• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Front Matter
 Letter of transmittal
 Enforcement personnel
 Introduction
 The commission's report














Group Title: Biennial report, Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.
Title: Biennial report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075940/00014
 Material Information
Title: Biennial report
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
Publisher: The Commission,
The Commission
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1943-1944
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Game protection -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Fish culture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
Periodicals   ( lcsh )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: State of Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish Commission.
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year ends June 30.
Numbering Peculiarities: First biennial report covers the period from the time of the organization (of the Commission) July 1, 1935 to December 31, 1936.
General Note: Description based on: 1960/62; title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075940
Volume ID: VID00014
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ABV7514
oclc - 01332271
alephbibnum - 000327977
lccn - sn 87027948
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Annual report - Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission

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VID00014 ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Letter of transmittal
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Enforcement personnel
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Introduction
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    The commission's report
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
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Full Text





























tA.













UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY








Biewnal Repazo

GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH
COMMISSION
of the

STATE OF FLORIDA
BIENNIUM ENDING
December 31, 1944


















SUAmdhdt Repaid



Tallahassee, Florida
February 15, 1945

Mr. L. G. Bruce, Chairman
Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
State of Florida

Sir:

I am submitting herewith the report of the work of the
Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission of the State of Florida
for the conservation of Florida's Wildlife Resources during the
biennium closing December 31, 1944.

Respectfully yours,



I. N. KENNEDY,
Director.


177873












ComnoUIlo c4

GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH

STATE OF FLORIDA


FIRST CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT
L. G. Bruce, Bartow; appointed January 7, 1943, until
next Senate; confirmed by Senate with term to
expire January 6, 1948.

SECOND CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT
Lester Varn, Jacksonville; appointed January 7, 1943,
until next Senate; confirmed by Senate with term
to expire January 4, 1946.

THIRD CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT
L. G. Morris, Monticello; appointed January 7, 1943,
until next Senate; confirmed by Senate with term
to expire January 6, 1947.

FOURTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT
John W. Corbett, Ft. Pierce; appointed January 7, 1943,
until next Senate; confirmed by Senate with term
to expire January 5, 1945.

FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT
John S. Clardy, Ocala; appointed January 25, 1943,
until next Senate; confirmed by Senate with term
to expire January 24, 1944; reappointed to serve
until next Senate.


L. G. BRUCE, Chairman
I. N. KENNEDY, Director
Tallahassee, Florida


OFFICE PERSONNEL
I. N. Kennedy, Director C. R. Phillips, Auditor
Alice S. Burr, Secretary Edith Bevan, Stenographer



















.Rette4 e/ ToatLmi/tal



Tallahassee, Florida
February 15, 1945

To His Excellency
Millard F. Caldwell
Governor of the State of Florida

Sir:

I have the honor of transmitting herewith the biennial
report of work that has been done for the conservation of
Florida's wildlife resources, as directed by the Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission during the period closing December
31, 1942.
Respectfully submitted,
L. G. BRUCE
Chairman











mn/ecemen1 PeC-donnel

FIRST CONSERVATION DISTRICT
D. F. SMOAK, Chief Conservation Officer
Conservation Officers: G. L. Abbott, H. C. Bigbie, Ira Brewer,
A. H. Carlton, J. L. Cathcart, J. W. Crum, Roscoe Godwin,
James S. Goff, H. A. Graham, Elam Murphy, James T.
Philbin, S. B. Snell, Thomas Stanaland, Leffy L. Taylor,
Frank Turner, C. E. Watson, C. C. Youmans.

SECOND CONSERVATION DISTRICT
ROBERT T. HEAGY, Jr., Chief Conservation Officer
Conservation Officers: J. F. Cauthen, D. D. Conner, G. C. Hill,
Henry Howell, Fred Kirkland, W. B. Lucas, I. W. McCall,
J. W. Mikell, Lester Mikell, Richard G. Pittman, Mark
Read, J. A. Revels, J. W. Simmons, D. H. Smith, J. J.
Walker, Von Walker.

THIRD CONSERVATION DISTRICT
BEN H. COX, Chief Conservation Officer
Conservation Officers: J. M. Atkins, C. P. Bush, Lothair
Chester, J. J. Cotten, Joe Dykes, Henry B. Foster, Henry
F. French, J. C. Gerrell, T. L. Griffin, Robert L. Haire,
J. D. Hopkins, Sam Hunter, J. 0. Johnson, Allen Legrone,
* A. D. Livingston, D. D. Miller, H. C. Pelt, T. G. Steele,
W. L Stelts, J. E. Wiggins.

FOURTH CONSERVATION DISTRICT
EARL J. RICOU, Chief Conservation Officer
Conservation Officers: J. Ray Barnes, Engram Hazellief, Axel
Jenson, J. S. Lanier, R. R. Merritt, John S. Odom, Homer
Rhode, Jr., Erwin Winte, Curtis E. Wright.

FIFTH CONSERVATION DISTRICT
C.-,J. FINLEY, Chief Conservation Officer
Conservation Officers: J. 0. Buckles, Grady Cason, Charlie
Clark, S. C. Collier, H. R. Daugharty, E. M. Ferrell, Leo
Godwin, D. C. Land, Tom W. Lanier, H. L. Lungren, Roy J.
Osteen, J. R. Parker, Hatton Perkins, R. Remington, E. H.
Richey, LeRoy Rooks, Vanness Seckinger, W. C. Tanner,
L. A. Tindall, George Townsend, J. C. Trice, J. B. Walker,
Mallory Welch.















fn ( odacaon



The 1941 session of the Florida Legislature adopted a
Constitutional Amendment creating the Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission, and on November 3, 1942, the voters of
Florida ratified this amendment by a large majority.
Under the Constitutional Amendment a five-man Commis-
sion was provided, to be appointed by the Governor for five-
year staggered terms, one from each Congressional District
as existing on January 1, 1941. The Constitutional Amend-
ment provided that from and after January 1, 1943, this five-
man Commission should be charged with the management,
restoration, conservation and regulation of the birds, game,
fur-bearing animals, and fresh water fish of the State of
Florida, and the acquisition, establishment, control and man-
agement of hatcheries, sanctuaries, refuges, reservations, and
all other property owned or used for such purpose by the
State of Florida.
The five men chosen by the Governor to assume this
important duty were:

First District-L. G. Bruce of Bartow, appointed January 7,
1943, for a five-year term.

Second District-Lester Varn of Jacksonville, appointed
January 5, 1943, for a three-year term.

Third District-L. G. Morris of Monticello, appointed
January 7, 1943, for a four-year term.
Fourth District-J. W. Corbett of Fort Pierce, appointed
.,anuary 7, 1943, for a two-year term.
Fifth District-John S. Clardy of Ocala, appointed January
25, 1943, for a one-year term.
These appointments were all later confirmed by the 1943
Senate.
The members of the Commission receive no compensation
for their services. Each Commissioner receives his necessary
traveling or other expenses incurred while engaged in the dis-
charge of his official duties, but this expense allowance is
limited by law to $600.00 in any one year.









10 BIENNIAL REPORT


The new Commission held its organization meeting on
January 25, 1943, at which time Commissioner L. G. Bruce
of the First District was selected as Chairman.
I. N. Kennedy, who had served in the capacity of Executive
Secretary under the old Commission, was employed in the
capacity of Director.
Among the powers granted to the Commission by the Con-
stitutional Amendment was the power to fix bag limits, fix
open and closed seasons on a state-wide, regional or local basis,
as it deemed appropriate, to regulate the manner and method
of taking, transporting, storing and using birds, game, fur-
bearing animals, fresh water fish, reptiles and amphibians and
to acquire by purchase, gift, or otherwise, all property neces-
sary, useful, or convenient for the use of the Commission in the
exercise of its powers.
Under the Constitutional Amendment, the right to enact
license laws and fix penalties for violations of the laws and
rules and regulations of the Commission remained a power of
the Legislature. The Legislature is also empowered to enact
laws in aid of but not inconsistent with the provisions of the
Amendment.
Many and varied have been the problems which confronted
the new Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission, foremost of
which was the formulation of Rules and Regulations governing
methods of taking, and seasons during which game, fur-bearing
animals and fresh water fish may be taken. The Constitutional
Amendment failed to provide a method of formulating Rules
and Regulations by the Commission, and it was not until after
the 1943 session of the Legislature provided the method by
passing Committee Substitute for House Bill No. 705, which
later became Chapter 21945, Acts of 1943, that any action
along this line could be taken by the Commission.

Prior to the enactment and ratification of the Constitu-
tional Amendment, there were on the statute books of Florida
13 general laws dealing with the conservation of wildlife
resources and a total of 187 special or local laws on the same
subject. The enforcement of these numerous laws had re-
sulted in much confusion in the minds of the sportsmen over
the State, especially with regard to seasons and bag limits.

With the adoption of the Constitutional Amendment, some
of the general laws and practically all of the special laws were
repealed, and the Commission sought to replace them by the
adoption of rules and regulations which would relieve the









GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH 11


confusion, and at the same time provide ample protection for
Florida's wildlife resources.
With no precedent set for them to follow, it is possible that
the Commission has yet much ground to cover before their
rules and regulations will be satisfactory in every respect.
They are moving forward slowly with only one thought in
mind-complete protection for wildlife. It is felt, however,
that the sportsmen have been able to follow their favorite
sports with much less confusion as to the application of the
law under the provisions of the Constitutional Amendment
than under the provisions of the numerous laws which had
previously been enacted.
During the past two years the Commission has been faced
with the responsibility of restocking the areas in Florida in
which deer had been slaughtered by the Live Stock Sanitary
Board in connection with tick eradication work.

Federal funds allocated to the State under the provisions
of the Pittman-Robertson Act were greatly reduced because
of war activities, thus making it necessary for the Commission
to find some other way for financing its five-year land acquisi-
tion project begun in 1941.

The operation of fish hatcheries in the State has become
increasingly difficult with the induction into the Armed
Services of all able bodied men in draft age. This same thing
has occurred among the personnel of our Field Force-the men
charged with the enforcement of all laws, rules and regulations
governing the protection of our wildlife resources.

To all of this, however, there is a bright side. The Com-
mission had at first felt that the war, with the resulting
rationing of gasoline and scarcity of shotgun shells would
drastically reduce the revenue upon which the Commission
would have to operate. To the contrary, however, our revenue,
derived solely from the sale of hunting, fishing, and trapping
licenses, together with a few commercial licenses, has continued
to increase. This would seem to indicate clearly that even
in times of stress, recreation, particularly that derived from
hunting and fishing, remains an important factor in the every-
day life of the individual. For this reason, if for no other,
the Commission is particularly conscious of the responsibility
resting on its shoulders.

The detail report which follows covers every phase of the
work undertaken by the Commission during the past two years.










BIENNIAL REPORT


LICENSES
Funds for the operation of the Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission are derived solely from the sale of hunting,
fishing and trapping licenses together with a small number
of commercial licenses. Hunting, fishing and trapping licenses
are sold by the several County Judges over the State who re-
ceive a small fee authorized by law for the service they render
in that connection. Commercial licenses are sold direct from
the office of the Commission in Tallahassee.
The only exemptions authorized by law are to children
under the age of 15 and to residents over the age of 65, also
residents fishing with not more than three poles and lines
at any one time in the county of their legal residence are not
required to have a license.
Men in the Armed Service stationed in Florida are ex-
tended the same privileges as those given residents of the
State.

FISHING
Series A-Resident State, Fresh Water......----..........-..........$ 1.25
Series B-Non-Resident State. Fresh Water--..-......--.......... 5.50
Series C-Non-Resident, 10-Day Continuous Fishing,
Fresh W ater .. ................ .. .................. ............. ... 2.25

License required to take fresh water fish from St. Johns
River, including Doctor's Lake, North to the Florida East
Coast Railway Bridge in Duval County, or in the waters
of Lake Okeechobee or in that part of Crescent Lake
and Dunn's Creek in Putnam County.
License not required of residents to fish non-commercially
with three poles and lines in county of legal residence.

Use of mere than a single pole and line at any one time
anywhere else in the State prohibited.

GAME*
Series I- Resident County Game.......................... ........$ 1.25
Series J-Resident, Other Than Home County ............ 3.25
Series K-Resident, State .......-............-- .........-- .. 5.50
Series L-Non-Resident, State ---------........................................... 25.50
Series M-Non-Resident, 10-Day Continuous.......--------......... 10.50
Series M-1-Non-Resident County, Owners of and
paying taxes on 3,000 acres of land............................ 10.50










GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH


Series Y-Guide, required for guiding hunting parties.
Guides may not take game or carry rifle or shotgun
while conducting party, Issued from Office of
Com m mission, Tallahassee ..................................... ........ 10.50
Alien Hunting-Issued from Office of Commission,
Tallahassee ................. ------- ..----....--......-.. 50.00

TRAPPING*
Series N- Resident, County.................----------- ..................----- $ 3.25
Series O- Non-Resident, County ................................ 25.50
Series P- Resident, State -........................-- -- ......... ........... 25.50
Series Q-Resident of County Other Than Home........ 10.50
Series R- Non-Resident, State ................. ................100.50

*Report of Game and Fur-bearers taken in previous
season must be filed with County Judge when applying for
hunting or trapping license. Failure to file data on blank
form attached to application is cause for refusal of license.

COMMERCIAL LICENSES
(Issued from Office of Commission, Tallahassee)

DEALERS IN ALLIGATOR SKINS AND GREEN OR DRIED FURS (SKINS)
Series S-Resident Local Dealer or Buyer (must not
solicit by mail, advertise, travel to buy or employ
agents to buy) ..................... ......... ... ......--------------- .......... $10.00

Series T-1-Resident State Dealer or Buyer.................... 100.00
Series T-2-Agent for Licensed "Resident State Dealer
or Buyer" ......------.....---.....-- .............. 5.00

FRESH-WATER FISH DEALERS
Series U-Resident Retail. May sell to consumer or
dealer. If he takes fish must have also license for
b oat .................................... ..................................................$ 5.00
Series ,--Resident Wholesale, (to sell or ship by half-
barrel or in bulk). .... .. ... ................ ..... ....... 50.00
Non-Resident or Alien, (to sell to consumer or whole-
saler). If holder catches fish must secure license
for taking and license for boat............................-.........----.----. 50.00
Non-Resident Wholesale, (to sell or ship half-barrel,
barrel or bulk)--..............................--....................----.................500.00


13










BIENNIAL REPORT


BOATS FOR HIRE

Series W-Required for each boat rented for hunting,
or fishing in fresh waters:
18 feet length......--... ---------..........------ ..............----- ..----....$ 1.50
19-21 feet length ................................................................ 4.00
21-25 feet length ........................ ........................................ 15.00
O ver 25 feet length............................................................ 25.00

COMMERCIAL BOATS

Series X-Resident, fish boat twenty feet long, five
foot beam and under.--............---.............------.............................---------$ 1.00
Ten cents for each additional foot in length of beam.
Non-R resident, fish boat.................................. ................... 10.00

GAME FARM

Series Z-For operating privately owned Game
Farms .................................................................-.............--------$ 5.00


Winter Haven Fish Hatchery.










T4e

oRmmimeot

Reizad









GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH 17












It is the belief of the Commission that the game situation
throughout the State of Florida remains very satisfactory.
A survey made following the close of the 1943-44 hunting sea-
son by members of our Field Force indicated that all species
of game were holding their own, and that some were showing
a decided increase in population, this in the face of the fact
that vast areas of Florida have been taken over by the War
Department for training bases, and other large areas made
into grazing ranges to meet the ever increasing demands of
the cattle industry in Florida. There are several contributing
factors. First, we have had good seasons during the past two
years which have made it possible for the young to reach
maturity. Second, the rationing of gasoline and the scarcity
of shotgun shells has made it impossible for hunters to go into
the woods as often as they would under normal conditions.
There has also been a gradual decrease in the number of
persons purchasing hunting licenses. During the fiscal year
ending June 30, 1942, 66,405 persons purchased hunting licenses
in Florida. During the year ending June 30, 1943, this number
was reduced to 65,096, and for the year ending June 30, 1944,
there was a further reduction to 51,123. Fresh water fishing
for which Florida is known the world over is still the main
attraction. Even though the number of persons purchasing
fishing licenses shows a slight decrease, 80,009 licenses were
told during the period ending June 30, 1944. When con-
sidering this figure, it must be remembered that under the
present license law, residents of Florida may fish with not
more than three poles in the county of their legal residence
without purchasing a license. Men in the Armed Forces sta-
tioned inrFlorida are considered residents insofar as licenses
to hunt,and fish are concerned. Fur-bearers, which because
of the weather conditions in Florida, do not produce pelts
which bring top prices on the fur market, are decidedly on
,: the increase. In addition to this, war conditions, which brought
higher prices for furs, has caused greater interest in this wild-
life resource. Records show that 1,995 persons purchased
trapping licenses during the 1942-43 period.









18 BIENNIAL REPORT


There follows a brief report on each species of wildlife
to be found in Florida.

GAME ANIMALS
We have two game animals in Florida-deer and squirrel.
DEER

Deer, which suffered such a setback when laws passed in
1937, 1939 and 1941 authorized their slaughter by the Live
Stock Sanitary Board as a part of its cattle fever ticket
eradication program, are now on the increase. The tick eradica-
tion work has been completed and a deer restocking program
has been started to rebuild the deer population in Florida.
The recent survey shows an estimated deer population of
25,202. The areas where restocking is being carried on have
been closed to the taking of deer and it is believed that the
deer population will show an even greater increase within a
short time. Our last available kill report shows a total of
1,293 deer killed.
SQUIRREL

There are two species of squirrel found in Florida, the
gray or cat squirrel, and the fox squirrel. The gray squirrel
has increased to such a point that they are becoming trouble-
some in some sections of the State. The Commission is con-
fronted almost daily with requests for permits to destroy squir-
rel which are damaging personal property, an evidence of the
great increase in squirrel population. The fox squirrel, which
several years ago was almost extinct in Florida is making a
slow comeback. Our survey shows an estimated squirrel
population of 683,000. Our last kill report taken for 1942-43
hunting season and covering 40 of the 67 counties in Florida.
shows a total of 193,768 squirrel taken by sportsmen.

GAME BIRDS
There are three birds in Florida classified as game birds--
quail, wild turkey and marsh hens.

QUAIL
This species of game bird continues to hold the limelight
in the eyes of Florida sportsmen. During the 1941-42 hunting
season 577,126 quail were killed by Florida hunters according
to information contained in reports received from 39 of the 67
counties in the Srte. Jn 1949-?, 349,553 quail were repor;tf










GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH


killed in 40 of our 67 counties. These figures show quite a
contrast when compared with the reported kill in 1939-40 of
677,548 and of 735,690 in 1938-39. The rationing of gasoline ,
and scarcity of shotgun shells is largely responsible for this
reduction in the number of quail taken. The game survey
reveals an estimated quail population of 730,800 at the close
of the 1943-44 hunting season. A good breeding season to-
gether with the continued scarcity of shotgun shells in 1944-45
leads the Commission to believe that the present quail popula-
tion is far in excess of that number.
WILD TURKEY
While Florida does not boast to be one of the leading
States in the Union insofar as wild turkey is concerned, Florida
does boast, however, to be one of the few remaining States
where the pure strain of the bronze wild turkey can still be
found. The Commission has felt that reductions in season and
bag limits and the complete closing of certain areas over the
State to the taking of turkey were far better methods of con-
serving Florida's turkey population than the importation of
other strains of wild turkey. That they have been successful
is revealed by the figures shown in our game kill reports.
In 1941-42, 1,622 wild turkey were killed. In 1942-43 this
number was increased to 3,126. Our game survey shows that
we still have an estimated turkey population of 26,643.

Stretching Net for Trapping Quail.









BIENNIAL REPORT


MARSH HENS
Marsh hens are plentiful, especially along the upper East
Coast line of the State. The fact that they are hunted by very
few, keeps the marsh hen well in the upper bracket as far as
population is concerned.

MIGRATORY BIRDS
Migratory birds are under the complete control of the U. S.
Fish and Wildlife Service. Any change in population is im-
mediately reflected by changes in seasons and bag limits. The
past two years have shown a decided increase in population of
migratory birds and the resulting extensions in seasons and
bags.

DOVE
During the 1942-43 season when dove were still feeling
the effects of the freeze which in January of 1940 killed
thousands of them, the season was set in Florida from Decem-
ber 1 to December 30 all over the State. In 1943-44 dove had
made sufficient comeback to warrant the U. S. Fish and Wild-

Placing Quail in Shipping Crate.


K'4dUflinEK.,










GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH


life Service extending the season from December 1 to January
11. For 1944-45 the season was set from November 20 to
January 15, for all of Florida except Dade, Broward and Mon-
roe Counties which were permitted to return to a season from
October 1 to October 31. Reports from the field indicate that
there are more dove in Florida today than there has been for a
number of years back, and sportsmen report being able to
take the day's bag practically every time they were hunted.
There was a reported kill of 159,379 dove during the 1942-43
hunting season.

DUCK

Duck, which several years ago had been reduced to such a
low population as to cause the Fish and Wildlife Service
officials to fear they would soon become extinct, have made a
remarkable recovery. Due to weather conditions in Florida
the Commission had been trying to have the duck season ex-
tended into the month of January. For years this has been
denied them as being biologically unsound from a conservation


Locating Quail to be Trapped.










22 BIENNIAL REPORT


standpoint. In 1944-45, the duck population was such that the
season in Florida was set from November 2 to January 20, and
the day's bag which had been established at 10 was extended
to include an addition of 5 singly or in the aggregate of mal-
lards, pintails, or widgeons. 70,917 ducks were reported killed
in 1942-43 as compared with 51,115 during the previous year.
Florida, because of its late season does not get the benefit
of the first flight of duck. It is only during January and
February that the duck finally reach this State, and for this
reason the Commission hopes that soon Florida will be placed
in a zone to itself and the hunting of duck permitted at least
through the entire month of January, if not until February
15, the close of our regular hunting season.

GEESE
Geese are on the increase although not in the same pro-
portion as duck. Most of the area in Florida where geese

Deer in Shipping Crates.










GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH


were hunted in former years has been taken over by the
U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service as a migratory game breeding
ground and for this reason the hunting of geese is carried
on on a very limited scale here. Kill reports for the last two
seasons show 477 in 1941-42 and 384 in 1942-43. The same
situation applies to geese as to ducks, in that Florida might
well be placed in a separate zone which would permit the
taking of this bird through January or possibly into February
without any harmful effects to the United States conservation
program.

FUR-BEARING ANIMALS

For the purpose of better protecting the fur-bearing animals
which need such protection and removing protection from those
species which are considered more or less predators, the
Commission has divided Florida fur-bearing animals into two
groups. The muskrat, raccoon, beaver, mink and otter are
in the group given full protection; the skunk, red and gray
fox, bear, opossum, panther, bobcat, civet cat, hare or rabbit,
are unprotected and may be taken at any time and in any
manner.

A Scene From Bear Creek










A















......










BIENNIAL REPORT


MUSKRAT

There are very few muskrat to be found in Florida. Several
years ago the Commission purchased from the State of
Louisiana some muskrat which were liberated in territory
similar to that from which they were taken. Recent investiga-
tions show that while some survived, the survival was not in
sufficient number to warrant the Commission continuing this
effort to increase the muskrat population. Our most recent
take record for this fur-bearer shows only 96, taken during the
year 1942-43.
RACCOON
This animal is decidedly on the increase in Florida. Their
numbers have become so great in some sections of the State
that the Commission has been forced to grant permission for
their destruction in order to avoid damage to personal property.
In the citrus section, raccoon have been known to make deep
inroads into the citrus crops. This is the most popular of our
fur-bearers, since they are to be found in numbers that it
makes it profitable for trappers to take them in spite of the
fact that Florida pelts do not bring such high prices.
MINK AND BEAVER
These animals are not found in sufficient numbers in
Florida for the Commission to be able to determine even
approximately what the population is. They are so scattered
that it is not often that they can be taken at all. When they
are taken, the price of the pelt is quite a reward to the for-
tunate trapper. It is hoped that their number will increase.

Deer Woods in Choctawahatchee National Forest (Eglin Field Military Reservation)










GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH


OTTER
The taking of otter in Florida was prohibited entirely until
several years ago. They have returned in sufficient numbers
for the Commission to feel that they might again be taken
without endangering the supply. Their pelts are considered
more valuable than that of the raccoon. Recent surveys indi-
cate that their number is still on the increase in Florida in
spite of the fact that they are being taken in ever increasing
numbers.

ALLIGATOR
The alligator, which until recent years, was considered
more of an attraction to the tourists than an attraction to
business, came into its own with the beginning of the war.
The use of leather was greatly restricted for civilian use at
that time, and the attention of the manufacturers turned to
the alligator as a source of supply to replace the shortage of
leather. The increase in price in alligator hides was tremen-
dous and it became evident that something would have to be
done to protect them or they would soon be extinct. With this
in mind, and under the powers granted by the Constitutional
Amendment, the Commission closed entirely eighteen counties
in the southern portion of the State; then made it unlawful
to take or sell alligators less than four feet in length; provided
a state-wide closed season during which alligators could not
s be taken; prohibited possession of alligators, their hides,
teeth or eggs during such closed season. It is hoped that with
these restrictions, alligators will be able to return to some-
thing approximating their former number. It is also hoped


Trail Through Deer Woods, Choctawhatchee National Forest










BIENNIAL REPORT


that the Legislature will see fit to enact some additional laws
giving further protection to the alligator and the alligator
industry in Florida. These should include a license for those
who trap or take alligators, a special license for dealers in
alligator hides and some provision for alligator farms where
alligators are raised in captivity.

FRESH WATER FISH

Fresh water fishing in Florida has long been a world re-
nowned attraction. Principal species of fresh water fish to
be found in this State are the large mouth black bass, which
grows to such a size in Florida that it became necessary to
place Florida in a group by itself in fishing contests carried
on over the country, speckled perch or crappie, red breast
bream, warmouth perch, bluegill or copperhead, and the stump-
knocker. These fish are to be found wherever fresh water is
found, the number and size depending on the amount of food
available in the waters. It is very seldom that a sportsman
goes fishing and is not rewarded with an ample catch. Except
for black bass, on which a closed season on fresh water fish
was necessary to keep up the supply, fresh water fish may be
taken the year round in Florida.

The Commission operates three fish hatcheries and the
Federal Government one hatchery from which large liberations
are made each year. This practice, together with a strict
observance of bag limits set for each species should assure
Florida remaining in the forefront insofar as fresh water fish
is concerned.


Wewahitchka Fish Hatchery.




















3n ifeemoriam


T HIS space is dedicated to those Conservation
Officers of the Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission whose deaths occurred during the past
two years. In recognition of their years of service
to the conservation of their State's wildlife, tribute
is hereby paid:

J. J. Clinton, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
W. C. Jones, Holt, Florida.








28 BIENNIAL REPORT




Th4e Cammkt Sian 'V


4ctIaiti~e

The activities of the Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission did not change with the passage and approval of the
Constitutional Amendment. The Commission was simply given
Li-oader powers in matters of conservation in that they were
authorized to establish seasons and bag limits when and if
they were needed without having to wait until the Legislature
could meet to take the necessary action. This power, to some
extent, served to do away with the confusion which had re-
sulted from the enforcement of special acts which were passed
by the Legislature to take care of a particular condition in a
particular county within the State.
CONSERVATION OFFICERS
At the present time there are employed in the field 90
Conservation Officers, serving under the direct supervision
of 5 Chief Conservation Officers. These men are charged with
the responsibility of enforcing laws passed by the Legislature
for the conservation of wildlife resources and also the Rules
and Regulations of the Commission, authorized under the
Amendment.
While law enforcement is a Conservation Officer's chief
duty ,it is not his only duty. Conservation Officers represent
the Commission in their particular locality before local sports-
men's organizations and educational institutions. They also
are called upon to do salvage work when climatic or other
conditions make it necessary to save fish or wildlife from
destruction. Theirs is a twenty-four hour a day job, three
hundred and sixty-five days in the year.
LAW ENFORCEMENT
The major activity of the Commission is that of law en-
forcement. This work is carried on by the Chief Conservation
Officers and Conservation officers who make up the Commis-
sion's Field Force.
When arrests are made for a violation of the fish and game
laws or rules and regulations of the Commission, the Conserva-
tion Officer making the arrest is allowed the same fee as








GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH 29


that allowed Sheriffs. Mileage for transporting the violator
is allowed and included in the court cost. Any fine resulting
from a conviction goes to the County where the arrest is made.
The arresting fee and court cost is paid to the Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission. During the last two years, the
Commission has collected $10,339.88 from this source.

ARRESTS AND CONVICTIONS
During the biennium covered by this report, Conservation
Officers employed by the Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission made a total of 1,270 arrests resulting in 1,095 con-
victions and 140 acquitals. Thirty-five cases are still pending.
With but very few exceptions, all cases for violations of the
game and fish laws and rules and regulations are tried in the
County Judge's Court. The cooperation given by these County
Officials has been most gratifying to the Commission and has
been the cause for much greater respect of conservation laws
by the general public.
You will note from the tabulation which follows that
"Hunting without a license", "Fishing without a license", and
"Trapping without a license" are the cause of more than one-
third of the total number of arrests. The next highest number
of arrests were made for "Possession of undersize fish."
"Taking bass in closed season" and "Netting in the fresh
waters" brought the next in number for fishing violations.
"Taking game in closed season" caused the arrest of 91 persons
during the past two years, while "Hunting with unplugged
gun" and "Hunting on closed day" followed with 40 and 35.

Clearing Lake Maggiore in Pinellas County.


a'









BIENNIAL REPORT


The tabulation of arrests by counties is also very interesting.
22 counties show a conviction for every arrest made during the
past two years while 6 counties had no arrests for game law
violations.
FISH AND FISHING
Fishing without license ------------386
Possession of undersize fish -----140
Taking bass in closed season 72
Netting in fresh water -------- -- 66
Exceeding bag limit on fish -------- ---- 27
Fishing closed waters ---- --------- 22
Fishing with more than one pole ---- ---- -- 18
Possession of cast nets and traps ---------------- 15
Dynamiting fish.. .... -- --- --- 13
Taking fish with gig ------ -- -- 10
Taking fish with wire trap---------------- 8
Renting boats without license --------- 8
Selling fish without license ------------- 7
Fishing with improper license 6
Selling black bass ------ --- 5
Fishing with bream for bait 4
Fishing with cast net 3
Selling fresh water fish in closed county 2
Fish dealer in possession of black bass 2
Fishing with goard 1

815
GAME AND HUNTING
Hunting without license 102
Taking game during closed season 91
Hunting with unplugged gun 40
Hunting on closed day 35
Possession of gun and dog in breeding ground 33
Hunting during closed season 29
Taking doe deer ---------- ----- --- 17
Taking dove in closed season 15
Possession of firearms in National Forest 12
Hunting in breeding ground 7
Taking deer at night with light 6
Possession of deer with sex identification removed 6
Exceeding bag limit on game- ----- 5
Shooting on Tamiami Trail 5
Hunting deer with light 4
Taking duck during closed season 4
Tapping quail ------- -- -- --- 3









GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH 31



Shooting coot with motor boat ----- 3
Shooting quail on ground .. -- 2
Shooting dove after sunset ------ .........-- 2
Hunting over baited area .. .. ----.. 2
Taking marsh hens from motor boat 2
Killing non-game birds -- 2
Hunting without permit in National Forest 1
Exceeding bag limit on deer ..... 1

430
TRAPPING
Trapping without license ... ... 8
Taking and possession of hides in closed season 6
Taking alligator in closed season 4
Trapping during closed season 4
Illegal setting of traps ....--- ... --....... .. 2
Trapping in breeding ground -- ----- 1

25
ARRESTS AND CONVICTIONS FOR 1943 AND 1944

County Arrests Convictions Acquittals Pending
Alachua .... 35 30 5 ......
B aker ............. ........ ......... 11 9 1 1
B ay ...-- ..... .- ......- .....-.. ... 5 3 2 ......
Eradford
Brevard .... ................... 10 9 1 ......
Broward ............. .... 4 3 .-... 1
Calhoun .. ........................... 28 22 5 t
Charlotte .. ... ...... 19 '8 I
C itrus -.... .-........- ............ .. 14 34
C lay .......... .......4.- ......-- .. 4 4
Collier
C olum bia ................................ 7 7
D ade -........ ............. ... 33 32 1
D eS oto. .................................. 3 3
D ixie ............ ...... ............ .. 14 9 5
D uval ...................... ........ .. 12 5 5 2
Escam bia .... ...................... 9 8 1
F lagler ........ ... ............. 5 5
Franklin ... .... .... .. 2 2
Gadsden ... ...... 10 10
G ilchrist .... ....... 5 5
G lades ........ ....... . 4 1
G ulf .......... .. 63 53 12
H am ilton .... .......... 14 14










32 BIENNIAL REPORT




County Arrests Convi2tions Acquittals Pending
Hardee ...-----------......-..................... 7 5 2
H endry .................................. 27 26 1
Hernando .............................. 35 29 5 1
H ighlands .............................. 15 15 ......
Hillsborough .......................... 7 7
H olm es ... ... ......-...... 4 3 ...... 1
Indian River ..------........--------..........- 4 4 ..-- ......
Jackson ....................-------------------............ 82 64 15 3
Jefferson .......................... .. 23 6 10 7
Lafayette ..-.............-- ............- 18 16 2 --
Lake .........------ .....-----.--------.........--.. 47 45 2
Lee ...............-----------........------------............ 14 14 -
Leon .........-- .............-- ... 23 22 .... 1
Levy ....- ......-...- ....-- .......... 18 15 2 1
Liberty ............. -.......... -.... 10 10 ...... -
M adison ............. .............. 15 13 2 ---
Manatee
M arion .............. ......-.......-- 30 29 1 ---
Martin ...-------..........-- .- ........... 10 9 1 ---
Monroe
N assau ....... --.... -.. --..........-..... 4 4 ............
Okaloosa ............................... 43 23 14 6
Okeechobee ............-----------......-.....----... 5 3 2
Orange .......-.................-----------------.... 23 19 3 1
O sceola .................................. 1 1 .- -. ......
Palm Beach .......................... 10 9 1
Pasco ...................................... 26 26 --..
Pinellas .................................. 9 9
P olk ........................................ 107 96 10 1
P utnam .................................. 3 3 ...... ......
St. Johns ................................ 58 55 3 ......
St. Lucie
Santa Rosa ........................... ---------------- 23 23
Sarasota ................................ 26 25 1 --
Seminole ------....----.....--...-...-.....-... 12 11 1 ......
Sum ter ................................. 8 8
Suwannee .--------.....-.....------............. 21 9 12 ......
T aylor .........-..... ...... ....... 13 12 ...... 1
Union
V olusia .................................. 19 19 ............
W akulla ................................ -0 33 2 5
Walton ............-...-- .............--------------..-. 36 29 6 1
Washington ......-.........-.........-..-- 33 31 2 1

Total ...-......-..................... 1270 1095 140 35








GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH


RESTOCKING
Until just recently, the Commission's program of restocking
has been mainly with quail and fresh water fish. Some ex-
periments were carried on with wild guineas purchased from
Cuba, and some chukars were purchased and liberated in
Florida in an effort to propagate them here. These efforts
met with little or no success. Since Florida is one of the few
remaining states where the pure strain of the bronze wild tur-
key is still found, the Commission feels that any effort to re-
stock with turkeys brought into Florida might result in the
loss of this pure strain. For this reason it was considered bet-
ter to give proper protection to those turkeys remaining in the
State rather than import them. A strict observation of the
season and bag limit on turkey should take care of the situa-
tion. Following the killing of deer by the State Live Stock
Sanitary Board in connection with tick eradication work, it
became necessary for the Commission to broaden its restocking
program to include deer.

GAME SANCTUARIES, REFUGES, RESERVATIONS
Under the rules and regulations promulgated by the Com-
mission the following definitions have been given to areas
closed by order of the Commission:
Sanctuary-An area within which hunting, fishing and
trapping is prohibited for an indefinite period of time.
Refuge-An area within which hunting, and/or fishing,
and/or trapping is prohibited for an indefinite period of time.
Reservation-An area within which hunting, and/or fishing,
and/or trapping is prohibited for a term of years set by the
Commission.


One of the Fish Ponds at Holt Hatchery.





BIENNIAL REPORT


.A t 1! ], .~- n t tin n .h -: ii,.. iin i : .. i 1I;i-: I l.; -1 1i ,- ,- . l
.1 .. n iri ..t . -t i .. . l t i. i i 'll' : ; IItI' i*r-_ .I tI 'l i l. 1': iin n -
I\ t lr-7 n i.. I 1 1 i t .' r i l a. I I..f I i.
t h ,- l II.ill I f h l i I r.I ,. . l '- i Li i l r- l' .i t i I; l i. 1 1.,i r l -
:ill'i uim l < lill I*'..tru 1.t ,i i [uulinri ,1 l ; ni..In tli- |!. rl.I **..i
.:f' ir fi. rI u ..it. -l : u.i : k illn .. 12. 4 1' '.., n l. ;> i ,n i
Tra.'pcd Quail







it









GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH


In areas where hunting, fishing or trapping is prohibited,
it is a violation of the law to be found there with gun, fishing
tackle or any device which might be used for trapping. Dogs
are also prohibited within the closed areas. Quite a number
of arrests were made on these charges during the past two
years.
These closed areas are all posted and it is a violation of
the rules and regulations to remove or deface any of the posters.
QUAIL RESTOCKING
Following the close of the hunting season each year Con-
servation Officers go into the closed areas over the State and
trap quail. This is necessary in order to break up the covies
of birds which have not been hunted. Several of the birds are
liberated where they are trapped, in order to leave sufficient
stock for next year's breeding. The others are liberated in
pairs in open territory where they propagate and furnish
hunting for the next open season. In this manner 14,263 quail
were trapped during the past two years thus furnishing 7,131
covies of quail for the hunters to shoot during the open
hunting season in addition to those which were already in the
open territory over the State.
The Commission at one time operated a quail hatchery in
connection with the Game Farm at Holt, Florida, but this has
had to be discontinued due to inability to secure proper feed
during war times. It is possible that operation of this hatchery

Deer Corral at Holt Hatchery.










BIENNIAL REPORT


'. ill I.,, ,, L,: h lJ tl; : '. :] I ,.,..* f-. / ill i,.1t :l,,. l .it t ;,*
,. ill I'. I* I ii' I I .. .:* i I- 11I.111 1' 1 1".:1 ;it t1 w
.t lir. .il'o .* : rI i l. ,:i l:. l Il .:[ [it ... .II .i : .. t .



FISH HATCHERIES
S .:i I.,'n.,rinl --i..i i .|. |- l un r- l!n ',. n' h _l nl ,-r. ..il : -
IE: le L :ke hk ', \\ ,. i.:r H .i ri. FIl....n l.. ....., .ti H ,,It. F l..r,l'.l.
Il. i .l..i ,at \\ .. :. l i. t ik I n .- i :. :il Hi : nl ri.
I'.*>. tl*:i l-. i ; \\' I:. . I .1. ii-l 1l **-i i i l .
Fr..rn th- liit jh. i .it E. l I. L.it H ..It : in l \\.. ik i t..r;
,..f( 7 A"I 1 .lIm p f'|l' i; .._ l l i l- n Hi '. Ifl l'i l tlanIl :i. Fl., | i.. i. |,I,
ri i i v l i n F -I f '.i I i 1,: iV, '; tI . 3 | : l Ii i it iilli
.li l,.. t[., l :. (,1 1 1 aIll (I h-dl ill C ,.,I hL -

.ll Itli ul. l.l )'l' ... i I i, : I l .l.: : i.: t>.h ,. '. . --


i-'- I n :;- i- i


\ ..l.ik e .......... .. ..... 2 1l 4 .. ':l 1 7. .1:1.',
One ..f rh: F.:h Pond. at We ,.oh.rchka Hatcher'





rt.
0,"s

it ... -










GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH 37


DEER RESTOCKING
During 1937, 1939 and 1941 local laws were passed by the
Florida Legislature which provided for the slaughter of deer
by the Live Stock Sanitary Board in connection with tick
eradication work. These local laws applied to Orange, Osceola,
Highlands, Glades, Hendry and Collier Counties. The killing
of these deer has made it necessary that the Commission re-
stock these counties, when they have been declared to be
tick free.
(The 1941 session of the Legislature appropriated the sum
of $50,000.00 to be used for deer restocking in the areas where
deer had been killed in tick eradication work. The 1943 session
of the Legislature made a similar appropriation. This money
was to be expended by the Live Stock Sanitary Board in co-
operation with the Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.
Deer restocking has been carried on through two channels-


Deer Taken in Ocala National Forest










33 BIErNNIAL REPORT


the live trapping of ,*.i-r I ,.r F ,.lri l-,'.'. int l .1 1. .nI, t .:
purchase of deer thr...i i ...ilnr'i i rurl it-
Tick eradication w ..., :- .i .rtii l..t i1i l "a- .--. ,I -c I:, 1:,. :-
and Highlands Count i: .itndl ti t r .... kIn .. k I .i 11 nI lr r-
w ay in these counties. Tihe '..'lt: in i ,. iI, ".i .I I, in..Ir:, ,i- ..un-
ties is com plete but th, l ..i S .I .. iShtI li', 1..,.,rl II:;- INt:.r '.r
authorized the startiiiie t .it....kiuf.
Finding V irginia \le. T:iIl ,ii :.i' i.. ll nI m I. 1.r.i'-l '.i
is the big problem .1 .. I.-.t- ltie tii iiiY i.. hi I ImI -1.i t --
ful in locating and L ., ti i- tIr,. Fl.i' i -i4I t.ltes I, I.4 .,-t-i
to replace the deer v.hi.h .:'-. kill.,.i
In addition to the ,| '...|.' :i ti ..l'ii it i' ti... t ,i.' ip..-
viding for the slaught.-, A ,ti .l:r 1 ii .l!ir ,,n H,:n l Iriy i .,un ty
also m ade provision l'., :i .l-: r t: ti,.kiln. tiundi i Ti, lI-ilI'.
County law provided t'..r thi- l1, I, r l .\ ,ii,.- lI. St..-.. S.i -
Lary Board to the G.irni :ii.I F'r -I \\'-to-r Fi-h I-'..mnink i..

Liberated Dcer









GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH


of $25.00 for each deer killed. This has resulted in the sum of
$4,575.00, which money will be used to restock deer in Henry
County.
The Collier County law provided for a special $5.00 license
in addition to the regular hunting license. This has resulted
in the sum of $3,680.00 which will be used in Collier County.
The Commission also has a deer corral in connection with
the Game Farm at Holt, Florida, which contains at the present
time an estimated herd of 60 deer.


Garfish-One of of Our Worst Predators


LAKE AND STREAM IMPROVEMENT
The Commission is constantly confronted with the necessity
of clearing lakes and streams of various predatory or rough
fish. This is done by use of seines operated by members of
our field force or by persons under contract with the Com-
mission. During these operations rough fish are taken out of
the waters while all game fish caught in the seines are imme-
diately returned to the waters.









BIENNIAL REPORT


The garfish, which is our only true predatory fish, presents
our biggest problem. The Commission is at present trying to
work out some satisfactory method of destroying this predator.
This will also be included in the Commission's postwar pro-
gram. The water hyacinth which is fast covering numerous
bodies of fresh water in Florida is another problem as yet
unsolved by the Commission. Any method yet tried has proven
so expensive that it is prohibitive. Experiments are still being
made and it is hoped that a solution to this problem will soon
be provided. This will also be included in the Commission's
postwar program.

In 1943 and 1944 water improvement work has been carried
on in Lake Trafford in Collier County, Lake Rosalee in Polk
County and in Lake Maggiore in Pinellas County. The prob-
lem of securing labor with which to carry on this phase of the
Commission's activity has been the main thing confronting the
Commission. This has greatly limited the amount of water
clearance work which the Commission has been able to do
during the past two years.


COOPERATION

Since there are several departments of the State's Govern-
ment concerned with the conservation of Florida's natural
resources, it is to be expected that the program carried on by
each of these departments will eventually come in contact with
the programs being followed by the others. Cooperation be-
tween these various State Agencies is absolutely essential if
any of the programs are to be successful. The following
paragraphs will touch briefly on the subject of cooperation
with the other conservation agencies.


STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION

Under a plan started more than two years ago whereby
Conservation Agents employed by the State Board of Conserva-
tion held Honorary Game Warden Commissions from this
Department, and Conservation Officers employed by the Com-
mission are issued Honorary Conservation Agent Commissions
by the State Board of Conservation, these two State Depart-
ments have continued to assist each other in the enforcement
of laws relating to fresh and salt water fishing in Florida.
It is believed that much good has been accomplished by this
cooperative agreement between the two Departments.


40









GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH


STATE OF GEORGIA

Since the St. Marys River forms part of the boundary line
between the State of Georgia and the State of Florida, it is
almost necessary that the Rules and Regulations which apply
to this body of water be the same in both states and that
Officers of both States have full authority on either bank of
the river. This has been arranged by having Georgia Officers
covering the area adjoining the St. Marys River made Honorary
Wardens for Florida while Florida Officers hold Honorary
Commissions issued by the State of Georgia. It has also been
arranged that seasons for taking fresh water fish from this
body of water be the same.


U. S. FOREST SERVICE

BIENNIAL REPORT

on Apalachicola, Ocala, and Osceola Wildlife Management Areas

Under the cooperative agreement between the Commission
of Game and Fresh Water Fish and the U. S. Forest Service,
Wildlife Management Areas were established in the Ocala
National Forest, Osceola National Forest and the Apalachicola
National Forest. Game Management Plans for the areas stipu-
lated reduced seasons, bag limits, planting of stock and the
restocking of lakes and streams with fish from Federal hatch-
eries. Forest Rangers and Forest Guards in the National
Forests have been appointed Honorary Game Wardens with
full authority to enforce game and fish laws. Two residents
have been constructed by the U. S. Forest Service in the Ocala
National Forest for the use of the full time Conservation Of-
ficers of the state. One residence on the Osceola National at
the Olustee Guard Station has been constructed by the Forest
Service for the use of the Conservation Officer in charge. It
is planned to build a similar structure in the Apalachicola
Management Area when the funds become available.
1
Beginning with 1938, annual supervised deer hunts have
been held on the Ocala National Forest. During the month
of December, 1944, 3,804 hunters paid for permits to hunt.
i This was a record year, not only in attendance but also in the
number of deer killed. Four hundred and twenty-eight deer
were checked out at the eleven stations operated under the
supervision of the district ranger.










BIENNIAL REPORT


Following is table showing some pertinent statistics rela-
tive to hunts for 1943 and 1944:


1943
Number of Permits issued 2847
Number of Deer killed ------- 240
Ratio of Deer killed to number of permits 8.4%
Number of arrests 1
Antler Point Data:
Spike --- -- ------------
3-Point ---------------------------
4-Point --...---. ---------------
5-Point --...-------------------
6-Point --.---.------------ --
7-Point --.---... ------ ------
8-Point .--...-.--.---. --------
9-Point --------- ------------ ---
10-Point -----------------
11-Point --- ------- -------
12-Point -------.. -
13-Point -------- --------
Unspecified -----------------
Shed
Tabulation of Hunters by Conservation Districts
year 1944:


1944
3805
428
11.37
10

128
8
34
18
32
21
79
24
13
5
4
1
55
6
for the


Conservation District
Key Cities in District
1. Tampa and Lakeland
2. Jacksonville and Gainesville
3. Tallahassee and Pensacola
4. Miami and West Palm Beach
5. Ocala and Orlando

Totals
Fur Trapping Record

Fox
Raccoon
Opossum .........
Skunk -----.. .-- ...... .... .
Wild Cat
Otter --. ------------


Number
Permi
73
100
3
7
195

380
Apala
194

6


r of Percentage
ts of Total
7 19.4
2 26.3
7 1.0
4 1.9
5 51.4

5 100.00
chicola Ocala
14 1944
61 17
329 65
17 21
0 0
28 2


Six of the deek killed in the 1944 season had already shed
their antlers when taken. How the hunters knew them to be


42









GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH 43


bucks is very much of a mystery. The deer as a rule were only
in a fair condition, no doubt due to a total lack of acorns upon
which they usually fatten. However, about ten per cent were
found to be fat, which would indicate that there are some
fattening foods on the Management Area other than mast.
During the 1944 hunt fewer deer were observed with screw-
worms than in the previous year's hunt. In fact there was
considerable alarm over this condition of the deer in 1943,
but 1944 observations showed a reduction in the infection. In
1943 it was not uncommon to find a deer carcass in the area
with the only apparent cause being screw-worm. It was feared
that the disease would reduce the number of fawns, but at
the beginning of the 1944 season there was a larger number of
young deer than ever before.
Estimated deer population at the end of 1943 was 9,000. At
the end of 1944 the census was approximated at 9,050. Despite
disease and the take of hunters, the population remains stable.
There was a vast improvement in law enforcement work in
1944 as compared with 1943. Continued efforts will be made to
improve this phase of the management of the Ocala area in
future hunts.
CORLAND L. JONES

UNITED STATES ARMY
During the biennium covered by this report, annual hunts
have been carried on in Eglin Field Military Reservation, form-
erly the Choctawhatchee National Forest. These hunts are
conducted through cooperation between the Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commissioin and the United States Army. Permits
are issued free of charge by the Commanding Officer to per-
sons wishing to avail themselves of the privilege of hunting
deer within certain areas in the Reservation. The only re-
strictions are that hunters must be in possession of a valid
hunting license, be checked into the Reservation on arriving
and checked out when leaving, and confine their hunting to
those areas set out on the permits. All kills must be reported
and hunters are also required to observe legal bag limits
established by the Commission for other portions of the State.
During 1943 approximately 1,800 permits were issued and
,. 300 deer reported killed within the Reservation. In 1944 ap-
proximately 2,500 permits were issued and 425 deer reported
killed. These hunts are increasing in popularity as evidenced
by the increase in the number of permits issued.









BIENNIAL REPORT


FLORIDA FOREST AND PARK SERVICE
The Commission for several years has cooperated with the
State Forest and Park Service in an effort to provide recrea-
tional facilities in the several State Forests and Parks. Through
this program of cooperation the Commission has established
game breeding grounds in the following areas:
O'Leno State Forest in Alachua and Columbia Counties.
Pine Log State Forest in Bay and Washington Counties.
Gold Head Branch State Park in Clay County.
Suwannee River State Park in Hamilton and Suwannee
Counties.
Highlands Hammock State Park and Botanical Garden and
Arboretum in Highlands County.
Hillsborough River State Park in Hillsborough County.
Florida Caverns State Park in Jackson County.
Torreya State Park in Liberty County.
Myakka River State Park in Manatee and Sarasota Counties.
Cary State Forest and Ft. Clinch State Park in Nassau
County.
In all of these areas wildlife is given the same protection
as that given to other Game Breeding Grounds. Predator con-
trol is carried on by members of the Commission's Field Force
and wildlife is on an increase. This adds greatly to the value
of the areas from a recreational standpoint.

U. S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE
The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Agency
charged with the conservation of fish and migratory birds,
has been of great assistance to the Commission in all matters
pertaining to conservation of our wildlife resources. On the
other hand, the Commission has endeavored to cooperate with
the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service at all times. Conservation
Officers of the Commission hold U. S. Game Warden appoint-
ments from the Fish and Wildlife Service and are fully quali-
fied to make arrests for violations of Federal Regulations as
well as for violations of Commission Regulations. Each year
members of our Field Force assist in making a waterfowl in-
ventory which is used by the Fish and Wildlife Service when
considering Regulations for taking migratory game birds.
The Commission also permits the use of its tank truck for
delivery of fish from the Federal Hatchery located at Welaka,
Florida. In return, a great many applications for fish filed









GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH


with the Commission are filled with fish coming from the
Federal Hatchery. Hunting seasons in Florida are not defi-
nitely established until after the Fish and Wildlife Service
has set the seasons for taking migratory birds in order that
the Commission may set its Regulations to conform with those
established by the Federal Government.

MISCELLANEOUS

MEETINGS OF THE COMMISSION
Meetings of the Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
were held more frequently during the past two years than has
been customary due to the fact that it was necessary to formu-
late Rules and Regulations as provided by the Constitutional
Amendment. A schedule of meetings held follows:


Date
January 25, 1943
February 25, 1943
June 14, 1943
July 19, 1943
July 29, 1943
August 16, 1943
September 2, 1943
September 9, 1943
January 24, 1944
May 29, 1944
July 24, 1944
August 14, 1944
September 18, 1944
December 7, 1944


Place
Tallahassee
Jacksonville
Jacksonville
Jacksonville
Jacksonville
Jacksonville
Jacksonville
Jacksonville
Tallahassee
Jacksonville
Jacksonville
Jacksonville
Jacksonville
Tallahassee


FEDERAL-AI D-TO-WI LDLI FE
Because of a reduction in the amount of money included
in the budget of the U. S. Department of Interior, Florida's pro-
gram made possible under the provisions of the Pittman-Robert-
son Act has been greatly reduced during the past biennium. In
1943 Florida received from this source an allocation of $12,-
374.48 as compared with $34,290.56 allocated to Florida during
1941. In 1944, this amount was reduced to $11,061.79.
Florida had previously operated the following projects,
approved under the Federal-Aid-to-Wildlife program:
2-D Northeast Florida Quail Habitat Restoration.
3-D Northwest Florida Quail Habitat Restoration.









BIENNIAL REPORT


4-L Lake County Land Acquisition.
5-L Marion County Land Acquisition.
6-D Lake County Development.
7-D Marion County Development.
8-L Charlotte County Land Acquisition.
9-D Clark-Ray-Johnson Leased Land Development.
10-D Deer Restocking.
In 1943, Projects 2-D and 3-D were combined and the work
carried on by a single project leader. 6-D, 7-D, and 9-D were
extended, to be carried out when it was possible to purchase
materials necessary to complete these development projects.
8-L, which was a five year land acquisition project, was ex-
tended to take care of the purchase of another segment of the
land under option to purchase.
In 1944, Projects 6-D, 7-D and 9-D were again extended,
since it was still impossible to purchase the necessary ma-
terials. 8-L was again extended to take care of the purchase
of another segment of land in Charlotte County.
Under the Pittman-Robertson program, the Commission has
purchased 640 acres of land in Lake County, 1,280 acres of land
in Marion County and when the Charlotte County land acquisi-
tion project has been completed, the Commission will own
approximately 55,000 acres of land in that County.

HUNTING ACCIDENTS
Included in the reports which come annually to the office
of the Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission is the one
dealing with accidents due directly to hunting. In 1942-43
there were 26 such accidents reported to the Commission. Of
these 6 were fatal, 5 were serious and 15 of a minor nature.
During 1943-44, there were 16 accidents reported, of which none
were fatal, 5 were serious and 11 minor.








GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH


EDUCATION AND PUBLICITY

This phase of the Commission's work has been greatly re-
tarded during the past two years. The Educational Director
was called to the Army and publication of the Commission's
monthly magazine was discontinued due to conditions brought
about by the War. It is hoped that we will be in position to
resume publication at an early date.
The rationing of tires and gasoline and congested travel
conditions served further to reduce the Commission's participa-
tion in other phases of conservation education formerly carried
on No Fair Exhibits have been prepared and no wildlife con-
tests of any kind have been held.
MOVING PICTURES
Calls are continuing to come in for permission to show the
Commission's motion picture "Our Heritage." Requests to
show the film in other States are not at all uncommon. During
the past two years these requests have been received from the
States of New York, Illinois, Louisiana, Ohio and Georgia. The
picture has been shown twelve times in the State of Illinois.
In addition to this, copies of the film are constantly on the
move through all parts of Florida where it is shown before
schools, sportsmen's organizations, civic clubs and other in-
terested groups.
The Commission plans at a very early date to have another
picture made which will help to bring conservation of wild-
life even more vividly before the public eye.

NEWS STORIES AND OTHER PUBLICITY
Possibly the most valuable piece of publicity which has ever
come to the Commission was a story written by Harold Titus
and appearing in the February 1944 issue of Field and Stream.
Material for this story was furnished by the Commissiion. Pic-
tures of Florida scenes were furnished by the Commission and
also by Dave Newell, Editor of Field and Stream and one time
resident of Florida. This article was the means of bringing
Florida and the work of the Commission before the eyes of the
Nation awd the value of such publicity cannot be estimated
in any te;ms.
The Florida Highways magazine has also carried several
articles with reference to the work of the Commission and the
<'- value of Florida's wildlife resources. In addition to this, the
Commission, from time to time, has furnished to the press of
the State, articles which tend to keep the public advised as to
the work which they are doing.









SOURCE OF REVENUE DURING BIENNIUM ENDING JUNE 30, 1944
CLASSIFIED LIST OF LICENSES SOLD


Fishing Licenses-
Series A-Resident State -------
Series B-Non-Resident State -
Series C-Non-Resident 10-day Trip -
Total -----------------
Hunting Licenses-
Series I-Resident County
Series J-Resident County, Other than
Home ---- ----...---------
Series K-Resident State-- ------
Series L-Non-Resident --------
Series M-Non-Resident, 10-day Trip
Series 1-M-Non-Resident 3,000 Acre
Owner ---------------
Alien License -------------
Total
Trapping Licenses-
Series N-Resident --- ----
Series O-Non-Resident County
Series P-Resident State
Series Q-Resident Other than Home
County -------------- --
Total ----.- ----------.
TOTAL LICENSE SALES .--------.


$1.00
5.00
2.00



$1.00

3.00
5.00
25.00
10.00

10.00
50.00



$3.00
25.00
25.00


59,071
5,425
7,508
72,004


$ 59,071.00
27,125.00
15,016.00
$101,212.00


44,580 $ 44,580.00


457
19,631
122
291


1,371.00
98,155.00
3,050.00
2,910.00


17 170.00

65,098 $150,236.00


1,418
1
5


10.00 25
-- 1.449
138,551


$ 4,254.00
25.00
125.00

250.00
$ 4,654.00
$256,102.00


64,003
7,432
8,604
80,039


$ 64,003.00
37,160.00
17,208.00
$118,371.00


29,034 $ 29,034.00


413
21,068
164
418


1,239.00
105,340.00
4,100.00
4,180.00


16 160.00

51,113 $144,053.00


1,928
1
18

48
1,995
133,147


$ 5,784.00
25.00
450.00

480.00
$ 6,739.00
$269,163.00









GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH


GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH COMMISSION


STATEMENT OF
Receipts and Disbursements
July 1, 1942 t June 30, 1943
RECEIPTS
Balance on hand June 30, 1942
Hunting Licenses $150,161.00
Fishing Licenses ----- 96,396.00
Trapping Licenses ---...-- 4,597.00
U. S. Forest Permits ......----....------. 2,052.98 $253,206.98


$111,541.07


COMMERCIAL LICENSES
Retail Fish Dealers ..--$
Wholesale Fish Dealers -- -
Commercial Boat
Boat for Hire
Game Farm Licenses ...-
Wholesale Fur Dealers and


Agents--- --
Local Fur Dealers
Guide Licenses
Court Costs --------
Miscellaneous
Confiscated Boats --
Confiscated Fish
Sale of Old Equipment ---
Confiscated Furs and Hides
Previous Year's Licenses
Receipts from Pittman-
Robertson


DISBURSEMENTS
ADMINISTRATION
Office Salaries
Traveling, Executive
Secretary
Traveling, Commissioners
Miscellaneous --- --
Office Supplies ------
Postal, Telephone and Tele
graph ---------
Printing and Stationery ...-----
Premium on Bonds ...-----


2,750.00
700.00
403.20
2,906.50
75.00


1,130.00
200.00
210.00 $ 8,374.70
$ 4,604.46
4,448.26
228.00
27.84


350.00
107.75
556.00


$ 10,322.31 $271,903.99

29,495.30 29,495.30

$412,940.36


$ 10,403.10

1,112.60
1,051.81
937.64
257.36

954.91
2,766.18
40.00 $ 17,523.60









BIENNIAL REPORT


FIELD EXPENSE
Salaries, Conservation Of-
ficers ---
Traveling, Conservation Of-
ficers -----.-.-.------
Legal Expense --.-.
Miscellaneous, Field
Premium on Compensation
Insurance
Premium on Bonds
Equipment Purchased -.---
Maintenance of Equipment.
Rewards Paid -
Restocking
EDUCATION


Salaries $-- ---
Miscellaneous ----- ---
Moving Pictures
HATCHERIES
Blackwater Game Farm and
Hatchery:
Salaries $----------
Labor
Supplies
Express
Feed -- -----
Fertilizer -------
Gas and Oil ----------
Insurance ----------
Repairs to Equipment .....--
Truck Repairs
Restocking
Wewahitchka Hatchery:
Salaries $---------
Labor
Gas and Oil ----------
Repairs .--- .... --. .--.-
Winter Haven Hatchery:
Salaries -----
Labor -. ---------- ---
Traveling --------
Land Purchased ------
Improvements --------
Repairs to Equipment ---
Supplies -----------


$100,449.60

78,923.35
100.00
2,159.33

1,129.33
495.00
995.23
998.05
50.00
491.10 $185,790.99


300.00
11.86
46.53




2,775.00
890.50
132.48
2.28
388.85
66.42
612.25
53.08
60.00
716.18
45.00 $

200.00
9.00
8.75
166.01 $


358.39














5,742.04




383.76


3,247.40
46.00
234.75
875.00
164.80
225.00
116.19


50









GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH


Truck Operation
Gas and Oil
Insurance on Truck ------
Relief of E. L. Smith (Acts
1939) ---.--..------
Pittman-Robertson Expendi-
tures -----------


CASH ACCOUNT
Balance in State Treasury .$130,798.83
Balance in Lewis State Bank 23,376.85
Less County Judges' Credits 20.75
Less Hendry County Deer
Restocking Fund Reserve 4,575.00


401.69
546.77
69.90 $


5,927.50 $215,726.28


600.00

47,034.15 47,634.15 47,634.15


154,175.68


4,595.75 149,579.93

$412,940.36


51










BIENNIAL REPORT


GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH COMMISSION

STATEMENT OF
Receipts and Disbursements
July 1, 1943, to June 30, 1944
RECEIPTS


Balance on hand June 30, 1943
Hunting Licenses ---------$143,861.00
Fishing Licenses ----- 114,683.00
Trapping 6,727.00 $265,271.00
U. S. Forest Permits -... 2,871.62 2,871.62


COMMERCIAL LICENSES
Retail Fish Dealers ----..$
Wholesale Fish Dealers --
Commercial Boat
Boat for Hire ----- --
Game Farm Licenses --..
Wholesale Fur Dealers and
Agents
Local Fur Dealers
Guide Licenses
Court Costs ---------
Miscellaneous -------
Confiscated Boats, Nets and
Motors ----
Confiscated Fish -----
Sale of Old Equipment ----
Confiscated Furs and Hides
Previous Year's Licenses -
Receipts from Pittman-
Robertson
Refunds


DISBURSEMENTS
ADMINISTRATION
Office Salaries --------.. --$
Traveling Director -------
Traveling Commissioners -
Miscellaneous
Office Supplies
Postage, Telephone and Tele-
graph ------------
Printing and Stationery ----
Premium on Bonds ------


3,975.00
1,200.00
545.60
2,965.00
40.00

1,415.00
160.00
160.00
6,945.35
2,255.88

677.00
81.60
825.00
140.75
4,971.00


10,460.60







15,896.58

16,487.79
53.91


10,995.02
1,394.50
885.32
538.25
228.52

1,177.87
2,725.98
45.00 $ 17,990.46


$149,574.93


294,499.80

16,487.79
53.91

$460,616.43









GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH 53


FIELD EXPENSES
Salaries, Conservation Of-
ficers --- ----------
Traveling, Conservation Of-
ficers ----- --
Premium on Bonds
Legal Expense --------.-
Miscellaneous, Field ------
Premium on Compensation
Insurance
Equipment Purchased -.--
Maintenance of Equipment
Rewards Paid ----------
Restocking -


HATCHERIES
Blackwater Game Farm and
Hatchery:
Salaries ------------------ $
Labor ----- -------
Supplies --
Express and Telegrams ----
Feed -
Fertilizer and Seed
Gas and Oil
Insurance ----------
Repairs to Equipment ----
Truck Repairs --..----.-
Wewahitchka Hatchery:
Salaries $
Supplies
Gas and Oil
Winter Haven Hatchery:
Salaries -------- $
Labor
Traveling
Repairs to Equipment
Supplies ---------
Truck Operation -
Gas and Oil -------- --
Insurance on Truck -----.
Relief of E .L. Smith (Acts
1939)
Relief of J. A. McKeithen
(Acts 1941) ...-
Pittman-Robertson Expendi-
tures -


2,600.00
804.66
32.63
15.97
177.27
169.65
430.69
178.88
200.72
324.96 $

480.00
3.75
10.75

4,402.50
99.00
325.95
145.88
139.54
246.71
476.94
70.30


4,935.43



494.50








5,906.82 202,696.28


600.00

812.50


21,451.22 22,863.72 22,863.72


$ 91,934.73

75,352.29
320.00
211.29
3,262.27


665.53
519.50
750.51
200.00
152.95


$173,369.07










BIENNIAL REPORT


CASH ACCOUNT
Balance in State Treasury- $237,377.07
Due from County Judges -_ 2,586.00
Less Hendry County Deer
Restocking Fund Reserve 4,575.00
Less Cancelled Warrant Ac-
count -8-- 331.64


239,963.07



4,906.64 235,056.43

$460,616.43









GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH


GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH COMMISSION
*
STATEMENT OF
Receipts and Disbursements
July Ist, 1944 to December 31st, 1944
RECEIPTS


Balance on hand June 30, 1944
Hunting Licenses $186,297.00
Fishing Licenses ------- 54,244.00
Trapping -- --------- 4,221.00 $244,762.00
U. S. Forest Permits .-...--......-. 3,796.34 3,796.34


COMMERCIAL LICENSES
Retail Fish Dealers -----
Wholesale Fish Dealers ---
Commercial Boat
Boat for Hire -------
Game Farm Licenses -----
Wholesale Fur Dealers and
Agents
Local Fur Dealers
Guide Licenses ------
Court Costs -------
Miscellaneous
Confiscated Boats -------
Confiscated Fish
Sale of Old Equipment ---
Confiscated Furs and Hides
Previous Year's Licenses --
Cancelled Warrant Account
Refunds --- ------


DISBURSEMENTS
ADMINISTRATION
Office Salaries $
Traveling Director ------
Traveling .Commissioners -.-
Miscellaneous ---------
Office Supplies
Postage, Telephone and Tele-
graph
Printing and Stationery --
Premium on Bonds -..--..-


$ 3,435.00
1,550.00
434.20
3,084.00
65.00

995.00
50.00
130.00
2,132.38
2,987.25
422.25
133.27
595.50
4.55
3,892.00
331.64
56.49


9,743.20






10,167.20 268,468.74

388.13 388.13

$503,913.30


5,626.23
638.20
694.31
289.33
216.82

733.15
2,682.81
35.00 $ 10,915.85


$235,056.43










BIENNIAL REPORT


FIELD EXPENSES
Salaries, Chief Conservatior
Officers ---- ...
Salaries, Conservation Of-
ficers -...--
Traveling, Chief Conserva-
tion Officers --------
Traveling, Conservation Of
ficers -- ----------
Premium on Bonds
Legal Advertising
Legal Expense ------
Miscellaneous, Field --....
Premium on Compensation
Insurance -- ........ --
Equipment Purchased ---
Maintenance of Equipment-
Rewards Paid --------

HATCHERIES


Blackwater Game Farm and
Hatchery:
Salaries ------ $
Labor -----------
Supplies -- ---------
Express and Telegrams --.
Feed ----------
Fertilizer and Seed ----
Gas and Oil ------------
Truck Repairs -.--------
Wewahitchka Hatchery:
Salaries --.---. ----------$
Labor --. -----..-.--.-
Supplies ------...-..---
Gas and Oil --.---....-..---
Winter Haven Hatchery:
Salaries $-----.- --------$
Labor ------------
Traveling ....-
Supplies
Truck Operation
Gas and Oil
Publicity and Education
Salary- ---_--
Relief of E. L. Smith (Acts
1939)


$ 4,275.00

44,983.87

5,442.00

34,903.46
245.00
190.23
125.00
1,616.98

1,367.62
651.57
587.54
200.00 $ 94,588.27


900.00
1,066.21
17.78
8.09
107.35
12.00
425.59
745.45 $

240.00
16.00
2.75
12.45 $

1,879.99
120.00
192.47
152.83
279.81
234.01


3,282.47




271.20






2,859.11 111,916.90


200.00 200.00 200.00


300.00









GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH


Pittman-Robertson Expendi-
tures
Refunds


68,734.41
100.00


CASH ACCOUNT
Balance in State Treasury $302,329.43
Balance in Lewis State Bank 24,923.56
Less County Judge's Credit 16.00
Less Hendry County Deer
Restocking Fund Reserve 4,575.00


69,134.41 69,134.41



327,252.99


$ 4,591.00 $322,661.99

$503,913.30




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