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Biennial report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075940/00012
 Material Information
Title: Biennial report
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23-29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
Publisher: Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Creation Date: 1964
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Game protection -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Fish culture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Fishery management -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Wildlife management -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: First biennial report covers the period from the time of the organization (of the Commission) July 1, 1935 to December 31, 1936.
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000327977
oclc - 01332271
notis - ABV7514
System ID: UF00075940:00012
 Related Items
Preceded by: Florida. Dept. of Game and Fresh Water Fish.|Biennial report of the Department of Game and Fresh Water Fish
Succeeded by: Florida. Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.|Annual report

Full Text


State of Florida


Game & Fresh Water Fish Commission


BIENN


A


REPORT


U. F F. LIBRARY


July 1, 1964
7 f
F u//,


to


June


30,


1966


















ESTATE OF FLORIDA

G9CAME AND FRESH WATER FISH COMMISSION
TALLAHASSEE
S Dr. O. E. Frye, Jr., DrEcroR W. T. McBroom, CHAIRMAN
H. Wallace, ssrr on TV. B. Copeland Ronald Wise
S H. E. Wallace, ASSlSTAN-r DIREcroR
Harold TV. Ashley lack Cliett






HONORABLE CLAUDE R. KIRK, JR.
Governor of the State of Florida
Tallahassee, Florida

SIR: We have the privilege of submitting herewith the Biennial
Report of the Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission,
for the period starting July 1, 1964, and ending June 30, 1966.

This report contains detailed outlines on Commission activities,
and its major operational divisions, during that period.

Respectfully submitted, / / e /

Dr. O. E. Frye, Jr.
Director










UNIVERSITY

OF FLORIDA I











COMMISSION


S INCE January 1, 1943, the management, restora-
tion, conservation and regulation of the birds,
game, fur-bearing animals and fresh water fish, of
the State of Florida, has been under the jurisdiction
of the Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.
The Commission, a constitutional body, consists of
five members, one from each of the Congressional
Districts that existed January 1, 1941.
The members of the commission are appointed
by the Governor, subject to confirmation by the
Senate. The first commission members were ap-
pointed January 1, 1943, and served respective terms
of one, two, three, four and five years. At the ex-
piration of each of the initial terms, successors were
appointed to serve for standard five-year terms.
Members of the commission receive no compen-
sation for their services other than an annual maxi-
0-



o Commission Membership Changes
n- 1964-1966 Biennium

FIRST DISTRICT-Southern Region
E. L. MADILL, Dade City
cc Appointed December 19, 1961
JACK CLIETT, Wauchula
L. Appointed June 3, 1965
SECOND DISTRICT-Northeast Region
L- MARCUS MILAM, Gainesville
Appointed July 19, 1963
W. B. COPELAND, Jacksonville
O Appointed June 16, 1965
THIRD DISTRICT-Northwest Region
RONALD WISE, DeFuniak Springs
Appointed January 6, 1962
3- FOURTH DISTRICT-Everglades Region
W. THOMAS McBROOM, Miami
Appointed April 28, 1961
Reappointed February 10, 1965
i FIFTH DISTRICT--Central Region
LL, K. K. KENNEDY, Ocala
Appointed January 8, 1964
HAROLD W. ASHLEY, Melrose
Appointed June 14, 1965


mum allowance of $600.00 for traveling and other
expenses incurred while engaged in official duties.
The powers granted to the Commission include
the setting of bag limits, and establishing open and
closed seasons for fresh water fishing and hunting,
on a statewide, regional, or local basis, as it may
find to be appropriate, and to regulate the manner
and method for taking indicated species of wildlife.
Members of the Florida Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission are not professional wildlife con-
servation employees, but Florida businessmen,
sportsmen, hunters and fishermen. The five man
commission employs a specialized staff of profes-
sional wildlife conservationists to carry out policies
and programs as established, and to provide pro-
fessional advice for all related wildlife requirements.




Statement of Policy

It is the declared policy of this Commission that a
balanced program of enforcement, research, infor-
mation and education, administration and program-
ing is required to carry out the objectives of the
Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission. Further-
more this Commission believes that the Director
is the Chief Administrative Officer and shall be
charged with the carrying out of the policy direc-
tives of the Commission and the performance of the
routine administrative functions including person-
nel selection, promotion policies, research and pro-
graming.
The Commission reserves unto itself the power
for making all major policy decisions collectively
together with the budgetary controls as the current
fiscal situation may dictate.
The Commission feels that constitutional status
was conferred on the Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission by popular vote and would resist any
attempts to change the status of the Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission. In vew of the rap-
idly expanding requirements for hunting and fish-
ing throughout the State, it will be necessary for
the Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission to co-
ordinate and correlate its program with those of
other agencies but the dilution of existing author-
ity granted this Commission is contrary to existing
policy.










Administration


MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS recorded by the Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commission, during the
1964-1966 Biennium, include the completion of sever-
al long-range projects. Foremost in the construction
field was the Commission's State Office Building, in
the Tallahassee Capitol Center, completed early in
1965. Two of the three main floors of the modern
office building are leased, by the Commission, to the
Florida Sheriffs Bureau and the Florida Division of
Corrections.
The new Richloam Fish Hatchery in Sumter
County, one of the most up-to-date warm-water fish
hatcheries in the country, was also completed. The
Blackwater Fish Hatchery, Santa Rosa County, un-
derwent extensive facility improvement construc-
tion.
A new Commission general services building in
Fort Lauderdale was completed, as were additions
to the Regional Offices in Lake City, Ocala and
West Palm Beach.
The start of new buildings during the final months
of the period include a special Fisheries Research
Laboratory, in Eustis, and a Game and Fish Man-
agement Field Station, DeFuniak Springs.
In addition to building construction, four fishing
lakes were created in areas with limited natural
fishing waters; 20 new Fish Management Areas were
established, bringing the total to 65 by the end of
the biennium; and an additional 47 boat launching
ramps were constructed.
Another major completion was the Everglades
outdoor recreation facilities in Dade and Broward
counties, jointly financed with state, federal and
private funds.
EXPANSION OF FISHERIES projects during 1964-1966
were a result of the Fishing Improvement Program
Act of 1963, and the one-dollar resident fishing li-
cense increase that went into effect that year. In
addition to aforementioned projects there was some
expansion of programs related to fresh water quali-
ty investigations, noxious vegetation control and
general sport fishing improvements. Research con-
tinued with the South American Peacock Bass as
a possible future Florida gamefish, and the Withla-
coochee River Project was initiated to deal with
studies of water hyacinths including the value and
effects of hyacinth control planning.
ONE OF THE HIGHLIGHTS in the game management
field was the addition of three Wildlife Management


Areas, increasing the total to 32 (over 3-million
acres) by the end of the biennium. New areas are
the Lochloosa with 40,000 acres in Alachua and Put-
nam counties; the 20,000 acre Tide Swamp Area
in Taylor County, and the Adams Pasture Area
with 8,000 acres in Hamilton County.
A cooperative research program related to Flori-
da's declining winter population of Canada geese
was established, and research studies were continued
on various non-native (exotic) game birds as future
hunting possibilities. A specialized drug technique
was developed for the safe trapping and relocation
of certain wildlife species.
More than a thousand wild turkeys were trapped
in areas closed to hunting and released in regions
where improved habitat conditions can support ad-
ditional numbers of Florida's largest game bird. The
telemetry project involving "radio-tracking" of wild
game reached the operational level aiding in the
continuing, improved life history studies of deer and
wild turkey.
THE RADIO COMMUNICATIONS complex for Commis-
sion mobile units was replaced with a modern tran-
sistorized system.
FOR THE SPORTSMEN'S convenience a combination
annual AK-series Fishing and Hunting License was
established.
INCREASING LAW ENFORCEMENT complexities and
courtroom procedure changes have rapidly advanced
the Wildlife Officer as a specialist in his field. Under
a newly created position titled Chief of Law Enforce-
ment, mechanical modernization and training pro-
cedures were greatly expanded. In addition to
necessary regional and area instruction periods, all
officers attend annual one-week in-training sessions
at the Florida Law Enforcement Academy, in Talla-
hassee.
Efforts were increased to provide modern equip-
ment for Wildlife Officer responsibilities dealing
with the state's hunting, fresh water fishing and
boating laws. This included an additional helicopter
required for certain remote-region air patrol en-
forcement.
Legislative action in 1965 made possible greater
legal penalties for the more serious law violation
convictions. Out-of-state law enforcement coopera-
tion led to the seizure of approximately 600 "ex-
ported" illegally-taken Florida alligator hides. 0


Vo


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.. ~33
I .''~ i.



r












Organization


Florida Regions


NORTHEAST
REGION


CENTRAL
L REGION


NORTHWEST -








,lk,,Iui i




SOUTH FLORIDA -
.-l

















EVERGLADES
REGION
ADMINISTRATION REGION

DR. O. E. FRYE, JR., Director


H. E. WALLACE
Assistant Director


BRANTLEY GOODSON, Chief
Law Enforcement Division

JOHN W. WOODS, Chief
Fisheries Division

JAMES A. POWELL, Chief
Game Management Division

RHETT McMILLIAN, Chief
Communications Division

JAMES T. FLOYD, Chief
Information-Education


REGIONAL OFFICES '"


T. L. GARRISON, Manager
Northwest Region

ROBERT BRANTLY, Manager
Northeast Region

J. W. BICKERSTAFF, Manager
Central Region

J. O. BROWN, Manager
Southern Region

LOUIS F. GAINEY, Manager
Everglades Region













Financial Statement


Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission

Financial Statement--July 1, 1964, through June 30, 1966

Statement of Cash Receipts


1964-65


Sport Fishing
Fishing & Hunting AK Licenses ......................... -0-
Fishing ............................................. 1,077,870.25

Sport Hunting. ................. ... ...... ....... ..
AK Licenses .......................................... ,6-0-
Hunting................ ........................... .$1,029,912.00
U. S. Permits...................................... .. 1,650.00
Alien H hunting ........................................ 100.00
State Hunting Permits................................. 237,625.00
Archery Perm its ....................................... 8,870.00
W ebb Perm its....................................... -0-
Coon Permits....................................... .. 10.00
Quail Permits. ......................................... 6,536.00
Dove Permits ................. ....................... 13,871.00
Previous Years Permits ................................ 2,475.00
Guano Hog Permits ................................... 1,265.00
Underage Permits..................................... -0-


Com m ercial Fishing ...................................
Retail Fish Dealer .....................................
Non-Resident Retail Fish Dealer ........................
Wholesale Fish Dealer. ................................
Non-Resident Wholesale Fish Dealer....................
Com m ercial Boats...................................
Previous Years Commercial Licenses.....................
Non-Resident Commercial Boat .................. ......
Duplicate Commercial Licenses ..... ...................
Boat Registration Fees .................................

Commercial Hunting: ..............................
T rapping ....... ........... .................. .... .$
Nutria Licenses .......................................
H hunting Preserve ............... .......................
Guide................................................
G am e Farm ........................................
Wholesale Fur Dealer & Agents.........................
Non-Resident Wholesale Fur Dealer ....................
Local Fur D ealer ......................................
Licenses to Exhibit Poisonous or Venomous Reptiles.......

Miscellaneous............... .......................
Court Costs.......................................... .
Miscellaneous Receipts .................................
Previous Years Licenses Collected .......................
Sale of Magazine Subscriptions ..........................
Sale of Magazine Single Copies ..........................
Sale of Old Equipment ...............................
Sale of Confiscated Materials & Equipment...............
Transfer from Recreation Fund .........................

Federal Government ...................................
Federal Aid Hyacinth Control ........................ $
D ingell-Johnson .......................................
Pittman-Robertson. ...................................

Leases.................................................
W ebb Area Grazing Lease ............................. $
Webb Area Mari Lease .................................
Palm Beach County Lease ..............................
Stum p Lease ............... .........................
M miscellaneous Leases...................................
Oil Lease ............. ............................

T otal R revenue ......................................


18,050.00
50.00
4,285.70
1,000.00
12,928.30
19.70
-0-
-0-
2,868.50

1,482.00
75.00
2,175.00
270.00
2,320.00
710.00
-0-
80.00
95.00


53,195.70
56,917.68
43,825.50
37,153.54
2,299.08
4,647.31
2,939.22
30,000.00


58,417.21
132,874.71
238,996.24


10,889.40
-0-
10,000.00
22,546.91
3,236.60
9,160.00


$1,077,870.25


$1,302,314.00













$ 39,202.20


$ 7,207.00









$ 230,978.03


$ 430,288.16



$ 55,832.91






$3,143,692.55


108,836.00
1,090,969.75


27,217.25
953,449.25
1,400.00
-0-
241,245.00
8,880.00
1,630.00
-0-
1,180.00
13,289.00
800.00
-0-
7,707.50

17,260.00
150.00
4,000.00
500.00
12,925.30
-0-
51.65
1.00
2,798.50

$ 1,961.00
-0-
2,350.00
290.00
2,340.00
700.00
500.00
110.00
95.00


$ 46,570.63
30,110.03
39,570.75
34,363.71
636.04
1,974.25
2,100.66
19,000.00


65,931.69
167,827.91
346,742.04


$ 12,501.40
1,200.00
10,000.00
23,570.67
752.00
-0-


$1,199,805.75


$1,256,798.00













$ 37,686.45


$ 8,346.00









$ 174,326.07


$ 580,501.64



$ 48,024.07






$3,305,487.98


1965-66

















Disbursements and Balances


July 1, 1964-June 30, 1966






Disbursements by Object Code

1964-65 1965-66

Salaries......................... ................ $1,559,270.11 1,729,525.22
Professional Fees & Consultation Services............. 3,158.13 3,022.50
Other Personal Services............................. 63,212.75 70,481.48
Communication & Transmittal of Things............. 72,532.38 82,628.33
General Printing & Reproduction................. 112,406.42 84,268.06
Repairs & Maintenance ............................. 85,519.73 89,817.48
Travel............................. ... ............ 117,345.53 119,601.70
Utilities........ ............... ............... 15,485.74 13,758.82
Other Contractual Services...................... 48,150.87 66,005.33
Clothing ... ................................. 1,392.33 8,080.22
Building & Construction Materials & Supplies......... 581.95 121.16
Coal, Fuel, Oil. .... ................ ........ 1,703.46 1,807.22

Educational, Medical, Scientific & Agricultural
Materials & Supplies ............................ 24,262.54 38,173.14
Food Products .................... .. ......... ....... .. 2,386.16 2,917.48
Maintenance Materials & Supplies .................. 53,549.53 61,157.08
Motor Fuels & Lubricants ....................... 190,421.60 184,137.60
Office Materials & Supplies .......................... 20,095.71 15,816.20
Other Materials.................................... 162,174.24 110,761.24
Insurance ......................................... 49,459.17 48,626.93
Rental of Buildings & Equipment .................. 54,198.31 104,444.70
Other Current Charges & Obligations................ 24,850.30 21,271.28
Books ............................................. 355.72 1,299.67
Fixed Capital Outlay.................. ............. 1,812.01 17,758.09

Educational, Medical, Scientific & Agricultural
Equipment........ .......... .................. 5,920.27 7,090.23
M otor Vehicles ............................ ........ 183,381.37 217,333.82
Motor Boats & Trailers............................. 40,996.50 23,349.49
Office Furniture & Equipment ....................... 17,515.13 19,833.08
Other Structures & Improvements.................... 200.00 3,501.00
Other Capital Outlay............................... 25,482.05 95,938.31
Distribution & Transfer to Other Funds.............. 14,068.05 19,579.37
Service Charges General Revenue .................. 119,693.40 91,914.99
Revolving Fund....................... ..... .. ... -0- 552.50
Refunds ........................................... -0- 45.00
Intra-Agency Fund Transfers ........................ 37,800.00 21,000.00

Total ................... .............. ...... 3,109,381.46 $3,375,618.72


Disbursements by Departments


1964-65 1965-66

Administration $ 406,142.52 $ 426,471.98
Salaries &Wages........ 131,514.38 $ 130,952.22
Other Personal Services.. 4,190.50 3,174.45
General Expenses........ 138,766.48 187,103.74
Operating Capital Outlay. 11,977.76 13,281.58
Refund ................. -0- 45.00
Non-Operating Expense.. 119,693.40 91,914.99

Information & Education... $ 223,903.85 $ 192,032.05
Salaries& Wages........$ 70,602.71 $ 71,252.73
Other Personal Services.. 2,740.63 2,799.50
General Expenses ....... 139,615.79 112,934.42
Operating Capital Outlay. 10,944.72 5,045.40

Law Enforcement ........ $1,220,863.33 $1,345,814.56
Salaries & Wages........ 769,841.17 903,698.93
Other Personal Services.. -0- 269.37
General Expenses........ 323,266.10 293,123.21
Operating Capital Outlay. 127,756.06 148,723.05

Communications .......... $ 117,230.20 $ 191,052.99
Salaries & Wages........ 69,184.10 74,477.14
Other Personal Services.. 408.88 71.93
General Expenses........ 33,718.96 37,059.42
Operating Capital Outlay. 13,918.26 79,444.50

Aviation .................. $ 73,009.36 $ 114,341.94
Salaries & Wages......... 41,654.99 27,710.00
Other Personal Services.. 126.00 -0-
General Expenses........ 27,288.90 44,917.03
Operating Capital Outlay. 3,939.47 41,714.91

Game Management........ $ 562,958.77 $ 612,861.01
Salaries & Wages........ 215,099.05 $ 242,896.59
Other Personal Services.. 51,141.08 57,422.61
General Expenses........ 225,224.86 260,421.82
Operating Capital Outlay. 68,493.78 38,214.53
Fixed Capital Outlay.... -0- 13,905.46

Fish Management......... $ 467,473.43 $ 472,044.19
Salaries& Wages........$ 261,373.71 $ 278,537.61
Other Personal Services.. 4,763.79 9,263.62
General Expenses........ 162,702.93 138,468.70
Operating Capital Outlay. 38,633.00 40,871.63
Fixed Capital Outlay.... -0- 4,902.63

Intra-Agency Fund Transfers S 37,800.00 $ 21,000.00

Total................ $3,109,281.46 13,375,618.72


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U. OF F. UBRARY