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Biennial report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075940/00009
 Material Information
Title: Biennial report
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23-29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
Publisher: Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Creation Date: 1958
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Game protection -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Fish culture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Fishery management -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Wildlife management -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: First biennial report covers the period from the time of the organization (of the Commission) July 1, 1935 to December 31, 1936.
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000327977
oclc - 01332271
notis - ABV7514
System ID: UF00075940:00009
 Related Items
Preceded by: Florida. Dept. of Game and Fresh Water Fish.|Biennial report of the Department of Game and Fresh Water Fish
Succeeded by: Florida. Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.|Annual report

Full Text

BIENNIAL REPORT


FOR
Si THE

YEARS

0 1 I i :. 1958-1960


-F/ Florida
/ GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH OMMISS
C-- GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH COMMISSION


I







UNIVERSITY

OF FLORIP A
TC










woer '~Aotofrrapip


A misty dawn on Ocheesee Pond in Jackson County,
Northwest Florida. Florida-style bateaux with a push-
pole await the early-morning fisherman who is certain
that he'll find a lunker bass or a concentration of bream
in the still waters around the boles of the majestic cypress
trees. Photograph by James T. Floyd, Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission.








STrATI F01" FLORMIA


GAMIE AND FRESH AVATER FISH CON IMIISSION

TALLAHASSEE


January 31, 1961

HONORABLE FARRIS BRYANT
Governor of State of Florida
State Capitol
Tallahassee, Florida

DEAR GOVERNOR BRYANT:

I have the privilege of submitting to you the Biennial Report of the
Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission for the period ending June
30, 1960.
During this time, we have been concerned primarily with improving
conservation practices, providing adequate law enforcement, promoting public
relations, and increasing game and fish populations and public hunting and
fishing areas, together with eradication of undesirable fish, control of noxious
aquatic weeds, conservation of surface waters, and establishment of boat
landing ramps and water access areas.
At the present, and in the future, we in Florida are witnesses to a human
population explosion which is creating greater demands upon all State Agen-
cies for more extensive services. This is especially true, in our area of conser-
vation, in increased hunting and fishing pressures, as well as the demand for
multiple-use recreational areas within or adjacent to our present management
areas and fresh water bodies of Florida. We also feel the effects of continued
land developments for residential and business uses, which are creating addi-
tional competition in land usages. While we welcome continued growth of
Florida population and industry, we must, in the name of conservation, con-
tinue to jealously guard those areas of our great State which are adapted to
good hunting, fishing and outdoor recreation.
We take heart in the fact that you, too, are a strong advocate of conserving
our State's natural resources, and we welcome the opportunity to work under
your leadership to assure the maximum hunting and fishing recreation for all
the people.
Our progress, however, will be limited in direct proportion to the funds
available to us; and even though special legislative appropriations in the past
have permitted limited programs of rough fish and noxious weed control, as
well as the conservation of surface waters, actually we have made only a small
beginning into the overall Statewide need. Our most glaring financial defi-
ciency is caused by the failure to have a more uniform and equitable fishing
license structure. We sincerely invite your consideration of reasonable and
acceptable legislation, as well as your leadership in presenting such a program
to our State Legislature.
On behalf of the Commission and Staff, I want to express our appreciation
for your keen interest in our natural resources, and for the help and coopera-
tion of the other agencies of State Government with whom it has been our
privilege to work during the past biennium.
We hope this Biennial Report will permit you and other State officials an
opportunity for appraisement of our work and progress over the past two
years.
With kindest personal regards, I remain

Sincerely,
JULIAN R. ALFORD, Chairman























































Conservation Pledge

I give my pledge
- o an Atmeriscn to Sve
and faithfully to defend from
waste the natural resorcos of *
S my country -Its tol nd
minerals. Its foross, waters,
4t ond wildlife.
.. *




















CONTENTS
Subject Page
Letter of Transmittal ........................................... 1
Report of Progress ................................ .............. 4
Future Prospects ...................... ........................ 6

Administration of the Commission ..... .............................. 7
Merit System ................................................. 10
Law Enforcement and the Wildlife Officer ............................ 11
Fisheries Division .............. ................................. 13
Game Management Division ................................... ... 18
Fiscal Division ............................................... 32

Information and Education ........................................ 44
Florida Wildlife ................... ......................... 49
Radio Communications .. ......................................... .. 50
Aviation ....................................................... 52
The Northeast Florida Region .................................... 53
The Northwest Florida Region ............... ...................... 55

The Everglades Florida Region ................................... 57
The Central Florida Region .......................................... 59
The South Florida Region ........................................ 61
Youth Conservation Education ....... .............................. 63
The Commissioners .................................. ........... 67
The Administrators ..................... .................... 69
The Administrative Staff ........ :.................... ............. 70


I









REPORT


OF


PROGRESS


A. D. ALDRICH, Director


P ROGRESS in all phases of con-
servation work has resulted
from the vigorous and continuing ef-
forts made by the Florida Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission dur-
ing the biennial period.
In general, the Commission con-
tinued to devote its efforts toward
rendering better service to the
sportsmen and general public of the
state. This was done .in many ways
and on many levels.
Personnel qualifications and stand-
ards were improved through appli-
cation and development of the Merit
System and Employee Classification
and Salary Schedules. The use of
standardized competitive examina-
tions for new employee applicants
has been very beneficial.
General policies of the Commis-
sion were strengthened and clarified.
The Wildlife Code Book and all reg-
ulations were streamlined and made
more effective.
Better liaison between the Com-
mission and the public, and between
the Commission and other State and
Federal agencies was established.
The general overall scope of de-
partmental activities and services
was continuously expanded, and new
fields of endeavor added, by more
effective usage of existing personnel
and equipment.
During the biennium, there was a
continuation of the programs to
obtain and open additional public
hunting and fishing areas, and the
acquisition of public access areas.
Also continued was the effort to at-
tain sound fish and wildlife manage-
ment practices based upon accurate
technical research programs.
The effort to bring all programs
of the Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission, especially the setting of


hunting rules and regulations, closer
to the people was accelerated.
Better coordination and efficiency
was achieved in and between all di-
visions and sections of the Commis-
sion, with greater emphasis placed
on law enforcement and public serv-
ices.
On the overall, the record serves
to show as a concrete indication of
the determination of the Commission
and its employees to have a more
and more progressive program of
fish and wildlife conservation in
Florida.
Following are some of the high-
lights of work accomplished during
the biennial period:

CHANNELS
There has been a continuing effort
to clarify the channels of authority
within the Commission. This is ne-
cessary to enable all staff officers
and employees to re-evaluate and re-
organize their activities, procedures
and objectives.
The administrative task is to prop-
erly delegate authority down
through clarified channels of com-
mand so as to coordinate all em-
ployees and divisions and sections
into an aggressive and efficient work
force.
To properly issue commands and
have them executed, there must be
clear lines of communication from
administration down through the
chain of supervisory command to
each and every employee in the
field. But this is only half the task.
There must, in turn, be clear lines
of communication from the field em-
ployees returning up through the
chain of supervisory command to the
administration.


It is only when both of these lines
of communication-from the top to
the bottom, and the return response
from the bottom back up to the top
-are clear and functioning that the
operating organization becomes truly
effective.
Always, the employees must be
regarded as the "internal public" of
the Commission, and steps must be
taken to achieve good liaison, mor-
ale, and coordination of work and
objectives.
A great deal of effort is being
spent so as to achieve these funda-
mental principles of good adminis-
tration.
PAY SCALES
The salaries for qualified em-
ployees has been steadily increased,
insofar as possible in reference to the
financial income to the State Game
Fund from which the Commission is
operated. The Commission has, right-
fully, been demanding more services
and efficiency from its employees,
and, in return for this, the Commis-
sion has held to the steadfast aim
to gradually increase 'base salaries
for employees. This is necessary in
order to attract and hold the quali-
fied conservation career employees
able to give the services and effici-
ency required by the Commission.
MERIT SYSTEM
The upgrading of personnel and
the increases in base salaries has
been achieved through the installa-
tion of an effective Merit System
program. The Commission's Merit
System is separate from the Florida
State Merit System, but is modeled
closely after the State Merit System,
and utilizes its best procedures.
Part of the intrinsic value of a
Merit System is the provision for


I







periodically rating all employees
through a supervisor's grading sys-
tem. Dismissals from the service or
inservice promotions may then be
made on valid evidence resulting
from the accumulation of ratings
and performance records. Thus, the
Merit System protects good em-
ployees, while providing a logical
method for upgrading or removing
inferior employees.
EMPLOYEE TRAINING
One of the Commission's greatest
continuing efforts is toward the in-
stallation of a permanent and highly
effective employee and supervisors
training system. A training system
affords the employee a method for
in-service improvement of himself,
and a chance at promotions to higher
position. In time, a good training sys-
tem will develop new supervisory
personnel of high calibre for the
future, through in-service training
and promotions.
DATA ANALYSIS
Statistical data analysis machine
(IBM) operations were installed for
the purpose of property inventory,
cost control, accounting and scientific
data analysis. This allows much bet-
ter handling of fiscal and property
operations, and the data analysis is
extremely valuable to efficient and
economical planning and execution
of work programs.
COORDINATION WORK
Interagency coordination was
greatly improved during the bien-
nial period, most especially through
the Florida Inter-Agency Confer-
ence, of which the Commission's
director has served as chairman
since the inception of the Confer-
ence. This conference is the meet-
ing place for all state and federal
agencies that are involved in any
phase of work in natural resource
conservation, or affecting such con-
servation work.
Other achievements included the
automatic review by the Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission of all
dredge-and-fill applications received
by the Florida Internal Improvement
Fund Trustees. The Commission in-
vestigates and reports as to the ef-
fects of these operations on fish and
wildlife resources.
Perhaps the most outstanding pro-
gram yet achieved, a program
which will have far-reaching effects


into the future, is the current inven-
tory of all state-owned lands in
Florida. This may result in the set-
ting aside of some lands for future
public multi-purpose recreation.
Cooperative agreements with the
Florida Forest Service, the U. S.
Forest Service, the U. S. Corps of
Engineers, the Central and Southern
Florida Flood Control District, and
similar agencies, were also achieved.
CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS
Outstanding during the biennial
period were the capital improve-
ments of constructing Regional
Headquarters buildings at Lake City,
Ocala, West Palm Beach and Pan-
ama City. Construction of the Lake-
land Regional Office is slated for the
forthcoming biennium.
OTHER PROGRAMS
Progress made during the bien-
nium in all Divisions and Sections


of the Commission is adequately
presented in the various reports con-
tained in this Biennial Report.

GENERAL
There can be little doubt that the
Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission made considerable prog-
ress in all phases of its activities
during the biennial period. More
important, the basic groundwork
was laid to allow a greatly acceler-
ated program to take effect during
the current biennium. Much has
been done, but a great deal more
remains to be done. We feel certain
that, with the help of all sportsmen
and the general public, we can
continue to do our job of conserv-
ing, protecting and restoring the fish
and wildlife under a wise resource-
use program that will guarantee an
outdoor heritage for future genera-
tions. 0













FUTURE




PROSPECTS


N o BUSINESS should be, or can be,
operated properly without
comprehensive plans for the future.
The Florida Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission has such
plans. Plans which are designed to
insure future satisfaction for the
Florida sportsmen the fishermen
and the hunter. Plans which affect
the future of our fish and wildlife.
Plans which will help guarantee a
heritage of natural resources for our
children and their children.
We sincerely believe that much
has been accomplished during past
years, as the result of active co-
operation from interested sportsmen
and the general public. And we fully
realize that much more must be done
to protect, preserve, conserve and
utilize our natural wildlife resources.
We, the Commission, firmly be-
lieve that there is a much brighter
future for Florida wildlife interests
during the coming years. We believe
that sportsmen are fully within their
moral and legal rights in demanding
a more aggressive and effective pro-
gram for Florida wildlife and the
conservation thereof. We believe that
it is the duty and the responsibility
of this Commission to do everything
within its power to implement such
a program.
BUT this cannot be done without
the firm and active backing of all
interested sportsmen and citizens.
Such a future cannot be attained
without adequate finances. And it
most certainly cannot be done with-
out aggressive and progressive plan-
ning.
Here are the general plans that
will be undertaken by the Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission:
First will be a continually improv-
ed and more effective Law Enforce-
ment program. The Commission


plans to continue employing and
training a progressively higher
caliber of Wildlife Officer. We plan.
to continue improving the coopera-
tion and coordination of our Law
Enforcement efforts. We plan to con-
tinue improving the equipment of
the Wildlife Officers, so that they
may more efficiently perform their
duties in the field. We plan to obtain
more simplified and improved Fish
and Game Laws and regulations,
based on sound management prin-
ciples and resource-use needs.
Number two on the list of future
plans is the acquisition and develop-
ment of additional public hunting
and fishing lands. This is of utmost
concern to every fisherman, hunter
and wildlife student. Florida is de-
veloping rapidly. Without an aggres-
sive land acquisition program, areas
available for the average sportsman
will be drastically reduced. More
lands must be held in trust for the
Florida fisherman and hunter, and
every other citizen-public lands ac-
cessible for the enjoyment of all.
The Commission plans to work to-
ward opening more privately owned
lands to controlled public hunting,
fishing, boating and general recrea-
tion purposes in conformance with
sound wildlife and land management
principles.
The Commission intends to dis-
cover and develop new techniques
and procedures that will enable the
greatest possible realization of the
potentialities of game and fish popu-
lations, and fishing and hunting op-
portunities.
We intend to do everything within
our power to study all plans formu-
lated by State and Federal agencies
when such plans will affect the wa-
ters, soils, forests, wilderness, and
fish and wildlife of the State of Flor-
ida. We intend to continue, where


necessary, to make recommendations
for changes in any plans or programs
which we consider to have a poten-
tial detrimental effect on the fish and
wildlife, and other natural resources,
of the State. We intend to take any
necessary steps that will help safe-
guard our wildlife heritage.
We plan to continue acting in our
capacity of custodian and watchman
of our natural resources, especially
fish and wildlife.
In the future, we plan to continue
the Commission's Merit System for
Employees, to insure that all em-
ployment is based on aptitude and
qualifications of employee appli-
cants. We plan to continue training
our employees so that they will be
better fitted for their work.
We plan to continue serving the
general public in all possible ways-
Civil Defense, rescuing lost persons,
aiding citizens in difficulty, furnish-
ing information to the general pub-
lic, answering calls for emergency
help and transportation, and similar
public service duties.
We plan to work toward a more
uniform and equitable Florida fish-
ing and hunting license structure
that will be fair to one and all.
We plan to support legislation that
will be beneficial to the sportsmen
and to wildlife. We plan to work for
legislation that will include stiffer
penalties for game and fish law vio-
lations, more satisfactory control of
airboats, more funds for hyacinth
control and acquisition of public
lands and waters, more workable
laws affecting fish and wildlife, and
a more uniform license structure.
The Commission also plans to im-
prove its programs dealing with farm
pond management, food and cover
plantings for wildlife, youth conser-
vation education, public information
and education, and the many other
vital phases of conservation activi-
ties.
We know that there is a bright
future for the Florida sportsman.
The Florida Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission plans to do every-
thing within its power to work to-
ward that brighter future. This fu-
ture must be attained through the
cooperation of everyone in Florida.
We are confident that we will ulti-
mately reach the goal of realizing
all of Florida's vast fish and wildlife
potential. 0


~1


































T :E FLORIDA Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission was
created by a Constitutional Amend-
ment passed at the general election
of 1942, and becoming effective Jan-
uary 1, 1943. Under this amendment,
there is vested in the Commission
all regulatory and management au-
thority for birds, game, fresh water
fish, fur-bearing animals, reptiles
and amphibians.
The Commission consists of five
Commissioners one of whom is
appointed by the Governor from
each of the five Congressional Dis-
tricts of Florida that existed as of
January 1, 1941. Such appointments
are for terms of five years, are sub-
ject to confirmation by the Florida
Senate, and are staggered so one
appointment falls due each year.
The overall administration of the
Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission is delegated by the Commis-
sion to a Director who is appointed
by and serves at the pleasure of the
five-man Commission.
Assisting the Director, and imme-
diately under his supervision, are an
Assistant Director, a Secretary to
the Commission, personnel working
on special assignments such as spe-
cial investigators, and all Staff Of-
ficers.
Staff officers of the Commission


consist of the Chiefs of Fiscal, Game
Management, Fisheries, Information
and Education, Communications,
Aviation, and the Magazine Editor
and the five Regional Managers.
The lines of Administrative au-
thority are as depicted in the at-
tached diagram. This diagram shows
that the Director is immediately re-
sponsible to the Commission. All
Chiefs of Divisions, or Staff Officers,
are, on the other hand, responsible
to the Director. Division personnel
are, of course, responsible to their
Staff Officers.
Thus, when a policy is set by the
Commission, it is administered by
the Director through his Staff Offi-
cers and their personnel.
Under this arrangement, it is the
Staff Officers' duty not only to at-
tend to their particular administra-
tive duties, but also to keep the Di-
rector, and through him the Com-
mission itself, fully informed as to
all important activities in all admin-
istrative branches.
Prior to 1951, all Game Commis-
sion programs were organized and
put into effect from one state-wide
office in Tallahassee. This resulted
in a cumbersome procedure that re-
sulted in a loss of vital contact with
personnel working in the field, and
the local problems with which they
were constantly confronted. Staff


ADMINISTRATION




of the




COMMISSION




Dr. 0. EARLE FRYE
Assistant Director


Officers in the Tallahassee main
office were often isolated, not only
from their own personnel, but also
from the sportsmen and general
public of the State of Florida.
In an effort to overcome this oper-
ational handicap, the Administra-
tive set-up was decentralized to at-
tain closer contact with field prob-
lems and personnel.
To accomplish this, Game Com-
mission Regional offices were estab-
lished in strategically located spots
throughout the state. Five Regions,
and offices, were located in North-
west Florida, Northeast Florida,
Central Florida, South Florida and
Everglades Florida, with headquar-
ters now in Panama City, Lake
City, Ocala, Lakeland and West
Palm Beach. Permanent headquar-
ters buildings have been constructed
at all of these sites, except Lakeland,
and plans are now underway to con-
struct the Lakeland office building
in the near future.
Each Region was placed under a
Regional Manager, responsible to
the Commission's Director and As-
sistant Director. The Regional Man-
agers are directly responsible for all
activities within the geographical
area composing their Region. These
include all work and personnel in
law enforcement, communications,
game and fish management, avia-
tion, information and education, and
budgetary matters.
In order to make this operation
workable, all activities of a techni-
cal nature must be supervised joint-
ly by the Regional Manager and the
Division Chief or Staff Officer of the
appropriate function.
Thus, the Regional Manager, and
his personnel, are assisted, at the
upper level, by various Staff Offi-
cers. All state-wide programs set
into effect by the Commission are
organized and coordinated, with the
cooperation of the Regional Man-
agers and their personnel, by the
Division Chiefs. It is therefore pos-
sible to put any overall program
into immediate effect in all points
of the state, with no discrepancies
in policy or administration. A state-
wide program is thereby operated
exactly the same in every point of
the state.
The close cooperation between the
Director, the Assistant Director, the
Division Chiefs and the Regional







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Managers is the most important
item in the entire Administrative
set-up.
Answerable to the various Staff
Officers are additional sub-supervis-
ory personnel. To the Chief of Fiscal
is delegated responsibility for the
State Property Officer, and Book-
keeping and Auditing personnel.
The Game and Fish Management
Chiefs are responsible for the lead-
ers of Federal and State-wide Proj-
ects, such as the hyacinth control
program, wildlife management areas,
deer and turkey restoration, and wa-
ter fowl and mourning dove re-
search and management projects.
The Information and Education
Chief is responsible for the Chief of
Youth Education, Chief of Audio-
Visual, Chief of Conservation Ex-
tension, and the five Regional In-
formation Officers. Regional Man-
agers are responsible for regional
fish and game and education officers,
and area supervisors.
Each of these is, in turn, respon-
sible for other personnel. For exam-
ple, the Area Supervisor is respon-
sible for law enforcement activities
in from two to four counties within
a Region, and is directly in charge of
the activities of law enforcement
personnel in such areas.
All of the lower level supervisory
personnel actually participate in
carrying out the work concerned.
For example, Area Supervisors
spend a great deal of their time in
actual law enforcement as well as
in supervision of law enforcement
in their respective areas.
The degree to which any individ-
ual can participate in actual work


----; i I 1-" ) i- -,-- fi-n.,












Administrative .
Regions
of the
Florida
Game and Fresh Water ...
Fish Commission '""'

KEY--1. South Florida Region, Of-
fice at Lakeland; 2. Northeast Flor- 4p
ida Region, Office at Lake City; 3.
Northwest Florida Region, Office at
Panama City, Central Office at Tal-
lahassee; 4. Everglades Florida Re-
gion, Office at West Palm Beach; 5.
Central Florida Region, Office at
Ocala.


depends, of course, upon the extent
of his administrative duties. The
farther up the administrative ladder
he goes, the more he is occupied
with administrative matters, and the
less he is able to participate in the
work he is supervising.
One of the most important duties
of the Director is the collection and
assimilation of information from the
various staff members for presenta-
tion to the Commissioners for use in


EMPLOYEE STABILITY
If you are considering a career in the wildlife conservation and law
enforcement field, you will be interested in the following facts:
Fifty-eight percent of all the employees of the Florida Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission have been employed for a period of five years
or more.
Twenty-eight percent of the employees have been with the Commission
for eleven years or longer.
Following is the percentage of employees in the various five-year
brackets:
Employed for Percent of Total
1 to 5 Years 48%
6 to 10 Years 23%
11 to 15 Years 21%
16 to 20 Years 5%
Over 20 Years 3%
Note that the Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission, in its present
form, was created on January 1, 1943. A few of the older employees worked
for previous Game Commissions.


evaluating and establishing overall
policies of the Commission. It is
the Director's very definite respon-
sibility to keep the Commissioners
fully informed as to activities in the
various phases of conservation en-
deavors, and as to public opinion re-
garding any specific issue. This can
be accomplished by frequent per-
sonal contacts with individual Com-
missioners, and by means of peri-
odic reports covering Commission
activities.
Beyond assisting the Director in
these vital tasks, the Assistant Di-
rector customarily also handles de-
tails such as Personnel employment,
training and qualifications, as well
as revisions of the Wildlife Code
Book rules and regulations, and cer-
tain legal affairs. He does these
things as a portion of his responsi-
bility to the Director.
By the use of such direct descend-
ing lines of authority and adminis-
tration, and by the returning lines
of responsibility, personnel welfare
and public contact, it is possible to
administer a complete and well-
integrated program of wildlife con-
servation for the State of Florida.
*








MERIT


SYSTEM


for Employees


DURING the biennium, the Game
and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission further aligned its Merit
System of Examinations for em-
ployees with the standard proce-
dures of the approved State Merit
System.
The Commission's Merit System
is designed so that all employment is
based on the aptitude and qualifica-
tions of each employee. The system
is designed to be a continuous pro-
gram which will better fit all em-
ployees of the Commission for their
particular work, and, in turn, render
better service to the people of the
State of Florida.
Since the first examination, Octo-
ber 15, 1955, the Commission has
hired all of its employees under the
Merit System procedures.
An indication of the selectiveness
of the Merit System is that in the
first five years of operation, a total
of 1,299 applications for employment
was received by the Commission. Of
the 1,299 applicants, 172 (or 71/2%)
successfully completed the competi-
tive examinations and were em-
ployed as Wildlife Officers in re-
placements of resigned or retired
employees.
All applicants must successfully
complete a series of written exami-
nations, with the examining being
done in various locations throughout
the state in order to encourage addi-
tional examinees. The examinations
are then graded by an impartial sys-
tem.
Those who successfully complete
the written examinations are then
called before an oral interview
board. Those who successfully com-
plete oral interviews are then placed
on the Commission's Merit System
Eligibility List for employment
when vacancies occur.
New employees are then put
through an extensive training pe-
riod, during which they are drilled
intensively in all facets of the Com-
mission's programs, policies and op-
erations.


After completing the training
course, the new employees are then
assigned to the field.
Under terms of the Commission's
Merit System, applicants taking ex-
aminations must have a high-school
education, or the equivalent, and
must be between the ages of 21 and
35. They must also have resided in
Florida for at least two years imme-
diately preceding employment, un-


less a qualified resident is not avail-
able. Applications for employment
may be made to the Commission at
any time. All applicants are then no-
tified of the date and places of the
written examinations.
During each year of the Merit
System Examinations, the Commis-
sion finds that the overall caliber
and quality of employee applicants
improves steadily throughout the
year, as prospective employees be-
came familiar with the Merit System
of the Commission.
As the result, the Merit System
has enabled the Commission to place
better-qualified and better-trained
officers in the field. The increase in
employee efficiency and morale has
been noteworthy. *


HOW...
The Average Florida Wildlife Officer Distributes His Time


1% COURT PROCEDURES
1% PUBLIC ASSISTANCE
Vz% PROFESSIONAL IMPROVEMENT
V3% ARl PATROL
13% FISH MANAGEMENT
1L/ MISC. ACTIVITIES







VIGOROUS enforcement of the
Game and Fish laws will al-
ways be an extremely important
phase of a good wildlife conservation
program. It will always be necessary
to have game and fish laws, and it
will always be necessary to see that
such laws are properly enforced.
Florida's Wildlife Officers have
the tremendous task of enforcing the
game and fish laws applying to ap-
proximately 39,000,000 acres of land
and water within the confines of the
State of Florida. With the second
largest woodland area in the United
States, and with over 30,000 named
fresh-water lakes, countless rivers
and streams, and 58,560 square miles
of territory to patrol, the Florida
Wildlife Officer is faced with a task
that is all-important and never
ending.
Our Florida Wildlife Officers are
engaged in a tremendous task that
is most important to the welfare of
the State of Florida. The importance
of each individual Wildlife Officer
cannot be over-emphasized.
While in the field, the Wildlife
Officer represents the authority, the
responsibility, the duty and the po-
tentiality of the entire Florida Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commission.
To the average fisherman and hunt-
er, who has no other contact with
the Commission, the Florida Wild-
life Officer IS the Florida Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission.
It is vitally important, therefore,
that our Wildlife Officers be men of


sonal character and educational
background. They must have the
physical stamina necessary to a life-
time of rugged work in the outdoors
under difficult conditions. They


and the general public of Florida.
The Wildlife Officer must also be
capable of working independently,
by himself, in wilderness areas
where he cannot obtain either com-


Law


Enforcement


and



The Wildlife Officer


good character and excellent quali-
fications. They must be thoroughly
trained in all techniques of good law
enforcement and must understand
general wildlife conservation and
management principles. It is impor-
tant that they have both good per-


must have the mental attributes
necessary to keep abreast of the
rapid advance in modern wildlife
conservation theories.
The Wildlife Officer must, above
all, be ever courteous and fair in all
matters relating to the sportsmen


pany, assistance or instructions. He
must, in other words, be self-operat-
ing, self-governing and self-supervis-
ing at many times.
It takes many qualifications to
make a good Wildlife Officer. There-
fore, it is necessary that all Wild-







life Officers pass a strict mental,
physical and character examination
before being employed by the Com-
mission.
One of the more important aspects
of the Law Enforcement branch of
the Commission is that it is sub-
divided geographically, correspond-
ing to the five administrative Re-
gions of The Commission. Each Re-
gion has a force of Wildlife Officers,
supervised by several Area Super-
visors, under the authority of the
Regional Manager.
The job of Wildlife Officer is es-
sentially the same in all Regions of
the State. The Officers must, how-
ever, adapt their work procedure to
fit local circumstances, such as geo-
graphy, topography, population con-
centrations of wildlife and humans,
and seasonal variations. With good
transportation equipment cars,
trucks, Jeeps, airboats, marsh bug-
gies, horses, boats, motors, airplanes
- and effective radio communica-
tions, the Florida Wildlife Officers
effectively cover the entire State, in-
sofar as is practicable under present
budgetary requirements.
But Law Enforcement, or the sole
responsibility of enforcing the Game
and Fish Laws, is not the Wildlife
Officer's only duty. The Officer is
also expected to serve or assist in
local game and fish management
work, community service, special in-
vestigations and public appearances.
The Wildlife Officer is expected to
make suitable speeches before or-
ganized groups, maintain his equip-
ment in good working order, assist
in fair exhibits and special promo-
tions, and make many appearances
in court. He is also concerned with
maintaining good relations between
the sportsmen of the state and the
Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission. And, since he has epecial-
ized transportation equipment, good
radio communications and the neces-
sary experience, the Wildlife Officer
is often called upon for aid in search
and rescue missions involving dis-
tressed persons.
In all, the Wildlife Officer has a
well-rounded schedule of duties that
is extremely important in the pro-
gram of conservation, protection and
utilization of our fish and game.
During the biennial period, the
Florida Wildlife Officers in the five
regions accomplished the following


totals:
Traveled a total of 5,534,212 miles
and made 7,318 arrests for violations
of the fish and game laws. They
spent a total of 726,354 hours in land
patrol and 100,736 hours in water
patrol. An additional 88,715 hours
were spent in miscellaneous duties,
including court appearances, meet-
ings, equipment maintenance, office


OUTSTANDING Wildlife Officer
Award for 1959 was presented to
Ernest G. Pierce, right, of Clermont,
by Central Florida Regional Man-
ager D. C. Land, Ocala. Pierce was
selected from Game Commission
tests and interviews concerning on-
the-job training and activities. He
has attended 80 hours of special
schooling, and continually works at
improving his knowledge of conser-
vation and law enforcement tech-
niques.
work, and similar duties.
By definition, the Florida Wildlife
Officer is the man who is primarily
concerned with enforcement of the
Game and Fish Laws. However, all
male employees of the Commission,
except office janitors, are actually
commissioned as wildlife officers
with the duty of enforcing the Game
and Fish Laws, no matter what their
routine jobs might be.
Just as the Wildlife Officer is con-
cerned with good public relations, so
is the Information and Education
Officer concerned with Law Enforce-
ment. And, as the Wildlife Officer
is concerned with good game and
fish management work, so, too, is
the Game or Fish Management
Technician concerned with good
Law Enforcement.
The policy that it is mandatory for
all employees to be concerned in all


phases and programs of the Com-
mission is of primary importance to
the sportsmen of the State of Flor-
ida. It is the only way in which a
true wildlife conservation program
may be achieved.
The fine cooperation between the
Wildlife Officers of the Florida
Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission and the Federal Game
Agents of the U. S. Fish and Wild-
life Service in Florida should also
be mentioned. The excellent team-
work between the three Federal
Agents stationed in Florida and our
Florida Wildlife Officers has been
responsible for improved protection
not only of migratory game but of
resident species as well, and has
been extremely effective in many
difficult cases.
There were also continuous im-
provements in the Training Pro-
gram whereby all new Wildlife Offi-
cers undergo a brief but compre-
hensive training program before
being assigned to their duties in
the field. As a result, the inexpe-
rienced officer is much better pre-
pared to assume the responsibilities
of his new job.
All Wildlife Officers, new and old,
undergo periodic Training Schools
where they receive the latest infor-
mation concerning all Commission
programs and activities. In Train-
ing, the accent is on Fish and Game
Laws, Law Enforcement Techniques,
Wildlife Code, Commitment and Im-
prisonment, Searches, Seizures, For-
feitures, and similar topics. Other
studies include the State Constitu-
tion, Game Management, Fish Man-
agement, First Aid and Safety, Fed-
eral Court Procedures, Public Rela-
tions and many other courses of in-
struction.
The well-trained Wildlife Officer
is a good Wildlife Officer.
The Florida Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission realizes that
only through the cooperation of an
informed and interested public can
game law violators be controlled
and good conservation practices be
employed. This is the reason why
Wildlife Officers are expected to
serve in so many diverse capacities.
Law Enforcement is, without
question, one of the most important
branches of the many varied pro-
grams and activities carried on by
the Florida Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission. 0


II







TO PRESENT a broad view of the
overall program of the Fisheries
Division, brief descriptions and ob-
jectives of each work unit are
outlined here.
It should be pointed out that vari-
ous projects may terminate periodic-
ally, with new projects beginning
infrequently. Thus, the Fisheries
Division program is not necessarily
confined to the descriptions present-
ed here, since it is most practical to
adopt a flexible approach to the
many complicated and important
problems in fisheries work.
In the future, projects may include
new work designed to make major
contributions to the sum of knowl-
edge concerning the Florida fresh-
water fisheries so that adequate
management programs may be de-
veloped and applied. These may in-
clude creel census data reports and
analysis, comparisons of growth
rates in black bass and other impor-


tant species, and adequate studies of
fishing license structures. Also, as
new chemicals are developed and
manufactured for better control of
fish populations and undesirable
aquatic vegetation, such chemicals
will have to be carefully tested and
techniques developed for maximum
usage and applications.
Outlines of the various objectives
and programs follow.
LICENSE STRUCTURES
Preliminary work was accom-
plished to analyze critically the pres-
ent structure of Florida fishing li-
censes and fees. As the study is car-
ried forward, it is hoped that recom-
mendations may be made as to feasi-
ble improvements needed to attain
a more equitable and uniform li-
cense structure.
Although fishing license revenue is
a major portion of the revenue ac-
cruing to the State Game Fund, there
is now little reliable information to
be had as to license buyers, sellers,
causes and origins. Present informa-
tion is essentially limited to numbers


and types of licenses sold, and little
is known concerning the habits of
license-buyers and their reasons for
purchasing.
In order to attain an equitable li-
cense structure, it is necessary to
analyze the various groups and ori-
gins of those who buy licenses, so
the structure may be adapted equi-
tably to the buyers.
With full cooperation from the
County Judges of Florida, who han-
dle license sales and distribution, we
are now obtaining copies of licenses
sold, and information about individ-
uals and groups of fishermen. This is
being carefully compiled, analyzed
and correlated.
When sufficient reliable informa-
tion is at hand, then recommenda-
tions may be prepared.
Several preliminary graphs and
tables are included in this Biennial
Report, showing trends of resident
and non-resident license sales for the
past several years.


E. T. HEINEN-Chief


FEDERAL AID PROGRAM
Financing of the Federal aid to
Fisheries program is obtained under
the so-called Dingell-Johnson pro-
gram by a return of funds from the
Federal tax monies on sales of fish-
ing tackle and equipment. The
amount made available to a state is
determined by a formula which uti-
lizes the geographical area of the
state in ratio to the number of peo-
ple purchasing fishing licenses. The
proportion of money coming back to
a state is, therefore, based on the
area of the state and the number of
license buyers.
When a state participates in such
a program, the Federal aid money is
returned on a state-matching basis
of 75%-25%, with the state furnish-
ing the twenty-five percent. Thus,
for $25.00, a state receives a return
of $75.00 in additional funds to ex-
pend within certain approved proj-
ects. A D-J project, therefore, costs
the Commission only twenty-five
percent of the entire costs of the
project.
Dingell-Johnson Aid projects dur-
ing the past biennium follow:
LAKE AND STREAM SURVEY
This F-6-R project continued map-
ping and sampling of certain water-
sheds, and completed work on the
Apalachicola River. A publication
consisting of maps and narration of
the watershed was prepared and


FISHERIES




DIVISION


s








distributed, with extra copies pres-
ently available from Commission
Offices.
Work was also completed on the
Choctawhatchee River Watershed,
with final maps and publication due
momentarily. These also will be
available from the offices mentioned
above.
The canal area of the Everglades
Region, the Suwannee River Water-
shed, and the West Florida Yellow
and Shoal River Watersheds have
also been or are currently being in-
vestigated, with publications due
within the coming biennium.
RIVER BASIN-FISHERIES
STUDIES
The F-8-R River Basin Fisheries
Investigation studies were under-
taken to examine proposals and
make recommendations regarding
fish management on the lands and
waters included in the Central and
Southern Florida Flood Control Dis-
trict project, for which the U. S.
Corps of Engineers is the planning
and construction agency. The proj-
ect boundaries include all or part of
seventeen central and south Florida
counties, and some of Florida's ma-
jor rivers and lakes; i.e., the Kis-


simmee River, Lake Okeechobee,
Caloosahatchee, and a major portion
of the St. Johns River.
Much of the work of this Project
during the past two years has been
spent in the two large conservation
pools of South Florida. These areas
are slowly taking shape, and they
hold promise of offering some of the
most important fishing areas in the
entire southeast. Recent studies
along the Tamiami Trail, which bor-
ders the #3 Pool, have indicated that
fishermen there contribute almost
$1,000,000.00 annually to the local
economy.
This economic survey became nec-
essary in order to justify certain ex-
penditures for fisheries improvement
work which were recommended for
inclusion in the project works. A
fishery contributing substantially to
a local community certainly merits
the attention of such a special sur-
vey. Indications are that the extra
works recommended will be pro-
vided, thereby assuring an adequate,
continuing fishery with sufficient
parking and access areas available
for the general public.
Other investigations and reports
by this Project included the Caloosa-


hatchee River, Northwest Shore of
Lake Okeechobee, various smaller
watersheds, and beginning work in
parts of the Upper St. Johns River
watershed. From these studies will
come additional recommendations
for preserving the famous fresh wa-
ter fishing in that area, in the event
they are endangered by proposed
construction plans of other agencies.
ANADROMOUS FISH STUDY
This F-10-R Project deals primar-
ily with striped bass and efforts to
establish them in larger quantities,
particularly in the Jim Woodruff
Reservoir, Lake Seminole, North-
west Florida.
Since the lake borders both Flor-
ida and Georgia, mutual interest in
the fishing potential of the lake is
shared by both states. Joint meetings
of fisheries workers from Florida
and Georgia have been held, with a
cooperative study of the reservoir
being formed, and work begun both
in the lake and below the dam in the
Apalachicola River.
Work on the anadromous striped
bass is concentrated in this area,
since a greater population of both
young and adult specimens has been
reported from this watershed than


AN ANALYSIS OF FLORIDA'S SPORTFISHING LICENSE SALES

1940-41 THROUGH 1959-60

GAME & FRESH WATER FISH COMMISSION


Fiscal Year



1940-41. .............
41-42 ...............
42-43..............
43-44..............
44-45..............
45-46..............
46-47..............
47-48. .............
48-49..............
49-50..............
50-51..............
51-52 ..............
52-53..............
53-54..............
54-55..............
55-56..............
56-57..............
57-58..............
58-59..............
59-60..............


Resident-State


Number Amount


21,132
63,540
59,071
64,003
73,282
59,020
122,186
160,512
190,145
186,265
180,113
191,219
219,678
239,529
268,413
275,802
290,553
315,432
349,158
366,385


$42,264
63,540
59,071
64,003
73,282
103,285
213,826
280,896
332,754
325,964
315,198
334,633
384,436
419,176
469,723
482,654
508,468
552,006
611,026
641,173


State


Number

5,848
5,711
5,425
7,432
9,898
4,877


Amount

$29,260
28,555
27,125
37,160
49,490
34,139


...... Breakdo


15,339
17,399
12,835
14,771
14,443
13,760
10,606
10,484
9,642
9,176
10,247


* Estimated


107,373
121,793
128,350
147,710
144,430
137,600
106,060
104,840
96,420
91,760
102,470


Non-Resident
Non-Resident
14-Day 3-Day Totals
TNotals
Number Amount Number Amount Number Amount


t10,868
t11,057
t 7,508
t 8,604
t 9,001
+20,792

wn Not

174,147
t89,292
t77,874
184,328
t84,651
188,723
31,507
30,865
26,557
27,287
29,486


$21,736
22,114
15,016
17,208
18,002
41,584

Availabi i

148,294


178,584
233,622
252,986
253,953
266,169
94,521
92,595
79,671
81,861
88,458


136,615
154,596
128,570
135,559
140,787


$136,615
154,576
128,570
135,559
140,787


16,716
16,768
12,933
16,036
18,899
25,669
45,521
62,639
83,869
89,486
106,691
90,709
99,099
99,094
102,483
178,728
195,945
164,769
172,022
180,520


$50,996
50,669
42,141
54,368
67,492
75,723
*120,000
180,418
238,047
255,667
300,377
361,972
400,694
398,383
403,769
337,196
352,031
304,661
309,180
331,715


Grand Totals


Number Amount


37,848
80,308
72,004
80,039
92,181
84,689
167,707
223,151
274,014
275,751
286,804
281,928
318,777
338,623
370,896
454,530
486,498
480,201
521,180
546,906


$93,260
114,209
101,212
118,371
140,774
179,008
*333,826
461,314
570,801
581,631
615,575
696,605
785,130
817,559
873,492
819,850
860,499
856,667
920,206
972,889


t 10-Day Non-Resident


,


.


.


,







from any other in Florida. Reports
of increased striper activity above
the dam are encouraging, and hopes
for a larger, more active fishery, are
believed to be well founded. If and
when sufficient numbers of these
fish are established in this general
area, additional areas will be select-
ed to be studied for possible stock-
ing.
TABULATION ST. JOHNS DATA
This F-11-R Project was com-
pleted during the biennium, and has
now made available a complete and
detailed breakdown of results of sev-
eral years work with haul seines in
the St. Johns River. Such data had
been recorded on daily and monthly
hand written report forms, but now
is assembled on statistical data cards
for additional future machine analy-
sis.
This is the first such project in
Florida, and it leads the way for
preserving, assembling, and present-
ing data from other projects. This
technique is sure to be used exten-
sively in future development of fish-
eries work.
LAKE MANAGEMENT
Only seldom have we been able
to acquire or exert management
rights to lakes in Florida without
exhaustive preliminary efforts to win
public support for such plans. In
many instances, certain management
recommendations or techniques that
are not well known by the general
sportfishing public are desired for a
lake in order to make better fishing.
Because of the full schedule kept by
our Regional Biologists, sufficient
time or effort is not usually available
to devote to such projects. It has
become necessary, therefore, to set
up the F-12-D Lake Management
Project so that definite investigative
and treatment plans can be carried
out on a regular and continuing
basis. Constant checks are required
of large waters, and treatments,
usually of a chemical nature, are
often required within within short
time intervals.
From this project, therefore, will
come a more intensive management
plan for our natural waters than has
been applied before. It also affords
a better balanced Federal-Aid pro-
gram by allocating some funds to
"development" rather than "re-
search." Both are of extreme value


to fishermen of Florida, but, prior
to this biennium, no actual develop-
ment type projects were in opera-
tion.
Chemical treatments, based on
findings from previous research proj-
ects, will be employed extensively in
this program as cheaper materials
make feasible the management or
development of progressively larger
bodies of water.
PUBLIC BOAT LAUNCHING
RAMPS
One of our most popular projects,
the F-13-D Project for installations
of boat ramps is designed to assure
the rights of fishermen and boaters
to access to our public waters. Un-
der this program, access sites are ac-
quired through cooperative agree-
ments with counties, cities, or pri-
vate land owners, and boat ramps
installed for public use. Sites select-
ed are those in selected areas where
there is a critical shortage, or com-
plete lack, of public access. Of
course, final site selections are de-
pendent upon satisfactory lease or
purchase arrangements with the
owners.
It is our aim to provide basic
space and facilities only, with hopes
for future expansion of most sites
through cooperative agreements with
counties, civic groups, private indi-
viduals or other interests. With the


tremendous interest in boating
shown during the past few years,
this project receives wide public ac-
ceptance and needs to be increased
as soon as additional funds are avail-
able.
A listing of ramps completed un-
der the Federal Aid F-13-D Project
is shown below:
1. Dead Lakes-Gulf County
2. Apalachicola River-Ocheese
Landing-Calhoun County
3. Buck Lake-Marion County
4. North Bay-Bay County
5. Lake Hart (Moss Park)-
Orange County
6. River Styx (White Oak Land-
ing)-Liberty County
7. Orange River-Lee County
8. Hancock Creek-Lee County
9. Ocheese Lake (Shady Grove)-
Jackson County
10. Alligator Lake-Columbia
County
11. Guano River-St. Johns County
12. Apalachicola River (lola Land-
ing)-Gulf County
REGIONAL SERVICES
In each of the Commission's five
administrative regions, a Fisheries
Biologist is available to investigate
reports of pollution and fish-kills, to
report on dredging or pumping and
filling activities around public lakes,
to answer numerous inquiries about
fish and fishing, and to make liter-




































ally hundreds of checks and recom-
mendations for improving fishing in
public fishing waters and farm ponds.
Applications for fish from the hatch-
eries are first processed by the Re-
gional Fisheries Biologists, and then
forwarded to the Tallahassee office
for approval and referral to the


0Ui


hatchery personnel. Additional fish
for stocking are available from the
U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service Hatch-
ery at Welaka.
Stocking fish from the hatcheries
consists of bass and bluegills-bass
in the spring, bluegills in the fall.
Stocking policy requires prior inves-


$ GAME FUND REVENUE FROM
1,20o SALE OF SPORTFISHING

0nrr~\


1,ouu00


800.0


600,0


4000(


200O


L V71 xI LICENSES
00 .

00- :- RESIDENT

S7---NON-RESIDENT
S001 4 / / ;- -- COMBINED


100- .


O .. .- -
1940 44 49 54 59
1941 45 50 55 60


tigation of ponds or lakes to be
stocked, and then if it is believed
that stocking would increase or im-
prove fishing, applications for a spe-
cific number and kind of fish are ap-
proved.
FISH RESTORATION PROJECT
One of the two projects in opera-
tion that receive funds from legisla-
tive appropriations is the Fish Resto-
ration Project. This project allows
for additional work on public waters
for improving fishing. Management
plans for such lakes or streams may
call for total or partial renovation of
a fish population in an effort to im-
prove fishing conditions. Improved
techniques, utilizing some of the
newer and more powerful chemical
toxicants enables the destruction of
many millions of pounds of undesir-
able fish-particularly shad, without
injury to game fish. In lakes or ponds
that are determined to be far out of
balance, it may be necessary to use
methods to destroy all fish life and
thus completely renovate the body
of water for receiving a complete
new fish population in proper ratios
of balance for maximum production.
With thousands of lakes in the
state, it is apparent that huge sums
of money could well be spent in im-
proving fishing. Since Commission
funds are necessarily limited, special
funds are most welcome and are well
utilized in the management and im-
provement of the state's fishing wa-
ters.
NOXIOUS VEGETATION
The noxious vegetation control
program is financed in part through
a special appropriation from the
Florida Legislature. Parts of two
separate appropriations, plus about
$100,000 of State Game Fund reve-
nue, were utilized during the bien-
nium.
During the period from July 1,
1958 through June 30, 1960, 301
different bodies of water were
treated. This amounted to a total of
50,539 acres of treated vegetation.
To accomplish this immense task,
six airboats, three outboard motor
units, one full time airplane and ten
vehicles were employed by a staff
including mechanical, shop, field,
and administrative personnel.
A process of screening and testing
many of the new chemicals now
available for vegetation control pur-
poses was a part of the noxious


- -- -- ----







vegetation control program during
the biennium. Working closely with
the manufacturers, various combi-
nations of chemicals were sprayed
on different forms of vegetation in
an effort to determine the most effi-
cient and economical controls. This
screening process has resulted in
additional services, as some types of
vegetation are now being controlled
which formerly were resistant to
treatment.
Cost figures show that control of
one acre of hyacinths costs about
$6.50. This includes all costs involved
in the program. Controls for other
types of vegetation generally cost
more per acre, as more expensive
chemicals are usually required than
that needed for hyacinths.
It should be noted that a close
working relationship is maintained
between this department and similar
departments of county, state, and
federal agencies. This is particularly
true with the U. S. Department of
Agriculture Laboratory in Ft.
Lauderdale, the U. S. Corps of Engi-
neers, and the Central and Southern
Florida Flood Control District.
Enactment of Section 372.93,
Florida Statutes, by the 1959 Legis-
lature, enabled expansion of hya-
cinth control work by entering into
cooperative contract with the U. S.
Corps of Engineers. This was accom-
plished in March, 1960.
Areas under this program are:
Grassy Munson Watershed (Leon
County), Bayo Chico (Escambia
County), Lynn Haven Lake (Bay
County), Lake Talquin (Gadsden
and Leon Counties), Myakka River
(Sarasota and Manatee Counties),
Withlacoochee River (Citrus, Her-
nando, Marion, Pasco, Polk and
Sumter Counties), Oklawaha River
Watershed (Putnam, Marion, Ala-
chua, Lake and Orange Counties),
Lake Okeechobee Tributaries Wa-
tershed (Okeechobee, Glades, and
Highlands Counties), Hillsborough
River Watershed (Hillsborough
County), Upper St. Johns River Wa-
tershed (Indian River, Brevard, and
Orange Counties), and Apalachicola
Watershed (Franklin, Gulf, Liberty,
Calhoun, Gadsden, and Jackson
Counties).


-m


Areas where additional work is River Watersheds: Lake Okeechobee
anticipated during the 1961-1963 bi- and the Tamiami Watersheds.
ennium under the Cooperative Pro- It is hoped that the Cooperative
gram are: St. Johns, Peace, Kissim- Program will encompass the entire
mee, Caloosahatchee, and Suwannee state by June 30, 1963. *


600000

50Q0000
SOOW


NUMBER OF 5PORTSFISHING

-RESIDENT -/ LICENSES
---NON-RESIDENT
- COMBINED _: SOLD
_T OL


1940 44 49
1941 45 50


S-A
54 59
55 60







to members of its game management
division. The annual award for the
best paper at the preceding meeting
was given to Mr. C. M. Loveless and
the award for the best publication
during the year was given jointly to
Mr. J. A. Powell and Mr. John
Sincock. In the previous year this
same award was won by Mr. R. W.
Murray and Dr. O. E. Frye, Jr.
Technical Bulletin No. 5, An Evalua-
tion of White-tailed Deer Habitat in
Florida by Richard Harlow, was
published in 1959 and won the
Southeastern Section award for best
publication. Thus, for three conse-
cutive times Florida won this award,
a truly outstanding record.
Important studies and investiga-
tions dealt with wildlife resources,
habitat changes, and land use in
connection with the Central and
Southern Florida Flood Control
Project; studies of quail, dove, deer,
turkey, waterfowl, squirrel, and
frog; land management, browse,


E. B. CHAMBERLAIN, JR.
-Chief-


MANAGEMENT


DIVISION

T HE BIENNIAL REPORT covering
the fiscal years 1956-57 and
1957-58 outlined a number of ad-
ministrative changes which were
made, and discussed certain new
projects which were begun. Activi-
ties of the fiscal years 1958-59 and
1959-60 were in accord with these
changes. Unfortunately, shortage of
funds and lack of personnel caused
the curtailment of a number of
desired and proposed projects.
Renewal of land agreements in
1958-59 covered property of the
Tomoka Land Company in the
Tomoka Management Area and of
Owens-Illinois Glass Company in
the Steinhatchee Area. Agreements
were also secured with Atlantic
Land Improvement Company cover-
ing its land in the Devil's Garden
and Lee Areas.


In 1959-60 agreements were made
on the Devil's Garden, Lee, Big
Cypress, Fisheating Creek, and
Okeechobee Areas and added 38,000
acres to the Tomoka Area. Contracts
could not be renewed for the Sum-
ter-Citrus Area and these lands
were dropped from the management
area system for the 1959-60 season.
Particular difficulty was experi-
enced during the biennium in at-
tempting to employ technical
personnel. This has been due to a
shortage of adequately trained and
experienced men, but more especial-
ly to Florida's salary scale. The
situation was particularly acute in
1959-60 with the loss of several key
personnel. Mr. D. D. Strode resigned
to work for the U. S. Forest Service,
Mr. E. L. Tyson to work for the
State Board of Health, and Mr.
C. M. Loveless to return to school.
Florida was fortunate in that both
awards presented at the 1958 meeting
of the Southeastern Association of
Game and Fish Commissioners went


population, harvest, and inventory
studies. During the period, the
game management division engaged
in the following investigations co-
operatively with other states and
agencies: Southeastern Deer Disease
Study, Southeastern Statistical Proj-
ect, Atlantic Waterfowl Council, Site
Preparation Studies (one with State
Forest Service, one with U. S. Forest
Service), U. S. Forest Service Food
Plant Study, and Fire Ant Study.
Development and habitat improve-
ment received the major share of the
funds. These activities were largely
confined to the management areas,
and involved food plots, controlled
burning, clearing, and maintenance
and construction of facilities. Turkey
trapping at Fisheating Creek, hunt
operations, and fire ant studies were
done with state funds. In addition,
most personnel were placed on full
state salary for 25% of their time
due to a lack of Federal Aid funds.
The following tables and project
discussions summarize game man-
agement division activities during
the years 1958-59 and 1959-60,


GAME







W-11-R, Charlotte County Quail
Investigation
During 1958-59, project activities
involved principally the collection
and tabulation of routine data on
quail populations, slough grass
abundance, age and sex ratios of
quail and experimental quail feed-
ers. Unfavorable water conditions
interfered with both the fall and
spring census. The census indicated
a substantial increase in quail
throughout the management area.
Hunting success on the management
area was good, the total kill being
the highest experienced to date.
The quail population on Feeder
Area 1 remained at a considerably
higher level than before the feeders
were increased in the spring of 1954.
The population on Feeder Area No. 2
remains considerably lower than on
Feeder Area No. 1 but consider-
ably higher than on the no-feeder
area.
All activities were rather re-
stricted during 1959-60 due to the
extended illness of Assistant Leader
Allgood and to considerable turn-
over of other personnel. Mr. Allgood
found it necessary to transfer to law
enforcement in March. Project As-


sistant Benton resigned in Septem-
ber and was replaced by A. M.
Smith in early October. The va-
cancy created by Mr. Allgood's trans-
fer was filled in June with the em-
ployment of Scott Krug as assistant
leader.
Both the fall and spring quail cen-
sus were incomplete. Feeder opera-
tion was carried on through the year,
though not as consistently as desir-
able. Quail wings for age determina-
tions were collected during the hunt-
ing season.
Hunting on the management area
was limited to 17 days because of
low success. During this time 461
hunters took 1764 birds for an aver-
age of 3.83 quail per hunter.

W-15-D. Farm Game Habitat
Restoration
During the spring of 1959 the fol-
lowing amounts of quail food plant-
ing material were distributed to
landowners in 44 counties for habitat
improvement: 534,000 thunbergii les-
pedeza plants, 6,550 pounds of part-
ridge pea seed, 6,000 pounds of com-
mon lespedeza seed, and 12,619
pounds of combine pea seed. A fol-
low-up evaluation study of plantings


Table 1. Pittman-Robertson Apportionments and Expenditures of Funds
During Fiscal Years 1958-59, 1959-60, and 1960-61 with Summary of
Projects by Type


1958-59 1959-60 1960-61

Amount* % Amount* % Amount* %

Coordination........ $ 25,600.00 6.3 $ 25,500.00 6.9 $ 23,300.00 6.4
Research........... 126,700.00 30.9 105,300.00 28.5 104,150.00 28.5
Development......... 257,500.00 62.8 238,600.00 64.6 237,900.00 65.1

Total......... $ 409,800.00 $ 369,400.00 $ 365,350.00
Apportionment.... $ 234,066.25 $ 222,612.58

Federal monies with matching State funds. These amounts are planned expenditures.

SUMMARY OF PROJECTS BY TYPE


1958-59 1959-60 1960-61
Research. .......................... 8 8 9
Development ....................... i i (
Coordination.................. ...... I 1
Land Acquisition. ................... 1 1 1


made from material distributed in
the spring of 1958 showed the fol-
lowing results:
Excel-
lent Good Fair Poor
Thunbergii les-
pedeza 16% 36% 40% 8%
Partridge pea 27 31 35 7
Cooperative work with the Soil
Conservation Service nursery at Ar-
cadia has given good information on
the best methods of planting com-
bine peas. An experimental planting
of hardy wild cowpea was made.
Some time was spent in an attempt
to get better landowner participa-
tion in the wildlife aspects of the
Soil Bank program. Prior to 1959
there had been no landowner par-
ticipation in the wildlife practices on
Conservation Reserve land. This
year, there are 145.4 acres signed up
under wildlife ("G" practice) con-
tracts.
Considerable time was spent in
investigating the effects of the Fire
Ant Eradication Program upon wild-
life in Florida. A research study was
drawn up for the purpose of study-
ing the effects of the program upon
the endemic biota on treated lands.
The Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station, the State Plant Board, and
the Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission are cooperating in the
study. There are three study areas
involved; one infested with fine ants
that will be treated, one infested
with ants that will be untreated, and
one area will be uninfested and un-
treated. Studies will be conducted








for one year prior to treatment and
two years following treatment.
Sampling studies of birds and
mammals have been conducted on
the three areas. Dr. Henry M. Ste-
venson of the Zoology Department
at Florida State University has been
conducting song b i r d sampling
studies. Mr. Ted T. Allen, a gradu-
ate student at the University of Flor-
ida, conducted small mammal studies
last summer using the live-trap
method of sampling. The project
leader conducted quail and dove call
count studies last summer and is
continuing with this study this sum-
mer. These counts are run at 10-day
intervals on each area. A total cen-


sus of the wintering quail population
was made on each area last winter.
A track count sampling study of
larger mammals was begun in Au-
gust, 1959, and has continued at ap-
proximately monthly intervals since.
During the spring and summer of
1960, distribution of 539,000 thun-
bergii lespedeza plants, 2,000 pounds
of partridge pea seed, 5,000 pounds
of common lespedeza seed, 15,700
pounds of combine pea seed, and 8,-
700 pounds of brown-top millet seed
were distributed in 39 counties with
the cooperation of the Soil Conserva-
tion Service.
Follow-up inspections of plantings
from material distributed in the


Table 2. Wildlife Management Areas Operated in 1958-59


1. Eglin Air Force
Reservation ...
2. Blackwater. ......

3. Roy S. Gaskin ...
4. Liberty .........
5. St. Marks .......

6. Aucilla. ..........

7. Steinhatchee.....
8. Osceola. .........
9. Lake Butler .....

10. LittleTalbotIsland
11. Gulf Hammock...
12. Ocala............

13. Tomoka.........
14. Sumter-Citrus.. .
15. Farmton.........
16. Groom...........
17. Richloam .......

18. Holopaw.........
19. Avon Park.......
20. Okeechobee .....
21. Fisheating Creek..
22. Cecil M. Webb...
23. J. W. Corbett ...
24. Lee..............
25. Collier...........
26. Everglades .......


27. Woodruff........
28. Camp Blanding...
29. Leon-Wakulla ....
30. Big Cypress ......
31. Guano River .....
32. Devil's Garden...


Open to
Hunting

acres


Closed to
Hunting

acres


Ownership


390,000 70,000 U.S. Air Force.........
85,000 .......... Florida Forest Service..


118,300
133,120
3,000

110,000

206,500
92,000
89,000


100,000
203,680

44,000
20,000
60,000
17,000
63,000

23,000
108,000
16,000
100,000
57,000
90,000
40,000
300,000
725,300


6,000
60,000
67,000
133,000

40,000


62,000



18,500

7,000

250
20,000
46,280










175,000
5,000


50,000



1,000
10,000


10,000
18,000
18, 000


Private. ..............
U.S. Forest Service ...
U.S. Fish & Wildlife
Service ............
Private. ..............

Private. ..............
U.S. Forest Service....
Private

Florida Park Service...
Private. ..............
U.S. Forest Service....

Private. ..............
Private. ..............
Private. ..............
U.S. Forest Service....
U.S. Forest Service....

Private. ..............
U.S. Air Force.........
Private. ..............
Private. ..............
Game & Fish Comm ....
Game & Fish Comm....
Private. ..............
Private. ..............
Central and Southern
Florida Flood Control
District. ..............
U.S. Corps Engineers...
State Armory Board ...
U.S. Forest Service....
Private. ..............
Private. ..............


Location by County


Santa Rosa, Walton,
Okaloosa
Santa Rosa,
Okaloosa
Gulf, Bay, Calhoun
Liberty

Wakulla
Wakulla, Jefferson,
Taylor
Dixie, Lafayette
Columbia, Baker
Union, Baker,
Columbia
Nassau
Levy
Marion, Putnam,
Lake
Volusia
Sumter, Citrus
Volusia
Hernando
Hernando, Pasco,
Sumter
Osceola
Polk, Highlands
Okeechobee
Glades
Charlotte
Palm Beach
Lee
Collier

Palm Beach,
Broward, Dade
Jackson
Clay
Leon, Wakulla
Collier
St. Johns


Private. .............. Hendry


spring of 1959 showed the following
results:
Excel-
lent Good Fair Poor
Thunbergii les-
pedeza ...... 4% 34/% 41% 21%
Partridge pea 0 47 30 23
These results are considered gen-
erally satisfactory. The low percent-
age of successful partridge pea plant-
ings was due to a wet summer which
prevented satisfactory seed yields.
This factor was also responsible for
low seed yield on some thunbergii
plantings. The majority of combine
pea plantings was quite satisfactory.
It was learned that the best planting
period for this species is from Au-
gust 1-15 in north Florida, August
15-31 in central Florida, and Sep-
tember 1-15 in south Florida.

W-19-R, Florida Waterfowl
Investigation
Without an assigned permanent
leader for a ten month period, W-
19-R was relatively inactive during
1958-59. Annual mid-winter water-
fowl surveys were handled by W-39-
R and W-45-D personnel in conjunc-
tion with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife
Service's annual winter waterfowl
survey of Florida.
Since the new leader reported on
20 May 1959, time has been devoted
to the familiarization with Florida's
wetlands and waterfowl situation.
This has been accomplished by re-
viewing the literature, some of the
state and federal management areas,
contacting agencies that have and
will continue to have direct bearings
on the waterfowl habitat situation,
and a general familiarization with
the topography and vegetation in
Florida.
Work during 1959-60 consisted of
Florida duck inventories, periodic
fall and winter aerial inventories,
water quality tests, vegetation an-
alysis, trapping and banding activi-
ties, taking waterfowl bag checks,
wing collections and investigations
concerning possible land acquisi-
tions. Additional activities included
tabulation and analysis of population
data, preparation of a report con-
cerning exotic waterfowl species in-
troduction in Florida, calculations
and tabulations concerning periodic
waterfowl surveys, and general wa-
terfowl migration observations. An-
nual meetings of the Atlantic Water-


I


I







fowl Council Research Committee
and the Atlantic Waterfowl Council
were attended.
Periodic aerial inventories were
expanded over northeast, northwest
and west coast Florida in addition
to south and central Florida. Peak
populations of 552,000 waterfowl oc-
curred in January as revealed by
the more intensive coverage of the
state in the Annual Winter Survey.
December waterfowl populations cal-
culated 477,366 waterfowl; Febru-
ary's population, 480,982 waterfowl.
Annual Winter Survey results indi-
cated an- overall decrease in water-
fowl from last year of 29%; dabblers,
46%; divers, 28%; geese, 14%; coot,
15% decreases.
Florida duck breeding ground sur-
vey in July tallied 587 birds; 411
adults, 176 young; a 2.3 to 1 adult
to juvenile age ratio. The July den-
sity was calculated as 4.1 birds per
square mile. Fall population was es-
timated as 27,000 to 30,000 Florida
duck from the pre-hunting season
survey, probably the highest in the
past six years. Waterfowl bag checks
indicated a 1 to 7.2 adult to juvenile
age ratio. May breeding ground in-
Sventories counted 359 Florida duck
for a density of 2.6 birds per square
mile censused.
W-22-R, Mourning Dove Study
Two hundred and thirty-four
doves were banded at Alligator Point
in 1958 resulting in a 10.7 per cent
Recovery. The high percentage of
immature birds trapped points to a
healthy situation in this segment of
the population.
Pittman-Robertson personnel par-
ticipated in the dove call count
breeding census, and the informa-
tion was sent to the regional office
in Atlanta. The project leader pre-
ipared a report for Director Aldrich
recommending a 12 bird bag limit
and 5 more days of hunting if the
regional call count census shows an
increase in population over 1958.
Trapping also continued to be suc-
cessful in West Palm Beach. Trap-
ping results, through June 1960 are
22,526 new birds banded and a total
of 38,101 trapped one or more times.
The highest ratio of adult birds ever
banded at West Palm Beach oc-
curred in February, 1960, (81.3%
adult). This contrasts with 2.2%
adults in June, and 4.3% adults in
July, 1959.
The project leader attended meet-


ings with the Southeastern dove rep-
resentatives for future dove studies
and for making recommendations to
the Southeastern Association for
hunting regulations, and the pre-
regulation dove meeting in Washing-
ton, D. C. Further relaxation of reg-
ulations is expected this year.
Machine work on the West Palm
Beach banding data was continued
at the Leesburg office.

W-27-R, Eglin Field Deer
Investigation
Activities during 1958-59 included
reposting of Eglin Field as necessary,
TSI studies at Blackwater, deer dis-
ease studies in conjunction with the


University of Florida, and deer trap-
ping. Track counts indicated an Oc-
tober population of 11,500 animals,
and a February population of 8,600
animals on Eglin Field.
Principal findings and actions dur-
ing the year are summarized as fol-
lows: Titi, live oak, yaupon, and
greenbrier seem to offer the best
possibilities of responding to habitat
manipulation techniques for increas-
ing available deer browse. Deer are
being provided to the University of
Florida at Gainesville by the Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commission
for a study of the sickled erythrocyte
condition found on Eglin. The Com-
mission is planning to build two bear


Table 3. Wildlife Management Areas Operated in 1959-60


1. Eglin Air Force
Reservation...
2. Blackwater .......

3. Roy S. Gaskin. ...
4. Liberty. .........
5. St. M arks ........

6. Aucilla. ..........

7. Steinhatchee......
8. Osceola. .........
9. Lake Butler .....

10. Little Talbot Island
11. Gulf Hammock. ..
12. Ocala............

13. Tomoka .........
14. Citrus. ..........
15. Farmton .........
16. Croom ...........
17. Richloam ........

18. Holopaw ........
19. Avon Park .......
20. Okeechobee ......
21. Fisheating Creek..
22. Cecil M. Webb...
23. J. W. Corbett....
24. Lee..............
25. Collier. ..........
26. Everglades ......


Apalachee .......
Camp Blanding...
Leon-Wakulla....
Big Cypress .....
Guano River .. ..
Devil's Gardens...


Open to
Hunting,

acres

390,000
85,000

118,300
133,120
3,000


Closed to
Hunting

acres


Ownership


70,000 U.S. Air Force .........
......... Florida Forest Service..


62,000


110,000 ..........


206,500
92,000
89,000


100,000
203,680

70,000
41,000
60,000
17,000
63,000

23,000
108,000
16,000
100,000
57,000
90,000
40,000
300,000
725,300


6,000
60,000
67,000
133,000

40,000


18,500

7,000

250
20,000
46,280


175,000
5,000


50,000



1,000
10,000


10,000
. . . .


Private. ..............
U.S. Forest Service....
U.S. Fish & Wildlife
Service ............
Private..............

Private. ..............
U.S. Forest Service....
Private. ..............

Florida Park Service. .
Private. ..............
U.S. Forest Service....

Private. .......... .. .
Florida Forest Service..
Private. ..............
Florida Forest Service..
Florida Forest Service..

Private. ..............
U.S. Air Force........
Private. ..............
Private. ..............
Game & Fish Comm...
Game & Fish Comm... .
Private. ..............
Private. ..............
Central and Southern
Florida Flood Control
D istrict...............
U.S. Corps Engineers...
State Armory Board...
U.S. Forest Service ...
Private. ..............
Private. ..............
Private...............


SLocation by County


Santa Rosa, Walton,
Okaloosa
Santa Rosa,
Okaloosa
Gulf, Bay, Calhoun
Liberty

Wakulla
Wakulla, Jefferson,
Taylor
Dixie, Lafayette
Columbia, Baker
Union, Baker,
Columbia
Nassau
Levy
Marion, Putnam,
Lake
Volusia
Citrus
Volusia
Hernando
Hernando, Pasco,
Sumter
Osceola
Polk, Highlands
Okeechobee
Glades
Charlotte
Palm Beach
Lee
Collier

Palm Beach,
Broward, Dade
Jackson
Clay
Leon, Wakulla
Collier
St. Johns
Hendry








proof platforms as demonstrations,
and to determine costs and best
method of handling bee hives on the
platforms.
In the 16-day 1959 archery season,
262 hunters killed 12 deer. A total
of 6,144 hunters participated in the
32 day gun hunt and reported killing
507 deer. This represents a 10% in-
crease in hunter success. Track
counts in February indicated a popu-
lation of 9,000 deer (one per 51.25
acres) on the area. Data were as-


sembled which led to a tr
son bag limit" regulation
This should permit better
of the total annual kill.
A turkey management
ing increased controlled
food. plots, feeders, and
was formulated. Two rel
ing 17 birds from Fishea
were made.

W-32-R, Ocala Deer In
During the months o


Table 4. Summary of Active Pittman-Robertson Projects Operate


Project


Name


Purpose


- I


W- 8-L

W-11-R

W-13-C

W-15-D

W-19-R
W-22-R


Charlotte County Game Man-
agement Area Acquisition. .
Charlotte County Quail Inves-
tigation .....................
Wildlife Management Coordina-
tion. .......................
Habitat Restoration for Farm
Game ....................
Florida Waterfowl Survey......
Mourning Dove Study. ........


W-27-R Eglin Field Deer Investigation..

W-32-R Ocala Deer Investigation ......


W-33-R

W-35-D

W-39-R


W-41-R


W-43-D


W-45-D

W-46-D

W-47-D


Wildlife Inventory, Harvest and
Economic Survey............
North Florida Management Area
Development...............
Wildlife Investigation of the Cen-
tral and Southern Florida Flood
Control Project. .............
Management Area Research...


Wildlife Development of the
Central and Southern Florida
Flood Control Project........
South Florida Management Area
Development................
Woodruff Reservoir Develop-
Sm ent......................
Guano River Development.....


Exchange of land to consolidate
Commission holdings.........
To study ecology of South Flor-
ida quail....................
To administer and supervise pro-
gram ..................... .

To improve quail habitat.......
To study waterfowl ecology.....
To study dove populations and
migrations..................
To study deer populations and
management ...............
To study deer populations and
management ................
To learn statewide harvest and
hunting pressures ............
To develop management areas in
north and central Florida ....

To develop management and op-
erational methods............
To study game populations and
make management recommen-
dations .................. ...


To develop Everglades Area.....
To develop management areas in
South Florida.... ...........
To development management
area .......................
To develop a waterfowl manage-
ment area through construc-
tion of dike and water control
structures.................


PERSONNEL


Full time technicians .................. 19
Part time technicians ................ 1
Full time non-technical............... 21
Part time non-technical ................ 7


Bookkeeper. ...............
Secretarial .................
Half time secretarial .....


ial "no sea- August, 1958, approximately 12 days
for 1960-61. were spent doing the annual track
Evaluation counts along with random track
counts of 24 miles of roads. Roads to
plan involv- be used for random roadside counts
d burning, were selected by giving each mile of
restocking road that could be used a number,
eases, total- then selecting at random 24 loca-
ting Creek, tions. Counts on all roads indicated
13.99 tracks per mile. August showed
an increase over July in tracks per
vestigation mile.
f July and The 1958-59 kill was 426 legal deer,
just over half of the 1957-58 kill.
d in 1958-59 The per cent of deer in the one and
one-half year age group also dropped
from 56.5 per cent of the total in
Estimated
Totamated 1957 to 34.8 per cent in 1958. This
decrease in kill and the age groups
percentage is directly related to the
None acorn production two years earlier.
Preliminary data indicates that
9,200.00 acorn production is directly related
to the fawn production, kill and
25,200.00 weight of deer.

14,950.00 E. L. Tyson resigned as project
5,000.00 leader in July 1959, and compara-
tively little work was done on the
5,500.00 project until Richard Harlow was
assigned as leader in January, 1960.
4,600.00 Activities carried out by Mr. Harlow
include studies of habitat, con-
8,000.00 trolled burning, brush cutting, pop-
2200. ulation, fertilization of oak trees, and
acorn production.
100,000.00 The combined 1959 scrub oak
acorn crop (Quercus myrtifolia, Q.
geminata and Q. Chapmanii) was
21,000.00 slightly above the nine year average.
When compared individually, how-
ever, Q. Chapmanii was consider-
245,000.00 ably below the average while Q.
geminata and Q. myrtifolia were
11,400.00 only slightly below. Compared com-
paratively over the nine year study,
60,000.00 it may be considered a normal crop.
The oak tree fertilizer experiment
26,000.00 is progressing as planned, and the
effect of fertilizer on the acorn crop
will be studied for the first time dur-
12,500.00 ing the 1960-61 fall and winter.
In the oak tree orchard study
$349,050.00 where 15 trees per acre were left,
the traps collected the greatest num-
ber of acorns per tree and contained
the smallest per cent of unsound
acorns. Further study is necessary
before any definite conclusions can
.......... 1 be reached. The ground vegetation
........... 2 survey taken during January in the
........... treated areas showed the greatest
quantity in plant coverage on those
areas where oaks were thinned out.







The increase in plant quantity was
due almost entirely to wiregrass and
Andropogon.
The controlled burning studies on
longleaf pine islands in one, two,
three, and four year old burns in-
dicated that one year old burns con-
tained the greatest quantity and va-
riety of quail and deer foods, with
the two year old burns contributing
the next greatest quantity and var-
iety of plants. By the third year, old
wiregrass (duff) and new wiregrass
dominates the ground vegetation.
Burning every two years (if enough
duff and dry plant life is present)
would be most suitable for quail,
while for deer every third or fourth
year would produce the best results.
W-33-R, Wildlife Inventory, Harvest
and Economic Survey
Throughout the biennium, opera-
tions of this project have been re-
stricted because of recument illness
of the project leader. Fortunately,
all routine activities have been fully
carried out. The 1957-58 Random
Survey and Permanent Mailing List
were completed and reported in the
January, 1959, quarterly report. A
series of sub-samples were analyzed
by the former project leader, who
resigned to continue his education.
The 1958-59 Random Survey was
completed and tabulated. The Perm-
anent Mailing List was discontinued
for statistical and economic reasons.
The 1958-59 Management Area Sur-
vey was completed and tabulated.
The 1958-59 managed hunt data
were collected, tabulated and re-
ported in the Annual Report for
Project W-41-R.
The project requested the North
Carolina State Statistical Laboratory
to furnish a proposal and cost esti-
mates for determining certain facts,
such as harvest, hunting pressure,
utilization, hunter opinions and eco-
nomic importance for the entire state
and/or management areas, on an
annual and 5-year basis.
A 650 program for analyzation of
the road block sampling data was
received from the North Carolina
State Statistical Laboratory and is
described in this report. The eco-
nomic data collected in conjunction
with the 1957-58 Random Survey
were tabulated and reported in the
January '59 quarterly report.
A special opinion survey was con-
ducted in regard to opening the
Inverness Refuge. Results of this


survey, which favored opening of
the area, were reported in the Octo-
ber, 1958, quarterly report.
In other activities, dove banding
data and quail census data were
processed, and work was also done
on the fire ant study. The project
leader attended the workshop of the
Cooperative Statistical Study at the
North Carolina State Statistical


Laboratory.
On the 1959 Random Survey Ques-
tionnaire, the question "Would you
favor a limited 'any sex' deer season
on specified areas when and if the
Commission determines such a sea-
son necessary to good deer manage-
ment?", was asked. A tabulation of
the answers to this question is pre-
sented in Table 6.


Table 5. Summary of Active Pittman-Robertson Projects Operated in 1959-60


Project


W- 8-L

W'-l 1-R

W-13-C

W-15-D

W-19-R
W-22-R


Name


Charlotte County Game Man-
agement Area Acquisition.....
Charlotte County Quail Investi-
gation ................... ..
Wildlife Management Coordina-
tion ..................... ...
Habitat Restoration for Farm
Game ......................
Florida Waterfowl Survey. .....
Mourning Dove Study..........


W-27-R Eglin Field Deer Investigation...

W\-32-R Ocala Deer Investigation ......


W-33-R

W-35-D

W-39-R


W-41 -R


W-43-D


W-45-D

W-46-D
\V-47-D


Wildlife Inventory, Harvest and
Economic Survey ...........
North Florida Management Area
Development ................
Wildlife Investigation of the Cen-
tral and Southern Florida
Flood Control Project ........
Management Area Research ....


Wildlife Development of the Cen-
tral and Southern Florida
Flood Control Project........
South Florida Management Area
Development...............
Woodruff Reservoir Development
Guano River Development.......


FW-lI-R Cooperative Statistiell Project. .


Purpose


Exchange of land to consolidate
Commission holdings .........
To study ecology of South Flor-
ida quail .................. .
To administer and supervise pro-
gram ........... .... .....

To improve quail habitat.......
To study waterfowl ecology.....
To study dove populations and
migrations. .................
To study deer populations and
management ......... ...
To study deer populations and
management ................
To learn statewide harvest and
hunting pressures ............
To develop management areas in
north and central Florida.....

To development management
and operational methods......
To study game populations and
make management recommen-
dations.....................


To develop Everglades Area.....
To develop management areas in
South Florida ...............
To develop management area ...
To develop a waterfowl manage-
ment area through construc-
tion of dike and water control
structures...................
Statistical aid in research proj-
ects by the Institute of Sta-
tistics at North Carolina State
C college. ................... .


Es imated
Total Cost


None


5,000.00

24,500, 00

11,000.00
6,500.00

5,000.00

6,300.00

2,800.00

19,000.00

93,000.00


26,000.00


17,000.00


8,000.00

75,000.00
13,000.00



17,000.00



1,300.00

$330,400.00


PERSONNEL


Full time technicians .................. 18
Part time technicians ................... 1
Full time non-technical................ 23
Part time non-technical ................ 2


Bookkeeper ........................... 1
Secretarial.......................... 2
Half time secretarial ................... 1




































W-35-D, North Florida Management
Area Development
During the year 1958-59, work
plans were adhered to. The TD-18
repaired and maintained approxi-
mately 23 miles of roads on the Rich-
loam, Sumter and Gulf Hammock
areas. Project personnel repaired
and maintained boundary fences on
the Gulf Hammock, Steinhatchee,
Aucilla, Tomoka and Lake Butler
Areas, while food plot fences were
put up or repaired on 32 plots on
the Richloam, Citrus, Camp Bland-
ing, Steinhatchee and Aucilla areas.
Posting of boundary line was carried
out on the Gulf Hammock, Richloam,
Citrus, Farmton, Lake Butler, Camp
Blanding, Steinhatchee and Aucilla
areas. Twelve new gates were built,
and seven old gates were built or
repaired on the Gulf Hammock,
Farmton, Tomoka, Steinhatchee and
Aucilla areas. Checking stations


AU \VPI I1 IL8 M
were repaired or painted on the
Richloam, Farmton, Tomoka, Aucilla
and St. Marks areas, an equipment
shed was started on the St. Marks
area, and the shed on Lake Butler
was maintained by painting. Four
bridges were built on the Richloam,
Tomoka and Aucilla areas. Painting
of boundary posts was completed on
the Citrus area, and almost com-
pleted on the Aucilla area. At total
of 445 miles of fire lanes was plowed
on the Farmton and Tomoka areas,
and approximately 3,200 acres were
control burned on the Farmton,
Tomoka, Gaskin and Camp Bland-
ing areas. One hundred seventy food
plots were planted, limed or ferti-
lized or both, and planted in com-
bine pea, chufa, sweet suden, bur-
net, or grasses on all of the manage-
ment areas.
In 1959-60, current work plans
were practically completed on all


Table 6. Tabulation of Returns, Opinion Question on "Any Sex" Deer Season


District


I . . .
II. .........
III .........
IV .........
V .........

Total....


Total
Usable
Returns

718
650
683
741
663

3455


Total
Yes

477
405
355
461
453

2151


Per Cent
Yes

66.4
62.3
52.0
62.2
68.3

62.3


Total
No

140
154
188
158
128

768


Total
Per Cent Indiffer-
No ent

10.5 101
23.7 91
27.5 140
21.3 122
10.3 82

22.2 536
22.2 5361


Per Cent
Indiffer-
ent

14.1
14.0
20.5
16.5
12.4

15.5


areas. Weather and maintenance of
equipment delayed some develop-
ment and road work. Excessively
heavy rains throughout the first
quarter hampered field operations on
all management areas. During the
second quarter, personnel on all
management areas were primarily
concerned with preparation for and
operation of the annual controlled
hunts. In addition, fall planting of
oats, wheat, buckwheat and rye were
completed on 34 plots, totaling ap-
proximately 100 acres on the Citrus,
Croom, Farmton, Lake Butler, and
St. Marks areas.
On most management areas, the
early part of the third quarter was
devoted to closing of the annual
hunts and in cleaning and storage of
hunt equipment. The project leader
and several of the project personnel
conducted turkey trapping opera-
tions in Pinellas County, where 44
birds were caught and moved to
various management areas. The
project leader was also involved in
the release of Iranian pheasant, and
in attending watershed meetings
concerning the Green Swamp and
the Upper Josephine-Jackson Creek
areas. During the remainder of the
quarter, most of the management
areas were involved with routine
maintenance of facilities, and with
spring planting operations.
During the course of the year,
project personnel built one new
bridge and repaired two bridges on
the Tomoka and Gulf Hammock
areas. Approximately 100 miles of
road were maintained on the Gulf
Hammock, Tomoka, Farmton and
Aucilla areas. Boundary fences were
checked and repaired on the Gulf
Hammock, Tomoka, Lake Butler.
Steinhatchee and Aucilla areas. Two
new and 26 old food plot fences were
erected or maintained on the Rich-
loam, Croom, Gulf Hammock, Farm-
ton, Lake Butler, and Aucilla areas.
Boundaries of all areas were checked
for replacement of small posted
signs. Forty-eight signs were routed
by Camp Blanding project person-
nel and distributed to the various
areas. Painting of posts for bound-
ary identification was carried out on
the Tomoka and Aucilla areas. Ap-
proximately 225 food plots were
planted, fertilized, mowed and main-
tained in Pensacola bahia, combine
pea and chufas on the Richloam,
Citrus, Gulf Hammock, Farmton,


I_







Camp Blanding, Steinhatchee, Gas-
kin and Blackwater areas. Twenty
turkey feeders were maintained on
the Richloam, Croom, Citrus, Gulf
Hammock, and Lake Butler areas,
and 125 quail feeders were main-
tained on the Camp Blanding, Croom
and Blackwater areas.
One new equipment shed was
built on the Farmton Area, and other
equipment sheds were painted or
maintained on the Gulf Hammock,
Lake Butler, Camp Blanding and
Aucilla areas. Checking stations
were repaired and maintained on the
Steinhatchee, Aucilla and St. Marks
areas. Ten new gates and 26 existing
gates were built and repaired on the
Gulf Hammock, Steinhatchee and
Aucilla areas.

W-39-R, Wildlife Investigation of
the Central and Southern Florida
Flood Control Project
During the biennium, liaison was
maintained with the Central and
Southern Florida Flood Control Dis-
trict, Corps of Engineers, Fish and
Wildlife Service, Soil Conservation
Service, U. S. Geological Survey.
Agricultural Research Service, Trus-
tees of the Internal Improvement
Fund, Department of Conservation,
State Land Use and Control
Commission, Florida Development
Commission, other branches of the
Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission, Florida Wildlife Federation,
and various organized and unor-
ganized groups.
One particularly difficult problem
has been the continued construction
of camp buildings by trespassers in
Areas 2 and 3. In addition to other
factors, it was found by the Broward
and Dade County Health Depart-
ments that these camps constituted
a potential health menace and should
not be condoned. Consideration was
given to the transfer of all camps to
a central location in order to ex-
pedite administration and perhaps
facilitate the meeting of health re-
quirements as required by the state
sanitary code. After post project
water conditions were described, and
after costs for the necessary fill were
estimated, it became apparent that
such a plan was not feasible. As a
result, at the May 16 official meeting
of the Commission, a resolution was
passed which directed that all camps
within the two conservation areas
must be removed.


During 1958-59, a cooperative pro-
gram with the Florida Trustees of
the Internal Improvement Fund was
formulated regarding fresh water
lake bottoms and shorelines. In es-
sence, all applications received by
the Trustees' office requesting dredg-
ing or filling or otherwise altering
of these lake bottoms and shorelines
would be referred to our Commis-
sion for review before final action
was taken. This program has pro-
ceeded smoothly, and during the past
six months fourteen applications
were received, field inspections made
and recommendations given.
Deer and waterfowl harvest was
low during 1958-59 as compared with
other periods. In the case of deer, it
was occasioned by a reduced herd
as a result of high water in 1957-58.
The deer harvest was estimated to
be about 350 legal bucks for 3,500
man-days of hunting.
Mr. C. M. Loveless resigned from
the project in September to return
to school and was replaced by Mr.
Norman F. Schlaack, Jr. Mr. Wm.
Ware was called to active duty with
the U. S. Navy in June and was
given a 90-day leave of absence.
Four years of deer investigation
by Mr. Loveless resulted in the pub-
lication of a 104-page Technical Bul-
letin No. 6 by the Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission titled "The
Everglades Deer Herd Life History
and Management." Mr. Schlaack
prepared a comprehensive report


titled "Waterfowl in the Everglades
Wildlife Management Area," which
was a compilation of data accumu-
lated by project personnel during
the past five years. Mr. Ligas pre-
pared a comprehensive report titled
"The Everglades Bullfrog Life His-
tory and Management" which docu-
ments findings resulting from a five
year study of this resource.
It was estimated that 75% of the
Everglades Management Area was
flooded and made unsuitable for deer
during the past summer and fall.
The deer population for the man-
agement area in December, 1959,
was believed to total not more than
1,000. High water resulted in over-
browsing and subsequent starvation,
and dead deer were found on most
of the islands in the north end of
Area 3. It was estimated that 50%
to 75% of the 1959 fawn crop was
lost. Sixteen deer jaws obtained
from dead deer showed that few
adult deer died. Twelve of the 16
dead deer were nine months old, or
younger, two were 18 months of age
and two were two years old.
The weights and measurements of
38 bucks and two doe deer were ob-
tained during the past deer season.
Computed live weights (based on
dressed weights) showed that the
average weight was 117.5 pounds,
which compared with 118.3 pounds
for the 1957-58 season and 111.9
pounds for the 1958-59 season.
Five aerial waterfowl censuses








Table 7. Estimated Number of Resident Licensed Hunters of Each
Species During the 1958-59 Hunting Season as Determined by the Post-
Season Random Mail Survey.


DISTRICT
Species -
I II III IV

Deer ............... 11,000 13,000 11,200 9,000
Turkey............. 9,700 5,600 8,200 5,300
Quail............... 17,600 13,500 14,000 9,100
Squirrel ............ 18,000 18,800 25,400 4,400
Dove (Early)........ 11,800 9,000 13,400 10,000
Dove (Late) ........ 10,400 8,200 8,300 6,700
Duck............... 7,700 5,800 7,800 6,900
Coot .............. 1,600 1,500 1,500 2,700
Goose ............. .. 300 600 1,500 200
Marsh Hen......... 1,200 1,500 900 1,500
Snipe............... 4,000 1,700 1,800 3,800

Number of Licenses.. 35,100 30,500 38,500 21,100


V

15,300
7,500
13,700
18,100
8,400
6,700
11,300
5,500
400
1,000
2,600

33.700


State
Total

59,500
36,300
67,900
84,700
52,600
92,900
39,500
12,800
3,000
6,100
13,900

158,900


Table 8. Estimated Total Man-Days of Hunting Pressure Expended for
Each Species by Resident Licensed Hunters During the 1958-59 Hunting
Season, as Determined by the Post-Season Random Mail Survey.


Species


Deer ..............
Turkey............
Quail ..............
Squirrel.............
Dove (Early).......
Dove (Late) .......
Dove (Total) ......
Duck ..... ........
C oot...............
Goose ............ .
Marsh Hen .........
Snipe ...............


DISTRICT

I II III


68,700
49,700
132,100
95,200
71,800
58,100
129,900
32,000
4,400
500
3,200
11,000


78,000
28,000
103,400
141,000
44,500
44,700
89,200
31,800
5,000
1,300
4,600
4.800


54,900
41,100
113,700
190,800
71,900
37,400
109,300
43,800
7,500
5,100
2,800
11.000


IV

48,300
25,300
72,500
20,000
70,300
41,800
112,100
39,500
12,700
500
7,200
12,000


V

92,300
44,500
92,900
118,400
43,000
31,800
74,800
66,200
30,400
2,400
2,900
7,600


State
Total

342,200
188,600
514,600
565,400
301,500
213,800
515,300
213,300
60,000
9,800
20,700
46,400


Table 9. Estimated Total Kill of Each Species by Resident Licensed Hunters
During the 1958-59 Hunting Season, as Determined by the Post Season
Random Mail Survey.


Species


D eer...............
Turkey............
Quail ..............
Squirrel...........
Dove (Early)........
Dove (Late)........
Dove (Total) .......
D uck...............
Coot. ..............
G oose ..............
Marsh Hen .........
Snipe ...............


I

2,000
6,300
515,500
261,200
270,700
229,700
500,400
60,700
18,100
300
4,900
33,700


II

3,000
2,100
354,600
397,000
179,800
164,600
344,400
53,300
18,700
200
25,400
10,100


DISTRICT

III

2,700
5,400
390,000
454,900
277,200
153,900
431,100
75,300
11,700
700
5,100
11,200


IV

2,400
2,200
262,900
38,600
283,600
165,900
449,500
78,700
25,100
000
10,300
37,300


3,600
4,800
328,700
336,100
163,900
119,100
283,000
132,900
86,600
300
8,600
23,000


State
Total

13,700
20,800
1,851,700
1,487,800
1,175,200
833,200
2,008,400
400,900
160,200
1,500
54,300
115.300


~


Y


conducted during the winter months
revealed that greater numbers of
waterfowl were present than during
1958-59, with coots being the domi-
nant species. Blue-winged teal and
ring-necked ducks showed a consid-
erable increase.
The 1959-60 harvest of waterfowl
in the conservation areas was esti-
mated to be 200 ducks and 300 coots.
Deer and hog hunting took place in
the Everglades only during the last
two weekends of the year, because
of high water conditions. The esti-
mated kill for Areas 2 and 3 was 100
deer and 50 hogs.
Continued high water thinned out
extensive sawgrass stands and in-
creased the amount of white water-
lily, spatterdock, pickerel weed and
sagittaria. Certain desirable duck
foods, such as curly pondweed, naias
and vallisn,-ia, increased in both
Areas 2 and 3.
A coordinated water control plan
was put into effect in Conservation
Area 2 by the Central and Southern
Florida Flood Control District, Corps
of Engineers and the Commission in
an effort to maintain minimum water
levels to preserve the existing out-
standing fishery.
Engineering plans were completed
for the interior levee and its ap-
purtenant structures in Conserva-
tion Area 2, and construction com-
menced. A number of construction
features were incorporated in the
final design to meet the needs of the
game and fish management program,
and to provide for future recrea-
tional facilities at a cost approaching
one quarter million dollars. Similar
work by project personnel has re-
sulted in action by the Corps of
Engineers and C&SFFCD to provide
similar recreational facilities on
other areas. This is felt to be an
outstanding accomplishment.


W-41-R, Management Area
Research
During 1958-59, work was carried
on in all phases of this study. All
jobs were discussed in the annual
report with the exception of the in-
vestigations in natural food plots in
cypress swamps and hydric ham-
mocks. Due to pressures of other
activities, the only work done on
this phase was to select sites for the
various study areas.
Deer track counts were conducted








on those management areas where
this census technique is applicable.
Sight observations and poult counts
indicated very poor turkey hatching
success in the spring of 1958, and the
analysis of the sex and age ratios of
the turkey harvest and the turkeys
taken during the past trapping sea-
son verified these estimates. While
it is well established that at the
present turkey population census
methods are inadequate, it is felt
that with careful observation of
spring precipitation, coupled with
field observations and poult counts,
a trend can be predicted, or at least
observed, while it is taking place.
Examination of 423 deer stomach
samples showed that mushrooms and
deer's-tongue were among the ten
most preferred foods over the six
year study. Saw palmetto berries,
gallberry leaves and twigs and ber-
ries, Virginia willow leaves and
twigs, bamboo briar leaves and vines
and berries, and black titi leaves and
twigs occurred in the preferred list
five times during the six year study.
Some species of acorns occurred
among the first ten preferred foods
throughout the study.
The large number and variety of
food items taken indicates that the
wild turkey is quite omnivorous, op-
portunistic, and ready to take ad-
vantage of almost any potential food
item that might present itself. There-
fore, the occurrence of large quanti-
ties of a given item in turkey crops
one year is not necessarily evidence
that the item is a preferred food.
Important foods were acorns, cab-
bage, palm berries, green vegetation,
grasshoppers, chufas, wax myrtle,
black gum, cypress, pine seed, carpet
grass, panic grass, and Ilex glabra.
The most valuable habitat for both
deer and turkey in the Collier Man-
agement Area is the cabbage palm-
pine hammock. However, the amount
of this habitat is limited. The greater
portion of the Collier Wildlife Man-
agement Area is covered by cypress
swamp. The margins of the cypress
swamp and the transition zones
where it meets pine-palmetto flat-
woods are of much greater value
than the interiors of large cypress
strands. Therefore, the value of an
extensive cypress area as deer and
turkey habitat depends largely upon
the degree to which it is interspersed
with islands of pine-palmetto flat-


Table 10. Estimated Number of Resident Licensed Hunters of Each
Species During the 1959-60 Hunting Season as Determined by the Post-
Season Random Mail Survey.


Species


D eer..............
Turkey ...........
Quail ............. .
Squirrel. .............
Dove (Earlvy) ........
Dove (Late) ........
Duck ..... .........
Coot ..............
Goose. .............
Marsh Hen .........
Snipe...............
Bear ..............

Number of Licenses..


i-
I

11,200
10,500
17,000
14,900
10,300
9,400
4,300
1,100
200
900
3,000
600

33.900


DISTRICT

II III IV Vy

13,100 10,600 7,400 15,800
5,500 7,500 4,400 6,900
13,400 15,500 8,300 15,000
20,300 25,900 3,300 18,000
8,700 13,500 8,000 8,600
8,300 9,900 5,400 8,000
4,600 6,700 4,600 6,600
1,200 1,200 1,400 2,500
400 1,100 200 600
900 700 1,100 1,300
1.500 1,800 1,900 1,700
700 100 400 1,200

31,300 38,700 19,000 35,200


State
Total

58,100
34,800
69,200
82,400
49,100
41,000
26,800
7,400
2,500
4,900
9,900
3,000

158,100


Table 11. Estimated Total Man-Days of Hunting Pressure Expended
for Each Species by Resident Licensed Hunters During the 1959-60 Hunt-
ing Season, as Determined by the Post-Season Random Mail Survey.


Species


Deer ..............
Turkey. ............
Quail.......... .....
Squirrel ............
Dove (Early) ........
Dove (Late)........
Dove (Total) ........
Duck .............
C oot ...............
Goose ..............
Marsh Hen .........
Snipe ...............
Bear...............


I

78,000
51,300
164,500
90,300
46,700
44,600
91,300
15,200
4,200
400
2,300
7,700
21,000


DISTRICT

II III


105,000
35,000
90,900
129,500
42,000
43,000
85,000
23,100
3,100
1,200
2,300
3,200
4.500


77,600
41,600
128,700
205,200
64,400
48,700
113,100
36,000
6,600
3,800
1,200
4,900
200


46,300
22,900
55,600
12,000
42,600
29,300
71,900
21,100
6,000
400
4,200
6,400
1,600


V

148,100
42,200
112,100
118,400
44,800
42,000
86,800
35,900
9,200
2,000
3,800
6,500
8,300


State
Total


455,000
193,000
551,800
555,400
240,800
207,600
448,100
131,300
29,100
7,800
13,800
28,700
16,700


Table 12. Estimated Total Kill of Each Species by Resident Licensed Hunt-
ers During the 1959-60 Hunting Season as Determined by the Post-Season
Random Mail Survey.


Species


D eer ..............
Turkey. ...........
Quail ...............
Squirrel ............
Dove (Early) ......
Dove (Late) ...... .
Dove (Total) ........
Duck ........ ....
C oot ..............
G oose ............ .
Marsh Hen.........
Snipe. ............. .


I II


1,200
5,800
566,900
239,900
167,900
182,000
349,900
30,800
7,000
100
4,500
31,300


3,000
3,400
365,500
356,800
190,700
187.200
377,900
33,400
9,800
300
9,200
7,800


DISTRICT

III

1,800
4,100
368,300
489,200
247,300
187,200
434,500
52,400
11,800
1,300
2,400
6,700


IV V

2,200 3,900
3,000 4,300
159,800 357,800
31,000 302,700
149,500 146,400
101,800 138,300
251,300 284,700
34,400 60,700
9,600 21,500
200 500
8,600 11,200
19,800 18,400


State
Total

12,100
20,600
1,818,300
1,419,600
901,800
796,500
1,698,300
211,700
59,700
2,400
35,900
84,000








































woods or cabbage palm-pine ham-
mocks.
Study plots have been established
within the "Corkscrew Swamp
Sanctuary" to study the effects of
burning and grazing in this type of
habitat. Plant species as well as
abundance was recorded.
Wildlife habitat recommendations
were formulated for the three ranger
districts in the Apalachicola National
Forest. Considerable work was done
in pine site preparation areas in the
Leon District.
The University of Florida and the
University of Georgia coordinated
their efforts on the deer disease
study in 1959-60. A similarity be-
tween the abnormal hemoglobin in
deer and humans has prompted the
U. S. Health Service to contribute
to the investigation. The outbreak
of cattle tick fever has stimulated
investigation into means of control
other than the killing of deer in the
area of occurrence.
Gobbling counts in the Collier
Area indicated that a higher and
more constant population of turkeys
was present in the feeder area than
in the check area. The improved
design of feeders minimized feeder


losses and maintained a source of
food during periods of scarcity. This
type of operation can be of definite
value to turkey populations in mar-
ginal habitat in south Florida and
other parts of the state where food
supply is a limiting factor.


W-43-D, Wildlife Development of
the Central and Southern Florida
Flood Control Project
During 1958-59, project activities
closely followed the approved work
plan. Mr. Ware and Mr. Cone de-
voted the major portion of their time
to the job assignments, and also as-
sisted W-39-R personnel in collecting
hunt season data and in other activi-
ties. In May, Mr. Cone resigned.
Two additional temporary employees
were hired in June. These person-
nel will devote their full time to boat
trail construction in Conservation
Area 2.
The total length of boat trails cut
in the southern portion of Conserva-
tion Area 2 was approximately 15
miles. These trails were widened,
straightened, and open channels
maintained through water hyacinth
and other vegetation. Eight large
4'x4' management area access signs


were built and lettered. The man-
agement area boundaries were re-
checked throughout the year, and
signs replaced as required.
Approximately 7,300 gallons of
herbicide mixture were used during
the year for the control of water
hyacinth and alligator weed. Main-
tenance was performed on 10 major
items of equipment which included
three airboats, four vehicles, an Oli-
ver tractor, a swamp buggy, and the
Rotary Marsh Digger. Miscellaneous
other items such as power spray unit
and attachments, outboard motor,
and trailers were maintained. One
portable checking station was also
constructed.
The Rotary Marsh Digger was
used extensively during the first
half of the year 1959-60 because of
unusually favorable water level con-
ditions. By July, 1960, approxi-
mately 40 miles of trails had been
cut and improved in the southern
portion of Area 2.
Approximately 20 miles of bound-
ary were posted along the Tamiami
Trail at the south end of Area 3. A
number of large management area
signs was constructed and erected at
the major access points. ADproxi-
mately 250 gallons of 2,4-D were
used to control hyacinths along the
shore line of Area 2 to permit access
for canepole fishermen.

W-45-D, South Florida Management
Area Development
During 1958-59, all areas were
visited periodically and all project
personnel were contacted regarding
general administration, job comple-
tion schedules and preparation for
and operation of the public hunts on
the management areas. The project
leader met with landowners of the
Corbett, Devil's Garden, Fisheating
Creek, Lee, Collier, Avon Park and
Okeechobee management areas.
There were five checking stations
moved to new locations on south
Florida management areas and 25
check stations were maintained.
There were 608 quail feeders and 20
turkey feeders maintained and oper-
ated on south Florida management
areas during this period and approx-
imately 117,500 acres underwent con-
trolled burning. Approximately 250
acres of food plots have been planted
and fertilized on these areas and all
sho w e d excellent utilization by
game.


jl







On the J. W. Corbett area, the
south boundary fence and the grade
were completed, fulfilling this part
of the obligation of the Pratt-Whit-
ney Corporation. There were 178
wild cows removed from the Com-
mission-owned land in the Corbett
Area, and the Palm Beach Wildlife
Conservation League released 16
Wisconsin deer there. There were
192 turkeys trapped from the Fish-
eating Creek and Highlands areas
and released for restocking purposes
throughout the State. On the Cecil
M. Webb area, there is an estimated
76,500 cubic yards of shell material
stockpiled, and in addition about
20,000 yards have been sold. Fence
repair and spot posting on the per-
imeter fences of all south Florida
management areas has been accom-
plished where necessary.
The project leader and Assistant
Leader Jones, in 1959-60, vacated the
Lantana office and set up office op-
erations in the new regional office
building, built by the Commission
in West Palm Beach, and a branch
project office was established on the
Avon Park Management Area in a
building leased from the U. S. Air
Force.
Considerable time was spent by
the project leader supervising a spe-
cial cooperative project between the
Fort Myers Rod and Gun Club and
the Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission. During the month of
October, 80 dog kennels and 24
covered horse stables were con-
structed on the Cecil M. Webb Wild-
life Management Area field trial
grounds, and, in November, the Fort
Myers Rod and Gun Club utilized
these facilities in sponsoring the first
annual all-Southern Field Trial.
The turkey trapping season netted
176 turkeys that were distributed
on the various management areas.
Eight turkeys were flown to Texas
for a deer trade.
There were 24 checking stations
maintained and operated on south
Florida management areas. Approxi-
mately 230 acres of food plots were
planted and maintained. There were
607 quail feeders and 24 turkey feed-
ers maintained, and approximately
100,000 acres underwent controlled
burning.
An aerial fertilization experiment
was tried on the J. W. Corbett Area.
Fence repair and spot posting on the


r- ~ *~~rl


perimeter fences of all south Florida
management areas has been accom-
plished where necessary.

W-46-D. Woodruff Reservoir
Development
Following water draw-down op-
erations the previous year, approxi-
mately 20 acres of Jap millet were
planted in one of the subimpound-
ment areas in 1958-59. Growth and
seed production was quite satisfac-
tory. This planting was inundated
from a depth of 0-12 inches during
the first half of November. Smart-
weed was seeded in this subim-
poundment in June of this year, im-
mediately following water draw-
down. However, there was little ger-
mination of the seed, although they
were sacrified before planting.
The establishment of plantings for
geese and upland game has consisted
of planting agricultural crops
through cropping leases and share
crop agreements with farmers. Ap-
proximately 440 acres were leased
for such cropping last year, and 320
acres in 1958-59. Under share crop
agreements, the cropper leaves half
the crop of corn in the field unhar-
vested, and plants oats or rye on the
land from which he removes his half.


The corn which is left unharvested
is knocked down with a rotary
mower.
A dwelling for the project assist-
ant, and an equipment shed, were
constructed on the area during the
year.
Earth plugs. with 36-inch culvert
pipes equipped with sliding head-
gates were installed in two ditches
for the purpose of water level con-
trol in subimpoundments. The shore
line of these subimpoundments will
be planted to chufas and Jap millet.
Valves in the pipes will be closed
in the fall to permit inundation of
the plantings.
The hunt on the area in the 1958-
59 season was quite successful. There
was a total kill of 1,271 ducks, 22
coots, 360 quail, 74 squirrels, 80
doves, and 22 snipe. Between 5,000
and 6,000 ducks and 150 to 200 geese
wintered on the area.
The sides of two dams that were
placed in drainage ditches were
sand-bagged in 1959-60 to prevent
blowing out in times of high water.
Some tributary ditching was done
in order to permit water level con-
trol in subimpoundments within the
management area. The three major
impoundment areas are now con-
























nected with ditches.
Approximately 20 acres of Jap
millet were planted on the area for
ducks. A 10-acre island field of fes-
cue grass and ladino clover was
planted for geese in the fall of 1959.
In addition to this, there were ap-
proximately 60 acres of oats and corn
available as goose pasturage. Ap-
parently due to the limited number
of wintering birds on the area, all
waterfowl food plantings were util-
ized only slightly. There were only
about 50 geese on the area, and
1,000 2,000 ducks. Approximately
1,000 acres of land were controlled
burned during February and March
for upland game habitat improve-
ment. Approximately 400 acres of
agricultural crops were planted in
1959-60 through cropping leases and
share crop agreements with farmers.
Approximately 100 acres of cattails
have been sprayed with Dowpon.
This plant threatens to take all shal-
low water areas within the manage-
ment area.
Hunting success on the area in
1959-60 was poor, due to a low win-
tering duck population. Game killed
consisted of 239 ducks, 36 coots, 242
.' .^,


quail, 114 doves, 35 squirrel, and 15
snipe. Geese, turkey, and deer are
protected.
Two duck traps were constructed
and set on the area following hunt-
ing season. Eighty-four ringnecks
were trapped, banded, sexed, and re-
leased.
Twenty wild trapped Canada
geese were obtained from St. Marks
Refuge in March, pinioned, and re-
leased in the island enclosure to
serve as decoys in attracting wild
flocks. Six of these birds died short-
ly after being released due to par-
alysis developed while being penned
at St. Marks.
W-47-D. Guano River Development
Since the completion of the 1700
foot earth dam and control structure
in mid-April of 1957, over 2,200 acres
of potentially excellent waterfowl
habitat have been created. Stabilized
water levels and the freshening of
the water in the past year has re-
duced vast areas of undesirable sa-
line aquatic plants as cordgrass
(Spartina alterniflora; S. patens),
black needlerush (Juncus roemer-
ianus) and saltgrass (Distichlis spi-
cata) creating openings for more de-
,


sirable waterfowl food plants. The
area will be managed essentially for
submerged brackish water plants im-
portant as waterfowl foods.
Heavy rainfall and the opening of
the water control drop logs for six
days in March to relieve possible
flood conditions in the Ponte Vedra
residential area 20 miles upstream,
unfortunately lowered the desired
salinity of 20 to 30 per cent sea
strength within the impoundment.
Salinity readings in March showed
a high for the area of 10 per cent
sea strength. Water levels stabilized
at 4.4 feet at the dam gauge, com-
pared to 3.0 feet one year ago. The
desired average water depth of 2
to 3 feet was reached.
Water quality tests and vegetation
occurrences were taken at nine equi-
distant stations in late May for com-
parison with similar data accumu-
lated in May 1958. Salinity tests
showed that, for all practical pur-
poses, the 10 mile long area may be
considered as five miles of brackish
water and five miles of fresh water
waterfowl habitat, for the lower and
upper extremities respectively. Later
observations found good to excellent
growths of widgeon grass along the
southeastern borders.
Two sloughs on the peninsula
selected by previous investigators as
the most suitable areas for water
draw-down, and planting operations
were surveyed in June to determine
the most feasible means of managing
for waterfowl food plantings. Exist-
ing vegetation, natural drainage, and
the overall scope of the area was
noted. Possible future improvements
and management procedures for the
peninsula's dozen or more sloughs
were also taken into account.
Sprigging and seeding of Bermuda
grass on the dam was accomplished
in 1958. The entire dam was again
fertilized in April, 1959. The grass
is now well established on the north
slope of the dam and has proven to
be an excellent soil stabilizer for this
area.
Approximately 3,000 coot and 500
to 700 ducks populated the area dur-
ing the third quarter of 1958-59.
Three pairs of lesser scaup as well
as 12 coot are still utilizing the area.
No nest nor brood occurrences have
been observed for these species.
One brood of five wood ducks has
been observed, and reliable reports






indicate at least three more broods
in the impounded area.
Work during 1959-60 consisted of
filling washouts on the dam, repair-
ing the control structure, installation
of an automatic tide gate, preserva-
tive treatment on the control struc-
ture and scraping and painting the
stop logs. The grass was mowed on
the dam and fertilized with 6-6-6
commercial fertilizer at the rate of
300 pounds to the acre. Two ditches
were developed and each installed
with a 16-foot drain culvert with
sliding gate valve for draining two
fresh water sloughs to be developed
in waterfowl food plantings. The
northern ditch was seeded with 100
pounds of common rye grass. The
rye grass failed to establish. Both
ditches were fertilized with 6-6-6 at
300 pounds per acre and seeded with
common Bermuda grass at 30
pounds per acre and raked in. Both
ditches are draining satisfactorily.
Jap millet planted in the fall of 1959
resulted in dwarf fruiting plants
with a very limited seed production.
Failure is presumed to be the result
of a late planting and low soil fer-
tility. Approximately 7.0 miles of
road were developed or improved to
provide dry access to the planted
sloughs. Fences were repaired and
boundary signs replaced as needed.
A second introductory planting of
widgeon grass established this water-
fowl food plant within the southern
six miles of the impoundment. Sta-
bilized high water levels and reduc-
tion of the salinity of the impounded
water have effectively eliminated the
majority of undesirable saltmarsh
vegetation. Approximately 90 acres
of tropical cattail were sprayed by
helicopter applying Dowpon at a
rate of 20 pounds acid equivalent per
acre. Water quality tests and vegeta-
tion analysis were taken in the im-
poundment for comparison with
similar samples taken in 1958 and
1959. The impoundment was cover
mapped for comparison with cover
mapping accomplished in 1957. Salt
water was let in during June for the
first time in two years. Salinity
readings r o s e to 6.0-6.5(X sea
strength, compared to 2.0/ sea
strength in early June. It is sue-
gested that two additional auto tide
gates be installed to facilitate future
intake of salt water.
Six wild turkeys were trans-


planted to the peninsula from south
Florida. Although still on the area,
they apparently did not reproduce
in 1959-60. Fourteen hogs trapped
from the peninsula were trans-
planted to the J. W. Corbett Wildlife
Management Area.
Waterfowl densities on the im-
poundment indicate utilization at
716.2 waterfowl days per acre. Cal-
culations were based on aerial sur-
veys from November, 1959, through
March, 1960, except for ground pop-
ulation estimates taken for the
month of January. All species of
waterfowl common to north Florida,
including Canada and blue geese,
were observed utilizing the area.
Fall migration started with occur-
rences of blue-winged teal, pintail
and baldpate in early September.
Major fall migrations occurred on
October 18-19 and November 18.
Spring migration started with major
pushes of scaup on March 17. Peak
populations on the area reached an
estimated 30,000 birds during spring
migration, and the average winter
population was 10,000 birds.
Fresh water fishing and salt water




miami


.- I i
fishing have skyrocketed the area in
popularity.


FW-1-R, Cooperative Statistical
Project
Early in fiscal year 1959-60, Flori-
da, in cooperation with other south-
eastern states, contracted with the
Institute of Statistics at North Caro-
lina State College to work out statis-
tically reliable methods of gathering
data needed in the operation of all
state fish and game departments. The
primary concern has been in connec-
tion with surveys of harvest, pres-
sure, activity, and populations. Work
performed has been in basic me-
thodology and through consultation.
During the first year of the proj-
ect, Florida perhaps took greater
advantage of its facilities than did
any other state. At least, Florida
used 171/ days of consulting time,
while Georgia used 13 and North
Carolina and Tennessee used 9%
days each. One fish and one game
biologist f r o m Florida attended
the workshop held in Raleigh in
February. I
.&.-A IF A !** If



































THE Fiscal Division has a variety
of important tasks, and is rated
as a major division of the general
administration of the Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission.
The Fiscal Division is held respon-
sible for the accountability of all
funds which comprise the State
Game Fund and from which the
Commission operates. The Division
is also responsible for budgetary
planning, in cooperation with appro-
priate staff officers, and governs the
expenditures in proportion to reve-
nue income so as to properly carry


out the approved conservation pro-
gram over the entire state.
Other major duties of the Division
include distribution of licenses to
the County Judges, checking and
submission of invoices, recording of
arrests and fees, administration of
property and property records and
controls, and the sale of commercial
licenses.
REVENUE
The revenue from which the Com-
mission operates is derived mainly
from the sale of hunting and fishing
licenses, both sport and commercial.


- a Ciy Ri ic idi C r

Panama City Regional Office Building Completed After Biennium


_ I.


Lake City Regional Office Building Constructed 1958-59



FISCAL



DIVISION





In sport licenses, it is interesting
to note the trends of license sales as
compared to the previous biennium
-1956-58, and the current biennium
under report-1958-60:
In resident hunting licenses, there
was an increase of 27,700 licenses,
from the 1956-58 total sale of 289,320
to the 1958-60 total sale of 317,020.
In non-resident hunting licenses,
there was a decrease of 198 licenses,
with 4,594 being sold in 1956-58 and
4,396 being sold in 1958-60. Such a
decrease may suggest that the Com-
mission should devise adequate pro-
grams to better attract and service
the non-resident hunters.
In resident fishing licenses, there
was an increase of 109,558 licenses,
from the 1956-58 total of 605,985 to
the 1958-60 total of 715,543.
In non-resident fishing licenses,
there was a decrease of 8,172 li-
censes, with 360,714 licenses sold in
1956-58, and 352,542 being sold in
1958-60. Again, the decrease in non-
resident license sales suggest that
the Commission needs to devise ade-
quate programs to better attract and
service the non-resident fishermen
so as to meet the competition of
neighboring states.
Since tourism has always been
held to be one of the two major econ-
omies of the state-the other being
agriculture-it is evident that the
Commission could make a substan-
tial contribution to increasing the
tourism economy by better catering
to the tourist fisherman and hunter.
Other revenue of the Commission
results from leasing of rights for
timber, oil, grazing, stumpage and
marl on Commission property. Addi-
tional revenue comes from the sale
of Commission-owned equipment, no
longer suitable for use, and from
court case fees resulting from ar-
rests for violations of the fish and
game laws.
Contrary to general opinion, the
State Game Fund from which the
Commission is operated does not re-
ceive any money from the state gen-
eral tax revenue. The reason for
this is stated in the Constitutional
Amendment which created the Com-
mission and established it as a self-
supporting agency.

JOEL McKINNON
-CHIEF-







It should be pointed out, however,
that in past years the Florida Legis-
lature has appropriated monies for
control of noxious weeds and for
fisheries improvement. Expenditures
of these monies are administered by
the Commission under control of the
State Cabinet and Budget Commis-
sion.
The Commission also receives re-
imbursements from the Federal Gov-
ernment under the Pittman-Robert-
son program for aid to game man-
agement, and the Dingell-Johnson
program for aid to fisheries manage-
ment. The amount received each
year is based partially upon the total
number of fishing and hunting li-
cense holders in the state for the
previous year or years.
In considering revenue, it is inter-
esting to note that the Commission's
revenue showed increases in all ma-
jor categories when the 1958-60 reve-
nue is compared to the 1956-58 reve-
nue.
Sales of fishing licenses showed a
revenue increase of $110,042.50, from
the 1956-58 total of $1,665,520.25 to
the 1958-60 total of $1,775,562.75.
Sales of hunting licenses showed a
revenue increase of $153,446.00, from
the 1956-58 total of $1,352,434.50 to
the 1958-60 total of $1,505,880.50.
Sales of commercial licenses
showed a revenue increase of $5,-
175.75, from the 1956-58 total of
$71,185.60 to the 1958-60 total of
$76,361.35.
Revenue from court costs in-
creased $13,987.46, from the 1956-58
total of $56,383.27 to the 1958-60
total of $70,370.73.
A note of caution is to be found
in comparing the increases of reve-
nue for the two biennial periods to
the increases of expenditures for the
same two biennial periods. The bi-
ennial revenue increased $284,359.15,
from the 1956-58 revenue total of $4,-
387,112.64 to the 1958-60 revenue
total of $4,671,471.79. At the same
time, the biennial expenditures, to
meet rising costs of materials and
services, increased $374,957.29, from
the 1956-58 expenditure total of $4,-
339,422.14 to the 1958-60 total of
$4,714,379.43.
ARRESTS AND FEES
The Fiscal Division is responsible
for the recording of all fish and
game arrests, and, when each case
is disposed by the courts, the Fis-


cal Division must bill the respective
county for the arresting fees and
mileage allowances as provided by
law.
During the 1958-60 biennium, a
total of 6,935 arrests were made by
our Wildlife Officers, with 390 cases
left pending, and 6,545 disposed.
Total revenue in court costs was
$70,370.73 for the biennial period
1958-60.
These figures show that the Fiscal
Division had to record the details
for 6,935 arrests, and bill the respec-
tive 67 counties for 6,545 cases dis-
posed of, and then record the $70,-
370.73 in revenue in proper fashion.
LICENSES
One portion of the Fiscal Divi-
sion's varied duties includes the re-
sponsibility for checking the reports
of the 67 county judges relative to
the sales of fishing and hunting li-
censes and various permits. The ac-
countability for all licenses printed


by the Commission at the beginning
of the year is a major responsibility
of the Fiscal Division, and the rec-
ords must in turn be verified by the
State Auditing Department. The is-
suing of licenses to the County
Judges offices, and the printing and
composition of same, is also handled
by the Fiscal Division.
INVOICES
For each expenditure of $25.00 or
more made by any division or em-
ployee of the Commission, a Com-
mission purchase order is issued.
This control factor is extremely im-
portant in the proper distribution
of Commission funds, and in the im-
plementation of approved programs.
After the expenditure has been
made, each invoice submitted to the
Commission for payment must be
carefully checked by the Fiscal Di-
vision with reference to totals and
extensions. The invoices are then
submitted to the State Comptroller
1 .4


Ocala Regional Office Building Constructed 1959-60


West Palm Beach Regional Office Constructed 1959-60







for issuance of the warrant drawn
against the State Game Fund.

COMMERCIAL LICENSES
The Fiscal Division also handles
the sales of commercial licenses,
which are sold at the Tallahassee
office upon receipt of the applica-
tion by the buyer. These include the
Retail and Wholesale Fish Dealer's
licenses, the Commercial Boat li-
censes, the Boats for Hire licenses,
the Game Farm and Guide licenses,
and other similar licenses. The li-
censes, which are renewable at the
end of each fiscal year, are for-
warded directly to the applicant.

PROPERTY CONTROLS
Another important section of the
Fiscal Division is the Property Sec-
tion, which has the responsibility
of recording all purchases of equip-
ment. When a piece of property is
purchased, the Property Officer is-
sues and records property memo-
randum receipts, which itemize the
property involved, the condition of
the property, and the employee or
office to which it is issued.
The Property Officer makes pe-
riodic state-wide equipment inspec-
tions in order to keep the costs of
operation on all types of equipment
to a minimum.


Operational costs reports are
maintained for each piece of vehicle
equipment, which reports help de-
termine facts as to proper operation
and appropriate time of sale and re-
placement. In turn, such informa-
tion assists in determining wise pur-
chases of proper equipment.

NEW BUILDINGS
During the biennial period, three
new regional office headquarters
buildings were constructed, and
planning for the fourth building was
accomplished. The three buildings
completed were at Lake City, dur-
ing the 1958-59 fiscal year, and at
Ocala and West Palm Beach during
the 1959-60 fiscal year. Construction
of the three offices was accomplished
at a total cost of $48,668.44, and in-
volved the transfer of only $10,-
000.00 from the State Game Fund-
$5,000.00 in 1958-59, and $5,000.00
in 1959-60. The remainder of the
money for construction of the three
office buildings was taken from the
Commission's building fund result-
ing from the sale of the old Central
office building at Tallahassee. The
construction of the fourth regional
office building, at Panama City, was
initiated and completed after the
end of the biennial period under
discussion.


BUDGETARY
The Fiscal Division also consults
with each section and division in
preparation of the individual bud-
gets and program plans of expendi-
tures for the forthcoming period.
Preparation of the master budget
for the fiscal year is also the respon-
sibility of the Fiscal Division.
When the fiscal budget is ap-
proved by the Commission, the Fis-
cal Division must then exercise suit-
able controls to see that the rate of
expenditures is proportionate to the
rate of revenue at any particular
time or period.
As shown in the following finan-
cial report, the fixed assets at the
end of 1959-60 were evaluated at $1,-
483,551.87. Fixed assets for the pre-
vious year of 1958-59 totaled $1,-
324,135.25.
REPORT
The following pages contain a com-
plete statement of Commission State
Game Fund receipts and expendi-
tures for the fiscal year of 1958-59
and 1959-60.
Also included are circle-graphs
demonstrating financial expenditures
in various departments and func-
tions, as well as comparative re-
ceipts, and additional information.


WILDLIFE BRINGS WEALTH


Y








FLORIDA GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH COMMISSION

Financial Statement July 1, 1958 Thru June 30, 1960

Statement of Cash Receipts, Disbursements and Balances


1958-1959 1959-1960
Item Source Item Source
Total Total Total Total

Receipts:
Beginning Cash Balance July 1 ........................ ............. $ 146,658.24 $ 221,023.06
License Sold by County Judges ................... .................... $1,816,616.75 $1,843,955.50
License Sold by State Office ............................................. 48,834.30 53,651.05
Revenue from Other Governmental Agencies .......................... 369,873.13 355,702.62
Revenue from Use of Property .......................................... 28,017.26 22,791.12
Revenue from Sale of Fixed Assets ............................ 40,248.04 40,386.02
Revenue from Publication of Magazine ................................ 30,149.77 32,220.58
Revenue from Other Sources .................. ................ 2,411.72 6,613.93
Total Cash Receipts Schedule "A" ..........................................- 2,336,150.97 2,355,320.82
Adjustment Account ..... ......-........ .......... ....... .....-....... 215.89
County Judges Account ............ ...... ---.....-- .... ......-.. .... 91.10 35.80
Special Building Fund .--..................... ...................... 54,283.33 42,317.03
Cancelled & Restored Warrants .......... ......................... 2,537,399.53 243.95
Total Revenue Available ................ ................ 2,618,940.66
Disbursements:
Salaries ..-.................. .....- .................... .. .-- .................. 1,246,959.47 1,302,650.68
Repairs to Equipment, Maintenance, etc. .......-.................. 74,675.66 86,515.24
General Printing & Reproduction .................................... 123,379 62 124.882.68
Telephone, Telegraph, Postage & Freight ......................... 42,605.79 41,675.03
Travel ......... ........... ................................... ............. 86,285.69 90,645.08
Other Contractual Services ........................ ............... 61,516.95 48,758.55
Motor Fuel & Lubricants .............................. .......... 161,448.54 171,358.43
Materials & Supplies, Other ....... ...................... ............... 42,022.30 65,178.77
Office Materials & Supplies ............................ ......... 11,921.64 13,034.75
Insurance & Surety Bonds ........................ ...... ..... 47,553.50 44.082.49
Educational, Agricultural, Scientific & Medical Supplies .... 65,643.38 38.r97.25
Parts, Fittings & Maintenance Supplies .............................. 46,669.88 53,375.25
Rental of Building & Equipment ......................................... 31,710.15 51,495.09
Transfer to Federal Government ............ ......................... 27,120.60 31,454.50
M otor Vehicles ................................ .................. ........-..... .. 100,610.91 155,371.11
Motors, Boats & Trailers ............ ....... .................. ...... ... 14,225.79 25,974.75
Education, Medical. Scientific & Agricultural Equipment.... 3,430.41 8,896.81
Buildings & Fixed Equipment ................................... 10,277.74 995.00
Other Capital Outlay .... ............. .......... ..............- 33,627.78 71,987.09
Office Furniture & Equipment ... ..................... ....... 10,029.89 7,401.24
Other Expenses ...................... .......... ..... 15,377.45 22,956.50
Total Disbursements Schedule "B" .................... ......... 2,257,093.14 2,457,286.29
Adjustment Account .............................. 63.30
Transfer Special Building Fund .................................... .. 5,000.00 5,000 00
Building Construction & Furnishings ................... .....- 16,966.30 31,702.14
Total Disbursements ............ .... ............. ........... 2,279,059.44 2,494,051.73
Ending Cash Balance ............................... .............. 258.d0O.09 124.888 93
Less Special Building Fund Balance ......-........... .... 37,317.03 10,614.89
Cash Balance Carried Forward June 30 .........- ................ $ 221,023.06 $ 114.274.04





SCHEDULE "A"

1958-1959 1959-1960Ifi


Item
Total


SALE OF SPORTING LICENSE:
Fishing ................................. ............ ........................... $ 879,162.00
H hunting ............... ......... ........... ....................... ................. 754,432.00
Trapping .....-......~.............. ....... .... ....................-... 751.00
U. S. Permits ........................ .......................................... 500.00
Alien Hunting License ............................ .............- .........-- 50.00
State Hunting Permits ................................... ......... ......... 163,070.00
Goose Permits ................................................................... 3,174.00
Archery Permits .............................. ....................... 4,740.00
Charlotte County Permits ................................... ........ ..... 3,625.00
Previous Year's Permits ............................................. ....... 190.00
Total Sporting License ........................-............ ..... ..

(Continued on Next Page)


Source
Total


Item
Total


Source
Total


$ 896,400.75
751,448 50
783.00
900.00
150.00
154,305.00
2,055.00
8,725 00
1,985.00


1,809,694.00


1,816,752.25








SCHEDULE "A"- (Continued)

1958-1959 1959-1960
Item Source Item Source
Total Total Total Total

SALE OF COMMERCIAL LICENSE:
Retail Fish Dealer -- ......................... ...... ... .............. 13,854.00 12,485.00
Non-Resident Retail Fish Dealer .............................. ..... ....... 250.00 100.00
Wholesale Fish Dealer ................................. ...... 3,250.00 3,000.00
Non-Resident Wholesale Fish Dealer ................................. 2,000.00 2,000.00
Boats for Hire .......................................-- ....--..- 12,934.00 13,618.00
Com m ercial Boats .. ......................................... ........................ 2,037.30 1,964.80
Boat Registration Fees ............ .............. ........ ......... ...... 2,653.25
N utria License .............. .................. .. ......... ........ .............. 500.00
H hunting Preserve ............................ ...... ......... ..... ........ 725.00
Guide ....................................................................... 410.00 370.00
Game Farm .................. ............................ ......... 1,285.00 1,585.00
Wholesale Fur Dealer & Agents ......................................... 385.00 705.00
Local Fur Dealer ..... ....................... ........ ...... ... ...... 80.00 50.00
License to Exhibit Poisonous or Venomous Reptiles .............. 70.00 80.00
Total Commercial License ............................ ................ $ 36,555.30 $ 39,836.05
OTHER SOURCES:
Court Costs ......................................................... ..................... $ 34,561.05 $ 35,809.70
Miscellaneous Receipts ......................................................... 2,411.72 6,613.93
Previous Year's License Collected ............................................ 19,201.75 41,018.25
Dingell-Johnson ......................................................................... 77,734.98 65,464.63
Pittm an-Robertson .................................. .............................. 252,577.10 234,428.29
Sale of Magazine Subscriptions ............................................... 29,066.72 30,712.09
Sale of Magazine Single Copies .................... ............. 1,083.05 1,508.49
Sale of Old Equipment ........................... ..... ...................... 40,036.79 37,334.02
Sale of Confiscated Material & Equipment ............................. 211.25 52.00
Sale of Land ...... .............. ....................................... 3,000.00
Charlotte County Grazing Lease ................... ...... ..... 6,807.87 4,137.37
Charlotte County Marl Lease ....................... ................... 2,649.88 1,395.27
Palm Beach County Lease & Easement ................................... 10,000.00 10,000.00
C. & S. Flood Control ............................................................ 5,000.00
M miscellaneous Leases .......................... .. .... .......... .... 2,281.00 1,201.00
Charlotte County Stump Lease ........................................ 6,278.51 6,057.48
Total Other Sources ..................................... 489,901.67 478,732.52
Total Receipts .......................................................... $2,336,150.97 $2,335,320.82





SCHEDULE "B"
1958-1959 1959-1960


DISBURSEMENTS:
Salaries ........... ....- --......... ..... ......... --........................
Professional Fees & Consultant Services .................................
Advertising Florida's Resources ......................-..............
Communication & Transport of Things ...................................
General Printing & Reproduction Services .........................
Repairs and Maintenance .............. ..... ........ ............
T ravel ................................... .... .................. ....... ... ..............
Utilities ................ ...................................... ... ...........
Other Contractual Services ........................................ .......
Bedding, Clothing & Other Textile Products .........................
Building Construction Materials & Supplies ......................
Coal, Fuel & Other Heating Supplies ...................................
Educational, Medical, Scientific & Agricultural Materials
& Supplies ................................................................
Food Products ....................................... ...... ........................
Maintenance Materials & Supplies .........................................
Motor Fuel & Lubricants ................................................
Office Materials & Supplies .................................
Other Materials & Supplies ..........................................
Insurance, Surety Bonds & Auto Liability ..............................
Pensions & Benefits .................................. .. .... ....... .......
Rental of Buildings & Equipment .........................................
Other Current Charges & Obligations ..................................
B ooks .................. ........................................................................
Buildings & Fixed Equipment .................................... ..........
Educational, Medical, Scientific & Agricultural Equipment_
M otor Vehicles ... .................................. ... ........ ................


Item
Total


Grand
Total


$1,246,959.47
1,133.00
2,293.85
42,605.79
123,379.62
74,675.66
86,285.69
5,896.28
61,516.95
330.97
25.00
1,274.47

65,643.38
899.70
46,669.88
161,448.54
11,921.64
42,022.30
47,553.50
600.00
31,710.15
2,629.61
294.57
10,277 74
3,430.41
100,610.91


Item
Total


Grand
Total


$1,302,650.68
1,701.92

41,675.03
124,882.68
86,515.24
90,645.08
7,021.40
48,758.55
7,381.74
18.75
1,534.78

38,697.25
937.56
53,375.25
171,358.43
13,034.75
65,178.77
44,082.49
600.00
51,465.09
3,069.03
196.32
995.00
8,826.81
155,371.11


(Continued on Next Page)








Schedule "B"--(Continued)


1958-1959 1959-1960
Item Grand Item Grand
Total Total Total Total


Motors, Boats & Trailers ...................................................... 14,225.79 25,974.75
Office Furniture & Equipment ............................................... 10,029.89 7,401.24
Other Structures & Improvements ........................................... 495.00
Other Capital Outlay .... .......................... .. ........... 33,627.78 71,987.09
Distribution & Transfers ........................................... ......... 27,120.60 31,454.50
Grand Total ... ................................................... $2,257,093.14 $2,457,286.29




1958-1959 1959-1960
SCHEDULE "B"-Disbursement by Departments: Budget Dept. Budget Dept.
Total Total Total Total


ADMINISTRATION
Salaries ....................................... .................... .....................
G general Expenses .............................. ..................... ................
Capital Outlay ......................... .................... .................


GENERAL SERVICES
Salaries .......... ..... ........................ .......... ... .... ...--
General Expenses ........................... .... ................
Capital Outlay ................................. ........


FISCAL BRANCH
Salaries ... ..................... ........... ...........
General Expenses ............. .......... ........... ....
C capital O utlay .......................................... ......... ...

FISH MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATION
Salaries ............. ........- ... ............ ............ ............... .........
General Expenses ........................................................... .....
Capital O utlay ......... ..........- ............. .. ...... ............


HYACINTH CONTROL
Salaries .................. ......................... ....
General Expenses ............................ ......... ....
Capital O utlay .........................................................


DINGELL-JOHNSON
Salaries ....-- .............-. --...... .. ........-.. ..........
General Expenses ................................. -...................
Capital Outlay .......................................... ...............


WINTER HAVEN HATCHERY
Salaries ...................... ........-................. .......
G general Expenses ..............................................
Capital Outlay .............................--.-... .....................

HOLT HATCHERY
Salaries ................-............ ..... -....... .... ..........
General Expenses ................. ..... .................................
Capital Outlay ............................... ........ .. ............

INFORMATION & EDUCATION
Salaries ............................................. ............. .. ............
General Expenses ........................................ ....... ............
Capital Outlay .................... ...... ...................... ........


YOUTH PROGRAM
Salaries ........................... .............. ................
General Expenses ................................................... .......
C capital O utlay .................................................. .....................


$ 43,872.73
84,985.17
4,780.82


34,735.93
2,751.58
796.14


6,276.75
30,714.48
1,790.51


23,291.38
20,699.06
246.59


62,963.03
30,984.55
9,603.85


9,150.00
4,678.99
2,219.50


4,448.50
2,807.19
2,132.69


53,082.69
58,874.24
9,735.08



8,460.00
2,997.85
54.50


$ 133,638.72


38,283.65




38,781.74




44,237.03




103,551.43




16,048.49




9,388.38




121,692.01




11,512.35


$ 30,763.76
6,247.48
350.50 $ 37,361.74


20,536.48
86,364.43
1,055.00 107,955.91


35,557.35
6,565.52
2,962.97


38,426.20
13,703.85
7,268.92


26,214.69
29,069.75
11,356.26


69,473.55
44,619.13
7,213.85


8,780.00
3,926.14
63.11


4,462.50
3,073.54



50,000.53
41,724.81
6,257.80



9,718.38
3,736.23
2,635.12


45,085.84




59,398.97




66,640.70




121,306.53




12,769.25




7,536.04




97,983.14




16,089.73


(Continued on Next Page)


L









Schedule "B"--(Continued)

1958-1959 1959-1960
Budget Dept. Budget Dept.
Total Total Total Total


MAGAZINE PUBLICATION
Salaries ................... .... .... .................
General Expenses .................................. ...... ... ......
Capital Outlay ........ ..................... ..... ..... ..

PITTMAN-ROBERTSON
Salaries .....................-....---- ....--. ...... ......
General Expenses .................................... ...
Capital O utlay .................................... .... .- ......

GENERAL GAME MANAGEMENT
Salaries .................---..... ............
General Expenses ..........................- .............
Capital Outlay .......--........ --....... ................

STATE HUNTS
Salaries..........-..........- .---..--..-------- ..
General Expenses ..........................- .....-- ..........
Capital Outlay ....................- ... ...................


15,452.07
73,545.77
321.92 89,319.76


177,978.69
142,506.39
30,579.35


5,418.95
10,143.10



65,610.91
33,731.43
17.75


351,064.43


15,562.05




99,360.09


20,023.00
84,994.42
189.98 105,207.40


142,036.59
157,477.11
43,568.66 343,082.36


32,879.24
18,734.16
534.69


79,172.87
27,440.59
68.50


52,148.08




106,681.96


NATIONAL HUNTS
Salaries ............................. ......... .........
General Expenses ........................ ........ ............
Capital O utlay ...................................... ... .............

COMMUNICATION DIVISION
Salaries ..................... .......... ..........
General Expenses ......................................... ..........
Capital Outlay ........................-........--.... ..----

AVIATION BRANCH
Salaries ................ ........... ..............
General Expenses ...................... ........... ...............
Capital Outlay ...... ......................... ............... ....

SOUTH FLORIDA REGION
Salaries ................. ....... ... ... ...................
General Expenses .................................... ..........
Capital Outlay ........................................ .... ...... ..

NORTHEAST FLORIDA REGION
Salaries ......... .......... ......... .. .......................
General Expenses ............... ................ ........ ...... ..
Capital Outlay ..... .................................... ... ......

NORTHWEST FLORIDA REGION
Salaries ...................................................
General Expenses ..................................... ..... ..............
Capital Outlay ..................................... ..... ......

EVERGLADES REGION
Salaries ..................... .... ....---- ........... .......... ....
General Expenses ... .......................... -.... ...... .. ......
Capital O utlay ............................................ ...........

CENTRAL FLORIDA REGION
Salaries ........................... ............ .. ... .. .........
General Expenses ................................... ..... ................
C capital O utlay ................... ... ..................... ............. ...................
Grand Total ......................................


17,810.44
30,200.24
48,010.68


44,390.65
23,728.50
27,858.30 95,977.45


37,928.00
28,664.51
377.40 66,969.91


119,135.00
46,375.36
17,122.22 182,632.58


146,540.99
53,023.36
11,726.39


135,259.90
40,844.73
23,063.49


211,290.74




199,168.12


103,053.75
63,536.48
16,339.20 182,929.43


132,099.11
51,843.60
13,731.39


TOTAL EXPENDITURES BY BUDGET
Salaries .......................................... ... .. ................ $1,246,959.47
General Expenses ................................... ... ............... ...... $ 837,636.58
Capital Outlay ....... .. ............. ................... $ 172,497.09


197,674.10
$2,257,093.14


$2,257,093.14


11,187.58
33,026.01
44,213.59


46,092.64
24,356.10
41,175.12


111,623.86


39,368.29
33,090.63
28,428.85 100,887.77


112,257.10
47,159.19
25,694.91 185,111.20


148,272.48
53,396.98
19,065.90 220,735.36


138,480.55
43,956.05
20,299.10 202,735.70


104,919.50
66,073.52
21,822.99 192,816.01


134,027.40
54,652.65
31,235.10 219,915.15
$2,457.286.29


$1,302,650.68
$ 883,388.29
$ 271,247.32 $2,457,286.29


L








GENERAL FIXED ASSETS


1958-1959
General Fixed Assets (Cost Valuation) as of June 30, 1959
Land and Buildings ............. ..........................
Aircraft Equipment .......... ............
Automotive Equipment .........................................
Marine Equipment ....................................
M otors ............-- ........ ....................... $36,338.91
B oats ......................................................... 48,552.64
Trailers ............................ ................... 36,878.47
Office Equipment & Furniture ...............................
Photographic Equipment .......................................
Radio ..-....... .- .................................
Field Equipment ............... ..........................
Live Stock --... ... ..........................


Decrease in General Fixed Assets in Fiscal Year
1958-59 over 1957-58 ............................. ............


GENERAL FIXED ASSETS

1959-60
General Fixed Assets (Cost Valuation) as of June 30, 1960
Land and Buildings .......................................
Aircraft Equipment .....................................
Autom otive Equipment .........................................
Marine Equipment .....................................
M otors ................................... .. $39,907.48
B oats ...... .......... ... ...... ...... ....................... 52,263.48
Trailers .. -..................... .......... .................. 39,169.33
Office Furniture & Equipment ..........................
Photographic Equipment ................................
Radio Equipment -..................................................
Field Equipment ....................................
Live Stock ....................... ..................... ..........


Increase in General Fixed Assets in Fiscal Year
1959-60 over 1958-59 .....................................


TOTAL ARRESTS AND DISPOSITIONS

STATEWIDE FOR
GAME AND FISH LAW VIOLATIONS


Total number arrests made July 1, 1958-June 30, 1959 -
Cases Pending ----- ----------
Cases Disposed of .... .-.- .-- --------... -------

Total number arrests made July 1, 1959-June 30, 1960 -
Cases Pending ---. ------....-----------.-...
Cases Disposed of --..... --------... -------..--


$ 510,801.99
32,241.17
419,888.82
121,770.02


59,075.60
13,729.71
59,952.28
106,405.66
270.00
$1,324,135.25

$ 68.789.36


$ 511,319.78
60,949.17
465,997.32
131,340.29


67,039.39
18,543.73
112,705.90
115,386.29
270.00

$1,483,551.87

$ 159,416.62


3,616
46


3,319
344


3,570




2,975







TOTAL RECEIPTS


1958-59
Receipts
Sport License ................. $1,809,694.00
Commercial License ............ 36,555.30
Pittman-Robertson ............. 252,577.10
Dingell-Johnson .............. 77,734.98
Fixed Assets ................... 40,248.04
Other Sources .................. 119,341.55
Total .................... . $2,336,150.97


Percentage
77.50%
1.56%
10.80%
3.32%
1.72%
5.10%
100 %,


Receipts Percentage
$1,816,752.25 77.79%
39,836.05 1.71%
234,428.29 10.04%
65,464.63 2.81%
40,386.02 1.73%
138,453.58 5.92%
$2,335,320.82 100 %


RECEIPTS BY CATEGORIES


39.9%
FISHING


39.5 %
MUNT ING


1958-59 1959-60
Receipts Percentage Receipts


Percentage


*Fishing ...................... $ 913,487.30 39. 1%
**Hunting ....................... 932,762.00 39. 9%
Federal Aid .................... 330,312.08 14. 1%
Other Sources .................. 159,589.59 6. 9%
Total ......................... ..$2,336,150.97 100 %


$ 932,221.80 39. 9%
824,366.50 39. 5%
299,892.92 12. 9%
178,839.60 7. 7%
$2,335,320.82 100 %


*Includes all Sport and Commercial Fishing License.
**Includes all Sport Hunting License, Permits and Commercial Game License.








TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS: BY ACTIVITY


1958-59 1959-60
Receipts Percentage Receipts


Administration .................$ 171,922.37
Information and Education ...... 222,524.12
Fish Management .............. 212,007.07
Game Management ............. 513,997.25
Law Enforcement ................ 1,136,642.33
Total ....................... $2,257,093.14


7.62%
9.86%
9.40%
22.77%
50.35%
100 %


$ 190,403.49
219,280.27
267,651.49
546,125.99
1,233,825.05
$2,457,286.29


EXPENDITURES BY DEPARTMENTS


Administration


1958-59 1959-60
Receipts Percentage Receipts


General Administration .........$ 133,638.72
Fiscal ......................... 38,283.65
Total ......................... $ 171,922.37


77. 7%
22. 3%
100 %


$ 145,317.65
45,085.84


$ 190,403.49 100 %


Percentage
7.75%
8.92%
10.90%
22.22%
50.21%
100 %


Percentage
76. 3%
23. 7%


-----~----------~-







Information & Education


40.13%
MAGAZINE


54.7 %
ADMINI STATION


1958-59


1958-59
Receipts


Percentage


Administration ................
Youth Program ................
Magazine Publication ...........
T otal ..........................


121,692.01
11,512.35
89,319.76


54.70%
5.17%
40.13%


$ 222,524.12 100 %


Fish Management


$ 97,983.14
16,089.73
105,207.40


$ 219,280.27 100 %


1958-59 1959-60
Receipts Percentage Receipts


Administration .................$ 38,781.74 18. 3%
Hyacinth Control ............... 44,237.03 20. 9%
Dingell-Johnson ................ 103,551.43 48. 8%
Winter Haven Hatchery ......... 16,048.49 7. 6%
Holt Hatchery .................. 9,388.38 4. 4%
Total ..........................$ 212,007.07 100 %


$ 59,398.97
66,640.70
121,306.53
12,769.25
7,536.04


Percentage
22. 2%
24. 9%
45. 3%
4. 8%
2. 8%


$ 267,651.49 100 %


1959-60
Receipts


Percentage


-~-- ---------~ ~---







Game Management


Pittman-Robertson ............. $
General Game Management .....
State Hunts .................. .
National Hunts .................
Total ......................... $


1958-59 1959-60
Receipts Percentage Receipts
351,064.43 68.30% $ 343,082.36
15,562.05 3.02% 52,148.08
99,360.09 19.33c% 106,681.96
48,010.68 9.35% 44,213.59
513,997.25 100 o/ $ 546,125.99


Law Enforcement


1958-59
Receipts Percentage
South Region (14 Counties) .....$ 182,632.58 16.07%
Northeast Region (16 Counties) .. 211,290.74 18.59%
Northwest Region (16 Counties).. 199,168.12 17.52%
Everglades Region (9 Counties) .. 182,929.43 16.09%.
Central Region (12 Counties) ... 197,674.10 17.39%
Aviation (Statewide) ........... 66,969.91 5.89%
Communications (Statewide) .... 95,977.45 8.45%
Total .......................... ,136,642.33 100 %


1959-60
Receipts
$ 185,111.20
220,735.36
202,735.70
192,816.01
219,915.15
100,887.77
111,623.86
$1,233,825.05


Percentage
62. 8%
9. 5%
19. 6%
8. 1%,
100 %


Percentage
15.01%
17.89%
16.43%
15.62%
17.82%
8.18%
9.05%
100 %



































Information


and


Education

ROBERT A. DAHNE --.Chief


T HE DUTY OF the Information and
Education Division is to inform
and educate the people of Florida
as to the desirability of proper con-
servation in all its aspects, and as to
the programs and policies of the
Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission.
To accomplish this duty, the Divi-
sion uses many programs, methods
and ways of informing and educat-
ing the interested public.
PROCEDURES
Operational procedures and poli-
cies of the Information and Educa-
tion Division are outlined as follows:
By its nature, the Information and
Education program carried on by
the Florida Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission is both intricate
and widely diversified.
In all, the Information and Educa-
tion Division is responsible for car-
rying on a wide spectrum of inter-


related programs that fall roughly
into the five general classifications
of Information, Education, Publicity,
Public Relations and Internal Em-
ployee Services.
Each of these major programs con-
tains, of course, many minor and
varied programs and projects.
In general, the Information and
Education work is carried on two
main levels: Out-of-State Informa-
tion and Education, and Intra-State
Information and Education. Of the
two, the Intra-State work has always
been considered the more important
phase of the Commission's I&E
work.
OUT-OF-STATE
The Out-of-State I&E program is
carried on primarily through the of-
fice in Tallahassee. In its essence,
the theme of any programs designed
for out-of-state dissemination is to
publicize the great potentialities of


fishing and hunting in Florida. Much
of this work is involuntary in that it
is done at specific request from per-
sons, concerns and states outside of
Florida. The out-of-state work un-
doubtedly results in the arrival of
many hundreds of out-of-state visi-
tors-fishermen and hunters-and
many prospective permanent resi-
dents.
INTRA-STATE
The Intra-State work of the In-
formation and Education Division is
considered to be of most vital inter-
est to the Florida Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission. This is be-
cause the primary duty and respon-
sibility of the Game Commission is
to the Florida citizens who purchase
licenses to hunt and fish within the
state.
POLICIES
The I&E Division is primarily
charged with the responsibility of
informing and educating the gen-
eral public as to the policies, the
work programs, the game and fish
laws and the management practices
which are being set into motion by
the Commission.
The I&E Division is not, and has
never been considered to be, a prop-
aganda machine. Nor is it the
"brain" of the Commission. It serves,
instead, as the "tongue" of the Com-
mission, giving voice, in all possible
ways, to the official policies and
practices of the Commission.
It is not the duty nor the intent of
the Information and Education Divi-
sion to in any way infringe upon or
compete with established private
staff or free-lance writers, editors and
programmists for newspapers, maga-
zines, books and radio and television
stations. Instead, it is the duty of the
I&E Division to cooperate with and
assist in every possible way all such
writers and editors so as to help
them present complete facts about
fish and wildlife.
ORGANIZATION
In order to effect an efficient pro-
gram on a state-wide basis, the Staff
Officer known as the Chief of Infor-
mation and Education has the assist-
ance, cooperation and advice of five
Regional Information Extension Offi-
cers. These Officers, located in each
Region headquarters office of the
Commission, are completely respon-
sible for the proper conduct of com-
plete information and education pro-


LI







grams in the areas encompassed by
the respective Regions.
Under the Regional administrative
set-up, all state-wide informational
or educational programs are organ-
ized and set into motion by the Tal-
lahassee office, as per the policies
set forth by the Commission and its
Director. The programs are then
carried out on a Regional, or local,
basis by the Regional Officers.
Thus, when an official policy or
operation is adopted by the Commis-
sion or its Director, the informa-
tional and educational aspects are
organized and coordinated by the
Tallahassee office through the Re-
gional offices.
The Chief of I&E also has com-
plete responsibility for all actions
and programs carried on by the
Chief of the Youth Education Sec-
tion, the Chief of the Audio-Visual
Section, and the Chief of the Con-
servation Extension Section.
The Division office handles all
state-wide news releases emanating
from the Commission. It is also re-
sponsible for preparing, processing,
editing and distributing the majority
of pamphlets, booklets, brochures,
posters and similar printed items
used by the Commission to inform
and educate interested persons as to
wildlife and the conservation there-
of.
Where the Regional Information
Officer has the duty of advising and
counseling the Regional Manager
and field employees, the Division of-
fice has the duty of advising and
counseling the Commission's admin-
istrative officers as to certain public
relations problems and programs.
Much time during the biennial
period was spent in defining and
re-organizing the Divisional field op-
erations. Much effort went into up-
grading the calibre of work produced
by Division employees, and in plac-
ing balancing controls such as
quarterly reports and operational
assignments-into effect for all em-
ployees of the Division. The Merit
System job classifications and speci-
fications were written for the cate-
gories of work within the Division,
and, for the first time, a competitive
examination system for new Divi-
sion employees was developed and
utilized.
The Division office is occupied
much of the time with the routine
administrative chores of preparing


and approving programs, processing
invoices and reports, and developing
new and more efficient concepts of
work and operational procedures.
The assignments of duties and
spheres of activities for the Division
are as follows:
REGIONAL EXTENSION
The Regional Information Exten-
sion program is designed to extend
directly into a region the official
programs and policies of the Com-
mission so as to inform and educate
the people in the communities of a
specified group of counties.
Basically, the Regional Informa-
tion Extension Officer is charged
with the supervision and application
of a well-rounded program to inform
and educate the publics of the re-
gion to better fish and wildlife con-
servation practices.
The official state-wide Information
and Education Division programs
are created and formulated by the
state office under policies set forth
by the Director and the Commission.
The programs are then applied uni-
formly in each Region through the
work of the Regional Information
Extension Officers.
Just as the Regional Manager is,
within a given Region, the official
representative of the Commission's
Director, so is the Information Ex-
tension Officer the official Regional
representative of the Information
and Education Division.
The Regional IE Officer is charged
with the responsibility for making


decisions and supervising and apply-
ing programs within a given frame-
work of activities and interests, in
adherence to specific policies and
programs set forth by the state
office. This allows the placement of
any overall information and educa-
tion program into immediate effect
at all points in the state with no dis-
crepancies of policy or administra-
tion.
The Regional IE Officer deals with
both the "external public" and an
"internal public." He is, of necessity,
concerned with the general public,
as well as with the internal em-
ployees of the Commission.
For these reasons, the Regional
Information Extension Officer must
be a specialist in all phases of the
proven techniques used in informing
and educating the "mass mind" of
the public of Florida.
The techniques and tools at the
command of the Information Of-
ficer include the following:
NEWS RELEASES-All news re-
leases emanating from the Regional
office for distribution to the public
and the press are prepared and pro-
cessed by the Regional Information
Extension Officer, subject to the ap-
proval of the Regional Manager.
Such releases may concern any
phase of the Regional operations.
The five Regions produce an average
total of 100 such written releases
each year, in addition to many re-
leases given verbally by telephone,
personal visitation, or other method.
































EXHIBITS-Design, creation and
operation of all public exhibits and
special promotions sponsored by and
within a Region are under the su-
pervision of the Regional IE Officer,
subject to final approval by the Re-
gional Manager. Since a Region may
be operating several exhibits simul-
taneously, it is apparent that one in-
dividual cannot do all the actual
work involved. Therefore, the prop-
erly operated exhibit is installed
only with the approval of the Re-
gional Manager and the Area Super-
visor who must provide much of the
man-power to install and maintain
the exhibit. Over sixty exhibits for
fairs, conventions, special meetings
and public promotions are installed
and operated each year. Work is also
done with Fishathons for children,
special stage shows, and similar pro-
motions.
LIVE APPEARANCES-The Re-
gional Information Extension Officer
has the duty of acting as "booking
agent" for requests from the gen-
eral public for appearances of em-
ployees at meetings, special promo-
tions and on television and radio
programs. Since official Commission
policy encourages every employee
to handle public relations for him-
self and his job, the Regional IE
Officer has the duty of encouraging
and assisting any and all employees
in such efforts. Each employee of
the Commission is an expert in his
particular field and upon his particu-
lar job, and the public has the right


and desire to see and hear such ex-
perts. Therefore, the Regional IE
Officer has the materials and the
tools to aid any employee in present-
ing his particular field of knowledge
and employment to the public in the
proper light. For employee public
appearances, the Regional IE Officer
has available Master Speeches, Mo-
tion Films, Color Slide Lectures,
Charts and Graphs, Photo-Exhibits,
Animal Exhibits, and similar ma-
terials for use by employees. Such
employee appearances may be pub-
lic talks to organizations, school lec-
tures, television and radio program
appearances, wildlife shows, and
convention or meeting presentations.
Such appearances by employees
number well over 1,000 each year.
LITERATURE The filling of
mail-requests from the public for
literature published by the Commis-
sion is an important part of the IE
Officer's duties. The answering of
mail correspondence to and from the
Regional office is the duty of the IE
Officer when the mail involves gen-
eral information-requests from the
public. The writing of new litera-
ture, upon specific assignment by the
state office, is also part of the func-
tion of the IE Officer.
INTERNAL SERVICES-Special
functions and responsibilities of the
Regional IE Officer for the em-
ployees of the Commission-the in-
ternal public includes employee
morale, employee training, and em-
ployee aids. The Regional Informa-


tion Extension Officer is an impor-
tant link between the employees and
administration.
PHOTOGRAPHY Field photo-
graphy 'is an important tool of the
Regional Information Extension Of-
ficer. Each Officer is fully equipped
photographically, and draws supplies
of film and accessories from the state
office. Photo assignments range from
law-enforcement court evidence
photographs to identification photo-
graphs of fish and wildlife, and the
recording of outdoor recreation
scenes. Identification photographs of
all employees are also taken for the
official records.
LOAN LIBRARIES-The Region-
al motion film loan library contains
a basic assortment of from 18 to 22
films that are shown by employees
to the public, or loaned to the public.
Also available for loan to the public
and to employees are over 400 color
slides with printed lecture code-
cards. Other loan material includes
study-skins, exhibit material, auto-
slide projectors, film and slide pro-
jectors and screens, professional ed-
ucation books, and similar items.
These materials are under the super-
vision of the Regional Information
Extension Officer.
EXTENSION PROGRAMMING
-Certain portions of the program-
ming for the Youth Education Sec-
tion and the Conservation Extension
Section are of direct concern to the
Regional IE Officer. Basic contact
work and information and education
work for the Section programs is
often performed by the Regional IE
Officer. This includes consultations
with youth club advisors, public
school resource-use education, liai-
son work with adult organizations,
and visitations with the public
officials.
SPECIAL EVENTS-A varied as-
sortment of activities, classified
under Special Events, also occupies
the Regional IE Officer. He may
serve as production manager or
emcee for a stage presentation, as
organizer of a field trial, or as a
photographer for work programs of
the allied Divisions or Sections-
Game Management, Fisheries, Avia-
tion, Communications and Law En-
forcement. He may serve as press
agent or publicity specialist for a
special promotion. Since the Region-
al IE Officer specializes in informing


ii







the public, he automatically becomes
involved in many special events.
ADVISORY DUTIES-The infor-
mation Extension Officer serves as
a public relations advisor. He ex-
amines programs, and advises how
such programs may be best adapted
to his particular region. When re-
quested, he renders advice, in the
field of public relations, to the gen-
eral public and all organizations. He
continuously advises the state office
of the Information and Education
Division as to occurrences within the
region, and as to developing pro-
gram "trouble-spots" or problems.
CONSERVATION EXTENSION
The Conservation Extension Sec-
tion is designed to extend certain
services and informational programs
of the Commission directly to
specialized categories of organiza-
tions and individuals that would not
otherwise be able to avail them-
selves of such services or programs
through ordinary channels.
At the present time, work of the
Conservation Extension Section is
divided into six principal phases:
1. State-wide firearms accident
survey conducted on an annual basis
in cooperation with the Florida
Sheriffs and the National Rifle Asso-
ciation. Such survey statistics pro-
vide a basis for firearms safety
education programs.
2. Supervision of a program of
state-wide hunter safety instruction
in conjunction with the National
Rifle Association. All safety instruc-
tors and instruction in the state are
certified through the Conservation
Extension Section. The program in-
cludes grading examinations for


hunter safety credentials, certifica-
tion of safety instructors, encourage-
ment of instruction classes, and the
handling of all inquiries and reports.
A tentative legislative bill for man-
datory safety instruction and grad-
uation has been drafted.
3. Liaison with and between adult
conservation organizations. Efforts
are made to create needed civilian
organizations, and to achieve har-
monious relationships between ex-
isting organizations and the Commis-
sion. Efforts are also made to direct
civilian organizational efforts into
beneficial channels.
4. Gathering data for the Commis-
sion-published Directory of Florida
Conservation Organizations. This
affords a method for maintaining
current information about all con-
servation organization in the state,
and the Directory, itself, serves as
an informational and service bond
between organizations and the
Commission.
5. Editing and publication of the
monthly mimeographed bulletin
THE CONSERVATION SCENE,
which presents pertinent conserva-
tion news topics and programs di-
rectly to the key conservationists of
the state. It also serves as an inter-
agency publication for news from all
state and federal conservation agen-
cies, and as an internal educational
house organ for employees of the
Commission. Circulation has been
in the total of 850 copies per month.
6. Organization and operation of
a Landowner Sportsman relation-
ship program aimed at opening
private lands to public hunting and
fishing through a cooperative pro-
gram achieving substantial benefits
for both landowners and sportsmen.
This will be done in cooperation
with the Florida Agricultural De-
partment and interested adult
civilian conservation organizations.
YOUTH EDUCATION
The Youth Conservation Educa-
tion Section has the responsibility
for all Commission programs which
serve to educate children to the
needs for good conservation and
utilization of the natural resources,
with emphasis on conservation of
wildlife and fresh-water fish.
This Section exercises develop-
mental planning and execution in
the following categories of programs:


1. Creation, development and as-
sistance to Commission-sponsored
Youth Conservation Clubs. There
are twenty-five such clubs now in ex-
istence on an all-year-round or part-
year basis. Work consists of Merit
Point programming, advisory work,
and general assistance. The clubs are
banded together in a Youth Conser-
vation Club League, operating with
League youth officers and programs.
Independent clubs that are not
Commission sponsored or League
members are also serviced with in-
formation and advisory counsel.
2. The Youth Education Section
bears full responsibility for opera-
tion of the central Youth Camp in
the Ocala National Forest. Addition-
al camps are in detailed planning
stage for South Florida and North
Florida.































U T H 6


3. Allied youth education pro-
grams are in effect with a wide
range of independent organizations,
including Boy Scouts of America,
Girl Scouts of the United States of
America, 4-H organizations, Junior
Garden Clubs, Camp Fire Girls, and
similar organizations. These Com-
mission-sponsored award programs
for youth working in the conserva-
tion field are based upon cooperative
creative programming, with a great
deal of record-keeping and corres-
pondence needed on the part of the
Youth Section.
The work of the Youth Education
Section is presented in a comprehen-
sive fashion in a separate chapter
near the end of this Biennial Report.

AUDIO-VISUAL
The Audio-Visual Section is con-
cerned with all informational and
educational programming done with
Audio and Visual techniques and
aids. The work of the Section is ex-
tremely important in that it deals
in imaginative and creative presen-
tations that interpret the work,
programs and policies of the Com-
mission to the general public of the
state.
The broad phases of the Audio-
Visual work are:


TELEVISION-The creation, pro-
duction and distribution of sound-
films to the commercial and
educational television stations of the
state has been highly successful. One
hundred percent of the 22 commer-
cial stations have certified by writ-
ten statement that they repeatedly
use and re-use the short film clips
produced by the Commission. These
are high-impact films featuring
Commission programs and policies,
and some deal specifically with en-
couraging increases in the popula-
tions of hunters and fishermen with
subsequent increases in the sales of
licenses and the production of reve-
nue. Other television work includes
the production of visual aids used by
employees in making live appear-
ances on feature programs.
RADIO-New programming for
the 171 radio stations of the state
involved the creation and produc-
tion of half-minute and one-minute
spots on radio records for use by
program managers and disc jockeys.
Over eighty percent of the stations
of the state have certified in writing
that they use and re-use the Com-
mission recordings repeatedly. The
spot recordings embody sounds of
wild animals, with human voice nar-
ration and occasional music back-


grounds. The scripts are basically
those used in the television films.
LOAN LIBRARIES-During the
biennium, the feature motion film
libraries were completely revamped
and reissued. New procedures that
ensure handling of the films on the
most economical and effective basis
were put into effect. Such films are
shown and loaned by employees to
organizations and on television pro-
grams. They serve to hold the at-
tention of audiences for protracted
periods by standard entertainment-
education methods. A total of 65
copies of 21 feature films are carried
in six loan libraries.

PHOTOGRAPHY Documen-
tary motion footage and still photo-
graphs of the Commission's pro-
grams and policies, and of wildlife
and fish, is a continuing effort. The
still photographs are used for publi-
cation in all state and national
periodicals, while the motion footage
goes into the master-film files of the
Commission for the production of
television and feature films. This
details a great deal of field photo-
graphy, darkroom production, and
cataloguing, indexing and distribu-
tion work.

ARTWORK-The Audio Visual
Section also provides a certain
amount of chart-work and illustra-
tive material for all Divisions of the
Commission.


SUMMARY
In general, the Information and
Education section is charged with
the responsibility of informing and
educating the public to proper con-
servation methods and practices. It
is vitally concerned with publicizing
the activities and policies of the
Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission. It is always interested
in maintaining good relations be-
tween the sportsmen and the Com-
mission in all fields, and it must
attain continuous and complete con-
tact with all Commission employees
and programs. Essentially, the In-
formation and Education Division is
a service department offering its
service to all persons connected with
the Commission, and to all sports-
men and citizens of Florida and the
United States. *


1i









FLORIDA




WILDLIFE






BILL HANSEN
-Editor-


T HE MONTHLY PUBLICATION OF
FLORIDA WILDLIFE is an impor-
tant medium employed by the Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commission
for the effective dissemination of in-
formation and educational material
so important to the eventual success
of present and future Commission
programs.
A total of 44 major state Game and
Fish Commissions now make use of
periodic publications as a proven
public information service. These
publications range from weekly bul-
letins to the slick monthly magazine
type format. FLORIDA WILDLIFE has
recently obtained high national rec-
ognition in the latter category.
A balanced contents of factual,
technical and general type articles


o'ejda 1


.7'-^"bfflBF^^77.s i!


are presented each month. Subjects
covered in each issue include Com-
mission programs, fresh water fish-
ing, hunting, conservation and nat-
ural history in general.
FLORIDA WILDLIFE is dedicated to
the conservation, preservation and
propagation of Florida's fresh water
fish, game and related natural re-
sources. The purpose of this maga-
zine is to acquaint and educate the
public with the many problems con-
nected with the immense task of
conserving a natural heritage for all
future generations, and to report on
the progress being made by the
Commission in meeting the chal-
lenge. It also seeks to develop a gen-
eral understanding and cooperative
public relations between state offi-
cials and technicians and the people
of Florida.
The Commission now prints 24,000
copies of each monthly issue. Ap-
proximately 23,000 are mailed each
month to a regular mailing list con-
sisting of paid subscribers, Commis-
sion employees, state officials and
members of other state and Federal
conservation agencies. The remain-
ing 1,000 are distributed free of
charge through various fairs and ex-
hibits, Chambers of Commerce, and
through official state promotional
distribution agencies.
A portion of the cost of publishing
FLORIDA WILDLIFE is paid for from
the paid subscriptions which now go
to all 50 states and several foreign
countries. The remaining cost is ab-
sorbed by the Commission as an im-
portant public information service


with value received immeasurable
as to dollars and cents value.
It should be remembered that,
although this portion of the over-all
budget earmarked for FLORIDA WILD-
LIFE is expended mostly on the
monthly publication, the personnel
of this department spend consider-
able time assisting in functions di-
rectly connected with other Com-
mission departments.
Duties assigned to the small mag-
azine staff of four include: editorial
preparation, article writing and re-
writing, photography, publication
layout and makeup mechanics, field
work, information disbursing, book-
keeping, special addressograph and
mailing procedure, related clerical
duties and other required Commis-
sion activities.
Under the present organization
and Commission policy, FLORIDA
WILDLIFE has, for the past biennium,
shown a continuous increase in paid
circulation and improved format
quality. During the same period,
through an efficient systematic or-
*ganization, the general over-all pub-
lishing cost per unit has been stead-
ily decreasing.
Research in the magazine publish-
ing field shows that approximately
21/2 individuals read each distributed
copy of this type monthly periodical.
Based on the aforementioned fig-
ures, the Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission's monthly maga-
zine, FLORIDA WILDLIFE, delivers a
message of definite importance to
approximately 680,000 readers an-
nually. 0


florida .


S llIL If C
SEPriMBEK I960 p 71&105*1t'(ii't*fi~ Sf 1 CEXT


i.
F", ~1"











Radio





Communications





RHETT McMILLIAN
-Chief-


1j


THE Communications Section was
set up late in the year of 1948
to serve primarily as an aid to the
Law Enforcement program. Beyond
its primary purpose of serving as a
tool for officers in the field, the radio
system has since proved itself to be
a valuable adjunct to the Commis-
sion's continuous efforts in achieving
greater efficiency with a consequent
saving in both time and money.
Now, the Communications Section
not only serves as a law-enforcement
tool, but also as an aid to greater
flexibility in the overall state-wide
administrative functions.
The headquarters of the Commu-
nication Section are located central-
ly in New Smyrna, and here are
found the necessary operating tools
of the far-flung radio system. Com-
munications Headquarters keeps ac-
curate cost records of each radio
unit, operating manuals and signal
cards which are prepared and fur-
nished to Commission personnel,
and a stock of emergency parts and
supplies.
The communication operating
equipment now in the Commission
consists of 289 mobile units, includ-
ing airborne sets, 29 base stations,
including two stations at temporary
sites. Six of the base stations are
operated in cooperation with the
State Forestry Services, two in co-
operation with the State Park Serv-


ice, and one in cooperation with the
South Florida Conservation District.
Base station locations are: New
Smyrna, Molina, Munson, Eglin
Field, Panama City, Bortifay, Wilma,
Woodruff, Tallahassee, Perry, Cross
City, Lake City, Jacksonville, San
Mateo, Starke, Ocala, Williston,
Leesburg, Tomoka, Magnolia, Lake-
land, Myakka, Highlands, Okeecho-
bee, Belle Glade, Immakolee, Miami,
and the State Civil Defense Emer-
gency Control Center.
Several antenna sites have been
erected about the state, so ground


COUNTY LOCATION
Escambia .................. Molina
Santa Rosa............... Munson
Okaloosa ............... Eglin Field
Bay .................. Panama City
Holmes ................... Bonifay
Liberty ................. W ilma
Jackson .............. .. Woodruff
Leon .................. Tallahassee
Taylor ................... Perry
Dixie .................. Cross City
Columbia ...............Lake City
Duval ................ Jacksonville
Bradford .................. Starke
Putnam ................ San Mateo
Levy .................. W illiston
M arion ..................... Ocala
Brooksville ............. Hernando


mobile units may connect to the
larger antenna and send and receive
for greater distances at important
points.
The Commission continues to co-
operate with the Federal Civil De-
fense, and the Communications sys-
tem has taken important part in all
disaster tests. The Chief of Commu-
nications is a member of the State
Civil Defense Communications Com-
mittee.
The Communications Division is
composed of six technicians, and has
repair facilities and personnel at


COUNTY LOCATION
Volusia ...................Tomoka
Volusia ........ New Smyrna Beach
Lake ................... Leesburg
Orange .................. Magnolia
Osceola .............. Keenansville
Polk .................... Lakeland
Pinellas ............. Safety Harbor
Highlands ................Sebring
Sarasota........ Myakka State Park
Charlotte ................ Bermont
Okeechobee ...........Okeechobee
Palm Beach........... Palm Beach
Palm Beach........... Belle Glade
Collier ................ Immokalee
Collier .................. Naples
Broward ............... Hollywood
Collier............... Trail Center


STATION LOCATIONS


AT LARGE-STATE CD EMERGENCY CONTROL CENTER


_ _


11








New Smyrna, Panama City, Lake-
land, Lake City and Okeechobee.
Each technical is responsible for
the maintenance and operation of an
average of six base and sixty-six
mobile units.
The largest single project of this
period has been the installation of
selective calling decode boxes in all
base stations. Prior to this time, any
car within range of two or more
stations, in automatic relay position,
would key all such stations with
resultant degradation of signal. The


decode boxes, which were designed
and constructed by the Communica-
tions Division, now allow a mobile
unit to select any one station with-
out keying any other station within
range. This has been a major ac-
complishment, the only one of its
particular type in the country, and
has greatly increased the efficiency
of the system.
Another major development has
been the design and construction of
a dialing system for certain control
base stations, allowing them to con-


trol automatic satellite base stations
around them. Due to this operation,
mobile units may communicate with
the control station over distances of
up to 90 miles.
Initial work has been started on
automatic satellite stations to be lo-
cated at Weekiwatchee Springs,
Safety Harbor, Bermont, Keenans-
ville, and on the Tamiami Trail. This
work will be completed during the
next period and will complete the
statewide system as originally de-
signed. 0


BASE RADIO INSTALLATIONS-For law enforcement coordination and general communications purposes,
Commission operates base station net show above. Also used are seven airplane radio units, and 300 ground
mobile units in automobiles, trucks, airboats, motorboats, swamp buggies and similar operational vehicles. Prop-
er radio communications allows greatly increased efficiency. Radio system is Civil Defense, and also of prime
importance in rescue and public safety work.


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L AW enforcement is, without
question, one of the very im-
portant functions of the Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission. Our
wildlife officers are constantly con-
fronted with this tremendous task,
that is very necessary to the present
and future welfare of our State. It
is extremely essential that all means
of assistance, including the use of
Commission equipment, be utilized
to the fullest extent to effectively
maintain maximum results in our
law enforcement program.
The function of the Aviation Sec-
tion is to give close, coordinated air
support to ground personnel at all
times. Many various other duties are
performed, including aerial spraying,
surveys, photographic flights, per-
sonnel transportation, aerial stock-
ing of wild turkey, public services
and general assistance to other exist-
ing State and Federal Agencies. The
air arm of the Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission has many
times proven its worth and is con-
sidered a necessary and essential op-
erational division.
This past biennium has experi-
enced a positive progressive trend,
with improvement of facilities and
the replacement of needed equip-
ment.
The Chief of the Aviation Section
was appointed Director of Aviation
for the State of Florida Civil Defense
Council in 1959, resulting in the
construction of a carefully planned


emergency procedure to be used in
the event of any disaster.
This appointment also enabled the
Aviation Section to obtain aircraft
and aircraft engine replacement
parts and materials, maintenance
and shop equipment and various
other items through Federal Surplus
Property. Recently, a Bell Heli-
copter was procured at a fraction of
its original cost, made possible by
Federal Donable Properties. Need-
less to say, the versatility of the heli-
copter will offer tremendous assist-
ance to specialized assignments.
Because of the many and varied
tasks which an aircraft must per-
form, positive and thorough main-
tenance is a must. To facilitate this
need, a complete aircraft and engine
inspection and overhaul shop is
maintained at Aviation Section head-
quarters in Ocala, Florida. In con-
junction with maintenance, all pilot
activity reports, operational cost rec-
ord reports, aircraft and engine data,
and administrative duties are carried
on at division headquarters.
The fleet of seven aircraft are
strategically based throughout the
State, each being assigned to an in-
dividual region to carry out their
various assigned duties.
At frequent intervals, each air-
craft is returned to Ocala for a com-
plete inspection, repairs or over-
hauls. The pilots assist and are su-
pervised by qualified maintenance
personnel.


An adequate stock of spare air-
craft and engine parts and materials
are immediately available to reduce
the out-of-service time to a mini-
mum.
In addition to general aircraft
maintenance and aircraft radio in-
stallations, Commission owned air-
boats and outboard motors are fre-
quently brought in for repairs and
overhauls.
Aircraft used by the Commission
include three Piper PA-18-A's; one
Piper PA-25 Sprayer, one Cessna
182, one Stinson L-5 and one Bell
Helicopter.
The Piper sprayer is used for the
control of hyacinths and other noxi-
ous weeds.
During a 24-hour period, a pilot
may be requested to assist in many
tasks, day or night; such as patrol
flying our many lakes and streams,
game management areas, the famed
Everglades, and public properties.
Commission pilots very frenquent-
ly aid in the search for lost or miss-
ing aircraft, boats and unfortunate
individuals who have met with acci-
dents in the forests or upon the wa-
ters. General survey and aerial pho-
tographic work are commonplace,
and with the coming of each fall, a
statewide duck census is conducted
by air for the purpose of classifying
species and approximate numbers.
The aerial stocking of wild turkey
has proven entirely successful, eli-
minating many hours of tedious
traveling by ground personnel to the
many re-stocking areas within the
State of Florida.
Game Commission pilots must
possess a technique of controlling
their aircraft at altitudes and speeds
not familiar to the average com-
mercial pilot during routine flying.
In addition, a complete and thorough
knowledge of wildlife officer's duties
and responsibilities is essential.
A large percentage of pilot activi-
ties involve ground operation, in-
cluding law enforcement, public ap-
pearances with regard to informa-
tion and education, equipment main-
tenance and general assistance
wherever needed.
Operational procedures and divi-
sional policies are constructed and
constantly maintained to effect an
economical, progressive and essen-
tial function of the Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission. 0


A VIA TION


WILLIAM S. DURKEE
-Chief-


I I







THE completion, occupation, and
dedication of the new headquar-
ters building of the Northeast Region
was probably the highlight of this
biennial period. The regional staff
now has adequate, comfortable quar-
ters, and a sense of permanency is
felt by all the men in the field.
The 16 counties that comprise
the Northeast Region are Alachua,
Baker, Bradford, Clay, Columbia,
Dixie, Duval, Gilchrist, Hamilton,
Lafayette, Madison, Nassau, Levy,
Suwannee, Taylor, and Union. The
region logically divides into four en-
forcement areas, each under the su-
pervision of an area supervisor.
Twenty-eight wildlife officers are the


ETAe


Northeast Region


law enforcement arm of the region.
Other regional personnel includes a
regional manager, secretary, educa-
tion officer, three radio station op-
erators, pilot, fish management tech-
nician, and radio engineer. In addi-
tion, there are eight game manage-
ment technicians working in the
region, two more than during the
previous biennium. These additions,
together with an added radio engi-
neer and a radio station operator,
give the region a working force of
49 persons, which is two more than
in the previous reporting period.
Statistics sometimes make dull
reading, but a report of this kind is
not complete without them. They do
furnish, also an insight into the aver-
age working day of our Wildlife Of-
ficers.
Briefly then, the Wildlife Officers
of this region traveled 1,193,274
miles, and made 1,576 arrests dur-
ing the course of 178,651 hours of
land patrol and 16,317 hours of water
patrol. They spent 1,740 hours in
court, 2,333 hours in meetings of
various kinds, 2,072 hours in main-
taining equipment, and 2,103 hours
on office work which consists of
making the various required reports.
The licenses-checked figure doubt-
less includes many duplications,


C. N. CLYMORE
Manager

but the old sportsman's complaint
of never having his license checked
is seldom heard nowadays. Forty-one
illegal but usable deer, seven tur-
keys, and 6,300 pounds of fish were
seized by the men, and donated to
charitable institutions.
All officers are radio-equipped,
and, with stations now located at
Jacksonville, Lake City, Perry,
Cross City, and Williston, there are
no areas where radio coverage can-
not be achieved. It is hard to over-
estimate the usefulness of the radio
as a law enforcement tool in this
region.
The Communications Division al-
tered the radio stations so that when
the stations are not manually oper-
ated, they are in an automatic po-
sition which permits the men to have
24 hour radio coverage. This has
been a great advantage to the men
in their work, as was the installa-
tion of an automatic station in the
"fringe" area of Starke and Camp
Blanding.
As important as law enforcement
is, the long-range goal in this region


is recognized as education of the
public, and no effort is spared in this
department. All personnel partici-
pate in this phase of our work, but
the main burden, of course, falls on
the Information Extension Officer.
He is almost constantly on the road,
making talks to school groups, civic
clubs, and sportsmens organizations,
working with youth groups, getting
out favorable news releases and pic-
tures, and generally spreading the
word of good conservation. Much
emphasis has been laid on this work
during the past two years in this re-
gion, and a growing awareness on
the part of the public of the need for
following good conservation prac-
tices is plainly apparent in many of
our counties. This is evidenced by
the fact that sportsmen's clubs have
been organized and are actively
functioning in Baker, Dixie, and
Taylor counties. These are good
game counties, but have been some-
what of a law enforcement problem
in the past. The fact that the citizens
of these counties have seen fit to
organize these clubs is a sure sign of
conservation progress.
Although it is little known, the
Commission has a program of mak-
ing rewards to certain citizens who
assist in law enforcement work. A
citizen who is directly responsible
for the apprehension and conviction
of a person in a major game case is
entitled to a reward ($25.00) upon
certification by the proper authori-
ties. We have paid several rewards
in the Northeast Region, but it is
noteworthy that no person who has
received a reward turned in infor-





































mation for the reward, but as a pub-
lic duty. This is a fine program, but
the main satisfaction comes from the
fact that, reward or not, the public
is becoming more and more aware
of the importance of good conserva-
tion practices.
Requests for assistance with fish
management problems have con-
tinued to increase, and the regional
fish management technician works
hard to see that all requests are
promptly answered. In addition to
pond poisoning and noxious plant
control, the technician stocked 88
ponds, lakes, and streams with 180,-
000 bream, and 61 bodies of water
with largemouth black bass. He
inspected several hundred lakes
and ponds. He assisted the fish man-
agement division on several large
projects, and was in turn greatly
aided by the hyacinth control unit
with several hyacinth control prob-
lems in the region.
The seven management areas lo-
cated in the Northeast region total
698,250 acres, with all but 96,250
acres available for hunting. The
steadily increasing number of per-
mits sold testifies to hunters' satis-
faction with the management area
program in this region. Larger kills
of all game species are reported in
the areas every year, which indicates


that the game biologists stationed in
this region are doing an outstanding
job.
During the biennium, the Cessna
170B was traded for a Cessna "Sky-
lane," a more powerful and better
equipped plane. With a complete in-
strument panel and radio gear, night
flying has become routine, and many
good cases have resulted. The plane
is also used for such things as per-
sonnel transportation, fire spotting,
photo surveys, search for missing
persons, and duck counts. This plane
is well suited to the needs of law
enforcement work, and the experi-
ence of the pilot has enabled him to
be of great assistance to the officers
on the ground in making cases. Il-
legal fire hunters have been known
to shut off their light and go home
upon hearing a plane near them,
whether it was our plane or not.
They have learned that a plane in
the vicinity very often means that
wildlife officers in cars will soon
make their appearance, and it is be-
lieved that considerable game has
been saved as a result of the use of
the plane.
One of the most important uses of
the plane is in fire spotting. The pilot
is always on the lookout for fires
while on patrol, and has been the
first to report several fires. The plane


is available to personnel of this and
other regions when haste and dis-
tance are factors in making trips,
and has been especially useful in
this respect on several occasions.

One of the most important factors
in managing our deer population has
come as a side effect of the State
Livestock Sanitary Board's highly
successful screw fly eradication pro-
gram. While the primary purpose of
the program was to aid the Florida
cattleman, all field personnel have
noted the increase in our fawn popu-
lation this past year. We will now be
able to raise a much larger propor-
tion of the fawns dropped that we
formerly lost to screw worms. The
program would be well worth while
if it were conducted solely for the
sake of our game.
The Northeast Florida Wildlife
Officer's Club, composed of officers
of the region, continues to hold its
periodic meetings, and has seen the
practice spread to other regions.
Meetings are held quarterly, at
which time the men have the op-
portunity to exchange ideas and ex-
periences, and, quite often, officials
from the Tallahassee office are pres-
ent to explain new policies and pro-
grams, and to answer questions that
arise during the course of the of-
ficer's work. It is felt that these
meetings are invaluable from the
standpoint of morale.
The formation and encouragement
of sportsmens groups is one of the
most important aspects of the work
in this region. A good working con-
servation program is not possible
without the cooperation of the pub-
lic, regardless of the efforts of a
State conservation agency. All per-
sonnel of the region recognize this
fact, and no effort is spared to help
each and every sportsmens club in
the region to be a success. Several
new clubs have been formed in the
region in the last two years, and
they, in turn, have been extremely
helpful to the personnel of the re-
gion. On several occasions, members
of sportsmens clubs have held viola-
tors at the scene of violation until
the arrival of the wildlife officer,
and have appeared as witnesses at
the trial. This type of cooperation
between the two groups bodes well
for the success of wildlife conserva-
tion in Florida. *


__


1








































T HE Northwest Florida Region
Encompasses nearly eight million
acres of land, bordered on the west
and north by Alabama and Georgia,
and on the south by the Gulf of
Mexico.
The lands of the region are com-
posed mainly of hilly timberlands,
wilderness areas, and older agri-
cultural lands. Most of the fishable
waters are in rivers and streams, al-
though there are concentrations of
lakes in the Tallahassee, Chattaho-
ochee and Chipley areas. The region
is unique in that it has the heaviest
concentrations of farm fish-ponds
under management by the Commis-
sion's Fisheries Division.
The region is the Third Conserva-
tion District of Florida, comprised
of Bay, Calhoun, Escambia, Frank-
lin, Gadsden, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson,
Jefferson, Leon, Liberty, Okaloosa,
Santa Rosa, Wakulla, Washington
and Walton Counties.
Thirteen percent of all the land in
Northwest Florida is found in the
Commission's eight Wildlife Man-
agement Areas. This totals 1,009,420


acres, or more than one-quarter of
all the Commission's management
lands in the entire state.
Newest of the eight wildlife man-
agement areas is the 85,000-acre
Point Washington area in Bay, Wal-
ton and Okaloosa counties.
Most outstanding of the manage-
ment areas is the Eglin Field area,
with 390,000 acres in Santa Rosa,
Okaloosa and Walton Counties,
jointly controlled by the Commission
and the U. S. Air Force. The Eglin
is rightfully acclaimed as a "sports-
man's paradise," since it is noted as
one of the best deer hunting areas
in the South.
The centers for human populations
are Pensacola, Tallahassee-site of
the Commission's Central office, and
Panama City, site of the Regional
office. Personnel based at Panama
City are the regional manager, sec-
retary, information extension officer,
fishery biologist, radio engineer,
pilot, and two wildlife officers.
Highly important during the bi-
ennial period was the outstanding
improvement evident in the overall


calibre of the employees, which re-
sulted partially from careful Merit
System replacements of resigned and
retired employees. A large share of
the improvement is directly trace-
able to the region's in-service train-
ing programs for employees.
The Commission's first Wildlife
Officers Public Relations training
program was held in this region. It
was accounted as highly successful,
and the results are still evident.
Other training programs were held
on the area basis in a rotating fash-
ion that eventually reached all em-
ployees.
Promotion examinations were also
held. These have been successful
and have contributed to better em-
ployee morale. It is noteworthy that
of all regional wildlife officers eli-
gible for promotion to first class po-
sition, a total of 90.9 percent volun-
tarily participated in the examina-
tions, and fifty-five percent achieved
satisfactory ratings.
Other important facets of the
regional work include cooperative
endeavors with the new Choctaw-
hatchee River Valley Wildlife and
Outdoor Recreation Development
Commission, the Northwest Florida
Wildlife Association, the Eglin Field
Wildlife Board, and similar groups.
The region is also the pilot for the
Commission's new Regional Con-
servation Advisory Council, com-
posed of prominent citizens of the
Region. Members are Mr. Forace


c e


Northwest Region


J. W. BICKERSTAFF
Manager






































Holland, chairman, Panama City;
The Reverend M. A. DuRant, Mari-
anna; Mr. John S. Pittman, Jay; Mr,
W. I. ("Bubba") Stinson, DeFuniak
Springs; and Mr. Payne H. Midyette,
Sr., Tallahassee.
Over eight hundred farm fish
ponds are under the technical assist-
ance program of the regional fish-
eries biologist. During the biennium,
the biologist checked public and pri-
vate lakes and ponds to determine
management needs, and 857,525
bream and 140,825 black bass were
released in 435 lakes and ponds.
The biologist also assisted hatch-
ery personnel with management
needs at the Blackwater Hatchery at
Holt. During the biennium, this
Commission hatchery produced an
average of 1,500,000 bluegill finger-
lings and 70,000 black bass finger-
lings each year.
First installation and successful
operation of the new radio communi-
cations system for remote-control of
base stations was also accomplished
in the Northwest Region.
Radio communications for the re-
gion is accomplished by eight base
stations and 69 mobile units. With
the continuous effort to improve the
region's operational vehicle equip-
ment, causing transfers of radio
equipment to new vehicles, and


maintenance of same, the radio en-
gineer is engaged in a continuous
effort.
Because of the topography of the
region, the regional aviation pro-
gram has always been a great asset
in achieving good law enforcement
throughout the 16 counties. During


the biennium, the pilot's routine air
patrols and air-to-ground contact
with the wildlife officers accounted
for many arrests that otherwise
would have been impossible. Air
searches for distressed persons, and
waterfowl inventories were also ac-
complished during the period.

The Northwest Region is divided
into four enforcement areas, with a
wildlife officer supervisor over each
to supervise a combined total of 29
officers. A summary of law enforce-
ment activities for the biennium
shows totals of 160,744 hours on land
patrol, 31,748 hours on water patrol,
with a total of 1,364,704 miles trav-
eled to accomplish 1,225 arrests for
fish and game law violations. The
officers also spent 1,477 hours in
court, 4,422 hours in meetings, 3,006
hours in equipment maintenance,
2,281 hours on office work, and 7,513
hours on duties other than law en-
forcement. They investigated 2,072
complaints of violations.

The Information Extension Officer
for the region is the specialist who
is concerned with all public rela-
tions problems and programs in the
region. He is engaged in a widely
varied scope of work aimed at prop-
erly presenting the region's activi-
ties, policies and program to the peo-
ple of Northwest Florida. *


j







NE OF THE highlights of the past
biennium for the Everglades
region was the moving of the Re-
gional Office from Okeechobee City
to the newly constructed Commis-
sion Office Building, located at 551
Military Trail, in West Palm Beach.
This move meant a more centrally
located operation, both geographic-
ally and population-wise, for re- .. -
gional personnel. "---
The Everglades Region encom-
passes nearly eight million acres of
land area, ranging from the popu-
lous tourist resorts of the gold coast
to the forbidding primitive areas of
the Everglades.
The Region includes 10 counties,
which are Dade, Broward, Collier,
Indian River, St. Lucie, Okeechobee,
Palm Beach, Monroe, Martin and
Hendry. The two largest counties of
the Everglades Region, both in land
areas and in populations, are Dade
and Palm Beach.









Everglades Region


The Everglades swamp lands have
been described as a huge, shallow,
creeping river hidden by a blanket
of sawgrass. It is sometimes difficult
to realize, while riding through the
central part of the Everglades Re-
gion, that just 50 miles on either
side of you are populous tourist re-
sorts bulging with people and their
activities. On the other hand, a per-
son traveling down the fabulous
coast of the Everglades Region
would find it equally difficult to vis-
ualize the vast remote stretches of
cypress strands, flat pine and palm
hammocks that dominate the north-
ern and west central portion of the
Everglades Region. The never end-
ing expanse of sawgrass spreads its
reedy vegetation as far as the hu-
man eye can see in the southern end
of the Region.
All these wonders of nature so
abundant in the Everglades Region
present a challenging and fascinating
country that attracts more and more


LOUIS F. GAINEY
Manager


sportsmen and sightseers each year.
Certainly this Region contains
some of the most unusual hunting
and fishing in the world.
The distinctive mark of the Ever-
glades Region is the need for highly
specialized equipment to hunt, fish,
explore or work the uncivilized
areas. More 'glades sportsmen have
evolved mobile equipment capable
of conquering the remotest areas. So
proud are they of their equipment-
swamp buggies, airboats, half-tracks
or weasels-that two of the more ex-
citing events in South Florida are
the "Swamp Buggy Day" parade
and races at Naples on the south-
west coast, and the airboat races
held each year in West Palm Beach
and west of Miami on the Tamiami
Trail, where owners compete for the
highest honors.


The Commission's Everglades Re-
gion contains over one-third of the
population of the State of Florida.
It also contains some of the most
desolate wilderness areas. This
means that the Regional Office, lo-
cated in West Palm Beach is con-
stantly faced with specialized prob-
lems, peculiar only to this Regional
operation.
This Region is staffed by a force of
21 Wildlife Officers, four Area Su-
pervisors, one Pilot, one Regional
Fisheries Biologist, one Regional In-
formation Officer and a Regional
Manager. Most of these men were
trained by many years of associa-
tion with the vast reaches of the Big
Cypress, Lake Okeechobee and
Everglades Sawgrass, even before
coming to the Commission for em-
ployment. Such experience is help-
ful to our conservation job and to
wilderness survival, in view of the
many dangers encountered in the
more isolated areas.
Most of the Region's highly spe-
cialized equipment was developed by
personal knowledge and experimen-
tation by our officers. Through the
years, the Region's Wildlife Officers







have designed and built stronger
and faster airboats, to give the Offi-
cer the extreme advantage in the
'Glades, in spite of their added
equipment, such as extra gas and
camping equipment necessary for
extended law enforcement patrols.
Special tracks for the Commission
half-track mobile equipment had to
be developed, so the equipment
would be reliable at all times and
not fail at a crucial moment.
This transport experimentation is
still going on, and the results have
been appreciable. There is still the
ever-present problem of more and
more hunters and better equipment
invading this Region each year. The
Everglades personnel have to con-
tinue to improve equipment to
widen its range and potential in
order to keep pace with the ever-
increasing number of sportsmen in
the area.
The four types of terrain found in
the Everglades Region make it nec-
essary to use specialized equipment
to patrol areas. Airboats are a must
in the sawgrass area, while swamp


outboard motorboats to patrol the
open waters.
The Region has added a two-place
helicopter, during the Biennium, to
its inventory of specialized equip-
ment. This aircraft is equipped with
pontoons, making it adaptable for
use on land or water. The Regional
Pilot now serves the Regional Per-
sonnel as, both an airplane pilot and
a helicopter pilot.
Besides their primary duty of law
enforcement, Wildlife Officers in this
Region are continually called upon
for many tasks ranging from collect-
ing biological data to rescue work.
Throughout the past two years, many
messages of sickness and death were
delivered to sportsmen deep in the
'glades areas and several rescues
were made of fishermen in over-
turned boats and hunters lost in the
swampy Everglades. Hunters acci-
dentally shot or stricken with sick-
ness were given first aid and swift
transportation to hospitals. Creel
census and bag checks were often
made by Wildlife Officers, to aid in


obtaining a more complete picture
for the Game and Fish Management
Divisions projects.
The demand for fisheries efforts on
both public and privately owned wa-
ters is still increasing throughout
the Everglades Region, owing to the
rapid growth and development of
the areas involved. The Regional
Fishery Biologist inspected many
privately-owned ponds throughout
the Everglades Region, and sound
management advice was given to the
pond owners. The management prob-
lems encountered most within the
Region are non-fertile waters and
unbalanced fish populations.
The Fisheries Biologist assisted in
fish kill reports. The Biologist also
assisted in numerous fish projects,
outside of his normal duty station,
which consisted of surveys, both
ground and air, of lakes and streams.
Progress made during the Bien-
nium in other Regional and Divi-
sional operations of the Everglades
Region is adequately presented in
the various reports contained in this
Biennial Report. 0


RECAPITULATION
WILDLIFE OFFICERS
ACTIVITIES
Everglades Region
1958-1960


Miles Traveled ..........
Arrests Made ............
Land Patrol- (Hours) ...
Water Patrol- (Hours) ..
Meetings (Hours) .......
Court (Hours) ..........
Miscellaneous (Hours) ...
Complaints Investigated ..
Equipment Maintenance
(H ours) ..............
Spent Office Work (Hours)


845,186
1,655
116,754
11,537
1,879
2,665
7,896
1,988

8,651
2,014


buggies and half-tracks are often
used during a low-water period.
Swamp buggies, half-tracks and
weasels are mandatory in the big
cypress, where trees, rocks and mud
would soon rip the bottom from an
airboat or bog down a jeep. The
northern flat pine portion of the Re-
gion requires only jeeps and auto-
mobiles. In the Lake Okeechobee
area, consisting of open water and
marshy areas, airboats are most suit-
able, with one inboard and several


. I














































T HE CENTRAL FLORIDA REGION,
also known as the Fifth Con-
servation District, is composed of
Brevard, Citrus, Flagler, Lake, Mar-
ion, Orange, Osceola, Putnam, St.
Johns, Seminole, Sumter and Volu-
sia Counties. Smallest of the coun-
ties is Seminole, with 347 square
miles, while the largest is Marion,
with 1,624 square miles. The entire
area of the Central Region covers
11,879 square miles, and includes
some of the finest hunting and fresh-
water fishing areas in the State,
among which are the Ocala National
Forest and the St. Johns River with
its tributaries.
In the last biennial report, it will
be noted that a special law-enforce-
ment area, with its own patrol crew,
namely the St. Johns River, includ-
ing Lake George and Crescent Lake,
was created. This crew was assigned
to work the St. Johns River from


the north boundary line of St. Johns
County to Sanford. The task was to
control all types of illegal fishing,
with an emphasis to putting a stop
to electrical or "monkey fishing."
The crew has consistently been
equipped with the best possible boats
and high-speed motors. It should be
reported that the Wildlife Officers
have harassed and arrested the fish-
ermen who engage in illegal activity
to the extent that the illegal activi-
ties are not considered a profitable
business on the St. Johns River at
this time.
A crew of 28 wildlife officers and
three area supervisors handle the
law enforcement work in the Cen-
tral Florida Region. Approximately
four men devote full time to the St.
Johns River-Lake George water
area, and two others work part time
there. All other officers primarily
work the woods.


The rest of the staff is composed
of the regional manager, information
extension officer and secretary-radio
operator.
Other activities within this region
include the work of game manage-
ment personnel, covering game man-
agement areas which are located in
this region, the Lake Fishery Ex-
periment Station at Leesburg, the
office of the Youth Conservation
Education Section of the Information
and Education Division at Ocala, the
Youth Conservation Camp at Lake
Eaton in the Ocala National Forest,
the Communications Division at
New Smyrna Beach, and the Avia-
tion Division located at the muni-
cipal airport in Ocala.
There are five base radio stations
within the Region, located in Ocala,
Leesburg, San Mateo (Putnam
County), Tomoka (Volusia County)
and Magnolia (Osceola County).
The first two stations are operated
by Commission personnel. Remain-
ing three stations are operated by
Florida Forest personnel under a co-
operative agreement. All Wildlife
Officers, except one, are equipped
with mobile units in their vehicles
and, wherever possible, all personnel
have residence telephones creating a
minimum of delay in handling emer-
gency matters and administrative
problems.
During the biennium of 1958-1960,
Wildlife Officers in the region trav-
eled 1,058,271 miles. They made 1147
arrests, spent 133,610 hours on land
patrol and 34,800 hours on water pa-
trol. In addition to this, they spent
19,706 hours on miscellaneous type
duties.
Advancements are made in the
type of equipment used by officers
as fast as can be afforded. Seventy-
one percent of the officers have ve-
hicles not older than 1958 models,
24 of the current 29 officers have
boats, motors and trailers, and there
are three patrol airboats available at
all times in this region.
During this past biennium, the
third stage of chemical renovation
of Lake Apopka was finished, and
was very successful. Fishing started
to improve after the first poisining,
and has improved successively with
the other two.
On January 7, 1960, the Central
Florida Region moved its personnel
and equipment into a new office


174Je


Central Region

D. C. LAND
Manager







building owned by the Commission,
built on land donated by the State
Industrial S c h o o 1 s Commission
which was formerly a part of the
State Industrial School for Girls
property in Ocala. The building faces
State Road 40 (also known as Silver
Springs Boulevard) and is just east
of the city limits. The building is
modern, but simple, and its simplicity
and efficiency is in keeping with the
ideals of the Commission.
During the past two years, some
changes were made in Game Man-
agement Areas throughout the Cen-
tral Florida Region. In 1957, work
was started on the 12,200 acre Guano
River Management Area in St. Johns
County. Of this 12,200 acres, 2,200
acres is in marsh land. The other
10,000 acres includes a highland pen-
insula and a salt marsh. Work has
progressed satisfactorily on this man-
agement area and, in the future, it
should be an excellent migratory
waterfowl area.
In 1958, hunting was allowed on
the Citrus Wildlife Management
Area (formerly known as the With-
lakoochee Project) for the first time.
The first season was a one-day hunt
only. In 1959, archers were allowed
to hunt on the area for approxi-


SERVICE AWARD-D. C. Land,
Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission Regional Manager for the
Fifth District, completed 26 years
service in 1961. Land, who was first
employed as an enforcement officer,
received a special service award
from District Commissioner Don
Southwell.


mately 10 days. Gun hunters were
allowed on the area in a series of
three, special two-day hunts, from
applications sent to the Tallahassee
Office. The deer herd is considered
to be of good size on this area, and
an attempt is being made to stock
the area with turkeys to see if they
will successfully reproduce.
In 1959, the Sumter-Citrus Man-
agement Area was withdrawn as a
Public Hunt Area, leaving, in addi-
tion to the two mentioned above, the
following Wildlife Management
Areas in the Central Florida Region:
Ocala National Forest, Holopaw (Os-
ceola County), Farmton (Volusia
County), Tomoka (Volusia and Fla-
gler Counties; approximately 50,000
acres were added to this in 1959),
Richloam (Sumter, Hernando and
Pasco Counties), and Croom (Her-
nando and Sumter Counties).
Every species of native game ani-
mal, migratory and non-migratory
game birds, and waterfowl are avail-
able to the hunter in this region.
Personnel of the Central Florida
Region will continue to strive to
bring better hunting, fishing and con-
servation practices to the people
within their own area and the rest
of the State of Florida. 0

































South Florida Region


THE South Florida Region, ex-
tending along the central Gulf
coast of peninsular Florida and in-
land to the Kissimmee River and
Lake Okeechobee, encompasses a
thirteen county area of 7,220,000
acres. A picturesque and modern
Florida is exemplified in this region
composed of Hernando, Pasco, Pinel-
las, Hillsborough, Manatee, Sarasota,
Charlottee, Lee, Polk, Hardee, De-
Soto, Highland, and Glades counties.
The Regional office, located at
Lakeland, serves as headquarters
for coordination of regionwide Com-
mission programs and policies. A
building site for a new Regional
office building was recently obtained
by the Commission and construction
is planned for the next biennum.
This new building will provide com-
bined office space for this Region
and the Hyacinth Control Section of
the Fish Management Division.
The Regional personnel comple-
ment includes the Regional Man-
ager, three Area Supervisors, twen-
ty-three Wildlife Officers, ten Game
Management personnel, two Hatch-
ery personnel and a Fisheries Biolo-
gist, Information, and Education
Officer, Pilot, Communications En-
gineer, Stenographer and Clerk-
Typist. The functions of the Com-


mission are administered through
the Regional Office to meet the chal-
lenge of progressive wildlife re-
source conservation through a bal-
anced program of regulation, en-
forcement, management, education
and research.
Commission work in this Region
continues to be directed toward
meeting the extensive demands for
outdoor recreational opportunities
made by our rapidly increasing resi-
dent population. Wildlife conserva-
tion including both preservation
and use management must be
ultra-progressive in scope and appli-
cation. A continuous challenge is
effected by spreading urban areas,
an accelerated change in agriculture
and extensive industrial growth.
Large acreages of prime wildlife
habitat have fallen before this
growth, and the process continues
at a terrific rate. With proper man-
agement, our great natural resource
wealth will meet these demands.
The various duties of our wildlife
officers included many hours of
work with other divisional person-



D. E. TIMMONS, JR.
Manager


nel in many programs. Fish restora-
tion, fish population sampling and
census, game census, game habitat
improvement, fair and exhibit con-
struction and operation, and youth
conservation instruction were some
of the additional activities besides
pure law enforcement land and
water patrol. Extensive public serv-
ice work is rendered in the form of
aiding other public agencies, espe-
cially in participation in rescue work
and other emergency situations.
Professional improvement has
been emphasized, and regional and
area meetings have included instruc-
tional periods on the many and var-
ied subjects applicable to wildlife
law enforcement.
The Information and Education
Officer has accomplished much in
this employee information program-
ming. The surface has merely been
scratched regarding this subject.
Personnel must be continually train-
ed to match the progressive ideas
directing wildlife conservation today.
Publicity and public relations pro-
grams were continuously emphasized
during all phases of our operation
during this biennium. This work was
coordinated by the regional informa-
tion and education officer. Specific
management, enforcement, and re-
search programs were publicized
through varied communications
media. Television, radio, newspapers,
magazines, films, exhibits, and
speeches were used. Instructional
and educational talks were made,
and films were shown to all age
groups in many civic, school, church,


% II FBL~i~a~s I


i







and professional clubs and organiza-
tions.
The trend in wildlife conservation
education has been to emphasize the
many values of wildlife, serving not
only the hunter and fisherman, but
also the average public through its
irreplaceable aesthetic value. Ac-
cordingly, recreational values are
not based on the kill or the catch,
but more on the opportunity of visit-
ing the woods and fields, the lakes
and rivers, and throughout the out-
doors realizing this as recreational
fulfillment.
An increase in the license sales
in the South Florida Region verifies
the increasing numbers of hunters
and fishermen. It must be recognized
that certain factors will tend to fluc-
tuate numbers of licenses sold from
year to year. The high rainfall dur-
ing this two year period has been
very harmful to wild turkey and
bobwhite quail populations while
fresh water fishing has been phe-
nomenal. A proportionately small
increase in number of hunting li-
censes sold is therefore quite logi-
cal, as is the large increase in num-
ber of fishing licenses sold.


Fishing License Sales
Resident State
Non-Resident State
Non-Res. 14 day
Non-Res. 3 day
Total Number
Total Revenue
Hunting License Sales
Resident State
Resident County
Resident Other County
Non-Resident State
Non-Res. 10 Day
Private Preserve
Total Number
Total Revenue


Wildlife law enforcement
Region has progressed
qualified and trained perso
better equipment are beir
in the field. Activity repo
that during this biennium
number of arrests were m
The exhibit at the Flor
Fair has been improved e
with better display facilities
and built for showing the
fish. The Commission perse
sent explain details about ti
of native wildlife on exhil
interesting facts about ou
and its conservation, and a:
many questions asked by
ers. The usual display of 1
mens of Florida game anim
fresh water fish, and rep
varied to include a panthe
and a bear the next. Thes
tive species are of particular
to many people since they
sighted in the wilds today
The Wildlife Managem
in this Region produced
cellent hunting for deer
game birds and animals.
Park, Richloam, Croom, I
eating Creek, and Cecil We


1958-59
96,355
1,543
6,129
10,835
114,862
$213,270.25

21,002
13,051
163
41
288

34,545
$174,739.25


RECAPITULATION OF WILDLIFE OFFICER ACTIVITIES
1958-59 1959-60
Miles Traveled 563,025 509,3021/2
Arrests Made 1,021 694
Hours Land Patrol 70,974 65,621
Hours Water Patrol 3,837 2,495
Hours in Court 1,027 1,030
Hours in Meetings 1,341 1,171
Complaints Investigated 946 864
Hours Equipment Maintenance 1,123 1,092
Hours Miscellaneous Duties 5,687 4,973
Hours Office Work 812 701


it in this Hunt Areas have gained in popu-
is better larity as a place for the average man
nnel with to go hunting, fishing and camping.
ig placed As larger acreages of private lands
,rts show are fenced and posted, the demand
a record for public accessible lands and wa-
ade. ters has become a major Commission
ida State problem. Land use practices and
each year current land values restrict the ac-
designed quisition and maintenance of more
game and public hunt areas in this Region.
nnel pre- Continued research may discover
he species some practical solution for attaining
bit, relate more such facilities in the future.
r wildlife Shooting preserves providing both
answer the public and private hunting facilities
the view- have become more in evidence
ive speci- throughout this Region during this
als, birds, biennium. Their popularity will un-
)tiles was doubtedly increase as a solution for
r one year "a place to hunt." This type of hunt-
e two na- ing is gaining in popularity.
ar interest The Audubon Society gained valu-
are rarely able information on wading bird
y. populations in this Region during
ent Areas this biennium. In the course of study
some ex- of these birds, including ibis and
and other egrets, several new nesting colonies
The Avon were located by Commission person-
Lee, Fish- nel and referred to the Society.
ebb Public The Fisheries Biologist has done
considerable research and technique
1959-60 development work in addition to
routine pond management, fishery
100,597 survey, and lake and stream man-
1,947 agement projects. The list of ponds
7,047 under management now numbers ap-
12,040 proximately 860. Many of the fish
121,631 used in stocking these ponds are
$228,695.75 produced at the Winter Haven
hatchery.
21,064 Pollution effect analysis and pre-
13,229 vention studies have been a major
177 fisheries project during this bien-
nium. The principal problems have
3 been the appearance of large quanti-
243 ties of industrial wastes in streams
1 and lakes, and residential and agri-
43,748 cultural development effects on
$174,868.75 lakes. The increased values being
placed by the average sportsman on
game and fish habitat have been re-
Total flected by the considerable public
1,072,327'/2 reaction to the water and wildlife
1,715 destroying pollution.
Wildlife conservation is service
136,595
with progress-a kaleidoscope of
6,332 people, wildlife and the outdoors.
2,057 During this continues change of ele-
2,512 ments, the South Florida Region is
1,810 justly proud of its accomplishments
2,215 of providing the many recreational
10,660 opportunities for present and future
1,513 Floridians. 0































YOUTH


CONSERVATION


EDUCATION


DENVER STE. CLAIRE
-SECTION CHIEF-
T HE PHILOSOPHY is as follows:
In many communities over the
nation conservation education pro-
grams are being offered in schools
and in youth groups. What better
time can we find to teach our chil-
dren about man's dependence upon
land and water than during the for-
mative years? What better way to
teach them the proper concepts of
resource use than through our teach-
ing efforts in our youth programs
and our camps?
Our efforts in teaching our youth
in these various type programs are
a safeguard until more of our schools
are prepared to offer proper conser-
vation training.
We cannot escape the urgent need
for a dynamic type of conservation
education in our schools that will
be in accord with developing prob-
lems, achievements, and trends of
our times.
So much depends on our youth;
so much more depends on the adults


who must see that the youth of
Florida are in a position to accept
the proper concepts of conservation.
Herein lies a direct challenge to
any state agency involved in the dis-
semination of education and infor-
mation. Thusly, the information and
education of Florida's youth in na-
ture and wildlife and other resources
has become a vital part of the Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commission's
education policy.
The Information and Education
Division, through its Youth Conser-
vation Education Section, has been
charged with this great responsibility.
Consequently a program was
launched in January of 1952.
No sound program was ever in-
itiated without a definite purpose.
Fully cognizant of this, a program
was designed for Florida's youth. It
had to challenge and move our youth
into action.
In developing a multi-phase pro-
gram five-fold concepts were con-


sidered. They are:
1. To train our youth toward a
better understanding of conser-
vation of our natural resoruces.
2. To instill in the minds of our
youth a greater appreciation
of the out of doors and to rec-
ognize the great need of pro-
tecting and improving the
State's outdoors.
3. To teach them the wise use and
planned maintenance of our
soils and waters.
4. To guide them in the sound use
and intelligent management of
our fish and wildlife.
5. To help them foster the proper
utilization and systematic per-
petuation of our forests.
Using these five concepts as the
basis for the program, it has been
necessary to employ various meth-
ods to capture and hold the interest
and cooperation of youth. To stimu-
late their thinking to a better under-
standing of conservation of our nat-
ural resources, the program has
been designed to include as many
challenges as possible.
The multiphased program spon-
sored by the Commission includes
the following Florida divisions:
The Youth Conservation Corps;
the Youth Conservation Clubs;
Youth Conservation League; Youth
Conservation Camps; Scouting for
Conservation; Boy Scouts of Amer-
ica; 4-H Clubs; Camp Fire Girls,
Inc.; Junior Garden Clubs; Conser-
vation Camps for Special Groups;
Florida State Adult Advisory Coun-
cil and Council Workshops.
YOUTH CLUBS
The Youth Conservation Corps is
comprised of all club members
within the state. The Youth Conser-
vation Clubs Program has devel-
oped to a stage where it now in-
cludes 25 organized clubs in the
State League. These clubs are found
in some of the principal cities of the
State of Florida. Other than the 25
affiliated clubs, there are other
k no w n organized non affiliated
youth conservation clubs. When a
club is organized, it is not manda-
tory for the club to join the League.
The club may remain independent,
but it still may avail itself of the
many services which the Commis-
sion extends in its educational pro-
gram.







The clubs are organized by the
Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission. Any interested adult
group can sponsor one of the clubs.
A booklet, "How to Organize a
Youth Conservation Club," has been
prepared by the Information and Ed-
ucation Division. A second booklet,
"How to Operate a Youth Conser-
vation Club," has recently been
printed. The third and final booklet
in this series, "The Youth Conser-
vation League and Camp," is in the
process of being written.
YOUTH LEAGUE
The Youth Conservation Club
League, Inc., was created for the
purpose of bringing together the
clubs and their members, and to
consolidate their efforts toward a
greater understanding of conserva-
tion. Only those youth clubs that
have been organized and have a
charter and by-laws are eligible for
League Membership.
The clubs that join the League
are required to meet certain stand-
ards; when these standards are met,
they are invited to join and partici-
pate in all League activities.
Each year, at an annual meeting
held at the Youth Conservation
Camp, delegates from the various
affiliated clubs convene for the pur-
pose of discussing club and League
business. At the annual meeting, the
Board of Directors, elected by the
delegates, prepares an agenda for
the ensuing year, and makes recom-
mendations for the annual summer
camp.
The Board governs and creates
policies for the League and affiliates.
YOUTH CAMP
The Youth Conservation Camp has
been established for the purpose of
giving our youth an opportunity to
enjoy the outdoors, and to learn
more about conservation. At camp,
they join forces for a week of com-
bined recreation and outdoor educa-
tion. During the encampment, the
youthful conservationists learn new
concepts of conservation and are
given the opportunity to recognize
that conservation of our natural re-
sources means "the wise use of the
resources with the greatest good for
the largest number of people for the
longest time." They learn that the
wealth of the Nation depends upon
its available resources and upon the
resourcefulness of its people. At


camp, they are made aware that
conservation applies to all people,
urban and rural, and, to be most ef-
fective, must be practiced univer-
sally.
Qualifying for target shooting has
been one of the camp's important ac-
tivities. The program is approved
by the National Rifle Association.
The older boys shoot .22 calibre ri-
fles, while the smaller boys use air
rifles.
In 1958, the Hunter Safety Pro-
gram was offered as a supplement to
the Rifle Instruction Activity.
The Youth Conservation Camp is
located on 57 acres in the Ocala Na-
tional Forest on Lake Eaton. In 1955,
a mess hall, which will accommo-
date 400 young campers, was con-
structed. The building also contains
the Conservation Room. Here are
installed blackboards and exhibits of
Wildlife, Forestry, etc. Educational
films are shown here as well as study
skins of wildlife found in Florida.
Ten concrete-block cabins were
also constructed to accommodate a
total of 100 campers. Seven squad
tents are also available to house ad-
ditional campers. A power line has
been installed to supply electricity.
A winding road trails from State
Road 314 to the center of Camp. The
road was constructed by the State
Road Department in 1954. A sandy
beach has been pumped up.
During the summer of 1957, the
Youth Conservation Camp operated
for 12 weeks. In 1958 it operated for


eight weeks, including one two-
week camping period which was of-
fered on a trial basis. During the
past eight camping seasons, over
4,000 young campers attended the
camp and participated in the pro-
gram.
The operation of the camp is the
direct responsibility of the Chief of
Youth Conservation Education Sec-
tion, who employs a staff, each sum-
mer, which consist of a director;
program, waterfront, nature, and
campcraft directors; a registered
nurse; senior counselors; chief cook;
assistant cook and dishwashers. A
camp custodian resides at the camp
year around. The entire staff is
responsible to the Chief.
Plans for future construction call
for an additional 10 dormitory-style
buildings, and a recreation building.
The recreation building will include
a conservation library, sick bay, ad-
ministration offices, work shops,
stage, small auditorium, lecture
rooms and sleeping quarters. Plans
also include additional docks for
boating, fishing and swimming, and
a larger beach.
The encampment for 1959 was the
sixth held at Lake Eaton. Two previ-
ous encampments were held in the
southern part of Florida, making a
total of eight annual encampments.
Programming for each summer
camp is considered most important
for the young campers. Considerable
attention is given to outlining a pro-
gram which will be interesting.


/







Through the experiences of past
years, it has been determined that a
program offering the greatest inter-
est is one which includes active par-
ticipation. The lectures or talks have
been minimized; and wherever in-
struction is given to the young peo-
ple, discussion, groups are organized.
These discussion groups allow for a
greater exchange of ideas and more
participation by individuals.
Each encampment is evaluated.
The following year's program is de-
veloped by studying recommenda-
tions for the preceding year. Inno-
vations are constantly employed to
improve the program. The Director
and counselors are alert to evaluate
any part of the scheduled program,
and to make the necessary changes
which will bring about the most suc-
cessful results.
Age groups are now assigned spe-
cial weeks. Ages 8-12 and 13-16 have
their separate individual programs
and encampments. This practice was
initiated during the summer of 1958
and was found most successful. The
counselor to camper relationship
was greatly increased.
Counseling is the most important
phase of the summer camping pro-
gram. It is important to have quali-
fied counselors who know how to
work with, and understand, their
young charges. Each encampment
calls for better and more qualified
and enthusiastic counselors. These
men and women must have a sincere
interest and desire to help the
youngsters. Prior to opening of
camps, a workshop for training coun-
selors is held.
SCOUTING
In May, 1957, the Florida Scouting
for Conservation Program was made
public. The Scouting for Conserva-
tion Program, at the time of its in-
ception, had only one other state
program like it. Scouting for Con-
servation is a program created by
the Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission for the use of the Boy
Scouts of America represented by
the nine councils in the State of
Florida. It re-emphasizes conserva-
tion concepts. There are three de-
grees in this program: Ranger, Chief
Ranger, and Florida Wildlife Con-
servationist. Certain specified merit
badges must be completed for each
award. In addition to these merit
badges, there are fourteen conserva-
tion projects for them to select from


and complete.
These projects must be certified
by both the scoutmaster and a rep-
resentative from the Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission. Each
award earns a certificate of achieve-
ment. A cloth designed insignia with
the rank-Ranger, Chief Ranger, or
Florida Conservationist-is present-
ed to the Boy Scouts attaining the
awards.
GIRL SCOUTS
In June, 1957, the first Camp
Wildlife for Girl Scouts was estab-
lished at the Youth Conservation
Camp. There are three councils of
the Girl Scouts of America located
in Florida who use the camp. This
was an experimental camp, and was
so successful in its first year that the
fourth annual wildlife encampment
was completed this past summer,
1960.
During Camp Wildlife for Girl
Scouts, many of Commission biolo-
gists and technicians, and other ex-
perts, have talked and demonstrated
many of the subjects which are re-
lated to conservation. Some of the
specialists are qualified to pass on
merit badges.
4-H CONSERVATION
During the spring of 1959, after
many months of negotiating and con-
ferences, a 4-H program was ap-
proved by the Florida Department
of Agriculture Extension Service
and the representatives of the Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commission.
The purpose of this program is
to encourage 4-H boys to partici-
pate in all phases of conservation of
our natural resources: wildlife, soil
and water conservation, and for-
estry. This program is intended to
stimulate 4-H boys to complete a
program of projects in each of these
fields of conservation with a system
of awards leading to the title of Flor-
ida Wildlife Conservationist.
The following awards are offered:
County level-Primary Conserva-
tion Award. State level-Florida
Wildlife Conservationist Award.
Primary Conservation Award The
4-H boy working toward the Florida
Wildlife Conservation Award begins
by completing a 4-H wildlife project.
Upon completion, he receives a Pri-
mary Certificate indicating he is
working toward the Florida Conser-
vationist Award.
Advanced Conservation Award


The 4-H boy who has completed the
4-H Wildlife Conservation Project
and received the Primary Award
will carry on another such project
and either a soil and water project
or a 4-H Forestry Project. By com-
pleting both in an outstanding man-
ner he receives an Advanced Con-
servation Award.
Florida Wildlife Conservationist
4-H boys who have received the pri-
mary Conservation Award and the
Advanced Conservation A w a r d
working toward the title of Florida
Wildlife Conservationist, must com-
plete a 4-H wildlife project, a forest
project, and a soil and water project.
Upon completion of these three proj-
ects, and an inspection of the records
by the Award Committee, the 4-H
boy receives the Florida Conserva-
tionist Award. He will receive an
appropriate plaque, a certificate, a
medal, and a trip to Tallahassee to
attend the Awards Presentation
Meeting. The Governor will present
the awards.
The program involves at least six
completed 4-H projects in a mini-
mum of three years.
JUNIOR GARDEN CLUBS
In a conference with a special com-
mittee appointed by the President
of the Florida Federation of Garden
Clubs, initial plans were outlined to
create a joint conservation program
between the Junior Garden Clubs
and the Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission. The program offered
by the Commission is designed to
supplement the five areas in which
the Junior Gardener receives in-
struction. The Commission has taken
three of these areas and created a
program which will be approved by
the state Federation of Garden
Clubs. The three conservation de-
grees in which the Junior Gardener
may aspire are: The Order of the
Dirtdauber, The Order of the Sprig
and Sprout, and the Order of the
Florida Wildlife Conservationist. In
each level, certain specified and re-
quired projects are to be completed.
These projects are in the areas of
nature, conservation and horticul-
ture. Each level includes a grade,
starting with the fourth. Each order
may be earned by completing the
projects assigned within a given
grade. Certificates and pins will be
awarded to those completing the
three progressive stages.






























CAMP FIRE GIRLS
A program in the process of com-
pletion is another sponsored by the
Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission in cooperation with the
Camp Fire Girls, Inc., in Florida.
The program received national ap-
proval and commendation. It was
previously approved and sanctioned
by the Florida Camp Fire Girls.
Both groups (Bluebirds and Camp
Fire Girls) may complete the re-
quired conservation project to be
eligible for the various degrees. The
Order of Neoga (Dakota Indian)
and the Order of Osoha (Dakota
Indian) may be earned by complet-
ing the required conservation proj-
ects. The third and final degree will
be the same as in other youth pro-
grams.
A similar program is in the plan-
ning process for the Future Farmers
of America. One will also be created
for the Girl Scouts.
MERIT SYSTEM
To encourage both boys and girls
who are members in conservation
clubs, the Merit Point System was
inaugurated in 1954. The Point Sys-
tem includes 122 conservation proj-
ects. These projects have been pre-
pared and outlined by the Youth
Conservation Education Section.
These projects fall into two classes,
Self Improvement and Group Activ-
ity. Records of projects completed by
each member, and the points earned,
are kept on file within the local club.
A second copy is sent to the Office of
the Chief of Youth Conservation


Education, 2520 East Silver Springs
Boulevard, Ocala, Florida. This can
be done monthly, quarterly, or
yearly.
When a member has earned 10,000
points, he is called a Ranger and can
obtain a Ranger patch for his uni-
form by submitting his points to the
Chief. Other ranks that can be ob-
tained by earning points are as fol-
lows:
Forester 30,000 points
Chief Ranger 45,000 "
Chief Forester 60,000 "
Junior Conservationist 75,000 "
Junior Wildlife Officer 100,000 "
Patches are also available for these
ranks. Points earned for each rank
can be included in the number of
points needed for the next highest
rank.
Each year the Outstanding Junior
Conservationist is chosen. This spe-
cial award goes to the club member
who has earned the most points dur-
ing that year and has completed
several qualified conservation proj-
ects. All projects completed must be
certified by the advisor of the club,
a member of the Game Commission,
a school teacher, parents or an older
friend.
Tabulation Sheets for keeping rec-
ords of Points earned for Projects
completed are available. A great
deal can be learned by completing
these projects. They have been
planned with the club member and
conservation in mind.
OTHER PROGRAMS
Our continuing conservation pro-


e i


grams for 1961 include Future For-
esters of Florida, Woodmen of ihe
World, and Girl Scouts of America.
There are other programs in which
our energies must be directed.
ADULT COUNCIL
An Adult Advisory Council was
organized in April of 1959. A full
operating compliment will consist of
twenty-five members. Some of the
board members represent youth
organizations such as Girl Scouts,
Boy Scouts, Junior Garden Clubs.
The members are citizens who serve
without pay. The council has a chair-
man, and is empowered to create and
recommend policies in programs for
the Youth Conservation Education.
An annual conference for club adult
advisors will also be held.
CRIPPLED CHILDREN
Another highly successful experi-
mental program conducted this past
year, 1959, was the cooperation plan
of the Florida's Society for Crippled
Children. Eight handicapped chil-
dren were sent to the two-week
session at our Florida Youth Con-
servation Camp. A therapist and an
aide-counselor supplemented the
staff. The youngsters were so elated
at having a chance to be accepted as
regular fellows that all decided to
return the following summer. Plans
call for a one-week encampment for
60 of these young people, who will
share their experiences with one an-
other. We have been advised that
within a year or two the Florida
Crippled Children's Society will
have their own camp as the result of
the success of the program.
SUMMARY
We have only begun this tremen-
dous multiple conservation program
in Florida, that may eventually be
realized. It is for that reason that we
have become willing partners and
program planners with other youth
service organizations. It is our hope
and our plan to cooperate and work
with as many organizations as pos-
sible in order to emphasize the great
need for understanding of our natu-
ral resources and their wise use.
It is only through the combined
efforts of all of us everywhere that
any kind of success, conservation-
wise, will be accomplished, and that
the people will be informed and edu-
cated to the programs of the Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commis-
sion. 0














The





COMMISSIONERS


Julian R. Alford, Tallahassee, was
appointed April 4, 1958, to serve
on the Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission, and was subsequently
elected to serve three terms as Com-
mission Chairman.
A well-known attorney at law,
Mr. Alford has long been an active
worker in church and civic affairs.
He has also been active in Scouting
affairs, and lists hunting, fishing and
athletics as his favorite recreations.
In commenting on his tenure on
the Commission, Alford has this to
say: "My service on the Commis-
sion has offered me the opportunity
for public service in a chosen field.
It has been a period of pleasant re-
lationship with the peoples of the
State of Florida and with the staff
who executes Commission policies.
I believe we are building on a solid


foundation which will result in hunt-
ing, fishing, and recreational divi-
dends for our citizens and visitors.
Credit for this progress should prop-
erly go to dedicated conservationists
throughout the State and to a loyal,
competent staff."
Mr. Alford was born in Tallahas-
see April 22, 1912.
In church affairs, he is a Ruling
Elder in the Faith Presbyterian
Church of Tallahassee, and has also
been a member of various boards
and committees from the General
Assembly down to the local church
level. He is a Past Moderator of the
Synod of Florida, Presbyterian
Church U. S.
In Boy Scouting work, Mr. Alford
is a holder of the Silver Beaver
Award. He is a past president, and
presently an executive board mem-


ber of the Suwannee River Area
Council of the Boy Scouts of Ameri-
ca in Florida.
In addition to much local civic
work, Mr. Alford is a member of
the Leon County Forestry Fire Pre-
vention Committee. He served on
the Governor's Advisory Committee
on Water Access and Traffic Safety.
Mr. Alford is wed to the former
Miss Dorothy Price. They have four
children: Dorothy Ann, 20; Julian
R., Jr., 18; Elizabeth Clark, 14; and
Marvin Price, 11.



FIRST DISTRICT
T. Paine Kelly, Jr., of Tampa, was
appointed April 3, 1958, as Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commissioner
from the First Conservation District
of Florida.
As a Commissioner, Mr. Kelly be-
lieves that the single most important
objective of the Commission is to
expand the public hunting grounds
and public fishing facilities through-
out the state. He holds that such
expansion work must be done just
as rapidly as the local conditions
and populations of fish and wildlife
may permit. He feels, however, that
such work must always be per-
formed in accordance with the best
possible conservation practices and
techniques now available.
Long active in civic and business
affairs, Mr. Kelly is a life-time out-
doorsman, and an ardent golfer,
fisherman and hunter.
As a practicing lawyer, Mr. Kelly
is able to contribute much practical
legal knowledge and business expe-
rience to the conduct of the Commis-
sion's affairs.
Born in Tampa August 29, 1912,
Mr. Kelly now serves as chairman
of the Committee of 100 of the Tam-
pa Chamber of Commerce.
He also serves as a director of
the Boys' Club of Tampa, and is the
National Associate of Boys Club of
America for South Florida.
He is a past president of the
Tampa Chamber of Commerce, the
President's Round Table of Tampa
and the Tampa Exchange Club.
He married the former Miss Jean
Baughman. The couple have three
children: Carla Jean, 18; T. Paine,
III, 17; and Peggy Jo, 6.


Julian R. Alford
Chairman T. Paine Kelly, Jr.
Third District First District

























Charles L. Hoffman
Second District


Charles L. Hoffman, of Jackson-
ville, was born April 11, 1919, and
appointed January 23, 1961, to
the Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission from the Second Con-
servation District of Northeast
Florida.
Long prominent in banking and
civic affairs, Mr. Hoffman lists the
outdoor sports of fishing and hunting
as his greatest pleasures. He believes
that our fish and game represent ex-
tremely valuable natural resources,
from both the financial and recrea-
tional standpoints.
Now serving as Vice President of
the State Bank of Jacksonville, Mr.
Hoffman attended the University of
Virginia, where he received a Bache-
lor of Arts Degree, with a major in
agricultural economics.
Shortly after graduation from col-
lege in 1941, Mr. Hoffman enlisted
in the United States Marine Corps.
He served in the World War II
Pacific Theatre for two and a half
years in the Twenty First Regiment
of the Third Marine Division. He was
honorably discharged in December,
1945, with the rank of Captain.
He believes that our game and
fish populations and resources can be
increased to meet the growing pres-
sures of human populations only by
applying wise practices of conserva-
tion and management. "To insure
good hunting and fishing," he says,
"our citizens must be conservation-
minded."
Mr. Hoffman believes that the
Commission has, and will continue
to, increase the total acreages of land
set aside for game management and


Dr. J. W. Cosper, Jr.
Fourth District

public hunting purposes. He feels
that the best in Florida fishing will
be insured by the Fisheries Division
through programs for control of un-
desirable fish, such as gizzard shad,
and noxious weeds, such as hyacinth,
as well as the hatchery stocking pro-
gram for new and renovated fishing
waters.
A member of the St. Marks Epis-
copal Church, Mr. Hoffman is an
ardent worker for the Community
Chest-United Fund, the Cancer
Society of Duval County, the Jack-
sonville Symphony Association, and
the Florida Amateur Athletic Union.
He is a member of the Jackson-
ville Area Chamber of Commerce
and the Meninak Club. He holds club
memberships in the Timuquana
Country Club, the Florida Yacht
Club and the River Club.
Charles L. Hoffman married the
former Barbara F. Marshall, of Cedar
Rapids, Iowa. The couple has three
children-a son, Chip, who is 15
years of age, and two daughters,
Mimi, 13 years of age, and Lillian,
11 years of age. The family resides
at 3611 Richmond Street, Jackson-
ville.

FOURTH DISTRICT
Dr. James Watson Cosper, Jr.,
who is Commissioner for the Fourth
Conservation District, was born May
17, 1924, in Birmingham, Alabama.
He presently resides in Coral Gables,
where he practices dentistry.
Dr. Cosper attended the Univer-
sity of Alabama, where he received


F. Don Southwell
Fifth District


the following degrees: Bachelor of
Science and Doctor of Medical Den-
tistry from the school of dentistry.
He entered the Dental Corps of
the United States Navy in May,
1942, where he saw service in the
South Pacific. He was honorably dis-
charged in May, 1946.
Dr. Cosper is a member of the
Veterans of Foreign Wars, the Lions
and the Junior Chamber of Com-
merce. He serves on the Board of
Directors of the Redland District
Golf and County Club. He also
has served as Chairman of the Zon-
ing and Planning Board for the City
of Homestead, Florida.
Dr. Cosper is Treasurer of the
Dade County Dental Research Clinic
and is a member of the Board of Di-
rectors, Miami Dental Society, the
Florida Dental Society, the Ameri-
can Dental Society, the American
Society of Dentistry for Children, the
International Association of Anes-
thesiologists, and a Diplomat of the
National Board of Dental Ex-
aminers.
Dr. Cosper is especially interested
in fishing, hunting and golfing. Pro-
fessionally, he is interested in Den-
tal Research, especially as related
to restorative dentistry.
Dr. Cosper was appointed as a
member of the Florida Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission on
March 22, 1956.
Dr. Cosper is married to the
former Miss Evelyn Fay Sullivan.
They have one daughter, Denese
Marie, aged 6 years.


j







FIFTH DISTRICT
F. Don Southwell, Commissioner
for the Fifth Conservation District,
first came to Florida in 1917 from
Michigan. Until 1931 his time was
divided between Texas and Florida;
building telephone lines and survey-
ing Florida swamps and building
houses in Texas.
In 1939, he left the building busi-
ness and returned to Florida. He
made one trip to California in 1940,
to make sure that Florida was the
place, and in 1941, settled perma-
nently in Ormond Beach.
Hunting, fishing and conservation
have always been Mr. Southwell's
hobbies. A life-long interest in per-
petuation of natural resources and
wildlife, along with a firm convic-
tion that Florida should be main-
tained as a "Sportsman's Paradise,"
resulted in the years of his active
work in conservation in Florida.
Mr. Southwell accomplished much
conservation work while serving the
Florida Wildlife Federation as Di-
rector for many years. At times, he
also served as the Federation's
Treasurer, Executive Secretary, and
Recording Secretary.
He is an active member of the
Florida Outdoor Writers Association,
and served as president of the Fifth
District Sportsmen's Association in
1954, and as president of Halifax
Hunting and Fishing Club for sev-
eral years.
He feels that his interest and
knowledge of the needs of Florida's
sportsmen, and the state as a whole,
led to his appointment to the Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commission
on June 8, 1955.
Mr. Southwell is especially inter-
ested in every phase of the Commis-
sion's work with particular empha-
sis on the Youth Conservation Camp
at Lake Eaton, as well as acquisition
of additional managed public hunt-
ing areas, extended hyacinth control
operations, and the expansion of the
law enforcement and education di-
visions of the Commission.
Mr. Southwell married the former
Miss Doris Smith in 1934.


The


Administrators


A. D. ALDRICH DR. O. EARL FRYE
Director Asst. Director


A. D. "Bob" Aldrich began his
duties as Director of the Florida
Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission on April 11, 1955. Mr. Al-
drich has an impressive record of
conservation experience dating from
1921.

Mr. Aldrich has long been active
in the various fields of wildlife con-
servation through such national
agencies as the American Fisheries
Society, the International Associa-
tion of Game, Fish and Conser-
vation Commissioners, the Wildlife
Society, the National Waterfowl
Council, the Izaak Walton League
of America, the Boy Scouts of Amer-
ica, and other professional organiza-
tions.

Mr. Aldrich is presently serving
on the Advisory Council to the Out-
door Recreation Resources Review
Commission, and also as a member
of an advisory committee to the
U. S. Forest Service on "Multiple
Use of the National Forests."


O. Earle Frye has served as As-
sistant Director of the Florida Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commission
since 1951. He first joined the Com-
mission as a bobwhite quail research
technician on January 14, 1946, and
has since rendered service in many
capacities and positions.
Dr. Frye is especially noted for
organizing and putting into effect
a progressive game management
program for the Commission, with
a subsequent improvement in hunt-
ing success for the Florida hunter.
He has written numerous technical
and non-technical articles about
wildlife and game management pro-
grams for many different publica-
tions.

During recent years, Dr. Frye has
been particularly active in a pro-
gram to improve Commission em-
ployee standards and performance.
He is presently serving as Chair-
man of the National Waterfowl
Council.

















This Report Prepared By
THE ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

ADMINISTRATORS
DIRECTOR ........... ................ ...................... A. D. ALDRICH
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR ...................................... D 0. EARLE FRYE

DIVISION CHIEFS
FISCAL ........... ....................................... JOEL M cK INNON
GAME MANAGEMENT .......... .......................... E. B. CHAMBERLIN, JR.
FISHERIES ......... ............................. ............. E. T. H EINEN
INFORMATION AND EDUCATION ............................. ROBERT A. DAHNE

SECTION CHIEFS
"FLORIDA WILDLIFE" MAGAZINE ........................ .WILLIAM F. HANSEN
COMMUNICATIONS .................................. ... RHETT MCMILLIAN
AVIATION ...... .. .................................... W ILLIAM S. DURKEE

REGIONAL MANAGERS
NORTHWEST ....................................... JAMES W BICKERSTAFF
NORTHEAST ............................................ CHARLES CLYMORE
CENTRAL ........ ............... ..... ............ ........... D C. LAND
SOUTH .......... ..................... ................ D E. TIMM ONS, JR.
EVERGLADES ............................................ Louis F. GAINEY

THE REGIONAL OFFICES

NORTHWEST REGION ....................................Panama City
Airport Dr., P. O. Box 576, SUnset 5-5352
NORTHEAST REGION ...................... .............. Lake City
Jax. Hwy., P. O. Box 908, Phone 1725
CENTRAL REGION ..................... ...... ... ............. Ocala
2520 E. Silver Springs Blvd., MArion 9-2802
SOUTH REGION ............................. ............ Lakeland
Lodwick Airport, P. O. Box 1392, MUtual 6-8157
EVERGLADES REGION .............................. West Palm Beach
551 N. Military Trail, 683-0749





































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ABOUT THE BIENNIAL REPORT

The Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
submits, each two years, a full report covering all
operations of the biennial period immediately past.
This Biennial Report is submitted to the Governor
and each member of the State Legislature of Florida.
The Report is, in effect, a legal statement to all of
the people of Florida as to the administration of
their conservation monies and affairs.
Copies of the Report are also permanently filed
in the State Archives of Florida, to eventually
become a part of the historical record of our state.
Additional copies are requested by school and
public libraries throughout the state for placement
in research files used by students and other inter-
ested persons.
Additional copies are forwarded -by mutual
exchange agreement to other conservation agen-
cies, mainly throughout North America, but also in
some foreign countries. This allows all conservation
agencies to keep a current information file on the
status, progress and new developments of wildlife
conservation work in all parts of the nation, as well
as in many parts of the world.
A number of university students, in Florida and
other states, request copies of the Report for use as
research material in compilation of required theses.
On occasion, certain chapters of the Report are
later reprinted in leaflet form to answer specific
requests from interested Florida citizens, especially
those who are prospective employee applicants.
The Report is also used as an informational aid
in training new employees and in the "refresher"
training of older employees.
The Commission's Biennial Report is custom-
arily produced in "magazine-size," to allow better
presentation and reproduction of the material, and
also to reduce production costs. Many of the photo-
graphic engravings appearing in this Report are
engravings previously used in the Commission-
published Florida Wildlife magazine during the two-
year period covered by the Report.
The purpose of the Biennial Report is to allow
an opportunity for all interests in the state to
minutely examine the operations of their Florida
Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.

ROBERT A. DAHNE,
Chief,
Information and Education Division.