsidy program. Exports to South American countries are being con-
sidered for next season.
Jn this division's overall sales pattern, SEALD-SWEET juices are
being sold in 31 states and four Canadian provinces. Acceptance has
been good and quality of the product excellent.
Last season's pack was completely sold out in September. It is grati-
fying that so many of our customers continue to purchase SEALD-
SWEET juices year in and year out, commenting favorably on its con-
tinued and long standing quality.
As this report goes to press, the canning of single strength juices
has been virtually completed for the year. There is very little grape-
fruit remaining and concentrate' plants are actively purchasing all re-
maining oranges available for processing.













Florida

Citrus Products Exchange


CHARLES W. METCALF
Sales Manager




Concentrate Division

Production this season of popular SEALD-SWEET frozen orange
concentrate, now being sold in forty states and Canada, will represent
approximately one million boxes of choice Florida oranges.
SEALD-SWEET is gaining fame and ready consumer acceptance
wherever sold. It is presently being apportioned to 34 brokers who in
turn are selling SEALD-SWEET to some 400 distributors and chain store
buyers. This division is also selling directly to 32 distributors who
actively promote the frozen juice.
This record will become more impressive as SEALD-SWEET con-
tinues to be established on a firmer basis. The prestige and value to
grower-members of the Florida Citrus Exchange will also be increased
by a successful and aggressive concentrate division.
In addition to the retail size, SEALD-SWEET is now being sold in
a 12-ounce institutional can. Also added to the much sought after
SEALD-SWEET line this year are frozen concentrated limeade and
lemonade.
Customers are displaying keen interest in the two SEALD-SWEET
newcomers and demand is expected to exceed supply.
This division is under the able managership of Charles W. Metcalf
who has held many important positions in the food field. He replaced
Marion J. Young whose resignation to enter private business was effec-
tive March 1.












Exchange Supply

a S e rvic 0ooperativ


Guy E. Howerton .
Manager








April 30, 1953 wound up the fourth year in the existence of the
Exchange Supply and Service Cooperative. Sales for this particular year
totalled $2,169,504.07. This figure, when compared with the sales
total of $2,363,223.25 for the year which ended April 30, 1952, reflects
a decrease of $193,719.18.
Historically, the months of February, March and April are the largest
from the standpoint of sales of any months in the calendar year. This
year we went into February 1st with a very substantial increase in sales
over the same period last year. It was due to this lead that our April
30th total did not reflect a decrease greater than the $193,719.18 mer-
tioned above, for during February, March and April this year the vol-
ume of packing house supply sales was at the lowest ebb for many years,
not only with our organization, but industrywide.
It is, of course, never as pleasant to report a decrease as it is to
report an increase. This is the first year since the Exchange Supply and
Service Cooperative was organized that an increase over the previous
year was not reported. Had Florida citrus moved in fresh form this
Spring in the same volume as it did last Spring, we should have main-
tained, if not increased, our sales gain shown as of February 1st. How-
ever, it is a matter of record that Florida's fresh citrus shipments during
the early months of 1953 were in volume much less than in 1952. It
is inescapable that the packing house supply business is tied in with the
volume of fruit that moves to market.
















It may be of interest to note that while sales for period ending April
30, 1953 were $193,719.18 less than for the same period ending April
30, 1952, at the same time they were $173,282.01 in excess of the sales
for the period ending April 30, 1951.
During the past several years we, as well as others of the industry,
were plagued with shortages of some materials and supplies essential
to the operation of the various phases of the citrus industry; some of
these shortages being real, and others threatened. During this year there
were no shortages of supplies that were acute. Under present conditions,
we cannot see where during the coming year this situation should change.
It is our intent and purpose to keep abreast of the ever changing times,
and to make our plans in accordance with the current trends.
During this year we have had the services of two salesmen, who have
been calling on our members regularly. This steady solicitation has paid
off, particularly in the sales of miscellaneous items. While it is true
that our gross sales for this year were less than a year ago, due to a
smaller volume of fruit having been moved, at the same time we feel
that percentagewise our position is stronger than at this time last year.
Figuring it on this basis, we show a gain. We are hopeful that by being
constantly represented. in the houses of our members we shall be able
to show an increase in the summer items such as paint, roof coating, field
boxes, nails, strapping, etc.
We wish to thank our customers and members for the cooperation
given us this year in our efforts to move the many items which we
handle. We shall continue to try to justify the confidence in our organ-
ization which this cooperation indicates. Our organization belongs to
our members, and it is our function to serve the needs of those members.











Summary and Outlook








Considering all factors affecting supply and demand, Florida this
season is marketing a very large crop at reasonably high prices. Frozen
orange concentrate, selling at the rate of over one million gallons weekly,
is responsible in large measure for increasing orange demand.
Prosperity for the Florida citrus industry in the years to come de-
pends upon keeping demand and supply on an equal footing.
From 1943-44 to 1951-52, Florida's orange crop increased from
46,200,000 boxes to 78,600,000, an average of a little better than
4,000,000 boxes per year. The problem then is to keep step with this
tremendous increase. Florida's relative prosperity will be judged by
how well the job is done.
To offset even greater production to come, Florida growers, ship-
pers, and processors must fight to retain every box now being sold as
fresh fruit and single strength canned juice. National consumption
of frozen concentrated citrus juices on a wider scale must be developed
further.
Money earmarked for research is money well spent. Industry ap-
propriations for research into new fields designed primarily to bring the
best possible tasting juice to the greatest mass of consumers at the lowest
possible cost consistent with reasonable returns to growers, is a "must"
if Florida's citrus empire is to survive and prosper.
























Biggest I
for the Exch
other fresh
was when J.
Jr. present
with a Chr
reducing th
estimate by
boxes on D


This large 42-r
citrus, not apples, a
Association in St. L
tomers were capture


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The but., of the
future SEALD-
SWEET topa his shop-

'ilk tis hvehroepuv
#l: f4oix m-io 'rket


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chuips the Ntsm
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habits.





SEALD-SWEET goes to the Florida State Fair. This is the new Exchange
exhibit, featuring "The Royal Family of the Citrus World," which appeared before
thousands of visitors for the first time.

... ... ', "


SA rousing welcome was accorded the Florida Tropical Fruit Growers Associa-
tion, Inc., of Goulds which joined the Florida Citrus Exchange system in February.
The big South Dade County firm packs limes, avocados, mangos and frozen con-
centrated limeade. These products will be marketed under the famous SEALD-
SWEET banner.


m'. 1 -;_ u n
IORI TROPICAIft-wIROW'ERS ASSN
uDULOS.FLA.
FLORI-TROPIC
D T4& rtvte 0


fih-rf-rlhnni~ir IT TT-T-I n B *-* j-----i---r K_>


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Luke Dohner of West
Palm Beach has plenty of
reason to smile. He received
the Florida Citrus Ex-
change's $1,000 scholarship
in cooperative marketing for
1952-53, awarded each
year to the most outstanding
graduate of the College of
Agriculture, University of
Florida.


W b "Drug Store orders" were mainly responsible for the tearing down of a
building and reshaping of operating methods by one big Exchange house.
Shown is the before and after of the expansion move and the beginning of
a new era in citrus packing which cost $200,000.









I ^^^^^ Dist I Office-s^^ ^
*n^ff~ait^0


ORLANDO C. G. A.,
PLYMOUTH C. G. A.,
THEODORE STRAWN, IN springs
UMATILLA C. G. A., Umat
WEST ORANGE C. G. A., Tildenville
WINTER GARDEN C. G. A., Winter Garden
ALCOMA PACKING CO., INC., Lake Wales
ALTURAS-GARFIELD CITRUS COOP.,
Lake Garfield
AVON PARK C. G. A., Avon Park
DUNDEE C. G. A., Dundee
FLORENCE C. G. A., Florence Villa
GREAT SOUTHERN CITRUS ASSN.,
Winter Haven
HUNT BROS. COOPERATIVE, Lake Wales
LAKE BYRD CITRUS PACKING CO., Avon Park
SEBRING PACKING CO., INC., Sebring
WINTER HAVEN C. G. A., Winter Haven
BROOKSVILLE C. G. A., Brooksville
CLEARWATER GROWERS ASSN., Clearwater
DOMINO CITRUS ASSN., Sarasota
ELFERS C. G. A., Elfers
INGRAM FRUIT COMPANY, INC., Tampa
OWANITA C. G. A., Alva
PALM HARBOR C. G. A., Palm Harbor
FLORIDA TROPICAL FRUIT GROWERS ASSN.,
Goulds
FLAMINGO GROVES, INC., Ft. Lauderdale
SILVER PALM F. G. A., Redland
COCOA-MERRITT ISLAND CITRUS ASSN.,
Cocoa
FT. PIERCE GROWERS ASSN., Ft. Pierce
GRAVES BROS. CO., Wabasso
INDIAN RIVER ASSOCIATES, INC.,
Vero Beach
INDIAN RIVER GROWERS SERVICE,
Vero Beach
MIMS C. G. A., Mims
OAK HILL C. G. A., Oak Hill
OSLO C. G. A., Vero Beach
PALM BEACH-LOXAHATCHEE CO.,
West Palm Beach
E. P. PORCHER ESTATE, Cocoa
TUXEDO FRUIT CO., INC., Fort Pierce
VERO-INDIAN RIVER PRODUCERS ASSN.,
Vero Beach
INDIAN RIVER EXCHANGE PACKERS, INC.,
Vero Beach
DiGIORGIO FRUIT CORP., Ft. Pierce

DISTRICT OFFICES
WINTER HAVEN
Harold Warden, District Manager
VERO BEACH
W. G. Strickland, District Manager














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