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Biennial report
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075940/00005
 Material Information
Title: Biennial report
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23-29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
Publisher: Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Creation Date: 1951
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Game protection -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Fish culture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Fishery management -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Wildlife management -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: First biennial report covers the period from the time of the organization (of the Commission) July 1, 1935 to December 31, 1936.
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000327977
oclc - 01332271
notis - ABV7514
System ID: UF00075940:00005
 Related Items
Preceded by: Florida. Dept. of Game and Fresh Water Fish.|Biennial report of the Department of Game and Fresh Water Fish
Succeeded by: Florida. Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.|Annual report

Full Text










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Calling the end to a perfect day's hunt.



Photographs from previous issues of Florida Wildlife.










Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission







December 31, 1952.



HONORABLE FULLER WARREN
Governor of Florida
State Capitol
Tallahassee, Florida

Dear Governor Warren:

Herewith is submitted the Biennial Report of the Florida Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission for the period ending December 31, 1952.

Through this report we wish to make known to you, the Members of
the State Legislature and the people of Florida, the activities and achieve-
ments of the Commission. We realize that the contribution we have made
is but a small part of the work which must be done before Florida attains
the full realization of its fish and game potentialities. We feel confident that
the progress made in the past biennium will be multiplied many-fold in the
years to come.

Finally we wish to express our appreciation to the many State officials
and private citizens whose vision and cooperation have assisted so greatly
in our conservation endeavor.

Respectfully submitted,




CECIL M. WEBB, Chairman


CMW: ej


I. .1










































By BEN McLAUCHLIN


During the period of years be-
tween 1948 and 1952, particularly
the last Biennium, the Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission made
definite progress in all phases of
conservation work. In general the
Commission devoted its time to a
continued expansion of activities
and a streamlining of its methods
of procedure.
This four year period was the first
one in which the Game Commission
can say that it was wholly in opera-
tion for a real term of office, since
it was only a fledgling organization
at its beginning in 1943 and really
needed a few years in which to
find its wings. The first few years
were spent in getting prepared to
accomplish the uneasy task of con-
servation, whereas the last two years
were spent in actually accomplish-
ing a part of this program of con-
servation, protection and restoration
of the game and fish resources of
Florida.
Purchase of quarters for the Talla-
hassee office of the Commission and


eventual decentralization into five
division offices, one located in each
conservation district, were probably
two of the more outstanding im-
provements of this period, although
there are many others that can and
should be added to this list. All
added to a greater increase of ef-
ficiency.
In Game and Fish Management,
this period was marked by continued
progress in the acquisition of lands
for public hunting areas, the inaugu-
ration of water hyacinth control pro-
gram, investigations and surveys on
various projects such as farm fish
ponds, deer and turkey restoration
programs, roughfish control, but per-
haps most important of all was the
employment of men trained in the
science of wildlife and fish manage-
ment.
This led to a greater emphasis on
sound fish and wildlife management
practices as determined by research
programs, and a continuation of a
well balanced program designed to
diagnose the basic causes of game


L








Definite progress has been made in all phases of conservation work greater emphasis on sound
fish and wildlife management practices, more public hunting areas, a streamlined, more effective,
Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.

VD ectr es WedacleltsU Reapovs to te Peaope/


shortages and poor fishing and to
work out methods of remedying such
shortages.
We think, that perhaps the activi-
ties during the past two years might
serve as an indication of the pro-
gressive determination of the Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commission
to do something about this program
of fish and wildlife conservation.
Previously all Game Commission
programs were organized and put
into effect from one state-wide office
in Tallahassee. This past year, we
have undergone a decentralization
or a reorganization, with the estab-
lishment of five divisions-North-
west Florida, Northeast Florida,
Central Florida, South Florida, and
Everglades with headquarters in
Panama City, Jacksonville, Willis-
ton, Lakeland and Okeechobee.
This system has proved success-
ful for each division office is staffed
with a director, education officer,
pilot and airplane, game and fish
management technicians, and wild-
life officers. A look at the record of
programs and other projects carried
on within the division areas assures
us that the move was a good one,
for it helped to bring about more
efficient uses of Commission per-
sonnel.














I.H g







Hunting and


The pay scale for Wildlife Officers
and other employees has risen un-
der a personnel classification plan,
making for more efficient employees
to enforce the game and fish laws
and to work on conservation and
restoration programs. A uniform
pay scale has been established with
liberal vacation, sick leave and re-
tirement benefits.
PUBLIC HUNTING AND
FISHING AREAS
In 1947, just five years ago, the
Commission operated controlled
hunts on only 213,700 acres of pub-
lic grounds. Today, more than 1,-
700,000 acres of land and water were
opened to controlled public hunting
and fishing. For sportsmen who do
not own land, these acres offered
them a good shooting ground. The
cost of such wildlife management
areas average about .10 cents an
acre per year for restocking, pa-
trolling, fencing and supervision.
HYACINTH CONTROL
The Commission has purchased a
spraying plane to be used in control-
ling water hyacinths, and a special
budget which included personnel
and equipment has been established
for this year. An estimated 250,000
acres of water are infested by this
scourge, and an active program is


fishing were never better in Florida Here's the evidence.




7VV


Modern transportation helps wildlife officers enforce the conservation laws.


currently in operation to stop the
deadly advance of this flowering
pest. The cost for controlling these
plants amounts to approximately $6
per acre. During the past year more
than 3,200 acres of hyacinths on 39
lakes have been sprayed.
JUNIOR SPORTSMEN'S CLUBS
Probably one of the most impor-
tant activities in the State regarding
conservation has been the organ-
ization of the Florida Junior Con-
servation Club League. The League
was formally chartered at Camp
Rotary, near Auburndale-scene of
the first Junior Sportsmen's Sum-
mer Camp-on August 22 when
Governor Fuller Warren signed the
charter in the presence of 50 dele-
gates from 25 Junior clubs in the
State. Membership of the clubs at
that time was approximately 1,500
in the 27 clubs. Now, there are more
than 50 clubs.
Plans are now underway for
the construction of a $25,000 sum-
mer camp where 5,000 youngsters
may be trained each summer in
wildlife conservation while they en-


joy the many other recreal
tivities of the outdoors.
DEER AND TURKI
POPULATIONS
Our Game Biologists are
to learn ways and means oi
ing the amount of game I
animals with their work or
tion programs throughout t
Two of these programs sern
examples. In 1947, our deer
tion was approximately 33,
now estimated to be arour
and still climbing. Five yi
a state-wide survey rev
population of approximate:
turkeys. Now the figure i
neighborhood of 45,000.
The Commission feels
reason behind this increase
and turkey can be credited
protection by our wildlife
the more conservation-mi
titudes of the general pu
sportsmen, the posting of 1
the game management re
program of restocking, ha
provement and maintenance
ers in certain sections.


ional ac-

:Y

striving
increas-
irds and
restora-
he State.
e as fine
Spopula-
)00. It is
d 50,000
,ars ago,
ealed a
y 26,000
s in the

that the
in deer
to better
officers,
ided at-
blic and
and, and
storation
)itat im-
* of feed-


ACCOUNTING OR BUSINESS
OFFICE
A central purchasing system has
been established and has resulted
in procuring of higher quality equip-
ment and supplies at a lower price.
The buying of cars is a good exam-
ple. Every year, automobiles are
bought at a state price, through bids,
and resold a year later at approxi-
mately the same price that we paid
for them.
We have appointed a properties
officer to inventory the Game Com-
mission's equipment and keep rec-
ords on everything that we can. His
is also the job to make periodical in-
spection of all the equipment. Ob-
solete and worn out equipment is
advertised and sold to the highest
bidder.
RADIO COMMUNICATIONS
We have a workable radio system
that effectively covers the entire
State today. Last year we had 90
mobile units and two fixed stations.
Today we have 170 mobile units and
nine fixed stations in operation, with
five additional fixed radio stations


Science aids law

I -LU A



















Airborne wildlife officers patrol the state's inaccessible areas, coordinate their efforts with the ground patrol.


ready for installation. All five of our
airplanes also have radios.
RADIO PROGRAMS
A series of weekly 15 minute radio
programs preaching conservation to
more than 3,500,000 people in Flor-
ida, Georgia and Alabama has been
inaugurated this year. The programs
are informative, educational and en-
tertaining, and they are broadcast
over 48 radio stations in the above
three states.
TRAVELING ZOO
We have just constructed a $10,-
000 traveling wildlife display unit
which will be exhibited at most of
the State fairs and to most of the
schools, towns, and cities on a 50-
week basis each year. Twenty-two
cages and tanks of animals, birds,
fish and reptiles will be displayed
in this conservation-educational mo-
bile unit.
KEY DEER REFUGE
The Commission was instrumental
in bringing the plight of the Key
Deer to the attention of the press and
conservationists of America. We are
continuing our efforts to establish


a Federal Refuge for this species
in the vicinity of Big Pine Key. To-
day only about 50 of these deer are
alive, and we hope to build them
up again, establishing this reserva-
tion where they may prosper and
propagate.
DIVISION EDUCATION
OFFICERS
Under the Division system our
education officers are carrying on
a conservation-education program
within their own areas, making
talks to sportsmen's groups and
civic clubs, showing movies to school
children, organizing Junior Sports-
men's Clubs, sending out pamphlets
depicting our game and fish, and
aiding in the general program of
the Commission.
SUMMARY
We feel that the State Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission has
accomplished much with its many
activities to protect and restore the
game and fish resources with its
limited funds, but we also feel that
much more remains to be done.
We're sure that with the help and


cooperation of the sportsmen and
general public we can continue to do
our job, that of conserving, protect-
ing and restoring the fish and wild-
life for future Florida generations.


inieIn p -


5





















































NORTHWEST FLORIDA

By FLOYD D. NIXON


On November 1, 1951, the North-
west Florida Division of the Florida
Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission was established, with head-
quarters in Panama City. Composed
of 16 counties, the Division extends
from the Aucilla River, which runs
from the Georgia State Line to the
Gulf of Mexico, to the Perdido
River, which separates Florida and
Alabama.
Included in the Division are Jef-
ferson, Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden,
Liberty, Franklin, Jackson, Cal-


houn, Gulf, Holmes, W
Bay, Walton, Okaloosa, S,
and Escambia Counties.
Game and Fish Manager
perhaps the most active fie
the past biennium in this a
throughout the State and
excellent fishing and hunt
In the Quail and Turke,
tion Program, to increase
and covers habitats for
turkey, 461,000 seedlings
and thunbergii lespedeza,
rose, and 4,051 pounds of


ashington,
nta Rosa,

.ent were
ds during
rea, noted
nation for
ing areas.
SRestora-
the food
quail and
f bi-color
multiflora
partridge


pea and beggarweed seed, were ac-
quired and distributed to interested
sportsmen throughout the section.
This Division also inspected 111
planted food plots, inspected and
furnished recommendations for 16
plots of land, laid the groundwork
for 400 quail food plots in breeding
grounds, conducted quail feeding
habits and food analysis studies,
and, in Jackson County, maintained
and operated experimental quail
food plots.
Extensive food studies were con-






ducted on Eglin Field, Blackwater,
Gaskin and Apalachicola Forest
Refuge, in the Deer Restoration
Program. The Division assisted in
planting food plots and trapped 18
deer from closed areas for restock-
ing or releasing in other areas.
Two bears were released in Bay
County; 2 troublesome bears were
captured in Jefferson County, for
releasing in other areas.
In Fish Management, technicians
inspected 234 ponds and public wa-
ters, of which a great number were
also renovated. They participated in
21 experiments to control the rough-
fish population and distributed 1,-
323,376 fingerlings. The hatcheries
at Wewahitchka and Holt produced
108,995 bass fingerlings and 1,523,-
375 bream fingerlings. The two
houses at the Wewahitchka hatch-
ery were repaired and new control
valves were installed at the Holt
hatchery.
Law enforcement is always an im-
portant part of fish and game man-
agement. Wildlife Officers spent 96,-
442 hours on land patrol and 19,832
hours on water patrol during the last
two years. They covered a total or
709,267 miles, investigated 1,926
complaints and alleged violations,
and checked 77,649 licenses. They
made 969 arrests. They sold 1,624
commercial licenses.
The Wildlife Officer pilot spent
1,043 hours on air patrol, and in
four instances, assisted other law
enforcement agencies in the pursuit
of their quarry. He located 15 lost
persons and assisted many times in
the recovery of stolen property.
Law enforcement personnel have
maintained an officer's camp in Eg-
lin Forest, managed the controlled
deer hunt in Eglin Field, and con-
ducted the controlled hunt in the
Apalachicola Forest.
Wildlife Officers assisted the Flor-
ida Fox Hunters Association in a
three-day fox trial in Walton County
and assisted the Florida Coon Hunt-
ers Association in a one-day trial at
DeFuniak Springs.
Information and Education is a
vital part of our work. The Educa-
tion Officer alone made 78 speeches
and showed movies to organized
civic clubs, sportsmen groups and
schools. Six junior sportsmen's clubs
were organized and the Education
Officer was counselor at the first
summer camp held for junior clubs.
He supervised 22 camping trips for
sportsmen's clubs and assisted in the
formation of the state-wide Junior
Conservation Club League. He as-
sisted in the Florida Wildlife FFA


contest and aided when the wildlife
exhibit was in this area.
The Education Officer doesn't
make all the speeches. The Divi-
sion Office, headed by the Director,
addressed 83 sportsmen's clubs and
civic groups and made 42 talks to
schools and other organized groups.
Thirteen division meetings, to co-
ordinate our efforts and to increase
efficiency, were held. The Division
Director selected and supervised the
creation of three turkey manage-
ment areas and distributed 250 tur-
keys in these areas. Sixty-two per-
mits were made out and some 2,500
letters answered.
At the end of 1952, the North-
west Florida Divisi'on had 33 radio-
equipped mobile units and the four
base stations. Recently, a radio en-


gineer.was employed for installation
and maintenance of the equipment
in this and surrounding territory.
The Division is composed of a
Division Director, Education Offi-
cer, Pilot, three Game Management
Technicians, one Fish Management
Technician, and twenty-eight Wild-
life Officers.


Results from hunting in Northwest Florida.








































THE NORTHEAST




Dicziion Rep


The first year's operation since
the establishment of the Northeast
Division at Jacksonville has been
marked by unquestioned improve-
ment in the morale and appearance
of law enforcement officers, better
public relations, and a more sym-
pathetic public understanding of the
aims, ambitions, and problems of the
Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission.
The record of this Division is con-
clusive proof of progress and stands
as a definite vindication for the es-
tablishment of the divisional offices
throughout the State, facilitating
quicker and more efficient service


from the Commission to t
The Law Enforcement r
the Second District has
great improvement and th
cers here are demonstrate
interest in their duties and
qualified for their respon
Through their efforts la
Madison, Suwannee, Nas
chua, and Duval counties,
fiscated approximately 7,
of illegal fish nets, 6 boats,
of outboard motors, and ,
000 pounds of illegally ti
game fish. They remove
squirrels which were en
the Jacksonville area and


tL~4r By GEORGE INMAN


ie public.
divisionn of
registered
e 29 Offi-
ng added
are better
sibilities.
At year in
sau, Ala-
they con-
)00 yards
a number
eized 15,-
ansported
I 850 cat
angering
removed


40,000 bass, bream and bluegills from
pot holes resulting from drought, re-
leasing them in deep waters for
fishing.
The use of Deputy Officers has
been very successful and has met
with excellent public support. When
this project is completed in the 16
counties within this district, we will
have 160 part-time officers who
doubtlessly will prove of great value
in increasing the district's efficiency.
Hyacinth control spraying has
been inaugurated at Lake Lucina,
Hamburg Lake, Lake Orange, New-
man Lake, Cunningham Creek, and
Alligator Lake, and more of this


F


1 _






work is in progress for other fresh
water areas in the district. More
than 200 brush piles have been
placed in the St. Johns River and
its tributaries-Doctors Lake, Lake
Brooklyn, and Ocean Pond. We now
have more requests for projects of
this kind than we can fill.
Under supervision of Wildlife Of-
ficers, professional seining crews
have removed rough fish from
Lake Lochloosa, Orange Lake, Lake
Washington, and Lake Bedford, with
less than one percent mortality, re-
moving in excess of 60 tons of rough
fish. In excess of 7,000 special cast
net permits have been issued by this
office.
A special fishing party for dis-
abled war veterans from the Lake
City Veterans Hospital was held
last year, with 20 representatives
of three wars, including crippled
or blind veterans, participating.
Commission boats, manned by Wild-
life Officers, transported the vet-
erans on the trip, with Veterans Ad-
ministration doctors and nurses on
hand at all times. The trip proved
so successful that we plan to make
it, at the request of the VA, an
annual event. The project was de-
scribed in the American Legion
Magazine.
In past years Wildlife Officers
have experienced some difficulty
with armed forces personnel sta-
tioned within this district, who al-
though enthusiastic hunters and
fishermen, consistently failed to
purchase resident licenses. Work-
ing closely with officials at the
various stations who then appointed
qualified officers as game officers
at the stations, our relations with
the military have greatly improved
and finding a member of the armed
forces hunting or fishing without a
license is now the exception rather
than the rule.
During July of 1952 the first of
200 tracts in a 38,000 acre forest
section near Hastings was seeded.
It is anticipated that these seed
plots eventually will attract suffi-
cient game birds to provide excel-
lent hunting. The entire area will
be open for free use of hunters dur-
ing each hunting season. Since the
establishment of the divisional office
in Jacksonville, we have trapped and
released hundreds of quail in Duval,
Columbia, Madison, Bradford, Ala-
chua, Nassau, and Hamilton counties.
Two Wildlife Officers accompa-
nied a group of Jacksonville boat-
ing enthusiasts on a 1,250 mile boat-
ing trip from the Okefenokee Swamp
in Georgia to Miami and return to
Jacksonville, as a public service of


the Division. This trip received a
great deal of favorable publicity and
resulted in increased good will and
understanding of the Commission's
activities.
Representatives from this office
have appeared before scores of
groups of Boy Scouts, crippled chil-
dren, orphans, and Future Farmers
of America, making conservation
talks and showing conservation
movies. Three youth groups were
formed, at Yulee, Branford, and
Jacksonville. At present we are
forming a Youth Conservation Club
in Jacksonville which will number
approximately 4,000 members, mak-
ing this the biggest organization of
its kind in Florida. A growing in-
terest in conservation and the Com-
mission activities has been shown
by churches, schools, clubs and or-
ganizations and we have distributed
thousands of pieces of literature to
these persons.


We have made a constant effort
to inform the public of important
Commission policies and things of
interest to the public through the
facilities of the press, radio, and
television and we have received ex-
cellent cooperation from all three
mediums. As a "feeler" on the draw-
ing power of television, this office
authorized a sportscaster to give
away 200 copies of "Florida's Fresh
Water Fish and Fishing" to the first
200 persons to mail him a written
request for the book. To our amaze-
ment he received 1,125 requests, sev-
eral of them telegrams, from a radius
of nearly 200 miles.
Counties within the Northeast
Florida Division are Madison, Ham-
ilton, Lafayette, Suwannee, Duval,
Baker, Columbia, Nassau, Alachua,
Bradford, Clay, Union, Dixie, Gil-
christ, and Taylor. Headquarters are
at 516 Washington St., Jacksonville.
(Continued on Page 32)


A pleased patron of Northeast Florida.












































By DAVID E. SWINDELL


Here in the Central Florida Divi-
sion, located at Williston, are the
Fisheries Experiment Station, Hya-
cinth Control headquarters, and wild
turkey and quail hatcheries. Em-
bracing twelve counties, this Divi-
sion contains four Game Manage-
ment areas and an experimental
feeding tract for quail named in
honor of I. N. Kennedy, former Di-
rector of the Game and Fresh Wa-
ter Fish Commission.
The Division includes Levy, Put-
nam, Flagler, Marion, Volusia, Cit-
rus, Lake, Sumter, Brevard, Orange,
Osceola, and Seminole counties. The
establishment of Central Florida Di-
vision headquarters at Williston, in
Levy County, has brought 20 full-


time employees to the City
listen and made this comn
center of game and fish ac


of Wil-
lunity a
ivity.


The four Game Management areas
in this Division are the Ocala Na-
tional Forest area, the Gulf Ham-
mock area, the Farmton area, and
the Tomoka area.
Game Management technicians
from these areas, as well as resident
biologists here at Williston, are often
called upon to discuss game manage-
ment problems with individuals, to
make talks at various sportsmen's
group meetings, and to provide nec-
essary leadership for game improve-
ment.
Wild turkey and quail hatcheries
are located at Williston and both
species are raised in the hatcheries
and are released on land suitable for
their development. About 1,000 tur-


I L


-1


exeitia 5e741M


4 VV






keys are to be released this year,
with each of the divisions receiving
a proportionate share. Both turkeys
and quail are now paired off for the
Spring hatching season.
An experimental feeding tract for
quail has been established at Lees-
burg. This 700 acre tract is being
made available through the courtesy
of Mr. Blanton, of Leesburg, and is
called the I. N. Kennedy Experi-
mental Quail Feeding Area, in honor
of the former Director.
The Fisheries Experiment Station
at Leesburg is carrying on a large-
scale experiment in the use of the
haul seine as a management tool in
the controlling of fish populations
and other related and important re-
search problems are being studied
at this station.
A full-time Extension Fisheries
technician is available in this Di-
vision, working primarily with farm
ponds in restocking and fertilization
practices. He has distributed 15,000
fingerlings in the past few weeks
and has examined and made im-
provement recommendations for a
great many pools. Quarters are pro-
vided here for the U. S. Fish and
Wildlife Service officer.
Hyacinth Control Headquarters
are located in the office of the Cen-
tral Florida Division. This important
work is well underway and between
the airplane crew and the boat crew,
have brought approximately 3,200
acres of hyacinths in 39 lakes under
treatment.
During the last two years, this Di-
vision has rendered public assistance
to 1,606 persons, checked 45,700 li-
censes, sold 2,069 commercial li-
censes, and built 50 brush piles.
Four hundred and ninety-one ar-
rests were made for violations and
the Division confiscated 5,330 yards
of nets, 5,500 pounds of fish, 5 mo-
tors, 1 trailer, 150 alligator hides, 7
guns, and about 500 fish traps. Con-
victed violators of Florida game and
fish laws spent 880 days in jail; no
record of the total amount of fines
is available.
Relationships with sportsmen in
the Division area and particularly
with the people and City of Willis-
ton, in which Division Headquarters
is located, is excellent. The Division
enjoys a very amicable relationship
with the City of Williston.
Two gasoline pumps are located at
headquarters, and this Division buys
all vehicular and aviation gasoline
at wholesale prices at a considerable
savings.


Various commission activities in Central Florida.


C'i
r


I~




'. P., +
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South Florida
By FRED W. JONES


Law enforcement-one of the im-
portant phases of game and fish
conservation-has been better with-
in the boundaries of the South Flor-
ida Division since November, 1951,
than ever before.
This is shown conclusively by the
increased sales of commercial fish-
ing licenses and by the number of
major law violations cases which
have been made. Wildlife officers
made 235 arrests for violations dur-
ing the five-month period from Sep-
tember to January alone.
Law enforcement has also been


made more efficient by the addition
of ten radio units in vehicles,
through the establishment of two
stations, (one at Lakeland and one
station at Myakka State Park), and
by the consolidation of the former
four supervisor areas into three.
Youth activities have been a ma-
jor concern of this Division during
our operations here at Lakeland.
The Division has conducted four
Fishathons for youngsters in Arca-
dia, Tampa, Clearwater, and St.
Petersburg, all with great success
and enjoyment to the youngsters.


Eighteen youth conservation clubs
are now in operation with several
more contacts made from which
additional clubs are expected to be
organized in the near future.
This Division cooperated with the
State Information and Education
Coordinator in securing and operat-
ing a Youth Conservation Camp at
Auburndale, for one week, at Camp
Rotary on Lake Juliana. A motor-
cade was planned, cook obtained,
arrangement for special events, and
all the necessary planning details
were handled by division personnel.






Like the Fishathons, the camp was
of inestimable value in our youth
program and in the furtherance of
conservation.
Some 48 speeches were made by
the Division Director and the Divi-
sion Education Officer in connection
with conservation and the fostering
of sound conservation practices.
Many requests for literature and
other information have been
handled, and the Commission movies
are in great demand and are con-
tinually booked. The Division has
also furnished many photographs
and news items to newspapers with
the area and many feature stories
have been written about Commis-
sion activities here.
A fish management technician has
been maintained by the Division and
one wildlife officer has been assigned
to fish management. These men


make arrangements for securing fish
for Fishathons, conducted about 50
seine hauls for rough fish control,
and have participated in the im-
provement of many fish ponds.
In conjunction with the fish man-
agement program, the Division has
operated the Winter Haven hatchery
which has produced, transported,
and released several thousand bass
fingerlings in public waters through-
out the state.
The Division also cooperated with
the hyacinth branch and to date
some 500 acres have been cleared.
There are several more bodies of
water on the schedule for future
operations.
The hunting season, on the whole,
in this area, was extremely satis-
factory with increased supply of all
game species being reported by
hunters, concrete evidence that
conservation pays!


A fishathon angler.




































































loc..











From the Everglades


By CURTIS WRIGHT


Two of the Nation's famed game
and fish areas-Lake Okeechobee
and the Everglades-are included in
the aptly-named Everglades Division
of the Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission. It should be expected,
then, that the report of this Divi-
sion would contain references to lost
hunters and fishermen.
During the last two years Enforce-
ment Officers of this Division have
located 17 lost fishing parties on
Lake Okeechobee and 30 lost parties
in the Everglades, performing a
service unmatched in any other Di-
vision of the State. In addition, the
officers recovered the bodies of 3
drowned persons and furnished the
information resulting in the arrest
and conviction of 3 cattle rustlers.
Game Management was the out-
standing activity of this Division
during this biennium and our rec-
ords show 6,323 hours spent on this
phase alone.
Several thousand acres of land
have been acquired here for public
hunting purposes and three control-
led hunting areas were opened to
public hunting. This has afforded
Wildlife Officers the opportunity to
contact more hunters and to obtain
information needed by this Division
for the implementation of its objec-
tives. The opening of these areas
has created general good will and
better public relations.
Four managed hunts were held
here last year, with the following
results:
Collier County Hunt-87 deer, 356
turkey gobblers, 427 turkey hens,
1,088 quail, 259 squirrels, 162 doves,
and 2 ducks.
Fisheating Creek Hunt-5 deer,
108 turkey gobblers, 158 turkey
hens, 5,311 quail, 638 squirrels, 108
doves, and 146 ducks.
J. W. Corbett Hunt-8 deer, 1,156
quail, 4 doves, and 4 ducks.
Hendry County Hunt-17 deer,
126 turkey gobblers, 188 turkey
hens, 226 quail, 186 squirrels, 1 dove,
and 47 ducks.
Approximately 300 wild turkey
and 1200 quail were trapped in
closed hunting areas and were re-


leased in open hunting areas for re-
stocking purposes.
There are 20 farm fish ponds un-
der management in this Division
which are producing. We have stock-
ed 15, inspected 83, and have com-
pletely renovated 4 new farm fish
ponds. Fish Management personnel
also worked at five fairs, explaining
the various fish tank exhibits.
Everglades Division personnel
traveled 757,222 miles this past bi-
ennium in the service of the Com-
mission. During this time, 1,191 ar-
rests were made, 39,221 licenses
checked, and the Division personnel
spent 134,207 hours on land patrol,
6,261 hours on water patrol, and
2,747 hours on air patrol.
Six hundred and twenty commer-
cial licenses were sold, 1,395 com-
plaints and alleged violations were


investigated and 711 informers were
contacted.
More than 30,700 persons were
contacted regarding conservation
and game and fish management
practices, 48 speeches to civic,
school, and sportsmen groups be-
ing made, with 715 hours spent for
community service. In addition to
these activities by Wildlife Officers,
the Education Division made 79
speeches, distributed 7,656 pieces
of literature, showed conservation
films to a total of 3,567 persons and
was responsible for 160 news articles
and items written by staff corre-
spondents for local newspapers after
contact with this office.
Nine special exhibits and displays
were created for use at various fairs
and exhibitions within the Division
area.
(Continued on Page 32)

































This Miss finds excellent fishing in one of Florida's re-stocked lakes










By JOHN F. EQUINE

By JOHN F. DEQUINE


Fish management activities during
1951-52 pointed toward the accom-
plishment of two major objectives:
the improvement of recreational
fishing, and the proper utilization
of Florida's freshwater fishery re-
sources. In attempting to attain
these aims, emphasis was placed on
four major programs. These were
the fish management extension serv-
ice, fish culture, aquatic weed con-
trol, and fish population control.
Accomplishments in each of these
during the biennium are discussed
individually below.
Fish Management Extension
Service
In late 1950, a program of ex-
tension service similar to that ap-
plied in the field of agriculture was
instituted in freshwater fish manage-
ment. This service included techni-
cal assistance to individuals and or-


ganizations desiring help and advice
in various problems related to fish
and other aquatic life throughout the
state. During the period from Jan-
uary to November 1951, more than
600 requests for this service were
filled. These services included as-
sistance on the management of small
lakes and ponds for fishing, control
of aquatic vegetation, bait minnow
production, fish mortality, and re-
lated problems.
By far the greatest demand, how-
ever, was for help in the manage-
ment of small ponds. Such assistance
included fish population analyses,
determination of factors interfering
with best fishing, and recommenda-
tions for correcting and improving
fishing conditions. Recommendations
were made for several hundred
ponds and lakes, some of which had
unbalanced fish populations. com-


pletely eliminated through poison-
ing, were subsequently restocked
and fertilized, and are now produc-
ing excellent fishing. From Novem-
ber 1951 to the end of 1952, this
service was administered through
the newly formed regional divisions
and is reported on elsewhere in this
report.
Fish Culture
The Commission continued to
operate its fish hatcheries, located
at Holt, Wewahitchka, and Winter
Haven, during the biennium. Citrus
plant pollution affecting the water
supply continued to interfere with
maximum production at the Winter
Haven hatchery, while low water
levels in the Dead Lakes reduced
the output at Wewahitchka. Opera-
tions at the Blackwater Hatchery
near Holt, however, were quite suc-
cessful. An innovation at the Holt






station was the hatching and rear-
ing of bass fingerlings for use in
West Florida. Under the system now
in effect, a number of fingerlings
are held from one season and used
as brood fish the next, as their rapid
growth in the fertilized ponds al-
lows them to attain maturity during
one year.
While the demand for hatchery
fish for stocking new and renovated
ponds has increased greatly during
this biennium, directly as a result
of the extension service work, re-
quests for stocking large unman-
aged waters have declined. Presum-
ably this decline has occurred be-
cause more Floridians have come to
realize that stocking of fish in such
waters does not improve fishing, but
is a waste of their license funds. A
summary of the fish distributed and
the waters stocked may be found in
the following table.
Hyacinth Control
Early 1952 saw the beginning of
an attack on one of the foremost
enemies of freshwater fishing-the
water hyacinth. This plant has en-
croached upon many of the state's
public fishing waters, and has cov-
ered a number of the more easily
accessible lakes, completely elimi-
nating fishing. In addition to inter-
ference by hyacinths, water lilies,
bonnets, and other aquatic plants
have reduced available fishing wa-
ters in many areas.
With the aid of the Dingell-
Johnson Federal Aid to Fisheries
funds which first became available
in 1951, a limited program of con-
trolling these obnoxious aquatic
plants has been started. Under this
program, public fishing waters where
hyacinths or other plants have be-
come a nuisance are treated with
chemical sprays which kill the
plants. The project has been equip-
ped with a PA-18 125 h.p. airplane
for spraying the larger areas and a
boat with portable power sprayer to
follow the airplane and work on
waters where use of the plane is not
feasible. All equipment and man-
power for performing the necessary
work is provided under the pro-
gram, while local interests reim-
burse the Commission for the nec-
essary chemicals and other materials
used at cost.
Preliminary surveys to determine
the most practical method of control
have been made on 48 bodies of wa-
ter. A total of 39 waters, comprising
3,209 acres of hyacinths or other
plants, had been treated up to the
end of 1952. It is hoped that ad-
ditional funds can be made available
in the future for the expansion of
(Continued on Page 39)


1 .. .- 1 -N t- I
Commission restocking a Florida lake with fingerlings.

Number of Fish Distributed and Numbers of
Waters Stocked During Calendar Years
1951 and 1952


Hatchery




Blackwater....


1951


Number of fish
distributed


Bass

31,951


W ewahitchka..1...........


Winter Haven.
Totals....


237,070
269,021


Bream

435,202
431,300
14,280
880,782


Number of
waters
stocked


110
17
100
227


1952

Number of fish
distributed


Bass

91,613


408,880


Bream

1,162,810
260,500
9,755


500,493 1,433,065


Number of
waters
stocked


264
22
104
390


Rescuing fish from a pond that is going dry.


"


I











































Game Management



By EDWARD B. CHAMBERLAIN


During the past biennium the
principal activities of the Game
Management Division have been
concerned with research, develop-
ment, land acquisition, and operation
of managed hunts. In all of these
phase es there has been an expansion
of work and accomplishment during
the period.
As in the past, much the greatest
part of the financial load of Florida's
wildlife management program has
been carried by the United States
government under the provisions of
the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restor-
ation Act commonly called the
Pittman-Robertson Act. This Act,
approved by Congress in 1937, pro-
vided that funds realized from an
excise tax on sporting arms and
ammunition be apportioned to the


states for use in wildlife restoration
work, according to their area and
their annual sale of hunting licenses.
The state must match each three
dollars of federal money received
with one dollar of state money. This
money is to be spent by the state
either on research, development,
land acquisition or maintenance of
projects, with a small percentage of
the total fund set aside for admin-
istration. All expenditures must be
approved by the U. S. Fish and
Wildlife Service, the trustees of the
Pittman-Robertson fund.
Since personnel as well as projects
must be approved by the Fish and
Wildlife Service, the Act serves as
a stimulus to state game depart-
ments to maintain sound and pro-
gressive research and management


programs under the direction of
scientifically trained men.
In the fiscal year 1950-51, Florida's
Pittman Robertson allotment was
$121,214.92; in 1951-52, $232,085.32,
and in 1952-53, $133,265.13. Table 1
shows the budgeted expenditure of
total Pittman-Robertson funds dur-
ing the fiscal years 1950-51 through
1952-53.
In the past, Florida's game man-
agement budget has often been less
than its Federal Aid apportionment,
permitting a reserve to be accumu-
lated. During the past biennium.
however, the program has been so
expanded that the total apportion-
ment is used in each year's opera-
tions.
The established policy of employ-
ing only necessary and essential


I






personnel has been continued. At
the present time the game manage-
ment division staff consists of 17
trained men, 10 untrained men of
whom five are on a half-time basis,
two secretaries and one bookkeeper.
There are 19 active projects.
Research
In any sound game management
program research plays a vital and
leading role. It is the light which
shows the path to be taken by
development and land acquisition.
Valid and realistic research gives the
information which is essential in
management.
During the past biennium, eleven
research projects were conducted.
In addition, the results of another
project were published as Technical
Bulletin No. 1, "Deer and Turkey
Habitats and Populations of Florida."
The active research projects have
dealt with all the more important
game species, and in some cases
have been directed toward obtaining
management information for specific
areas.
Quail have been the subject of
study on four projects. Special ef-
forts have been made to develop
methods compatible with cattle rais-
ing for increasing this species in
south Florida's flatwoods. At present,
emphasis is being placed on obtain-
ing data on year to year quail
population fluctuations as correlated
with food and weather conditions.
An investigation of quail food pref-
erences was conducted largely in
the preceding biennium, but was
completed and the final report filed
in the present. Extensive experi-
ments have been conducted with
quail feeders, a practice which holds
much promise for increasing quail
populations where food is the limit-
ing factor. Investigation has also
been made to determine the results
of establishing lespedeza food plots
for quail.
Waterfowl and dove have each
been studied through a research
project. During the present bien-
nium, the principal activities of the
waterfowl project have been popu-
lation and kill studies, location of
areas for acquisition and develop-
ment, and carrying capacity studies.
The fall 1952 population of the
Florida Duck was determined to be
the highest in the past five years,
approximately 30,000 birds.
The primary aim of the dove in-
vestigation has been the gathering
of information on which to base
sound regulations. Activities have
consisted of trapping, dyeing, and
banding birds, making road and call
counts to gain population data, and
collection of hunting data. Florida


TABLE 1
PLANNED EXPENDITURES OF FEDERAL AID FUNDS
During the Fiscal Years of 1950-51, 1951-52 and 1952-53
1950-51 1951-52 1952-53
Amount % Amount % Amount %
Coordination .........................$ 13,798.40 6.4 $ 14,732.00 6.8 $ 14,364.90 6.4
Surveys & Investigations...... 36,393.02 16.8 59,529.61 27.4 49,119.23 22.0
Development & Maintenance 87,808.50 40.7 103,399.16 47.6 158,051.14 70.6
Land Acquisition .................. 78,000.00 36.1 39,437.95 18.2 2,400.00 1.0
$215,999.92 $217,098.72 $223,935.27


was the first state to make extensive
use of the technique of color-dyeing
large numbers of doves, a practice
which has proved most valuable in
tracing migratory flocks. As a re-
sult of this study, Florida in 1952
had a state-wide split season, and
the best dove hunting in years.
Wild turkey have been studied on
five projects. The principal objec-
tives have been the gathering of
information on populations, kill,
food habits, range, and sex ratios.
Special efforts have been made to
obtain data on the utilization and
effects of artificial feeders and to
design improved feeders.
Five research studies have been
concerned with deer. These have
been investigations of range and
habitat, life history, populations, kill,
age and sex ratios, food habits and
management practices. Two of the
studies were designed specifically to
determine the best management for
the important Ocala and Eglin herds.
An intensive study of the Key deer
has been made to find out means
of saving this unique sub-species
from extinction.
In game management, as in any
other business, it is essential to know
the status of current stocks, the
harvest and replacement. To ac-
complish this, a broad survey of
wildlife harvests in the state has
been conducted. This has given
valuable and much needed informa-
tion on hunter activity and game
kill, facts never before available.
Development
The developmental activities of
the Game Management Division
during the past two years have been
extremely varied, including fence
construction and maintenance, post-
ing, road and bridge maintenance,
planting of food plots, controlled
burning, restocking with wild-
trapped turkey and deer, construc-
tion of checking stations, and dis-
tribution of planting stock. Most
of this work has been carried out
on the Commission's wildlife man-
agement areas, but some, par-
ticularly distribution of planting
stocks, has been on private lands.
In addition, all members of the staff


are available as consultants to any
landowner.
During 1951 and 1952 the follow-
ing amounts of planting stock were
distributed, primarily to north and
central Florida:
thunbergii and bicolor
lespedeza plants ....... 888,500
thunbergii lespedeza
seeds .......................... 110 lbs.
bicolor lespedeza seed .. 17 lbs.
multiflora rose plants.... 106,625
partridge pea seed ...... 2,200 lbs.
common lespedeza seed 3,800 lbs.
Florida beggarweed
seed ............................. 2,481 lbs.
Stocking wild-trapped turkey and
deer in localities which have good
habitat but little game has been a
very important part of the game
management program. These re-
leases have been outstandingly suc-
cessful, and have resulted in good
deer and turkey populations in areas
which a few years ago had none of
these species. For example, in
Hardee County, which had no
turkeys, approximately 80 wild-
trapped birds have in three years
built up a population of close to
500. During the past two years,
170 deer and 416 turkey were re-
leased in breeding grounds, closed
counties, and wildlife management
areas.
On the Gulf Hammock Wildlife
Management Area, the principal
activities have been controlled burn-
ing, planting of food plots, fence
maintenance, road clearing and
maintenance, and operation of the
controlled hunt. Approximately 30
miles of new fence were constructed
on the Steinhatchee Management
Area, and all the old fence main-
tained. Two new checking stations
were constructed and two moved to
better locations. All boundaries
were posted, and some experimental
plantings were made. Controlled
hunts were conducted in both years.
Work on the Charlotte Area has
consisted largely of maintenance of
roads, bridges, fences, buildings,
controlled burning, construction of
a feed storage room, supervision of
wood cutting operations, supervision
(Continued on Page 34)








































By BEN McLAUCHLIN




A clean sweep of the broom made
for less Wildlife Officers, more and
better equipment, a really effective
two-way radio system and a much
more efficient Law Enforcement
program during the past biennium.
Politics had always played an im-
portant part in the hiring of the
Wildlife Officers in the early his-
tory of the Game Commission, but
under operational procedures of the
past two years, much was changed
for the good of the Game Agency.
This can be easily seen by the fol-
lowing facts:
In 1950-51, the Commission had
190 wildlife officers who made 1,313
arrests. During the past year 154
officers arrested 1,484 game and fish
violators leaving us with the thought
that 20 per cent less men made 16
per cent more arrests during similar
periods of time.
Vigorous Law Enforcement is al-
ways essential to the successful op-
eration of a good conservation pro-
gram, not that the officers tried to
make a record number of arrests
for these violations; their major aim






was one of trying to prevent these
illegal happenings.
With that thought in mind, the
Commission spent considerable time
in the training of Wildlife Officers,
sending them to the Wildlife Offi-
cers School at Williston Air Base
and in general holding meetings at
the Division level in which the men
were instructed in various opera-
tional activities. Every summer there
is also a series of refresher courses
taught at the school.
The pay scale for wildlife officers
has risen under a personnel classi-
fication plan, making for more ef-
ficient employees to enforce the
laws. Included in this plan are also
liberal vacation, sick leave, and re-
tirement benefits.
One of the important aspects of
the Law Enforcement branch is that
it is subdivided geographically, cor-
responding to the five Conservation
Divisions, with a force of wildlife
officers, headed by several Area
Supervisors in each Division.
Their job is similar in all five Di-
visions, with few exceptions, and
within the past two years through
the use of good radios, good automo-
tive equipment, good motors and
boats, a pilot and airplane in each
area and several land base radio sta-
tions, the entire state is almost ef-
fectively covered.
One of the sad things, however,
about the Law Enforcement Divi-
sion is that as of now, each officer
patrols almost a quarter of a million
acres of land and water. Future
plans call for the addition of at
least one more wildlife officer-in-
cluding the hiring of veterans under
an on-the-job training program-to
each county, if the Commission can
get the necessary funds.
In looking over our summary of
Wildlife Officers activities for the
past year, we found quite a few in-
teresting facts regarding the distri-
bution on an average officer's time
during one month.
The average Wildlife Officer trav-
eled 1,360 miles each month, checked
129 fishing and or hunting licenses.
spent 226 hours on land patrol. -14
hours on water patrol-with the pi-
lots spending 59 hours on air patrol
-made two speeches to organized
groups, spent 8 hours on game man-
agement work and six on fish man-
agement work, four arrests, talked
to 55 persons regarding conservation
measures and principles, contacted
five informers, rendered four hours
of community service, investigated
five complaints, sold 12 commercial
fish dealers licenses, spent four hours


A clean sweep of the broom made for less Wildlife Officers, more
and better equipment, a really effective two-way radio system
and a much more efficient Law Enforcement program-


in professional improvement, labor-
ed on equipment maintenance for
four hours, spent five hours on dem-
onstrations, fairs, etc., rendered as-
sistance to three persons, worked on
their report for four hours, seized
five illegal fishing devices, spent 2
hours in division and general public
meetings, and attended court for
three hours while filing charges, etc.
In addition to that, the Wildlife
Officers are often called upon to do
other things. In the Everglades Di-
vision, enforcement men have re-
covered the bodies of 5 drowned
persons in Lake Okeechobee and
have located 11 lost fishing parties
on the lake and 24 lost parties in
the Everglades.
Information furnished by Wildlife
Officers has resulted in the arrest
and conviction of two cattle rustlers.
All of the above figures indicate that
the average officer works 111/3 hours
each day for the Commission or do-
ing Commission activities.
The success of law enforcement is
usually determined by the will of
the people in any particular section
of the State. Enforcement has been
difficult in some areas, due to a lack
of interest or misunderstanding by
the people. If the conservation pro-
gram is to be a successful one which

Wildlife officers rehearse


will result in increased game and
fish resources, the Game Commis-
sion must have the help of the peo-
ple throughout the entire state, to
see that the rules and regulations
are carried out, to see that illegal
hunting and fishing devices are
seized and to see that the violators
are brought into court.
The Florida Game Commission
also realized that only through the
cooperation of an informed and in-
terested public can game law vio-
lators be controlled. One of the
major responsibilities, therefore, of
the Wildlife Officer is that of carry-
ing on an educational and informa-
tional program, designed to halt such
violations. While law enforcement
has been one of the primary duties,
the officers have performed many
supplementary activities. These in-
clude assisting with managed hunts,
trapping and distribution of quail,
roughfish control work, conducting
surveys and investigations, showing
films and making talks to organized
groups, and generally serving as the
public relations men for the Game
Commission, for they are the me-
dium through which the public has
greatest contact with the Commis-
sion and with commission programs
and activities.

"arrest" of illegal seiner.


~1~Lr~~~


* a .


-- I.J


- MMENW -


"- ~-~2~--- ~ -------.rq---~~_


-- I


~~~~a*cs,
I~












































INFORMATION



and Educaticoan


Conservation has really started
coming into its own!
For many many years, conserva-
tion was really confused with the
word conversation, for the job of
protecting and restoring our natural
resources of game and fish was one


of mostly talk, without any action,
of the majority of the people living
in the State of Florida. Unfortu-
nately, such is still the case in a
few of the counties where some per-
sons like to hunt and kill wildlife
on a year-around basis, while in


several other areas the unsportsman-
like conduct of illegal seining and
dynamiting of fresh water fish still
continues.
But the majority of the people of
Florida have begun to realize that
something must be done in order to






A planned, well-coordinated program of Information and Education for effective conservation-
that's what Florida needs to obtain the necessary public understanding of the importance of con-
servation, to insure sufficient game and fish for all. And that's what Florida has in the Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission!


insure the increase of these resources
so vitally necessary to the economics
of the State, for concrete figures, as
ascertained by prominent sportsmen
and financial authorities, have told
us that "Florida's hunting and fish-
ing is BIG BUSINESS, amounting
to more than a Billion Dollars an-
nually."
Numerous attempts were made to
gain this increase of resources; re-
stocking was done at a cost of many
thousands of dollars, the law en-
forcement staff of wildlife officers
was increased, and laws and regu-
lations were passed, prohibiting this
and allowing that, and still no ap-
preciable increase of these resources
was noted.
Then Education made its way into
the picture, and with its instruction
came a program designed to acquaint
the people with the immediate need
for conserving and protecting the
few resources of game and fish on
hand and a full-hearted effort on
the part of everyone to restore the
habitat so necessary for the propa-
gation of Florida's animals, birds,
and fish.
The way was torturous, with the
Education program often being
pushed aside by other facets of con-
servation work. But the program
continued rolling along, slowly pick-
ing up speed, for the need for such
a project to inform and educate the
people with regard to conservation
activities was seen by the more-
alert, far-seeing residents of the
State.
Throughout the years the Infor-
mation and Education grew up and
began to take an equal place among
the other adults of the Game Com-
mission overall picture-the Game
Management, the Fish Management,
and the Law Enforcement.
Information and Education Activi-
ties during the past biennium reach-
ed a new high in the history of the
Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission, and through a series of edu-
cation programs which has engaged
the use of all publicity media and
all educational outlets, the people
and children of the State have in-
deed become more conservation-
conscious.
Probably the most important un-
dertaking during the past biennium
has been the establishment of five
Division offices, each of which is


staffed with an Education Officer,
and other personnel of the Game
Commission. His job is very similar
to that of the State Coordinator of
the Information and Education Di-
vision in that he carries out all
phases of the Information and Edu-
cation program within his own par-
ticular area.
At the present time our Educa-
tion Officers are: Arthur Nixon,
Northwest Florida Division; Bill
Snyder, Northeast Florida Division;
Charles Clymore, Central Florida
Division; Bob Revels, South Florida
Division; and Denver Ste. Claire,
Everglades Division.
All Education Officers are respon-
sible in seeing that an educational
program master-minded by the Di-
rector of the Commission and co-
ordinated by the State Education
Officer is carried on in its entirety
in all counties of their particular
area.
For the purpose of this report we
are going to attend strictly to those
Information and Education practices
carried on by the State Coordina-
tor's office in Tallahassee. We must
remember, though, that all these
programs and projects are also car-
ried on in the Division offices.


Two outstanding projects during
the past year in the Information and
Education Division were the Youth
Conservation Club movement and
the traveling wildlife trailer.
The Youth Conservation Club pro-
gram, getting off to an unheralded
start in January, 1952, has made an
unprecedented progress. Starting
with the St. Petersburg Junior Rod
and Gun Club and traveling the
circuit throughout the entire State
with an estimated 50 clubs organized
at the end of 1952, these clubs were
formed in cities throughout the en-
tire State, from Pensacola to Jack-
sonville, down to Miami, and up to
the West Coast.
The summer of 1952 saw the in-
auguration of the first Junior Sports-
men's Sumer Camp and the charter-
ing of the Junior Conservation Club
League of Florida. Future plans for
this youth movement call for the
construction of a permanent edu-
cational-recreational summer camp
donated by Cecil M. Webb, former
Chairman of the Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission from Tampa.
It is expected that this camp will
cost an estimated $25,000 and it is
hoped that it will be one of several


junior sportsmen learning finer points of archery.





summer camps to be established
within the next few years.
Our traveling educational wildlife
exhibit was constructed at a cost of
approximately $10,000 and was first
displayed on October 1, 1952, after
which it began to take in many of
the county fairs, schools and com-
munities in the State of Florida. It
is expected that an estimated 6,000,-
000 people in the state of Florida
will see this display during its first
year on the road.
There are 22 cages and tanks on
the trailer carrying the following
animals, birds, snakes and fish: deer.
bear, eagle, hawk, geese, turkey,
quail, squirrel, otter, alligator, coon,
wildcat, fox, duck and several spe-
cies of fish and snakes.
Also during the past year a se-
ries of weekly 15-minute programs
preaching conservation to more than
3 million people in Florida, Geor-
gia, and Alabama has been started.
The programs which are broadcast
over 48 radio stations in the above
three states are informative, educa-
tional, and entertaining. The ma-
jority of them have been recorded
in the open taking many game com-
mission activities and programs as
well as on-the-spot records of field
trials, deer hunts, and related out-
door activities.
It is expected that several new
radio stations will be added to the
release list of these taped recordings
so that the entire State will be ef-
fectively covered by the program
"FLORIDA WILDLIFE ON THE
AIR."
During the past two years the


breakdown on activities of the In-
formation and Education Division
included the following:
An estimated 39,428 pieces of lit-
erature have been distributed to
interested persons in every state
of the Country, an estimated 163
letters per month have been an-
swered for persons requesting in-
formation on hunting and fishing,
696 films from our library have been
shown to sportsmen's clubs, civic
groups and other organizations in
more than 43 states of the Union,
and 192 press and radio releases have
been sent out to every newspaper,
radio station, presidents of sports-
men's clubs, and outdoor writers in
Florida as well as being sent to more
than 150 of the more outstanding
outdoor writers in other states. Our
total press release list numbers 750
names.
Our clipping service has consist-
ently informed us that the majority
of all newspapers in the State of
Florida are very anxious to receive
our releases since they have pub-
lished them in full throughout the
past two years. We feel that this is
the result of distributing stories fill-
ed with factual information and no
propaganda, as these stories never
would have been printed otherwise.
We started last August to send
out a series of weekly cartoon mats
entitled "Outdoor Notes" in which
we took a central Information and
Education theme each month and
had an artist draw a cartoon with
a picture and copy which illustrated
the various conservation principles
and data about the particular sub-
ject in the cartoon. To date we are
sending these out to more than 100
newspapers, in the State and they
are meeting with a lot of interest.
We definitely plan to continue this
project.
The Information and Education
Division has also made arrange-
ments for a number of staff officers
of the Commission to speak before
numerous organizations about the
State with regard to programs and
activities of the Commission. We
have also purchased three new pro-
jectors and three new screens in
order that each of our division Edu-
cation Officers might be equipped
to show the many movies in our
film library. We have purchased sev-
eral new films to help keep the pub-
lic informed on conservation princi-
pals as well as entertain them with
actual pictures of hunting and fish-
ing activities.
The majority of the films in the
library were not produced by our
Commission and there was no rec-


ognition on the film or during the
showing that the Florida Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission was

showing the film. In view of this
fact, the Information and Education
Division made arrangements with a
film company to supply us with
leaders telling the audience that
"This film is being shown through
the courtesy of the Florida Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commission."
All our films have been equipped
with these leaders.
Under a separate heading you will
find that we have taken up the in-
spiring progress of our Commission
publication, Florida Wildlife Maga-
zine. For the year 1951 it was en-
tirely under the Information and
Education Division but since April
14, 1952, when Jack Grant became
Editor, it has been carried on the
budget as a separate department.
The Commission's House Bulletin
has been re-organized and sent to
all Commission personnel each
month, carrying up-to-date changes
in policies and news releases, as well
as personal items concerning the
employees.
During the period of 1950-52, we
have continued our annual Wildlife
Officers School at the Williston Air
Base, with the Third Annual Ses-
sions held in the Summer of 1951
and the Fourth Annual Classes at-
tended by the entire Commission
staff of wildlife officers, game and
fish technicians and division staff
personnel in July and August of
1952. This school was a series of re-
fresher courses, taught by Commis-
sion personnel to all the employees,
and the subjects included everything
relating to any and every type of
activities encountered in the con-
servation program.
We are making definite plans to
enlarge the wild animal and bird
zoo at the Florida Industrial School
for Boys at Marianna. Since it is
necessary to change the animals and
birds in our traveling wildlife ex-
hibit every 5 or 6 weeks it will be
necessary to increase the area of the
Marianna zoo so that we will have
enough animals and birds on hand
for both the transfer to the exhibit
and others to be displayed at the
zoo, on a year-round basis.
We have promoted fishathons for
children in the following cities:
Tallahassee, Clearwater, Leesburg,
Orlando, St. Petersburg, Lakeland.
Tampa and in many other cities and
towns throughout Florida.
These one-day fishing contests for
boys and girls have met with quite
a lot of enthusiasm among civic of-
(Continued on Page 35)


_


[REVE FO lImRS F-GrRASS I-IR
































COMMUNICATIONS


By RHETT McMILLIAN


By the end of 1952, the radio sys-
tem of the Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission effectively covered
the entire state, so far as the opera-
tions of the commission are con-
cerned.
In the field are 200 mobile two-
way radio units, installed in auto-
mobiles and other vehicles. The five
aircraft of the commission are equip-
ped with radio for talking to the
ground and to our vehicle. Ten
walkie-talkies are used by the men
in the field for even closer com-
munication.
The commission has 13 fixed base
stations in the state, located at the
following cities and towns:


Crestview, Panama City, Blounts-
town, Tallahassee, Perry, Live Oak,
Williston, Jacksonville, Leesburg,
Lakeland, Myakka, Okeechobee and
Immokalee.
Four radio engineers employed by
the commission service and maintain
this equipment, with the commu-
nications headquarters located cen-
trally at New Smyrna Beach.
One of the most significant
achievements of the communica-
tions division has been the work-
ing out of cooperative radio op-
erating agreements between the
commission and certain municipali-
ties where there are fixed radio sta-
tions, for the purpose of mutual aid
in communications and law enforce-
ment. These arrangements have
saved the commission a consider-
able amount of money, because the
municipalities furnish the radio op-
erators, the building, the antenna
tower and the power to run the
stations, with agreement to answer
all game commission radio calls. The
commission furnishes and maintains
the equipment.
The communications system has
proved itself as an adjunct to the
commission's work in saving time
and money. It has greatly improved
the overall state-wide flexibility of
the administrative function.

































FUTURE




PROSPECTS


By BEN McLAUCHLIN


Throughout the last few months
the Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission has been asked time
and time again, "What are your
plans for the future?"
We feel that much has been ac-
complished during the past four
years, and with the cooperation of
interested sportsmen and the general
public, we know that much more
will be done in the conservation of
our natural resources.
Highlighting the Game Commis-
sion's activities during the next five
provided of course that we can
secure the necessary funds for these
projects.
First and foremost is a better law
enforcement program. Today we
have an average of two Wildlife
Officers per County, with each


Wildlife Officer having an average
of a quarter-million acres of land,
and water to patrol. This is defin-
itely more acreage than any one
person can successfully patrol, and
plans are now being formulated to
employ more and better trained
officers to aid in the enforcing of
game and fish laws. It is estimated
that it takes approximately $6,000
a year to equip one officer, and one-
third of all funds obtained will be
used to bring this project to a suc-
cessful conclusion.
Number two on the future project
list is that of the acquisition of pub-
lic hunting and fishing areas. With
the posting of lands going into an
all-time high, this is indeed of most
concern to the hunter and fisherman
who owns no private land or who


has no access to fishing waters.
During the past biennium we have
acquired through sale and agree-
ment a total of almost 2,000,000
acres of land for public controlled
hunting. This has been a godsend
to the city-dwelling nimrods, and
sportsmen have been quick to
acknowledge our program of mak-
ing good shooting available for the
hunter at a very small cost.
Through agreements with private
landowners, the Commission has
helped the small man to enjoy much
the same shooting opportunities
known to the big man with his many
acres of private hunting territory.
The Game Commission figures
that it costs an average of 10 cents
an acre per year to maintain this
land for hunting purposes. The cost


--


717






includes patrolling, restocking, in
some cases fencing, management,
plowing of fire lanes, food and cover
plantings, and several other items,
all of which are deemed necessary
for the best in future hunting.
We can easily acquire 5,000,000
more acres of this land for public
hunting purposes, for the large land-
owners have been quick to see the
benefits resulting from such a pro-
gram, particularly with regard to-
ward public relations. An easy
problem of multiplication tells us
that $500,000 must be found before
such a program can be made avail-
able.
In the public fishing area project,
the Game Commission contemplates
the construction of public fishing
piers and landings in many of the
rivers and lakes of the State and
improving the fishing in waters of
management areas. Along with this


will come an increased roughfish
control operation, designed to de-
stroy the many large concentrations
of gars, suckers, mudfish and gizzard
shad that inhabit our waterways,
depleting the food supply for the
game fish species of black bass, jack-
fish, crappie, bream, shellcrackers
and warmouths.
Last but not least in the three-
point program is that of water
hyacinths. Today more than 250,000
acres of this plant pest infest the
lakes and streams of Florida. During
the past year we have set up a
separate budget to buy a spraying
plane, several boats, hire several
technicians, and buy other materials
and equipment for the start of a
really effective control program.
In this short time almost 5,000
acres have been sprayed in some 40
lakes, at a cost of approximately
$4.00 per acre for the spraying ma-


trials. If we were to complete the
entire job of effectively controlling
this vast acreage of hyacinths, we
would need more than $1,000,000.
It would also take an undetermined
amount of money each year there-
after to keep the hyacinths under
control, since there is at present
no known way to eradicate this plant
completely.
We don't expect to get that much
money in a few years but whatever
extra funds we do get will be spent
by and large for these three main
projects.
Along with this three-point pro-
gram, we are definitely going to con-
tinue the many other projects cur-
rently in operation. These include
farm pond management, food and
cover plantings for wildlife, informa-
tion and education work, and all the
other phases of conservation activi-
ties carried on in the past.


1952-53



Fest Hautian Seaone Eveo !


If the shooting success in the
State's Wildlife Management Areas
is any indication of the overall game
kill-Florida's sportsmen had one of
the best hunting seasons in years.
A total of 773 ducks, 867 deer,
1,479 turkeys, 11,762 quail, 307
doves, 11,245 squirrels and 11 bears
have been killed during the past
season. That's the report from 14
of the 15 Management Areas, as
gathered by Edward B. Chamber-
lain, Federal Aid Wildlife Coordina-
tor of the Game and Fish Commis-
sion.
Better than last year? Look at
the record. During the 1951-52
season, with reports from 12 Wild-
life Management Areas, the kill was
527 deer, 740 turkeys, 4,782 quail
and 6 bears.


And data received from wildlife
officers and other game technicians
indicates a better than average
shooting success in areas other than
the Management Areas, making this
perhaps the best hunting season
ever!
Here's the breakdown, by area:
Gulf Hammock 439 ducks, 64
deer, 115 turkeys, 76 quail and 3,511
squirrels.
Tomoka 29 deer, 16 turkeys, 8
quail, and 106 squirrels.
Farmton-37 deer, 95 turkeys, 128
quail, and 645 squirrels.
Steinhatchee-82 ducks, 77 deer,
21 turkeys, 76 quail, 2 doves, and
1,500 squirrels.
J. W. Corbett--4 ducks, 8 deer,
1,156 quail and 4 doves.


Hendry-36 ducks, 17 deer, 283
turkeys, 226 quail, 1 dove, and 186
squirrels.
Collier-2 ducks, 87 deer, 679 tur-
keys, 1,021 quail, 140 doves, and 258
squirrels.
Fisheating Creek 157 ducks, 5
deer, 268 turkeys, 5,307 quail, 128
doves and 638 squirrels.
Sumter County 2 deer, 12 tur-
keys, 94 quail, and 1,674 squirrels.
Charlotte County-3,300 quail.
Apalachicola National Forest-12
deer and 6 bears.
Osceola National Forest-28 deer,
316 squirrels, and 1 bear.
Ocala National Forest-370 quail,
501 deer, 32 doves, 2,408 squirrels
and 4 bears.
Eglin-1,500 deer.







7t&ert /aaWF eomm44 ..,


CECIL M. WEBB
As president of the Dixie Lily
Milling Company, Cecil M. Webb
figures prominently in Florida's in-
dustrial life, and as member of the
Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission for a number of years and
two-time Chairman, he is more than
a prominent figure in the State's
conservation picture.
-^


CECIL M. WEBB
Born in Richland, Ga., Webb at-
tended school in the vicinity of his
birthplace and afterward added
greatly to his education by personal
reading and study. His father was
a farmer in earlier years and later
operated a chain of stores.
Webb's business career began
with a dairy organization, later fill-
ing a position as sales manager for
a Georgia bakery. In the latter job,
he had occasion to come to Florida.
It was then that he found an op-
portunity in the milling trade, with
the Eelbeck Milling Company, being
promoted steadily until he sold his
interest in that company in 1939 to
found his own company.
This enterprise of his was the
Dixie Lily Milling Company, which
now covers every part of Florida,
from Gulf to the Ocean, from the
Georgia line to the Keys.
In addition to his business activi-
ties, Webb has concerned himself for
many years in the conservation of
wild life. He is particularly inter-
ested in game birds and is an honor-
ary member of about 30 hunting
and fishing clubs in this State. He
was originally appointed to the
Game Commission by Governor


Caldwell and re-appointed by Gov-
ernor Warren, with the latter term
ending Jan. 6, 1953.
An enthusiastic hunter, the Com-
missioner has maintained hunting
rights on numerous acres of land
for his own use and for that of his
friends, and it is conservatively esti-
mated that he spends annually
thousands of dollars in the cause
of conservation here in Florida. His
one pet project has been the supple-
mental feeding stations for quail.
In addition to conducting these
"quail cafeterias," Webb has inter-
ested himself in various civic and
social organizations, including the
Tampa Chamber of Commerce, the
Florida State Chamber of Com-
merce, the American Corn Millers'
Federation, and the Free and Ac-
cepted Masons. During World War
II, he served as a Coast Guard vol-
unteer.
The First District Commissioner
is married and has two sons. His
wife and sons, both of whom are
veterans of the last World War, are
all active in the administration of
the Milling Company.

MILLER JOINER
Since the inception of the North-
east Florida Division of the Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commission,
there have been two important pro-
grams that have attracted the at-
tention of sportsmen, conservation-
ists and the general public. These
are "Operation Brushpile" and the
swearing in of Deputy Wildlife
Officers.
According to reports received
from persons through the northeast
section of the State, both programs
are meeting with a great amount of
enthusiasm, and the man respon-
sible for these projects is Miller V.
Joiner, of Jacksonville, Commission-
er for the Second Congressional
District.
Joiner is an ardent sportsman
who has been a member of the Com-
mission since 1949. He was appoint-
ed in June of that year and was
confirmed by the Senate to fill the
unexpired term of Milton H. Bax-
ley, which expired in January 1951.
He was re-appointed by Governor
Fuller Warren and confirmed by
the 1951 Senate to serve a full five-
year term.
Commisisoner Joiner is a native
of Jacksonville where he operates a
bus and taxicab business. He and
his two sons frequently join in hunt-


ing expeditions, and he maintains
a lodge on Lake Santa Fe at Key-
stone Heights. He has been in his
present line of work for nearly 20
years. Prior to that, he was an auto-
mobile representative.
In addition to his work, he has
been active in the civic and busi-
ness life of Jacksonville, as a mem-
ber of the State Chamber of Com-




















MILLER JOINER
merce, Jacksonville Chamber of
Commerce, and a member of the
American Legion and Veterans of
Foreign Wars, having served in
World War I.
The Commissioner has devoted
much of his time for the past four
years in the work of conservation,
not only of wildlife but also of the
State's other natural resources as
well. He is known throughout the
State for his many varied activities,
particularly those dealing with
game and fish resources, for he has
always demonstrated a keen inter-
est in furthering fishing and hunt-
ing opportunities for Florida.

A. F. RICH
As one of the newer members of
the Florida Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission, A. F. Rich, of
Tallahassee, believes that a continu-
ation of the youth educational pro-
gram is the main answer to most
of the conservation problems facing
the State of Florida today.
"If we teach the children of the
State the various principles they
must follow in order to have pleas-
ant hunting and fishing activities
all their lives, then we can get their
parents to understand a little bit
more about the program that we're


.J.J




























trying to accomplish for the general
public," said Rich.
"For just as the school boy patrol
has helped the adults to become
more safety conscious on the high-
ways, and just as the Boy Scouts
and Girl Scouts have helped to con-
vince the grownups that good moral
attitudes are still present in the
younger generations, so can our boys
and girls teach the older people to
obey and respect the game and fish
regulations to bring back the bounti-
ful wildlife resources that once gave
Florida the name of the "Sports-
men's Paradise!"
Rich, who incidentally is an ardent
hunter-he has hunted in almost
every State of the Union and in
Alaska and Mexico-was born in
Bainbridge, Ga., and got his high
school education there. He also was
a student at the Georgia Military
College in the same town.
He was then employed by the
Citizen's Oil Company for 13 years,
during which time he served as a
station manager and supervisor,
manager of the Alabama and Geor-
gia territory, and later construction
and marine superintendent. He left
this organization in 1945 to go into
business for himself as a general
contractor, which he still operates.
The Third District Commissioner
is married and has two daughters,
one who is 7, and the other, 11. He
was appointed to the Game Com-
mission as a member on Jan. 9, 1952,
and is subject to confirmation by
the Senate in the 1953 Legislature.
Rich has been hunting since he
was 10 years old, and he said that
the last hunting season was the best
in many years. Reasons for this,
he 'emphasizes, were the good feed
crop that nature so plentifully pro-
vided for the animals and birds, the
good conservation regulations, and


better law enforcement, as well as
the more conservation-minded atti-
tude of the sportsmen.

WALTER WARREN
Walter Warren, of Leesburg, can
definitely be classified as an ardent
sportsman, for he has fished and
hunted in all sections of the State.
He can also be classified as an ar-
dent conservationist, for since his
appointment to the Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission by Gover-
nor Fuller Warren in October 1951,
he has vigorously stuck by his guns
in various Commission programs.
His appointment is subject to con-
firmation by the 1953 Senate.
He can be called the major pro-
ponent of the controversial con-
trolled seining program, for, as he
tells it, "I am definitely in accord
with the reasoning and thoughts of
Chief Fisheries Biologist John F.
Dequine on this program." The con-
trolled seining program is a three-
year experimental program design-
ed to improve sports fishing oppor-
tunities in six Florida lakes by har-
vesting surplus populations of pan-
fish and destroying concentrations
of roughfish.
Warren is a lawyer in Leesburg.
He was born in Palatka where he
was educated in grammar and high
schools. After his high school grad-
uation he worked in a law office
while studying law on his own. He
passed the Florida Bar exam in 1936
and moved to Leesburg in 1938. He
is married and has four children,
two boys and two girls, all of which
are still in school.
A leading civic worker in Lees-
burg, Warren is a member of Ki-
wanis and Elks, and a former Pres-
ident of the Leesburg Junior Cham-
ber of Commerce.
The Commissioner said, "Consid-
erable progress has been made in
conservation in the past several
years, but I feel that much more
remains to be done." On the changes
in the central Florida area, he said
that the quail and dove shooting
have been getting better and better
all the time, with last year one of
the finest hunting seasons he re-
members in years.
One of his pet projects is a work-
able plan for hiring personnel. "The
next biggest step forward that the
Game Commission can take is that
of instituting a combination civil
service plan for hiring personnel
and a merit system for increasing
the pay of these employees. Such
a program would make for an effi-
cient staff and a more-than-effective
program in the protection and re-
storation of our various resources,"
said the Commissioner.


WALTER WARREN
LEO ADEEB
What will probably be considered
one of the best moves on the part
of the Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission to get advice from
sportsmen in any particular area
can be attributed to the newest
member of this group, Leo J. Adeeb,
of Miami Beach, who took office on
Aug. 25, 1952. His term is subject
to confirmation by the 1953 Senate.
Adeeb made a motion that the
Commission adopt a resolution
which authorized each member of
the Commission "to select a commit-
tee of five citizens in his district to
serve without pay as an advisory
board for that commissioner in all
matters pertaining to Game Com-
mission activities."
From various remarks heard
throughout the State on this reso-
lution and on the sportsmen and
businessmen chosen for these vari-
ous boards, it is expected that the
various members of the Commis-
sion are certain to get the best of
advice on various controversial
issues taken up by the Game Agen-
cy. These advisers will also serve
to give the Commissioner a consen-
sus from people throughout any
particular area on any program or
activity regarding conservation prin-
ciples.
Adeeb, an automobile dealer and
president of the Miami Beach Fla-
mingoes of the Florida International
Baseball League, succeeded E. Har-
ris Drew, West Palm Beach, who
resigned as Commissioner to accept
appointment to the State Supreme
Court.
The Commissioner has also been
active in civic and social club work,
holding the following offices:
Director and vice-president of the
Florida Dealers Association, mem-




























LEO ADEEB
ber of the Board of Governors of
the Miami Beach Chamber of Com-
merce, Past President of the Miami
Beach Kiwanis Club, Past President
of the Young Democrats Club for
Dade County, Vice-President of the
Gridiron Club, member of the
Mayor's Safety Council, member of
the President's Council of Miami
Beach, and President of the Beach
Chevrolet Corporation.
He is also a member of the Rod
and Reel Club, Variety Club, Old-
Timers Club, Quarterback Club,
Miami Shores Country Club, la-
Groce Country Club and Knights of
Columbus.

BEN McLAUCHLIN
A man who learned the principles
of good business the hard way by
personal work on his own farm, and
a man who was taught the principles
of good administration from his mili-
tary service in the last World War
is now applying those same prin-
ciples to the conservation program
of the Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission.
He is Ben L. McLauchlin, a
native-born Floridian who calls
Fairfield home. After his grammar
school and high school education,
he entered the University of Florida
where he received a B.S. degree in
Agriculture. It was here at the
University where his leadership first
became apparent, with his being se-
lected as vice-president of the stu-
dent body.
McLauchlin is married and the
father of three girls and one boy.
The boy was the latest addition, be-
ing born during the early part of
February 1953.
The Commission director spent


five years in the Army Air Corps
during World War II, and became a
Lieutenant Colonel of the 388th
Heavy Bomber Group, 8th Air
Force, before his discharge in Aug-
ust 1945.
Highlights of his business career
include the position of agriculture
teacher for Sumter County after
graduation from the University in
1937 and in 1941 he received the
award of Master Teacher for the
Southern half of Florida. He is cur-
rently engaged in the beef cattle
and farming business in Marion
County.
He was employed by the Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commission
in 1949 as supervisor of the Wildlife
Officers School, and shortly after-
wards was appointed Assistant Di-
rector. He was appointed Director
in June 1951.
McLauchlin served as Director of
the Commission for most of the past
biennium, and most of the accom-
plishments recorded in this biennial
report came into being during his
period as administrative head for
the Game Commission.
O. EARLE FRYE
Credit for a good hunting season
in Florida can be claimed by no
special person or organization, since
a lot of various items enter into
such success, but a large part of the
credit for organizing and putting
into effect a progressive game man-
agement program-which definitely
does have a bearing on future good
hunting-can be placed on one man.
He is O. Earle Frye, Jr., Assistant
Director of the Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission.
It was during the years of 1947
and 1951, while Frye was serving
as Chief Wildlife Biologist that a
management program including the


BEN McLAUCHLIN


acquisition of public hunting rights
on a tremendous acreage of private
lands was inaugurated. The suc-
cess of sportsmen in the fields and
forests this past shooting season has
ascertained that a good management
program was instrumental in pro-
viding game for this top-notch out-
door sport this year.
Frye, who was born in Tennessee
in 1917 and moved to Florida in
1925, first became interested in wild-
life as a boy hunting and fishing
near Winter Haven. He decided to
make a career of conservation when
a sophomore at the University of
Florida, where he received a Bach-
elor's Degree in Biology in 1939,
followed by a Master's Degree in
1941. He then spent one year of
training in the Department of Wild-
life Management in Agriculture and
Mechanical College of Texas.
The Assistant Director enlisted in
the U. S. Navy in June 1942 and
became a naval aviator. His two
years of sea duty were spent in anti-
submarine warfare as a torpedo
plane pilot aboard aircraft carriers
in the North Atlantic. He held the
rank of Lieutenant, Senior Grade
and received the Air Medal with
one Gold Star, and the Presidential
Unit Citation before being released
from active duty in January 1946.
After his Military service, Frye
was employed by the Florida Game
Commission to do research work on
the bobwhite quail. In 1947 he be-
came Chief Wildlife Biologist and
spent the following four years in
game management work. He was
then appointed Assistant Director
in 1951. He has written numerous
technical and non-technical articles
about wildlife and game manage-
ment programs for many different
publications.















By CLYDE R. REVELS, JR.


By CLYDE R. REVELS, JR. H


An educational program has its
most lasting effects upon children,
particularly those from the first to
the sixth grades, for it's in this
period of life that their opinions on
a variety of matters are moulded, to
become a true part of their thinking
for the rest of their lives.
The Florida Game and Fresh Wa-
ter Fish Commission realizes this
and an extra effort has been put
forth by all personnel in the fields
and in the offices, but mostly by the
Division Education Officers, to make
school children a vital part of their
everyday contacts.
Perhaps the most far-reaching of
all activities carried on with chil-
dren is that of the formation of
Junior Conservation Clubs through-
out the entire State of Florida. For
it is here that the thought of con-
servation-education is planted and
tended 'before finally blossoming
out as a new convert to the field
of saving and restoring our natural
resources.
In an atmosphere of recreation
as a member of these youth clubs,
the youngsters are also taught the
finer points of conducting them-
selves as "Guardians of the Out-
doors," pledged to fulfill their part
in seeing that no species of wildlife
suffers the fate of passenger pigeons.
Some of the many projects these
clubs engage in are the trapping and
releasing of quail, roughfish control
work, control of water hyacinths,
boating, swimming and shooting
safety, proper care of equipment,
predator control, and study of game
and fish rules and regulations.
Another facet of this school chil-
dren program includes the making
of talks and showing of movies to
either individual classes or combined
groups, the sending of pamphlets
and other literature on conservation
for use in the classroom, the con-
ducting of fishathons for children,


and on-the-spot lectures on forestry,
hatcheries, food and cover plantings
for game and camping trips.
One of the newer methods in game
and fish conservation-education is
that of bringing the animals and
fish to the schools in a traveling
"Zoo." The Commission has just re-
cently purchased a new trailer, car-
rying 22 cages and tanks of birds,
animals, and several species of
snakes and fish, which will be sent
to all schools in Florida during the
next few years. The fair manager
gives a short talk on conservation
before the youngsters file around
the trailer to view the various spe-
cies of wildlife. Signs which identify
the animals also tell various means
of assuring their survival and in-
crease throughout future years.
Under discussion for future proj-
ects are the following four pro-
grams, all designed to inculcate our
boys and girls with the principles
of good conservation:
A series of slides on birds, ani-
mals, fish and Commission activities
with a projector and a lecture to
go with each set of slides; a new set
of films; wildlife calendars which
will carry a conservation message
on it for each day of the year; more
colorful pamphlets to attract the at-
tention of the youths; distribution
of a poster with the "Conservation
Pledge" on it for every school room
in Florida; and a conservation essay
contest, with suitable awards, for
the various schools.
The time of the game and fish law
violator is drawing short, for with
the advent of a truly functioning
school conservation-education pro-
gram will come a new generation of
persons concerned with and pledged
to do something about the disap-
pearance of our natural resources.
You can't teach an old outlaw new
tricks, but we can teach our children
good conservation practices.

































uMI oa


The ae of the



Northeast Division


Our two-place seaplane, based at
Keystone Heights, has served as a
sharp pair of eyes in a constant
search for game law violators over
a gigantic area that could not be as
efficiently covered, day after day,
by any other mode.
Records disclose that our plane
operated in the air for a total of
824 hours at an average speed of
90 miles an hour. This means that
our pilot covered 74,160 land miles
during his annual operation in the
air. His ordinary visibility from the
air covers 256 square miles, so it is
only a matter of reckoning to de-
termine the gigantic area that came
under his surveillance.
During his tours in the air, our
pilot is able to maintain constant
radio communication with most
Game and Fish Commission radio
stations regardless of their location
in the state. In addition, he can
communicate with scores of our
radio equipped automobiles and
transmit important messages to
them although they are in remote


parts of Florida. The alertness of
our pilot has resulted in reporting
numerous forest fires during the
year-an added service that likely
has resulted in saving countless
acres of valuable wooded sections.
It is interesting to note that our
pilot was able to continue his law
enforcement efforts even when
weather or other conditions ground-
ed his airplane. Our records show
that he traveled a total of 35,000
miles in his state vehicle in his
patrol of various rivers, lakes and
forests in addition to his flying
activities.
OTHER NORTHEAST
ACTIVITIES
(Continued from Page 9)
During the year our wildlife
officers carried on a program of
strict and efficient enforcement
against illegal transportation of
fish, illegal taking of game, and the
use of illegal devices for taking
fish in all counties of the Northeast
Division.
Quail restocking was carried on


successfully in Alachua, Bradford,
Union, Duval, Clay, Nassau, Gil-
christ, Madison, Lafayette, Suwan-
nee, Columbia, Hamilton, and St.
Johns counties. Due to excellent
public relations and good will of
outstanding sportsmen in Dixie,
Taylor, and Baker counties, we have
received the type of cooperation that
resulted in efficient protection of
fine habitat and game supply that
already is provided in these sec-
tions.
Many of the facts and figures
covering the activities of our divi-
sional wildlife officers are extremely
interesting. Our records disclose
that during the year our officers
traveled a total of 471,097 miles
while performing their official
duties. During that period they
made 385 arrests and checked 18,638
licenses. They spent 75,973 hours
on land patrol in addition to 8,055
hours of water patrol. Their pres-
ence in court required 641 hours,
and their attendance at meetings
with clubs and schools accounted
for 971 hours.
Their assistance in game manage-
ment activities accounted for 1,236
hours, and 1,101 hours were given
to fish management activities. Dur-
ing the year our officers talked to a
total of 9,053 persons regarding wild-
life conservation and rendered 348
hours to community service. They
investigated 308 complaints and sold
315 commercial licenses.
Our officers devoted 1,368 hours
in maintaining and making minor
repairs to their state equipment and
spent 1,028 hours in rendering as-
sistance to the public. Meanwhile,
their efforts and alertness resulted
in the confiscation of 26 illegal nets
and 295 fish traps.


FROM THE
EVERGLADES
IContinued from Page T 5

Furthering the cause of sound
game and fish management and con-
servation, 17 Junior Conservation
Clubs were organized in this Divi-
sion. In addition, all newspaper edi-
tors, City, County, and State Of-
ficials, Chambers of Commerce,
schools, civic clubs, radio stations,
and sportsmen's clubs in this area
have been contacted by personnel
of the Everglades Division.
Counties included in the Ever-
glades Division are Lee, Charlotte,
Glades, Collier, Hendry, Monroe,
Broward, Dade, Palm Beach, and
Martin.


7)


m m









Opening and Closing of Seasons

By 0. EARLE FRYE


One of the biggest problems an-
nually facing the Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission is the estab-
lishment of sound hunting and fish-
ing regulations. The Commission's
responsibility in this matter is one
principally of enabling the maximum
utilization of harvestable supplies of
game and fish without danger of
depleting or. seriously interfering
with the recovery of the population.
Probably the single greatest head-
ache of a hunting and fishing regu-
latory board of today is the difficulty
of liberalizing hunting and fishing
regulations or at least the difficulty
of obtaining public and sportsmen's
approval of such liberalization. It
is much easier to put on additional
restrictions than it is to remove ex-
isting ones.
This attitude on the part of the
hunter or sportsmen is understand-
able enough since for many years
the conservation minded sportsmen
have been fighting for stricter regu-
lations to preserve the ever dimin-
ishing supplies of game and fish. He
has been thinking in terms of saving
rather than utilization. It is not
difficult to understand then why he
views with alarm any move to
liberalize regulations-even though
such liberalization will mean more
hunting and fishing opportunities
for him. This attitude on the part
of the sportsmen is highly com-
mendable when it is accompanied
by a realistic consideration of the
facts in any se. Only when such
facts are ob crd the emotional
appeal of ing g e and fish is
damage lik y to es to the en
conservation e o
The most cQl onserva-
tion matte s _-d j day have
to do withff s uns. First
of these is yll ve over the
necessity o 0 on for fish.
This contrc e~~j ly in West
Florida but at concern
in that par Q'1^ ^ ? the State.
In the rest l4Ie'the idea that
closed seae t Iunecessary for
warm water fi hes is generally ac-
cepted as a matter of course.
The other controversial fishing
issue and quite possible the most
important issue at present facing
the Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission is the matter of con-
trolled seining and sale of pan fish.


In this case it is generally agreed by entirely to the expression of the
fish management experts and there wishes of the sportsmen. There is
is a great deal of scientific evidence little evidence that staggered days
to indicate that a controlled seining have an appreciable effect on game
program would be beneficial to killed.
sports fishing. However, public op- The matter of an early season for
position to such a program in certain doves is a problem that has plagued
sections of the State is extremely the Commission for many years.
powerful, particularly to the idea Not until the last two or three years,
that such seining should be done when results became available from
by commercial fishing-interests. This a research program conducted by
condition is aggravated by the long Florida in conjunction with other
time feud between sports and com- southeastern states, has there been
mercial fishing interests, adequate information about doves
In the former of the above cases upon which to base regulations. The
public opinion is opposed principally dove regulation problem arises from
to a liberalization of fishing regula- the fact that a large flight of doves
tions. In the latter another factor enters Florida in September and
enters-this is the presumed conflict October and this flight offers the
between commercial and sports in- only shooting that some sections of
terests. Assuming that in both the the state are able to get. Inasmuch
above cases the scientific evidence as Federal regulations prohibit a
is correct, the Commission is faced section of the state having different
with this major question: Is the good dove regulations from another sec-
that would result from following the tion it became necessary for the
scientific recommendations worth Commission to hold an early dove
the damage that might be done the season in October and a later one
overall conservation effort by un- in December in order to accurately
favorable public opinion? distribute the availa>bldove hunt-
Probably the three most contro- ing.
versial hunting questions in Florida The State- ie split season was
at present are: the prohibition of first putjio effect in all of 1952
shooting turkey hens; the propriety and oved general satisfactory.
of staggered days versus continuous The bigges.bjection aose from the
hunting; and the question ofan fear at other gme would be killed
early dove season. There ~'little -yhuntes being all d in the
doubt that were it pos 'j to prol fields with during the October
early enforce a ed sd dov on. Some such game was
turkey hens the er o over -'ifed by dove hunters but by and
shooting e turkey tegal large the amount of game so killed
seas ,,euTated. The was negligible with very few reports
d'cu a regulation lies of game violations. If a great deal
i1arent inability of the aver- of game other than doves had been
age hunter to distinguish hens from killed in the October season it would
gobblers, and the consequent im- have been impossible to have had
practicability of enforcing regu- what was probably the best hunting
lations prohibiting the taking of season in Florida in many years.
turkey hens. It is interesting that Similarly the early season did not
in the district in the state where seem to appreciably damage the
the turkey gobbler only regulation dove population since more doves
has been in effect for the longest were reported in the December 1952
period, the regulation is very pop- shoot than have been reported in a
ular and would be difficult to re- number of years.
move. Also pertinent is the question One of the most pronounced im-
as to whether or not the insurance provements in regulations made in
against over shooting is worth the Florida in recent years has been the
loss in take-home game resulting establishment of generally uniform
from prohibiting the taking of hen hunting seasons throughout the
turkeys. State. This resulted to a great ex-
The question of staggered day tent from the almost universal de-
versus continuous hunting is one mand for uniform seasons.
whose answer should be left almost (Continued on Page 35)








GAME
MANAGEMENT
iContinued from Page 19i


of pasture improvement operations,
construction of checking stations
and operation of the controlled
hunts.
On the Palm Beach Area an old
project was re-opened to permit the
construction of approximately 32
miles of fence. This has been


largely completed.
With the rapid expansion in the
number of management areas, it was
decided to initiate a master project
covering developmental work on
several of them. There are at
present eight areas, totaling 851,000
acres, carried under this project. All
have now been posted. Much work
has been done in bridge, road, and
fence maintenance, in establishing
food plots, conducting controlled
burning, constructing checking sta-
tions, and conducting controlled
hunts. Five of the areas operated


under the master project were open
to controlled hunting in both the
1951 and 1952 seasons. In 1951,
575,000 acres were hunted a total
of 9029 man-days. The man-day
figures for 1952 are not yet available,
but through January 1953 the total
Public Hunt Area stamp sales were
10,013 as compared with 9,710 in
1951. Kill results for the two years
are shown in Table 2.
Land Acquisition
Probably that part of the game
management division's program
which results in the greatest direct


Table 2. KILL RESULTS ON THE FLORIDA WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREAS
1951-52 and 1952-53


Duck


AREA


Apalachicola ............
O sceola.................
Ocala.... ..............
Gulf Hammock .......
Tomoka...............
Farm ton................
Steinhatchee...........
J. W Corbett...........
Hendry .................
Collier..................
Avon Park..............
Fisheating Creek........
Sumter ................
Charlotte............
E glin ...................


Name


I. Eglin Air Force Reservation ..............
2. Blackwater Wildlife Management Area....
3. Roy Gaskin Wildlife Management Area....

4. Apalachicola Wildlife Management Area...
5. Steinhatchee Wildlife Management Area...


6. Osceola Wildlife Management Area........
7. Gulf Hammock Wildlife Management Area
8. Ocala Wildlife Management Area........
9. Tomoka Wildlife Management Area.......

10. Farmton Wildlife Management Area .....
11. Sumter Wildlife Management Area.......
12. Richloam Wildlife Management Area......
13. Avon Park Wildlife Management Area....
14. Charlotte Wildlife Management Area .....
15. Fisheating Creek Wildlife Management Area

16. J. W. Corbett Wildlife Management Area..

17. Hendry Wildlife Management Area .......

18. Collier Wildlife Management Area........

19. Everglades Wildlife Management Area.....


1951 1952 1951


. . . . 4
15
. . . .. 15
53 345
439 35

23
82 38
4 6
36 33
2 28
5
157
. . . . .


Deei


r

1952

12
28
501
64
29
37
77
8
17
87
2
5
2

1500


Turkey

1951 1I


65 115
16
25 85
12 21
1
203 283
430 697
4 31
268
12


)uail


1951

12


Dove


1952 1951


370
76
8
128
76
464 1156
226
1021
1306 1740
5307
94
3000 3300


Squirrel


1952 1951


2
. .. . ..


4
1
140
4
128


Bear


1952 1951 1952


316
2408
3511
109
645
1500

186
258
52
638
1674


6
1
1 4


Table 3. WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREAS IN FLORIDA


ACREAGE


Open to
Managed
Hunt


I !


410,000


100,000
225,000


65,000
100,000
185,000
50,000

50,000
35,000

38,000
57,000
100,000

45,000

50,000

300,000

720,000


20. Olustee Wildlife Management Area........ .


Closed
to
Hunting


50,000
85,000
110,000

98,500



42,000
20,000
90,000



48,000
70,000
5,000
175,000

52,000


Principal Game
Now Available
for Hunting


Deer .... ....... .. ...

. ..Deer, . . . . ..
Deer, Bear ..... ... .....
Deer, Turkey, Squirrel......


Deer, Bear. .................
Deer, Turkey, Squirrel. .....
Deer, Squirrel .............
Deer, Turkey ..............

Deer, Turkey ..............
Deer, Turkey, Squirrel.....

Deer, Turkey, Squirrel, Quail
Q uail ....................
Turkey, Quail, Squirrel......

Deer, Turkey, Quail........


........ Deer, Turkey. .............

50,000 Deer, Turkey .............

........ W aterfow l.................

100,000 .................. .. ..


Principal Ownership


U.S. Air Force
Florida Forest Service
International Paper Company
St. Joe Paper Company
U.S. Forest Service
Buckeye Cellulose Corporation
Consolidated Naval Stores
Hudson Pulp & Paper Company
Howell Estate
U.S. Forest Service
Patterson, McInnis Lumber Copany
U.S. Forest Service
Hudson Pulp & Paper Company
Tomoka Land Company
Deering Properties
Cummer Sons Cypress Company
U.S. Soil Conservation Service
U.S. Air Force
Game & Fresh Water Fish Commission
Lykes Bros. Corporation
Bee Branch Cattle Company
Game & Fresh Water Fish Commission
Indian Trail Ranch, Inc.
J. W. McDaniel
Bob Roberts
Collier Company
Lee Cypress
Central and Southern Florida Flood
Control District
Nat'l Turpentine & Pulpwood Co.
Southern Resin & Chemical Company
William Knabb


I-


--------~--~






benefit to the public is its land acqui-
sition work. As a consequence of
its efforts to make reasonably good
hunting readily available, Florida
now has one of the outstanding pub-
lic hunt programs in the country.
Particularly important is the amount
of private land which has been
acquired as wildlife management
areas. Florida's leadership in this
field is assisted by a number of
factors. For example, land owner-
ship in Florida probably lends itself
to such a program to a greater
degree than in other southeastern
states due to the high percentage of
land in cattle ranch or timber hold-
ings. Associated with this factor
and without question the primary
reason for the success of Florida's
public hunting program is the fact
that many of the big land holdings
in Florida are in the hands of real-
istic, civic minded concerns or indi-
viduals who recognize the problem
of supplying hunting for the average
man and are willing to do their part
toward solving it. Also of some
significance is the fact that Florida
is more or less a pioneer state and
in many sections the average man
does not accept fencing and posting
against hunting of lands that until
very recently were wide open.
Through a public hunting agree-
ment with the Commission, the land-
owner retains complete control over
his land and its particular resources
that are unquestionably his private
concern. At the same time he is
relieved of the headaches accom-
panying the responsibility for a
resource, fish and game, that tra-
ditionally belongs to the people.
The landowner receives such
tangible benefits as fencing, fire
protection, and assistance in the
prevention of trespass, but by far
his greatest benefit is the general
good will resulting from his con-
tributing his land for public hunting
purposes. In all cases the placing
of an area under cooperative wild-
life management has resulted in
reduced burning, fence cutting, tim-
ber theft, and cattle theft. The
program has been particularly effec-
tive in stopping trespass of a mali-
cious type frequently brought about
by public resentment against the
landowner fencing his property.
Similarly, on all management
areas previously suffering from
overshooting, there has been a
steady increase in deer and turkey
in spite of the fact that the areas
are still open to hunting. Three
factors are believed to be largely
responsible for such increases: im-
proved protection against illegal
hunting resulting from increased


law enforcement personnel assigned
to such areas; improved game habi-
tat resulting from food planting and
maintenance of turkey and quail
feeders, as well as pasture improve-
ment and controlled burning de-
signed specifically to benefit game;
and finally but possibly of greatest
importance-improved public atti-
tudes.
Table 3 summarizes the informa-
tion on Florida's wildlife manage-
ment areas. All except Eglin,
Steinhatchee, Gulf Hammock, Ocala,
Avon Park, Charlotte, and part of
the Corbett were activated in the
past two years.
In summary it might be said that
during the past two years the game
management division has been
active in research, development,
and land acquisition. The program
has been sound and progressive, the
staff small but well qualified. Re-
sults have been outstanding.

INFORMATION AND
EDUCATION
(Continued from Page 24)
ficials, and townspeople in the above
towns. We have definitely decided
to continue these fishathons during
the next few years because they
are one of our best public relations
activities. These affairs have become
so popular that we intend to honor
as many requests as possible from
many of the smaller cities in the
state during the coming years.
We have also set up numerous
special exhibits during the past two
years. Whenever there has been a
conflict in dates of county fairs, we
have tried to send our exhibit to
the fair with the earliest request
so that our schedule was more or
less maintained on a first-come, first-
served basis. In addition we have
displays at other fairs and at many
special conventions that are meet-
ing in the state. These groups in-
clude the National Rifle Association
meeting in Jacksonville, the Outdoor
Writers Association convention in
Miami, the Florida State Fair in
Tampa, and several of the fairs hav-
ing permanent buildings.
It is hoped that the budget for the
next several years will give the In-
formation and Education division
enough funds to go into the pub-
licity and public relations field much
more than it has during the past bi-
ennium. We have had innumerable
requests for films to be used in tele-
vision stations and for new films to
be shown to various organizations
throughout the State. Our future


plans include the printing of several
new booklets and pamphlets depict-
ing the various game commission
activities, a slide projector and a
series of slides for each of our edu-
cation officers, and an increased
number of pictures and mats to be
sent to newspapers and magazines
in the State, as well as prepared
radio scripts for all radio stations
in Florida. We are also going to
follow through with our Junior Con-
servation program, and make up
several new wildlife displays to be
used instead of our temporary dis-
plays at fairs and schools. We are
anxious to get into the poster pic-
ture more than we have in the past
with the expectation that multi-
colored pictures of animals, birds,
and fish, will be obtained and dis-
tributed to all the schools of the
State of Florida.
Another project slated for the fu-
ture includes the compilation of a
hand book for members of the Com-
mission. The handbook will cover
all activities of the Game Agency
and will serve as an up-to-date ref-
erence guide for both old and new
personnel.
We are continuing our efforts to
get the State Department of Edu-
cation interested in publishing a
book authored by commission per-
sonnel to be used in conservation
courses in both grammar and high
schools.

OPENING AND
CLOSING SEASONS
(Continued from Page 33)
A state-wide uniform season can-
not be expected to be perfect for all
areas of the State, but it certainly
is superior to the hodge-podge of
regulations that once existed in
Florida.
Another important development
in conservation regulations was the
deer and turkey tagging system that
was begun in the fall of 1951. This
system was widely backed by sports-
men and seems to have met with
almost complete approval of the
public. This was the first major step
toward actually enforcing season's
bag limits for deer and turkey.
In summary: The regulations of
hunting and fishing is one of the
most important functions of the
Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission. Sound regulations are
essential to any progressive conser-
vation program. Such regulations
must be based on two equally im-
portant factors-the best scientific
data available and a careful con-
sideration of public opinion.




































WILDLIFE


By JACK GRANT


Florida Wildlife Magazine, pub-
lished by the Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission, features
articles, true story adventure ma-
terial and regular columns on out-
door subjects such as hunting and
fishing, as well as conservation ac-
tivities of the Commission.
The magazine has grown in pop-
ularity not only throughout Florida,
but in many of the other 48 states,
as is evidenced by the large increase
in subscription in the past year.
The first of June, 1952, the publi-
cation was contracted in an attempt
to put it on a professional basis.
While the familiar characteristics
were retained, an effort was made
to secure the best writers obtain-
able to inform and entertain our
readers with diversified material of
interest to sportsmen and conserva-
tionists.
This year the subscription rate
was raised from $1.00 to $2.00 a
year, and instead of suffering a loss
of circulation, the Florida Wildlife
Magazine now has approximately


30,000 paid subscribers, of which
about 10,000 are outside the state.
Editors have attempted to gather
material for the magazine that would
be of interest to the entire family.
We introduced the column "Uncle
Rufus" for Juniors and it has stim-
ulated interest in the magazine and
has given us a larger percentage of
readers per issue. For the women
S. there is a well balanced amount
of material, including a cooking
column, and in the January issue,
fiction was introduced, which was
well received.
The magazine has an efficient staff
including those handling circulation,
advertising and mailing. An artist
has been added to the staff, giving
the magazine distinction.
In every way, we feel that Florida
Wildlife is a well rounded maga-
zine. The number of pages has been
increased from 48 to 64 and we have
tried to fill every page with the best
in outdoor recreation reading. At
the rate in which new subscriptions
are now being received, the circula-
tion should pass the 60,000 mark.








GAME AND FRESH WATER

FISH COMMISSION


By 0. EARLE FRYE


The overall Administration of the
Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission is delegated to a Director
appointed by and to serve at the
pleasure of the Commissioners.
Assisting him and directly under
his supervision are an Assistant Di-
rector, a Secretary to the Commis-
sion, personnel working on special
assignments such as special investi-
gators, and all staff officers. This
latter group consists of the Business
Manager, State Coordinators of
Game, Fish, Information and Edu-
cation, and Communications, and the
five Division Directors.
The lines of Administrative
authority are as depicted in the
attached diagram. Each of the per-
sonnel are directly responsible to
the Director. This diagram shows
that the Director is immediately
responsible to the Commission,
Heads of Departments, Staff Offi-
cers, or on the other hand respon-
sible to the Director. It is the Staff
Officers' duty not only to attend to
their particular administrative duties
but to keep the Director, and
Here the director assists in organizin


through him the Commission, in-
formed as to the details of the activi-
ties in his branch of the administra-
tive organization and of pertinent
information relating to his particular
field of endeavor.
The Division Directors are respon-
sible for all activities within the
geographical area composing their
Division. These include law en-
forcement, communications, game
and fish management, Information
and Education activities and budget-
ary matters. Activities of a tech-
nical nature in any of the above
fields are to be supervised jointly
by the State Coordinator of the
appropriate function and the Divi-
sion Director. Any difference of
opinion regarding such activities will
be settled by the Director or the
Assistant Director. Answerable to
the various staff officers are addi-
tional sub-supervisory personnel,
for example: To the Business Man-
ager-the State Property Officer,
Bookkeeping and Auditing Person-
nel; to the Game and Fish Coordi-
nators-the leaders of Federal and


State-wide projects, such as the
hyacinth control program, controlled
seining, deer and turkey restoration,
and water fowl and morning dove
research and management projects;
to the Coordinator of Information
and Education state radio pro-
grams and the state coordinator of
Junior Conservation Clubs; to the
Division Directors-the division fish
and game managers, Information
and Education Officers, and Area
supervisors. Each of the super-
visory positions are in turn respon-
sible for other personnel for
example: Area Supervisors are re-
sponsible for law enforcement activi-
ties in from two to four counties in
a Division and is directly responsible
for the activities of law enforcement
personnel in such areas.
All of the lower level supervisory
personnel actually participate in
carrying out the work concerned.
For example, area supervisors spend
a great deal of their time on actual
law enforcement as well as super-
vision of law enforcement in their
respective areas. The degree to
which any individual can partici-
pate in the actual work depends, of
course, upon the extent of his ad-
ministrative duties. The further up
the administrative ladder he goes
the less he is able to participate in
the work he is supervising.
One of the most important duties
of the Director is the collection and
assimilation of information from the
various staff members for presenta-
tion to the Commissioners for their
use in establishing overall policies
of the Commission. It is his very
definite responsibility to keep the
Commissioners informed as to activi-
ties in the various phases of con-
servation endeavor and as to public
opinion regarding specific issues.
This can be accomplished by fre-
quent personnel contacts with indi-
vidual Commissioners and by means
of periodic written reports covering
Commission activities.








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38








FISH MANAGEMENT
IContinued from Page 171



this program, which promises to re-
claim many acres of formerly fine
fishing waters.
Fish Population Control
During 1951 rough fish control
activities were conducted on a num-
ber of central and southern Florida
lakes. Essentially, these activities
included the operation of state-
owned haul seines for the purpose
of reducing rough fish and making
studies of the fish populations. All
seining was conducted under the
supervision of a Commission fish
management technician by experi-
enced commercial fishermen who
received three-fourths of the pro-
ceeds from the sale of marketable
rough fish principally catfish as
compensation. The names of the
waters and the counties in which
the operations were conducted are
listed below.
WATERS IN WHICH ROUGH FISH
CONTROL OPERATIONS WERE
CONDUCTED DURING 1951.
'Name of Waters County
Tsala Apopka ................................. Citrus
Lake Francis .......................... Highlands
Lake Red Beach ...................... Highlands
Lake Stearns ......................... Highlands
Lake Istokpoga .......-............. Highlands
Lake Thonotosassa ........... Hillsborough
Lake Wilmington ................ Indian River
Lake Beauclair .................. ........ Lake
Lake Harris ............. ..... .......... Lake
Lake Eustis ........................ ......... Lake
Lake W eir ...................... ....... .. M arion
Lake Ivanhoe ......................... .. Orange
Little Lake Ivanhoe ................... Orange
Lake Eola ................ .............. .. Orange
Lake Concord ............................ Orange
Lake Davis .................................... Orange
Lake Pickett ....................... Orange
Lake Apopka ...........................-- Orange
Lake Johns ............... .... ...Orange
Lake Jessup ....................... Seminole
Lake Monroe ............................. Seminole
Lake Harney ....................... Seminole
Withlacoochee River ................... Sumter
Lake Panasoffkee ...................... Sumter
Lake Reedy ........................................ Polk
Lake Hollingsworth ..................... Polk
Lake Parker ...................... ......-........ Polk
Lake Hunter .................- ................ Polk
Lake Rosalie ................................ .. Polk
Lake Ashby .................................. Volusia
More than 300,000 pounds of rough
fish-gars, bowfin mudfishh), gizzard
shad, suckers, and catfish were re-
moved in these operations. Other
fish population control activities are
discussed under the section of this
report entitled "The Controlled
Seining Program."
The Controlled Seining Program
In February, 1952, the Commis-
sion approved an experimental pro-
gram of controlled seining on six


large lakes, after such a program
had been recommended by the bio-
logical staff. The lakes chosen were
Lakes George, Crescent, Okeecho-
bee, Harris, Eustis, and Reedy, all
of which had been the site of previ-
ous biological surveys. The objec-
tives of the program are to attempt
to manipulate the fish populations
of the lakes toward a composition
more favorable to the sport fisher-
man, particularly for bass. Surveys
had indicated that bass made up only
from one to eight percent of the en-
tire weight of the adult fish popula-
tions and that the removal of other
species which competed for the same
food and space would increase the
abundance of the bass and improve
bass fishing.
Recommendations by Florida bi-
ologists that such an experimental
program be adopted had been en-
dorsed by a panel of nationally-
recognized fish management scien-
tists in 1951.
Essentially, the experimental pro-
gram is based on findings of fish
management specialists in Florida
and other southern states which
have shown that fish may be man-
aged much the same as are other
annual crops. It is well established
that the capacity of a given area of
water is limited in its ability to
produce and support certain pound-
ages of fish, just as given areas of
pastureland will support certain
quantities of beef, or as an acre of
farmland will yield only so many
bushels of corn. Intensive manage-
ment of water areas, using practices
similar to those used in agricultural
crops has been found to increase
the production of desired species of
fish.
Among the practices used to im-
prove fish production are clearing,
planting, fertilization, cultivation
and thinning, and harvesting. The
first three- clearing, planting and
fertilization have been found very
successful in the management of


Month
A pril .............................. .
M ay ..................... .........
June ...................... ..........
J u ly .............................. ..
A ugust ............................ ..
Septem ber ...........................
O ctober ........................... ..
N ovem ber ...................... ....
December .......................... .
Totals ...... .....................
**Subject to minor revision.


small (under 50 acres) Florida
lakes. They are, however, too ex-
pensive or impractical for use on
the larger waters which provide the
bulk of Florida's freshwater fishing.
Cultivation, thinning, and harvest-
ing-also practiced successfully in
smaller waters can be used in
many of the larger shallow lakes.
These practices are applied through
the use of seines and the removal
of certain amounts of fish.
Cultivation of the experimental
lakes, for example, involves the re-
moval of garfish, bowfin mudfishh),
suckers, gizzard shad, and catfish-
"weed" species that compete for
food and space with more desired
fish and are not sought extensively
by sport fishermen. Seining of
these so-called "rough fish" has
been followed by improved angling
in several Florida lakes.
Thinning of desired species such
as the bluegill, shellcracker, and
crappie also of proven value in
smaller waters-is practiced to in-
crease the growth rates and to pro-
duce a faster-growing, better "bit-
ing" fish for the angler. At the
same time, large amounts of these
species which are surplus to the
requirements of sport fishermen
are processed under state super-
vision and sold as food.
Research in Florida and else-
where has 'indicated that less than
five percent of the total populations
of bream and crappie present in the
larger lakes are taken by fishermen.
The short life cycle of these species
-usually not over two or three
years-and the small catch taken by
anglers results in a loss of their use
as food, unless they are harvested by
the seines. While accurate data
are not yet available, it is estimated
that the rate of harvest by seines
will not exceed 50 percent of the
total annual crop. It is not antici-
pated that this removal of some 50
percent will effect the quantity, but
that it will increase the quality of


Bream
112,109
32,999
8,416
194,988
266,740
267,929
249,259
170,553
169,568
1,472,561


Crappie
15,325
3,781
1,928
45,909
93,299
115,797
151,450
202,298
292,231
922,018


MONTHLY POUNDAGE OF BREAM AND CRAPPIE TAKEN COMMERCIALLY
FROM FLORIDA FRESH WATERS DURING 1952**


'






fish caught by anglers. The ex-
pected effect of harvesting these
surplus fish may be compared with
caring for a lawn-regular mowing
strengthens the roots and produces
a thicker, more luxuriant growth.
Inasmuch as the largemouth
bass is Florida's most sought after
game fish, its importance in the rec-
reational and economic picture of
the State is considered greater than
that of any other single species.
That this is particularly true in the
areas included in the controlled
seining program has been verified
by surveys involving personal inter-
views and questionnaires covering
thousands of sport fishermen. One
of the major objectives of the pro-
gram is the improvement of fishing
for bass, through the removal by
supervised seines of certain amounts
of other species, simultaneously ac-
complishing the needed cultivation,
thinning, and harvesting.
Under this program, haul seines
up to 1,600 yards in length are used
by experienced commercial fisher-
men to remove all fish taken with
the exception of bass and pickerel,
which are returned to the water
alive. One Commission employee ac-
companies each seine and records
complete information on the fish
taken, as well as making certain
that the fishermen abide by the
regulations. In addition to studies
of the fish populations made through
the use of seines, investigations are
made of the age and growth rates of
the fish, food habits and reproduc-
tion, and records of the catch by


sport fishermen are kept. The stud-
ies are so planned to determine the
changes in the fish population
brought about by the seining, as
well as to measure the effects of
the program on the sport fisher-
man's catch, over a three-year
period. The seining can be slowed
or halted if evidence of over-fishing
is found.
Funds to support the supervision
and research activities are obtained
through a poundage fee collected
from the commercial fishermen, and
some of the research activities are
financed in part through the Dingell-
Johnson Federal Aid to Fisheries
Act. All bream and crappie taken
are processed under the supervision
of Commission personnel, and each
individual fish is tagged with a de-
structible metal seal before it can
be sold. Receipts from the fees col-
lected totalled $18,613.94 in excess
of costs at the end of December 1952.
Work on Lakes Harris, Eustis, and
Reedy started in April 1952, and in
the other lakes in July. Up to the
end of December, 773,260 pounds of
bass had been taken and returned
to the water with mortality rates
of less than one percent; 2,394,579
pounds of bream and crappie, and
735,612 pounds of catfish were sold
for food at an estimated wholesale
value of nearly one million dollars;
and 2,325,897 pounds of gars, giz-
zard shad, and other rough fish were
destroyed or given away for use as
fertilizer. A local court injunction,
which delayed the operations in
Lakes Harris and Eustis for about


MONTHLY POUNDAGES1 OF CATFISH2 REPORTED BY LICENSED
WHOLESALE FRESHWATER FISH DEALERS FOR 1951 AND 1952


Month
January .............................. ..
F ebruary ................... ..........
M arch .............. .. .................
A pril ... ........ ......................
M ay ....... .......................... ..
June ....................... ..........
July ... ............. ..................
A ugust ............................... ..
September ........................... .
October ......... ......................
November .... .. .........................
Decem ber ...............................
T otals .............................. ..
Estimated wholesale value3 ...............


1951
1,141,376
1,288,820
1,167,094
779,687
586,991
516,044
489,071
550,809
602,841
709,633
833,499
720,335
9,386,200
$1,595,654.00


1952
706,706
654,344
596,468
591,766
494,685
364,930
438,460*
510,108*
477,470*
617,184*
860,764*
816,931*
7,129,816
$1,212,068.72


*A few dealers' reports incomplete for this period.
1Poundages reported as dressed weights were converted to rough (round) weights
by multiplying X 2.
2Includes the southern channel catfish, white catfish, speckled bullhead, and
yellow bullhead.
3Based on an estimated average wholesale price of $0.17 per pound rough weight.


three months, was dissolved by the
State Supreme Court.
While no valid conclusions can be
drawn at the end of this biennium,
initial results are encouraging. Fish-
ing camp operators on Lakes Harris,
Eustis, and Okeechobee and many
fishermen have reported improved
catches of bass since the start of the
program. It is hoped that the pro-
gram can be continued through the
entire three-year period, so that the
answers to this controversial ques-
tion can be definitely determined.
Fish Management Bulletin No. 1,
Florida's Controlled Seining Pro-
gram, was prepared and published
to explain the purpose and opera-
tions of the program in detail. Copies
of this bulletin are available from
the Tallahassee office of the Com-
mission.
Commercial Fisheries
During recent years, an effort has
been made to collect and analyze
information concerning the econom-
ics and effects of various freshwater
commercial fisheries. The principal
freshwater fishes taken are the
southern channel catfish, the white
catfish, the speckled bullhead, the
yellow bullhead, and a few other
species from limited areas, as ex-
plained in the section of this report
on the Controlled Seining program.
Trotlines and wire traps probably
account for the greatest percentage
of catfish taken, while seines, pound
nets, gill and trammel nets, wooden
slat baskets, and hook and line ac-
count for the remainder.
Holders of wholesale freshwater
fish dealers' licenses are required to
report the poundages of fish pur-
chased monthly. These reports are
summarized in the adjacent table.
In addition to catfish, monthly
statistics on the poundages of bream
and crappie taken during the 1952
Controlled Seining Program are
tabulated. The term "bream" in-
cludes the bluegill, the shellcracker
(redear), and a few other miscel-
laneous sunfish; crappie are the
black crappie, or "speckled perch."
These totals represent the legal
commercial take of bream and
crappie for the period covered.
Estimates based on the number
of commercial fishing licenses sold
and other data indicate that at least
3,500 residents receive a major por-
tion of their annual income from
freshwater commercial fishing, plus
approximately 1,000 part-time or
seasonal workers.



















By JOEL McKINNON


The Fiscal Department of the Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission has the responsibility of keep-
ing records of all receipts and disbursements of the
entire Commission. With the increase and expansion
of the Commission our work has increased tremen-
dously.
During the biennium which is covered in the report
our total disbursements are $2,892,894.34, whereas,
in the past biennium the total disbursements were
$2,636,645.21, showing an increase in disbursements
of over $256,249.13.
This increase may be reflected in the fact that
during our past biennium we purchased a total of
159 automobiles at a total cost of over $204,000. We
felt that in doing this it would enable us to increase
efficiency in the field work. In purchasing these auto-
mobiles we accepted bids and found the over-all
average cost per vehicle was around $1,250. In de-
termining this average we took into consideration the
purchase of two pick-up trucks with 4-wheel drive;
one 1-ton panel truck and eleven jeeps. The cost of
these vehicles exceeded the $1,250.00 average, which
shows that cars purchased during this period were
bought at a very reasonable price. We also found that
in purchasing the new automobiles we naturally had
a decrease in repairs to equipment in 1951-52 over
1950-51 of approximately $25,000. The vehicles used
by personnel during 1950-51 were old cars; some were
1946 and 1947 models. We also had a decrease of
$4,743 on the purchase of parts and fittings.
During the fiscal year 1950-51 we had a total pay-
roll of $691,000 with the average number of employees
being 255, and during 1951-52 our payroll exceeded
$818,000 with the average number of employees being
286. This shows an increase of $127,000 and an in-
crease in personnel of 31. During 1951-52 period the
Commission set up a salary scale whereby each per-
son doing the same type work would receive equal
compensation. A yearly increase in salary of 2 per-
cent per year for each year's service up to 11 years
was also instituted at this time. At the end of 11 years'
service, maximum salary would be reached.
During 1951-52 the Division system was installed
and offices opened in Panama City, Williston, Lake-
land, Jacksonville and Okeechobee, which necessi-
tated the purchase of office equipment, such as type-
writers, desks, chairs, etc., in order that these offices
would be able to function efficiently.


During the two-year period we also purchased four
Piper Cub airplanes at a cost of $19,657.00. These air-
planes are used in law enforcement work and the
spraying of hyacinths on the lakes in Florida.
The Commission also purchased 17,984 acres of land
during this period at a cost of $89,923. The purchase
of this land is in accordance with our program of
increasing public hunting areas for the average
hunter.
The Game Commission now owns the building
which it occupies in Tallahassee after making the
final payment of $33,102.52 during the 1950-51 fiscal
year. This has enabled the Commission to expand and
progress since there was adequate space to put needed
equipment and employ necessary personnel.
Along with the increase in expenditures for the past
two years, we also had an increase in receipts. During
the present biennium we received a total of $2,702,-
455.28 whereas in the past biennium our receipts
were $2,351,131.85, showing an increase of over
$351,000 for the biennium.
This increase is found in the sale of hunting and
fishing licenses with a total collected of $2,076,303
for this period. We collected a total of $1,970,899.50
for the past biennium, an increase of over $105,000.
There is also shown an increase in our receipts from
the Federal Government under the Pittman-Robertson
program of $36,112.
During the last session of the legislature we were
authorized to sell some land and timber which was
owned by the Commission. The sale of this land and
timber increased our revenue $43,816.55.
Since our last biennium we show an increase on
the sale of magazine advertising of $35,244 and an
increase of $29,866 from the sale of magazine sub-
scriptions.
With the purchase of the new automobiles, we found
after making a thorough check that the Commission
would profit by selling the old automobiles to the
highest bidder and buy the new cars through bids.
In doing this we received over $43,000 from the sale
of old equipment.
The balance of the increase as shown on our report
is reflected in the increase of Commercial licenses,
along with the increase of miscellaneous receipts. The
last six months of our report shows that there is a
definite increase in our receipts over last year and
a very successful hunting and fishing season is ex-
pected during the 1952-53 fiscal year.


41


Accounting













GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH COMMISSION



Financial Statement-July 1, 1950 to December 31, 1952



Statement of Cash Receipts, Disbursements and Balances


For the Fiscal Year Ended
June 30, 1951
1950 -1951


For the Fiscal Year Ended
June 30, 1952
1951 -1952


July 1, 1952 to Dec. 31, 1952


Item Total Source Total


Item Total Source Total Item Total Source Total


Receipts:
Beginning Cash Balance July 1, 1950
License sold by County Judge............
License sold by State Office............
Revenue from other Agencies............
Other Revenue .................... .....


$ 999,292.00
29,911.20
131,595.15
46,755.15


Total Cash Receipts Schedule "A"
Cancelled Warrants..................
Adjustment Account ......................
Dixie County Deer Fund...........
County Judges Account.................. .............
Collier County Restocking Fund

Total Cash Receipts...... ...... ..................

Total Available ............ ............. ...................

Disbursements:
Salaries and Wages......................... $ 691,010.79
Professional Fees and Consulting
Services ............................... .. 1,537.25
Repairs to Equipment......................... 56,511.40
Printing and Binding .................... 60,190.57
Travel Employees ................................ 84,039.17
Other Contractural Services ........... 10,076.30
Parts and Fittings .............. .... 27,107.11
Gas, Oil and Lubrication.................. 98,013.31
Automotive Equipment ................ 53,114.99
Other Equipment ..... .................. 27,408.72
Other Expenses (Materials,
Supplies, etc.) .............................. 235,421.64


$ 249,997.92







$1,207,553.50
54.37

50.00




$1,207,657.87

$1,457,655.79


Cash Balance
July 1, 1951......$
1,078,908.00
32,198.80
224,151.58
159,643.40


Cash Balance
110,405.75 July 1, 1952......$ 57,112.95
.................... $ 757,277.25 ................
.................... 29,372.20 ....................
.................... 110,163.32 ...................
................. 229,440.20 .... .........


$1,494,901.78
27.02
37.00
50.00

300.00

$1,495,315.80

$1,605,721.55


$ 818,450.80

1,326.50
30,841.72
63,800.72
79,900.44
38,150.44
22,363.35
109,570.82
165,593.84
32,557.59

185,906.88


$1,126,252.97




169.00



$1,126,421.97

$1,183,534.92


................... $ 514,040.14 ... ........


170.00
19,758.07
51,946.81
43,841.03
12,328.30
13,485.81
60,123.08
104,001.22
16,001.00


................. 129,714.55


Total Expenditures Schedule "B"....
County Judges Account.....................
Adjustment Account ..............---

Total Disbursements ....................-... .-

Ending Cash Balance June 30, 1951...............


$1,344,431.25
2,713.79
105.00

............. $1,347,250.04

.......... $ 110,405.75


June 30, 1952.


$1,548,463.10 $ 965,410.01
145.50 .. ...... ..
..... .. 178.76

$1,548,608.60 $ 965,588.77

...$ 57,112.95 Dec. 31, 1952....$ 217,946.15


Less $52.50 received in June for 1952-
1953 License and recorded on '51-
'52 Report ....................... ............


52.50*


* $52.50 cr. received from Treasurer's Office in June, 1952, thus
making total Cash Receipts of 1952-53 year more in the above
amounts.


Cash Balance as
of Dec. 31, 1952 $ 217,893.65


............ I --- --
...............

. .. .........

............ .
I ........ I..... ....
............ .......

- .......... -------


- ............ I ..
............. ......
.. ..............
.............. I .....
....................
....................
....................
.. .............
....................


............... I ---
------ ....... ...
..............
11 ..............
...................

....................
.................
.......... I ------ -
















July 1, 1950 June 30, 1951
1950 1951


SCHEDULE "A"

Receipts by Source-
Sale of Sporting License:

F fishing ......................... ................
Hunting .......... .... ....... .......
Trapping ...................... ..................
Alien Hunting .. ............ ............
U S. Perm its ................... ..............
Gulf Hammock Permits..................
Avon Park Permits ........................
Charlotte County Permits..............
Sale of State Game Stamps............
Sale of Archery Permits................


Total Sporting License..................


Sale of Commercial License:
Retail Fish Dealer......... ...... $
Non-Resident Retail Fish Dealer..
Wholesale Fish Dealer ..............
Non-Res. Wholesale Fish Dealer....
Non-Res. Commercial Boat ...........
Commercial Boat .................... .......
Boat for H ire ......................................
Guide .......... .....................
Gam e Farm ....................... ..........
Wholesale Fur Dealer and Agents..
Local Fur Dealer................................


Total Commercial License..............


Other Sources:
Court Costs Collected ......................$
M miscellaneous ...............................
Prev. Year's License Collected........
Sale of Magazine Advertising........
Sale of Magazine Subscription........
Sale of Magazine Single Copies.-...
Sale of Miscellaneous Literature....
Sale of Old Equipment ................
Sale of Confiscated Equipment ......
Sale of Rough Fish.....................
Sale of Timber ......................
Pittman-Robertson ............................
Charlotte County Grazing Lease....
Dingell-Johnson ...............
Sale of Land ........... ......
Voluntary Adv. Receipts ...............
Refunds ................... ................-..
Supervision and Inspection Fee......
Sale of Radio Programs .................
Sale of Turkey Eggs .................
Sale of Turkey and Quail...............


Total Other Services .............




Total Receipts ..........................--....


Item Total Source Total


612,385.50
385,881.50
1,025.00
50.00
18,816.00
3,400.00
310.00

1,580.65


12,855.00
350.00

1,950.00


10.00

2,005.70
11,285.50
370.00
375.00
590.00
70.00







11,325.81
7,274.04
3,446.75
8,618.30
21,095.75
119.81


826.50
75.00
5,066.18


96,162.69
169.00





63.82





. ... -


....................
................. .


.............. .. .
........... .
..............


................
.. . ... ...




$1,023,418.65





............

.................
.. . .... .
.............. ..
.. . .... ....
.. ... .......
...............
............. ..
.. .I.............
........... I... .


$ 29,861.20




.. .............
............ .. ...
...................
.......... .. ...... I
............. ....
.......... .........

....... I............
............ ...
........... ....

.... .... ..
............
............

.. . .....


...... ......

. ....


July 1, 1951 -June 30, 1952
1951 -1952

Item Total Source Total


$ 666,004.25
412,031.75
872.00
50.00
400.00




2,178.70
48,550.00


$ 13,735.00
100.00
2,200.00
1,500.00
10.00
2,114.30
11,144.50
330.00
575.00
360.00
80.00







$ 14,380.35
6,417.11
3,166.75
26,625.76
21,356.20
1,141.22
1.45
42,451.54
360.00
2,391.26
17,848.55
158,642.53
5,491.50


25,968.00
743.00
295.38
5,278.63
94.05
13.00


$ 154,243.65


..................... $1,207,553.50


. ...........

...................

.. ..... ...

....... ......



........ ...........
.. ...




$1,130,086.70




................... -
....... .. ...

............. .....
.. ..........
........... .. ...
............. I ....
............ .......

-. .. ..... ...
...... ...... .. ...
........... .....


$ 32,148.80




.. ...............
............ ....
...................
.... I...............
....................
.................
..............
....... I............
..................

............. .. ...
............... .
.............. .....
....................

.. ... .



.............. ..

...............







$ 332,666.28


$1,494,901.78


July 1, 1952 to Dec. 31, 1952

Item Total Source Total


$ 417,536.00
339,608.25
133.00


300.00





31,795.00
590.00


$ 11,530.00
50.00
3,300.00
1,000.00
10.00
1,669.20
10,808.00
320.00
375.00
250.00
60.00







$ 8,604.05
234.20
30,586.75
13,531.79
21,826.06
752.21
8.75
38,427.79
785.66
67.76
555.29
45,015.53
6,162.50
23,858.74


...........
........ .....
.......... ........
--------------
................
............


....................
....................
.............


$ 789,962.25




....................
....................
....................
....................
....................
....... I ............
..................
....................
---- ------
----------
.......... ... --


$ 29,372.20




.................


...................
..................
......... ...
...........
....................
..............
.............


...............
....................


116,469.64 .......
21.30 .. .


10.50 ..




$ 306,918.52


$1,126,252.97











GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH COMMISSION FINANCIAL STATEMENT
July 1, 1950 June 30, 1951 July 1, 1951- June 30, 1952


SCHEDULE "B"
Disbursements:


1950-1951


Total
Per Item
Salaries ................................................ ...........$ 691,010.79
Professional Fees and Services ............................ 1,537.25
Repairs to Equipment ...................................... 56,511.40
Other Fixed Asset Repairs .................................. 1,587.00
Printing and Binding ..................................... .. 60,190.57
Publication of Notices ...................................... 573.08
Photographing and Blue Printing........................... 3,257.51
Heat, Gas and Lights ................................................ 1,779.67
Postage ..--........................................... 8,222.99
Telephone and Telegraph ....................................... 12,420.02
Freight and Express ... ........... ............. ........ 2,762.42
Travel-Employees ... .......................... ........ 84,039.17
Travel-Other than Employees ................................ 2,661.55
Subsistence, Care and Support of Persons............ ...............
Storage .- ..-. ....- ...... ................... ................. 370.85
Cleaning, Painting and Waste Removal .................. 1,036.50
Laundry Service .......... ............................... 292.16
Information and Credit Service .......................... 462.60
Other Contractural Service ................................. 10,076.30
Parts and Fittings ......---............................--. 27,107.11
Masonry and Road Materials ............................ 45.85
Lumber and Wood Products -............................... 3,189.54
Structural M etals .................. .....................
Other Building Materials ............ ...................... 3,643.38
Fibre and Textile Products .................................. 1,864.26
Other M materials ................................................. ...... 384.75
Stationery and Office Supplies ........................... 7,105.52
Chemicals and Laboratory Supplies ....................... 1,092.05
Medical, Surgical and Dental Supplies ................ 22.88
Gasoline, Oil and Lubricants ..................................... 98,013.31
Fuel ................................................... .............. 176.08
Agriculture, Horticulture and Park Supp. .............. 7,246.41
Forage, Stable and Animal Supplies ...................... 7,767.77
Hand Tools and Minor Equipment .......................... 2,861.36
Building and Mechanical Supplies .......................... 186.06
Clothing ............................................... .................. 14,064.35
Cleaning and Laundry Supplies .......................... 577.78
Food Products .................................................... 3,827.03
Educational Supplies .--..................................... 136.92
Household Supplies --......-.. ..........................-... 607.26
Other Supplies .....................................- 5,952.36
Rental Buildings, Offices and Land ................... 3,421.56
Rental of Equipment ......................................... 887.51
Other Rentals ..... ........ .......................................
Insurance-Building and Equipment .................. 14,450.15


Insurance-Liability, Workmen's Comp ..........
Official Bonds ...............................................
Awards, Gratuities, etc. .....................................
Registrations, Dues, etc ......................................
Information and Evidence of Law Violators ..........
Taxes and Assessments ............................................
Household and Laundry Equipment ......................
Office Furniture and Equipment ...........................
Engineering and Scientific Equipment ................
Heat, Light and Mechanical Equipment ............
Automotive Equipment .....................................
Educational Equipment ................................
Books ........... .......................................................
Livestock not for Slaughter .................................
Agriculture, Horti. and Park Equipment ..............
Other Equipment .................. .....................
Building and Fixed Equipment ..............................
Lands .. ......... ............................................
Refunds to Federal Government ........................
Refund to Tax Payers and Others .-...............

Total Disbursments ........................................................


1951 -1952

Total
Per Item
$ 818,450.80
1,326.50
30,841.72
200.00
63,800.73
1,009.75
5,897.18
2,279.04
10,885.52
13,659.33
2,610.00
79,900.44
1,752.48
72.00
219.05
677.90
99.13
853.70
38,150.44
22,363.35
284.86
2,543.02
17.66
2,491.03
2,294.47
34.65
7,993.82
2,652.14
54.00
109,570.82
19.81
9,370.83
8,622.71
3,637.98
82.77
591.36
489.53
3,591.27

452.76
12,494.62
3,513.50
1,349.68
115.72
14,598.30


2,158.76
1,335.77
2,015.01
1,272.36
131.74
186.10
225.00
3,123.51
505.60
84.95
53,114.99
240.00
52.56
7,650.50
1,170.30
27,408.72
40,226.74
51,022.50
9,083.05


$1,344,431.24


19,186.29
1,324.38
705.40
1,589.65
42.00
146.53
57.95
3,425.53
12.78
141.17
165,593.84
908.94
7.74
1,970.61

32,557.59

38,900.95

15.00

$1,548,463.10


July 1, 1952 to Dec. 31, 1952


Item
Total
$ 514,040.14
170.00
19,758.07

51,946.81
463.06
5,043.37
2,399.25
4,043.35
9,010.61
2,113.89
43,841.03
828.12

119.39
156.30
12.59
551.10
12,308.30
13,485.81
9.31
1,603.67
6.39
1,650.83
195.93
2.02
3,015.65
542.67
32.24
60,123.08
126.44
3,790.40
7,498.75
1,915.57
130.88

412.41
2,657.18
2.00
235.82
4,283.95
2,968.10
37.50
47.00
26,075.40

19,528.56


1,160.05

813.28
3,339.57
351.49
3,970.00
104,001.22

4.16

325.00
16,001.00

2,394.85
15,846.45


$ 965,410.01










SCHEDULE "B" Disbursements
by Departments


1950 -1951
Budget Department
Total Total


Administration:
Salaries .........................................$ 26,850.41
Expenses ......................... ................. 90,705.13
Fiscal:
Salaries ..................... .................... 13,772.50
Expenses .................. ..... ..... ...... 776.05
Law Enforcement:
SSalaries ....................-.................. 468,338.91
Expenses ............... ....................... 291,053.92
Communications:
Salaries ...................................... 7,180.07
Expenses ........................................ 12,068.87
School:
Salaries ......................... ............... 2,634.97
Expenses ................. ................. 6,954.81
Fish Management:
Salaries ........................ ........ 61,241.81
Expenses ............................ .......... 34,380.28
Information and Education:
Salaries .......................... ....... ....... 17,908.32
Expenses ................................... 15,018.86
Magazines:
Salaries ............... ...... ........ ..... 15,414.00
Expenses ................................... 57,023.95
Photography:
Salaries ..................... ..... ........... 2,059.96
Expenses .............................. 4,971.61
Fairs:
Salaries ..................... ............................
Expenses ................................... 4,115.26
Game Management:
Salaries .......................... ......... ....... 75,609.84
Expenses ..................... ................ 136,351.71


$ ----------------..................---
117,555.54


14,548.55


759,392.83


19,248.94


9,589.78


95,622.09


32,927.18


72,437.95


7,031.57


4,115.26


211,961.55


1951 -1952

Budget Department
Total Total

$ 31,746.23 $ .... .............
57,030.78 88,777.01


13,419.38
479.60

515,587.63
373,806.65

10,298.50
14,386.63

7,123.60
6,108.40

72,547.08
45,911.03

19,122.63
13,607.86

22,320.66
65,184.52

3,606.00
3,627.29

3,009.42
6,282.01

119,669.67
143,587.53


Grand Total....................... .............. ....... ..... .......$1,344,431.24
South Florida Division:
Salaries ...........................................................
Expenses .. ...... ....... ....... .. ......... .... ............
Northeast Florida Division:
Salaries ..... ............ ........ .....................
Expenses ................................... ... .......................
Northwest Florida Division:
Salaries ............ ........ .......... .......... .........
Expenses ................ ....... .................
Everglades Division:
Salaries ............. .......... ..........................
Expenses ........ ............................. .. ..........
Central Division:
Salaries ....................
Expenses ........................................
Dingell-Johnson:
Salaries ...... ........................ .. ....... .... ..................
Expenses ........................................ ..............................
Rough Fish Control:
E expenses ............................................. .... .. .... ..............
Lake Okeechobee F/M Station:
Salaries ........................................ .. ........... ... .... ...
Expenses ......................... .............-......-----...
St. Johns River F/M Station:
Salaries ............................. .................. ....... ..
Expenses .......... ........................ ..... ... ...............
Fish Squadron:
Salaries .............. .... ..- .... ...... ........ -
Expenses .............. -... ... ... ........ ....... ..
Pittman-Robertson:
Salaries .................... .. ... ........ ................... ...
Expenses ............ .............................. ..............
National Forest Hunt:
Salaries ............................ ............ ...............
Expenses .................. .... ............................................
State Hunts:
Salaries ............................ .... ....... .....................
Expenses ...................... .... ........ ..................
Quail Hatchery:
Salaries ........................................ ... .. ... .... .......
Expenses ...............................-...........- ...... .....

Total Disbursements as per Schedule... ............. ........


13,898.98


889,394.28


24,685.13


July to December 1952

Budget Department
Total Total

$ 26,165.49 $ ..........
44,596.75 70,762.24


8,622.60
1,001.26


8,503.96
14,785.07


9,623.86


23,289.03


13,232.00 .......... .. .... ...


118,458.11


32,730.49


87,505.18


2,080.00
1,719.95

8,244.45
24,200.98

17,501.37
48,462.46


3,799.95


32,445.43


65,963.83


7,233.29 ................ .............

9,291.43 ................ ....................


263,257.20

$1,548,463.10


58,519.29
46,719.24

59,153.11
42,249.16

65,335.84
41,858.52

45,584.34
43,483.04

61,714.60
34,672.07

25,416.77
12,778.69

556.13

20,167.28
12,255.47

29,517.28
10,357.50

1,540.00
1,083.35

46,038.46
41,739.96

599.76
17,313.07

21,683.45
2,439.71

7,652.09
9,097.49


105,238.53

101,402.27


107,194.36


89,067.38

96,386.67


38,195.46

556.13


32,422.75


39,874.78


2,623.35


87,778.42


17,912.83


24,123.16


16,749.58

$ 965,410.01


.............. ---------- --






GAME & FISH CONSERVATION


BENEFITS ALL THE PEOPLE