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Biennial report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075940/00013
 Material Information
Title: Biennial report
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23-29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
Publisher: Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Creation Date: 1966
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Game protection -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Fish culture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Fishery management -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Wildlife management -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: First biennial report covers the period from the time of the organization (of the Commission) July 1, 1935 to December 31, 1936.
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000327977
oclc - 01332271
notis - ABV7514
System ID: UF00075940:00013
 Related Items
Preceded by: Florida. Dept. of Game and Fresh Water Fish.|Biennial report of the Department of Game and Fresh Water Fish
Succeeded by: Florida. Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.|Annual report

Full Text




STATE OF FLORIDA
GAME & FRESH WATER FISH
COMMISSION


BIENNIAL
REPORT


JULY 1,
TO
JUNE 30,


1966

1968


. OF F. UI RY


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STATE OF FLORIDA

GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH COMMISSION
TALLAHASSEE
Dr. O. E. Frye, Jr., DIRCTOs W. B. Copeland, CHAIRMAN
H. E. Wallace, AsslsrArr DIEcroa W. T. McBroom Harold W. Ashley
Dr. R. H. Schulz William M. Blake





HONORABLE CLAUDE R. KIRK, JR.
Governor of the State of Florida
Tallahassee, Florida

SIR: We have the privilege of submitting herewith the Biennial
Report of the Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission,
for the period starting July 1, 1966, and ending June 30, 1968.

This report contains a concise statement of Commission
activities during that period.

Respectfully submitted,

Dr. O. E. Frye, Jr.
Director


UNIVERSITY

OF FLORIDA

LIBRARIES







COMMISSION


T HE Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission has
five members, appointed to staggered 5-year
terms by the Governor, subject to confirmation by
the Senate. They are citizen-commissioners-Florida
businessmen, sportsmen, hunters and fishermen who
serve, without salary, as a policy making body
in the conservation of publicly owned natural
resources.
Broad authority to manage, restore, conserve and
regulate birds, game, fur bearers, reptiles, am-
phibians and fresh water fish was vested in the
Commission when it was created as a constitutional
body January 1, 1943.
The Commission is empowered to set bag limits,
to fix open and closed seasons as it deems ap-
propriate, and to regulate the manner and method
for taking, transporting, storing and using wildlife
and fresh water fish in the State of Florida.
All laws fixing penalties for violations of the
Wildlife Code and the costs of hunting and fishing
licenses are enacted by the Legislature, however.
The Commission appoints a Director, who is the

Commission Membership Changes
1966-1968 Biennium

FIRST DISTRICT-Southern Region
JACK CLIETT, Wauchula
Appointed June 3, 1965
WILLIAM M. BLAKE, Tampa
Appointed January 6, 1968
SECOND DISTRICT-Northeast Region
W. B. COPELAND, Jacksonville
Appointed June 16, 1965
Reappointed January 6, 1966
THIRD DISTRICT-Northwest Region
RONALD WISE, DeFuniak Springs
Appointed January 6, 1962
DR. RICHARD H. SCHULZ, Marianna
Appointed January 20, 1967
FOURTH DISTRICT-Everglades Region
W. THOMAS McBROOM, Miami
Appointed April 28, 1961
Reappointed February 10, 1965
FIFTH DISTRICT-Central Region
HAROLD W. ASHLEY, Melrose
Appointed June 14, 1965


chief administrative officer and who employs an
Assistant Director and a staff of professional wild-
life conservationists to carry out the policy direc-
tives of the Commission.
To maintain a progressive, balanced, efficient
program of enforcement, management, research and
public relations is the objective of the Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission and its administra-
tive staff.
Six major divisions make up the agency, each
having a specialized area of responsibility: Admin-
istration, Law Enforcement, Game Management,
Fish Management, Information and Education and
Communications.
Each division within this organizational structure
is represented at the local level through five stra-
tegically located regional offices or at a subsidiary
field office. This arrangement provides convenient
access and communication channels between the
public and the Commission administration regard-
ing any operation or service.

Report of Progress

DURING THE 1966-68 biennium the Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission marked 25
years of service to the people of Florida. The
historic occasion was commemorated by publication
of a special report, "A Quarter-Century of Progress,
1943-1968." The 28-page illustrated booklet briefly
summarizes conservation efforts of historical inter-
est since Territorial days and details Florida's
modern wildlife conservation program since World
War II.
Highlights of Commission Administration this
biennium included the completion and dedication
of the Fisheries Research Laboratory at Eustis,
expansion of the Richloam Fish Hatchery in Sum-
ter County, construction of a new Central Region
Office at Ocala, and a Northwest Region Field
Office for Game Management, Fisheries and Com-
munications divisions at DeFuniak Springs.
The first statewide archery season in the state's
history was authorized during the biennium-16
days, beginning September 16, 1967.
Despite increased work loads for all divisions, the
Commission netted only 13 new employees during
the biennium. Personnel records showed 377 em-
ployees on July 1, 1966 and 390 on June 30, 1968.
Fisheries Division programs continued to expand
in 1966-68, as did the number of anglers on Florida
waters and the problems of attempting to preserve
and enhance the fresh water environment. Water
pollution, illegal dredging and filling, infestations
(Continued on next page)








Report of Progress


(Continued from preceding page)
of noxious aquatic vegetation and, in South Florida,
of exotic fishes-all these placed increased demands
on the fish management staff.
Research projects continued their vital investiga-
tive and monitoring services while regional fish
management personnel and other workers continued
to make progress in their several areas of respon-
sibility.
The Richloam Hatchery produced and placed
1,500,000 fish in the fresh waters of the state.
Twenty-eight new public boat launching ramps
were built during the report period, bringing the
total number of ramps installed since the project
began in 1958 to 243.
Eleven additional fish management areas were
designated by the Commission and various boards
of county commissioners during 1966-68, bringing
the total number of such areas to 61. These bodies
of water, which receive special fishing improve-
ments in the interest of public fishing, totalled
approximately 100,000 acres at the close of the
biennium.
Three new artificial lakes were constructed and
stocked: Lake Stone in Escambia County, Lake
Victor in Holmes County and Suwannee Lake in
Suwannee County.
Introduction of hatchery-reared striped bass
fingerlings into selected Florida lakes near the end
of the biennium was accomplished with excellent
initial survival.
The Game Management Division continued to
acquire and develop wildlife management areas
for public use. During the biennium three new areas
were added to the program, bringing the total to
34. They were: Edward Ball WMA in Gulf County,
75,000 acres; Nassau WMA in Nassau County,
80,500 acres; and Fort McCoy WMA in Marion
County, 28,000 acres. Two existing management
areas were enlarged: Aucilla, by 55,000 acres and
Everglades, by 30,000 acres. Lee Wildlife Man-
agement Area, with 40,000 acres, was eliminated.
At the end of the biennium there were approxi-
mately 3.5 million acres in Florida's public hunt
area program.
Generally increasing harvests of native game
were reported from across the state during the
1966-68 biennium, during which approximately
77,000 deer, 49,500 wild turkeys, 4.6 million quail,
plus other game species, were taken. Hunting


; .. ),


provided nearly 8 million man-days of outdoor
recreation during the biennium.
Wildlife research projects continued to report
progress in many areas, including drugging and
capture techniques, wildlife telemetry, exotic game
investigations, waterfowl research, and in studies
of non-game species, including the brown pelican
and the American alligator.
Personnel of the Law Enforcement Division
received additional responsibilities during the
biennium-aside from their usual job of enforcing
the Wildlife Code and boating safety regulations.
Under new legislation in effect during the last
half of the biennium, officers of the Commission
were authorized to inspect wildlife exhibits for the
detection of unsafe, unsanitary or inhumane condi-
tions or treatment of wildlife. The new statute
provides for the release or confiscation of wildlife
so housed or treated after due notice, a corrective
period, and a public hearing by the Commission.
During the biennium special emphasis was placed
on the replacement of motor vehicles and other
equipment used by Law Enforcement Division.
Newer boats, outboard motors, sedans and special
purpose vehicles, such as airboats, have reduced
operating costs while increasing the efficiency and
effectiveness of a modest complement of officers
who must patrol most of the state's 58,560 square
miles of land and inland waters.
An undercover squad was implemented during
the report period in a new move toward combatting
organized illegal market hunting and fishing in
Florida. The first major usefulness of the state
undercover investigators was demonstrated in
February 1968 when a thriving commercial hunting
operation was smashed-the largest ring ever
detected in Florida.
A comprehensive program of public information
and education was continued during the biennium.
Among the media utilized by the Commission I & E
Division were press releases, photography, radio,
television, personal appearances, exhibits, literature
distribution, short courses and other special pro-
motions, and the operation of a youth conservation
camp.
The Communications Division continued its im-
portant work during -the biennium: maintaining
the Commission's land mobile radio communications
network, which serves not only the cause of wild-
life conservation but also provides a valuable civil
defense communications system for the state. 0








Organization


Florida Regions

NORTHEAST
REGION


NORTHWEST
REGION


SOUTH FLORIDA
REGION


ADMINISTRATION

DR. O. E. FRYE, JR., Director

H. E. WALLACE
Assistant Director

JOEL McKINNON
Administrative Assistant

BRANTLEY GOODSON, Chief
Law Enforcement Division

JOHN W. WOODS, Chief
Fisheries Division

JAMES A. POWELL, Chief
Game Management Division

RHETT McMILLIAN, Chief
Communications Division

JAMES T. FLOYD, Chief
Information-Education


EVERGLADES I
REGION




REGIONAL OFFICES 1

T. L. GARRISON, Manager
Northwest Region

ROBERT BRANTLY, Manager
Northeast Region

J. W. BICKERSTAFF, Manager
Central Region

J. O. BROWN, Manager
South Region

LOUIS F. GAINEY, Manager
Everglades Region


REGION













Financial Statement


Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission

Financial Statement-July 1, 1966, through June 30, 1968
Statement of Cash Receipts


1966-67


Sport Fishing
AK Fishing .. ................................. ... $ 51,763.25
Fishing......... ............................... 1,198,444.50


Sport Hunting ................. .....................
AK Hunting ................. ......................
Hunting........................................... ...
U. S. Permits ................ .......................
State Hunting Permits..............................
Dove Permits.........................................
Archery Permits.......................................
Under Age Permits ...................................
Quail Permits.........................................
W ebb Permits....... .............................
Previous Years State Hunt Permits ......................

Commercial Fishing ..................................
Retail Fish Dealer ................................. .
Non-Resident Retail Fish Dealer. ..................
Resident Wholesale Fish Dealer ......................
Non-Resident Wholesale Fish Dealer...................
Commercial Boats....... ..........................
Previous Years Commercial Licenses & Registration Fees...
Non-Resident Commercial Boat .........................
Boat Registration Fees ................................
Duplicate Commercial Licenses........................
Fish Pond License.....................................

Com m ercial Hunting ..................................
Trapping............................................. $
Hunting Preserve......................................
Guide................................................
Game Farm ........................... ...............
Wholesale Fur Dealer & Agents........................
Local Fur Dealer......... .........................
License to Exhibit Poisonous or Venomous Reptiles........
Non-Resident Wholesale Fur Dealer....................
Field Trial Rentals.......... ......................
Non-Resident State Trapping........................
Wildlife Exhibit or Sale Permit.........................

Miscellaneous ......................................
Court Costs ........................................ .
Miscellaneous Receipts...............................
Previous Years Licenses Collected .....................
Magazine Subscriptions .............. .............
Magazine Single Copies...............................
Sale of Old Equipment...............................
Confiscated Material & Equipment ......................
C. & R. Cancellation ..................................
Fund Transfer .......................................
Previous Years CR Expense ............................
Concession Revenue ...................................

Federal Government ..................................
Federal Aid Hyacinth Control ......................... $
Dingell-Johnson.......................................
Pittman-Robertson ...................................
Leases..............................................
Webb Area Grazing Lease. ......................... .
Webb Area Marl Lease................................
Palm Beach County Lease ...........................
Stump Lease........................................
Miscellaneous Lease ................................

Total Revenue..................... ....................


131,768.00
957,626.50
1,600.00
242,185.00
11,760.00
12,760.00
9,765.00
1,388.00
4,030.00
1,222.50

18,865.00
200.00
4,150.00
500.00
12,960.60
136.95
52.30
5,544.25
11.00
210.00

2,945.25
2,275.00
330.00
2,100.00
485.00
100.00
75.00
500.00
100.00
100.00
-0-


42,363.52
6,333.45
48,109.00
33,468.74
289.98
2,472.05
11,624.99
24.90
10,403.00
-0-
3,774.71

66,825.27
106,358.54
281,199.47

11,346.06
3,715.92
26,200.00
24,066.10
752.00



$1,250,207.75


$1,374,105.00









$ 42,630.10









$ 9,010.25










$ 158,864.34


$ 454,383.28



$ 66,080.08


$ 47,643.75
1,218,525.50

121,275.00
1,047,892.00
1,710.00
296,750.00
14,300.00
16,125.00
11,987.50
1,074.00
4,770.00
11,420.00

8 18,730.00
800.00
4,800.00
50.00
12,772.20
-0-
154.80
5,319.25
11.00
444.00

$ 1,904.00
2,225.00
420.00
1,990.00
340.00
90.00
145.00
-0-
250.00
500.00
3,485.00

8 49,694.68
181,040.50
41,887.75
35,793.24
225.49
652.50
11,344.30
-0-
10,678.71
1,151.67
3,419.37

$ 99,330.38
158,744.45
365,152.97

$ 7,171.68
12,648.00
26,200.00
6,848.43
80,750.00


$3,355,280.80


$1,266,169.25


$1,527,303.50









$ 43,081.25









$ 11,349.00










$ 335,888.21


$623,227.80



$ 133,618.11





$3,940,637.12


1967-68










Disbursements and Balances


July 1, 1966 June 30, 1968






Disbursement by Object Code

1966-67 1967-68

Salaries .................................... $1,744,837.61 1,881,815.40
Other Personal Services............................. 64,196.59 65,226.56
Social Security Matching ............................ 0- 70,363.91
State Retirement................................. -0 71,358.76
Advertising Florida's Commodities, Resources
and Attractions .................... ............. -0- 2,428.63
Communications and Transportation of Things......... 42,718.67 45,056.57
Postage, Freight, Express, Drayage & Parcel Post...... 22,947.48 30,200.09
General Printing and Reproduction Services........... 119,728.34 158,251.84
Repairs and Maintenance........................... 90,709.86 98,816.03
Travel............... ............................ 106,494.22 111,316.12
Travel Other Than Employees....................... 2,458.45 2,464.11
Utilities ................... ......................... 13,931.31 19,586.27
Other Contractual Services.......................... 84,145.18 57,961.28
Bedding, Clothing, Linens and Other Textile Products .. 6,837.03 39,027.03
Educational, Medical, Scientific & Agricultural
Materials & Supplies............................. 29,731.50 64,917.45
Food Products ................................... 6,754.68 3,829.95
Maintenance Materials & Heating Supplies (Janitorial,
etc.)....................................... 59,538.21 76,173.72
Motor Fuels and Lutricants ........................ 246,667.01 222,461.15
Office Materials and Supplies........................ 16,229.49 22,589.53
Other Materials and Supplies ....................... 91,263.04 114,517.73
Insurance and Surety Bonds and Auto Liability........ 61,156.49 75,193.98
Rental of Buildings............................... 99,361.28 94,240.62
Rental of Equipment............................. 19,374.90 31,160.47
Service Charges to General Revenue................. 116,106.92 127,471.59
Other Current Charges and Obligations................ 24,363.94. 50,539.64
Books. .......................................... 508.20 834.13
Buildings and Fixed Equipment...................... 4,809.07 4,354.90
Educational, Medical, Scientific & Agricultural
Equipment....................................... 5,646.16 5,353.99
Motor Vehicles, Airplanes........................... 135,843.25 141,418.56
Motors, Boats and Trailers ......................... 34,783.76 26,072.91
Other Motor Vehicles ............................... -0- 12,693.89
Office Furniture and Equipment...................... 9,574.27 12,297.04
Other Structures and Improvements.................. 37,438.30 34,450.10
Other Capital Outlay................................ 70,991.46 107,384.99
Distributions and Transfers To Other Funds........... 25,000.00 39,420.97

Total....................................... .3,394,146.67 $3,921,248.91


\9 0 P 2


Disbursements by Departments


1966-67 1967-68


Administration
Salaries.................$ 135,059.67
Other Personal Services .. 1,802.96
Social Security & State
Retirement ........... -0-
General Expenses........ 153,460.33
Operating Capital Outlay. 3,236.88
Administrative Cost to
General Revenue 4%... 116,106.92

Information & Education...
Salaries................. 81,546.64
Other Personal Services .. 4,758.09
Social Security & State
Retirement........... -0-
General Expenses........ 134,555.26
Operating Capital Outlay. 665.63

Law Enlorcement ..........
Salaries................. 924,073.67
Other Personal Services .. 1,307.50
Social Security & State
Retirement ........... -
General Expenses........ 361,363.04
Operating Capital Outlay. 91,932.76

Communications...........
Salaries................. 78,890.23
Other Personal Services .. 132.00
Social Security & State ..
Retirement ........... -0-
General Expenses........ 29,628.98
Operating Capital Outlay. 64,669.54
Fixed Capital Outlay..... -0-


Aviation .. ...............
Salaries................
Social Security & State
Retirement...........
General Expenses........
Operating Capital Outlay.

Game Management........
Salaries ... .............
Other Personal Services ..
Social Security & State
Retirement...........
General Expenses........
Operating Capital Outlay.
Fixed Capital Outlay.....


29,553.22

-0-
59,156.01
5,339.44


S 409,666.76










S 221,525.62







$1,378,676.97







$ 173,320.75








1 94.048.67


$ 503,233.74
$ 150,698.86
2,026.57

10,337.87
210,338.81
2,360.04

127,471.59

( 250,696.14
$ 91,493.13
3,423.75

6,643.09
138,139.55
10,996.62

$1,579,808.71
$ 976,697.13
2,532.78

74,648.75
391,782.82
134,147.23

$ 237,343.33
$ 84,343.13
-0-

6,312.70
36,761.33
101,541.17
8,385.00

S 95,809.77


$ 32,241.01


2,397.94
60,186.89
983.93


$ 702,251.12
262,783.33
51,853.05

-0-
304,752.19
66,515.16
16,347.39


Fish Management.........
Salaries.................$ 232,930.85
Other Personal Services.. 4,342.99
Social Security & State
Retirement ........... -0-
General Expenses........ 126,495.27
Operating Capital Outlay. 24,987.69
Fixed Capital Outlay..... 25,899.98


$ 414,656.78


$ 797,319.85
292,113.18
53,770.99

21,941.65
366,180.00
36,794.03
26,520.00

$ 457,037.37


$ 254,228.96
3,472.47

19,440.67
156,762.78
19,232.49
3,900.00


Total Disbursements by Budgets
Salaries.................1,744,837.61 $1,881,815.40
Other Personal Services .. 64,196.59 65,226.56
Social Security & State
Retirement........... -- 141,722.67
General Expenses........ 1,169,411.08 1,360,152.18
Operating Capital Outlay. 257,347.10 306,055.51
Fixed Capital Outlay..... 42,247.37 38,805.00
Administrative Cost to
General Revenue 4%... 116,106.92 127,471.59

Grand Total .......... 3,394,146.67 $3,921,248.91


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