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... Biennial report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075939/00009
 Material Information
Title: ... Biennial report
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Shell Fish Division
Florida -- Shell Fish Commission
Publisher: T.J. Appleyard
Place of Publication: Tallahassee <Fla.>
Creation Date: 1929
Publication Date: <1915>-
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Shellfish trade -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Fisheries -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Aquaculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1st (1913/1914)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased with 10th (1931/1932)?
General Note: Third and fourth issues called reports of the Florida Shell Fish Commission.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001750196
oclc - 45623059
notis - AJG3100
lccn - sn 00229152
System ID: UF00075939:00009

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Title Page
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Main
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        Page 6
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Full Text
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NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT



SHELL FISH DIVISION

OF THE


Department of Agriculture


OF THE


State of Florida
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FOR THE YEARS 1929 -1930




T. J. APPLEYARD, INC., TALLAHASSEF, FLORIDA







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LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL


DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, STATE OF FLORIDA
COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE
SHELL FISH DIVISION
To His Excellency,
Doyle E. Carlton,
Governor of the State of Florida.
Sir:
We have the honor to submit herewith the Biennial Report
of the Shell Fish Division of the Department of Agriculture for
the years 1929-1930.
Supervision of the work during the first year of the biennium
was under the former Shell Fish Commissioner. Supervision of
the work during the last year of that period was under the pres-
ent Commissioner.
Respectfully submitted,
E. C. STRICKLAND,
Shell Fish Commissioner.
NATHAN MAYO,
Commissioner of Agriculture.



































































ST. MARKS LIGHT, WHICH HAS BEEN A GUIDE TO THE FISH-
ING FLEET SINCE EIGHTEEN-THIRTY.










Biennial Report of Shell Fish
Division

NO State has so great a seacoast as has Florida, none has as
many lakes; nor do the waters of any other afford a greater
variety and abundance of edible fish. These waters, since
the founding of the country, have been a storehouse from which
the people of this and adjoining sections have supplied their
tables with choice food, palatable and nutritious, food that may,
at great saving to the family income and without loss from a
dietary standpoint, be substituted for more costly meat. To-
day the vast surplus taken, above the need for home consump-
tion, is shipped to all parts of the United States giving rise to
one of the basic industries of Florida.
The fact that Florida waters are open to any who may wish
to fish them, that fields of operation may not be pre-empted by
one to the exclusion of others, makes of this natural resource an
attractive foundation for the development of industry and gives
it a place among the most valuable found in the State.
Like every other natural resource, Florida's fisheries call for
wise utilization, real conservation and development. If they
are not to be despoiled through the operations of those who see
no further than the need of the hour, who count a fish in the
net worth a school of fish to be taken another season, safeguards
must be thrown about them. Efforts of the Shell Fish Commis-
sion are directed toward securing the wise use and against the
abuse of the resource.
PRODUCTION
It is difficult to get an accurate record of the output of the
fishing industry in Florida waters. Questionnaires were mailed
to each wholesale dealer, as required by law. (Section 12,
Chapter 10123, Acts of 1925.) Returns from these though in-
complete give a good basis for approximating the catch for the
biennium. The figures so obtained have been checked against
Federal reports based on a census taken by the U. S. Bureau of
Fisheries. These are in the main in accord. Federal reports
over several years show, exclusive of shrimp, clams, oysters,
crayfish and sponges, an annual yield of approximately 125,-
000,000 pounds of fish. This includes the menhaden catch. On
this basis the biennial yield would be 250,000,000 pounds. A
conservative estimate of production over the period of the bien-
nium, given by species, by the Commission follows:
Mullet ........................... 86,152,847
Trout ............................. 12,063,251









6 NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT

Mackerel ......................... 18,067,213
Blue Fish ........................ 4,135,041
King Fish ........................ 7,145,225
Red Fish .................. ....... 3,165,620
Sheephead ....................... 1,437,960
Flounders ........................ 503,307
Red Snapper ..................... 22,998,825
Grouper ......................... 11,294,585
Pompano ........................ 2,954,843
Shad ............................ 1,896,612
Herring ......................... 1,295,603
Catfish ........................... 7,956,849
Bream .......................... 13,295,498
Black Bass ....................... 2,956,839
Crappie .......................... 3,357,947
Shrim p .......................... 17,108,449
Crayfish (Spiny Lobster)........... 1,745,893
Other Bottom Fish ................ 4,878,956

Total ............................ 24,411,.:;
To this should be added the catch of menhaden, which is used
commercially for fertilizer. Federal reports give the West
Coast catch at 13,500,000 pounds annually, which would mean
a yield of double this amount for the biennium, or 27,000,000
pounds. The East Coast catch would double this amount.
Revenue to the Department from the Fernandina menhaden-
fisheries alone approximates $3,000 annually, while their com-
mercial value runs into thousands of dollars.
VALUE OF FISHERIES
The price of fish to the man who takes them ranges from four
cents to twenty cents a pound, varying with species, demand
and season. The total value may, however, be approximated on
an average basis of twelve cents a pound. One hundred fifty
million pounds of fish annually would yield a revenue of $18,-
000,000. To this amount must be added that derived from the
sponge industry and from the sale of shrimp, oyster, clams,
roe, crabs, turtles and crayfish or spiny lobsters. These will yield
an income of $2,000,000 or more a year which added to the
foregoing gives a total of $20,000,000 annually from Florida
fish on a wholesale basis of reckoning. The retail market adds
a good margin of profit to this. The value of the menhaden
catch will increase this amount further. In addition to this,
fish furnish a considerable amount of tonnage to be moved by
transportation companies. Trucks coming into the border coun-
ties from adjoining States find the buying and carrying of
Florida fish a profitable industry. Both activities yield an ad-
ditional revenue derived from the industry.










SHELL FISH DIVISION 7





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NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


SPECIES
As is seen by the record of species taken, mullet is the heaviest
producer in Florida waters. The growing appreciation of the
good quality of this fish as food for the table has done much to
stabilize the demand for it. Roe from the mullet has risen in
favor until it is hardly possible to meet the demand for this
product during the open season on mullet in roe, a period of
about thirty days duration. The first roe is taken about Novem-
ber first. The closed season on mullet begin December first and
continues to January twentieth. It is interesting to note the
increase in price for this roe during the past decade. Sold in
earlier days at an average price of twenty-five cents a dozen, it
sells now at an average of a dollar a dozen. Shad furnishes
another roe that is held in high favor.
Reference to the annual catch of Florida fish show red snap-
per, Spanish mackerel, king fish, sea trout, grouper, catfish and
bream as heavy producers, highly favored by the market; while
other species as choice, though not so abundant, appear as staple
products. Though the price of the foregoing species is variable,
pompano, the premier pan fish of epicures, is consistently high.
Its average production is believed to be around one and one-
half million pounds a year

CLOSED SEASONS
For the protection of the various species of fish upon which
the Florida industry relies, the following closed seasons are
provided:
AMULLET: Between the first day of December of any year and
the twentieth day of January of the next succeeding year,
provided, however, that anyone having any fresh or unsplit
mullet, or roe on hand at the beginning of the closed season
may have five days in which to dispose of same.
MULLET IN ESCAMBIA COUNTY ONLY: Between the first day of
October and November twentieth of any year, provided,
however,,that anyone having any fresh or unsplit mullet on
hand at the beginning of the closed season, shall have five
days in which to dispose of same.
TROUT: From the fifteenth day of June to the fifteenth day of
July of each year.
SPECKLED TROUT IN ESCAMBIA COUNTY ONLY : From the first
day of June to the thirty-first day of July of any year.
SHAD: Between.the first day of April and the first day of De-
cember of any year, oir to be in possession of or transport
any iced shad betweeii the seventh day of April and the
first day of December of any year.


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CRAYFISII: Between the twenty-first day of March and the
twenty-first day of July of any year.
STONE CRABS: Between the twenty-first day of March and the
twenty-first day of July of any year.
SHRIMP, EAST COAST COUNTIES: Beginning on the first day of
May and ending on the first day of August of each calendar
year.
OYSTERS: Between the fifteenth day of April and the first day
of October of each year.

METHODS OF HANDLING
Refrigeration, salting and to a limited extent, freezing, as
distinguished from cold storage, make it possible for the dealer
to care for his trade during closed periods. Refrigeration is a
factor also in controlling the market. When the run exceeds the
demand, or shipments arrive on a glutted market, refrigeration
provides the method under which the supply may be held for a
limited period, often converting what would be a loss to profit,
or preventing total loss. Freezing as contrasted with refrigera-
tion is a method under which the small, attractively prepared
portion, ready for the pan, is frozen and offered to the market
as a special pack. This frozen package seems especially well
adapted to kitchenette cookery, or service in the apartment home,
where prepared foods are at a premium.
All fish are not equally adapted to this process. Mullet and
steaks from grouper and snapper have proven excellent for the
purpose, losing nothing of their good flavor when frozen. Special
equipment is required for putting up the package. One enter-
prising dealer in Pensacola has an attractive pack on the market.
Not only is it for sale in Florida but it is being shipped to mar-
kets in many States. This dealer has invented an electric ma-
chine for scaling the fish and cutting the steaks. The machine
greatly reduces the labor involved and shortens the time involved
in the process. A similar plant is just starting operation in
Brevard County. Equipment has been installed in St. Peters-
burg, but due to general business conditions is not yet in
operation.
SHRIMPING
Shrimping, followed some years ago as a short seasonal trade,
is today followed throughout the year except for the closed season
provided for the East Coast shrimping grounds. This season
extends from May first to August first. The lengthening of the
season has come about as the shrimp fleet has learned to follow
the shrimp when they move to deep waters where it is supposed
by some that they go to spawn. The place of their spawning is as
yet unknown. Operations in shrimping waters are limited as to










NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


LARGE SHRIMP OR PRAWN. COMPARE WITH SIZE OF HAND.
the depth of the water in which shrimp may be taken only by
the type of equipment at hand.
Though the output of shrimp from Florida fisheries has steadily
increased for a number of years past, shrimp canning in this
State has declined. This is due to the fact that under refrigera-
tion the shrimp taken may be placed in the markets of the coun-
try in fresh condition. Fernandina, St. Augustine, Fort Pierce,
New Smyrna, Canaveral and Cocoa on the East Coast and Apa-
lachicola on the West Coast are the centers of the shrimping in-
dustry. Fernandina is the one point at which a considerable
part of the shrimp taken are canned. An excellent product is
put up by the factories in this city. The closed season provided
for East Coast counties seems sufficient to maintain the supply.
OYSTERS
Florida oysters enjoy an enviable reputation for size, flavor
and the sanitary condition of the oyster beds from which they










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14 NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


















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are taken. Federal inspection has given Florida oyster beds an
unexcelled rating as to sanitation.
The bulk of the crop, which during 1929-1930 totaled 138,507
barrels, was shucked, iced, sealed and shipped to home and
foreign markets.
In an effort to maintain the supply, Florida, for the past
decade, has practiced oyster planting. The legislature of 1929
appropriated for this purpose $50,000.00. Of this sum $2,596.51
was expended in 1930. During this time there were 36,114
bushels of shells distributed. Lack of funds has necessarily
limited operations in this field.
These shells were purchased from dealers and canning fac-
tories at a cost of six cents a barrel, as against a price formerly
paid of from nine cents to eleven cents a barrel. This reduction
in price was given in a spirit of co-operation on the part of the
dealers who profit directly from the maintenance of a good supply
of oysters in the beds.
In the interest of efficiency and economy the method of plant-
ing shells has been changed. Formerly plantings were made
from a dredge, owned by the State. During the 1930 season
small boats owned by local fishermen were hired to do the plant-
ing. These proved more efficient than the old dredge and could
be procured for approximately twenty-five per cent below the
cost of operating the State-owned boat.
A further saving has been effected in that the dredge and a
cruiser owned by the State, which formerly required five men to
keep in repair and operate, were towed from St. Marks to New-
port, where they have been docked and left in the care of one
man until sold. The remaining boats of the fleet, five in number,
are located at points along the coast to be used as needed for
patrol service.




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SHELL FISH DIVISION 17












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CLAMS AND SCALLOPS
Coastal lands of Collier County provide the only grounds
where salt water clams are taken for the commercial trade. These
beds yielded during the biennium 40,596 gallons. They were
canned and shipped.
A very fine grade of scallops are being produced from beds
recently located in Apalachicola Bay. They have been well re-
ceived by the trade.
TURTLES
Green or lt-r.-..l .i turtles found both on the Atlantic and
Gulf Coasts, are protected by law through a prohibition of
"turtle-egging," a practice once common along the coast. Par-
ties used to be -organized during the egg laying season to watch
for turtles that came to the beach to deposit their eggs in an
excavation made in the sand for a nest where the e-._, covered
with sand could be left to incubate. These eggs which were
gathered and used for food ranged from 150 to 240 eggs to a
nest. A closed season of four months is provided on turtle which
include the months of May, June, July and August.
Trade in turtles has dropped in latter years. This matter
should be given attention for they occur in sufficient numbers
and are of such quality as food to warrant some investigations
for new markets.
STONE CRABS
Stone crabs, one of the greatest delicacies to be found in Flor-
ida waters, find a ready market here and in other States. They
are found at various points along the East and West Coasts and
in their greatest abundance on the Matacumba Reef. For the
protection of these crustaceans the State has fixed the minimum
size at which they can be legally taken at ten inches and pro-
vided a closed season on them from March 21st to July 21st.
The blue crab, also a choice article of food, is found in all of
the coastal waters of Florida. Their consumption is largely local.
SPINY LOBSTER
Southern or Spiny Lobster, also known as crayfish, another
highly prized crustacean, is found in a restricted area. It is
taken in the region of the Keys at the southern point of the
State where coral reefs afford protection from voracious fish that
would find the young especially tempting morsels of food. This
lobster closely resembles the lobster of northern seas except for
the fact that it lacks the large claws of its northern kinsman. Its
flesh, however, is as delicately flavored and perhaps more tender.
The crayfish hatchery established in Key West for the hatching
of lobsters produced 102,660,000 young in 1929 which were re-
leased in nearby waters. This hatchery was not operated during
the 1930 season due to a lack of funds. The Shell Fish Commis-
sion plans to put this hatchery back in operation during the 1931
season.












SHELL FISH DIVISION 19




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DIVER GOING BELOW TO GATHER SPONGE.










SHELL FISH DIVISION


SPONGE INDUSTRY
Extending from Franklin County east and south to the extreme
southern point of the State and up the East Coast as far as Dade
County, are to be found sponge grounds that yield an annual
harvest that is marketed by the spongers for approximately
$1,000,000. This industry has attracted to Florida many Greeks,
experts from the Mediterranean section in the taking of sponge.
Sponges, which grow in plant-like fashion into masses that vary
greatly as to size, color, shape and consistency, are of animal
origin, being but an elastic porous mass of interlacing horny
fibers which form the skeletons of certain marine animals of low
organization. Florida sponges are quickly grown and are of
fine quality. Experiments by the United States Bureau of Fish-
eries have demonstrated that in Florida waters a sponge of com-
mercial size, that is one five inches in diameter, can be grown
from a very small planting in thirty-five months. The wool
sponge, the most valuable on the market, is by far the most
numerous in our waters.
There are two methods of gathering sponges practiced by the
Florida spongers; grappling with hooks and diving. The divi-
sion of waters between the followers of the two methods has led
to many bitter controversies. At present waters of five fathoms
or less are assigned to those rising hooks, while waters of over five
fathoms are assigned to the divers.
Spongers using hooks depend on glass bottom buckets through
which to locate the sponge before reaching for, it. When using
this method a sloop will carry out several small boats which,
when the sponging field is reached, will be manned by two. One
man will operate the boat and the other will gather the sponges.
This method is a successful one where bottoms are not beyond
the reach of the hooks, a depth of twenty-five or thirty feet.
Divers wearing helmets with air hose attached and carrying
netted bags go to a depth of eighty-five feet, possibly more. They
remain below from one and one-half to two hours. The deeper
the water the shorter the time because of pressure which tends
to bend and paralyze the limbs.
During the biennium 7,825,359 sponges were brought in by
Florida spongers. These had a market value of approximately
-$2,000,000. Totaled according to species there were as follows:
Large W ool ............................. 3,729,348
Small Wool .............................. 2,455,638
Yellow .................. ..... ........ 970,016
Grass ................... ............. 562,955
W ire ..................... ............ 107,402

Total ................ .. ..... ......... 7,825,359


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The bulk of the sponge marketed in the State is sold at Tarpon
Springs, the largest sponge market in the world. Here an ex-
change is maintained. A well constructed brick building has
been erected. In it a large cement court is provided about which
the store rooms for sponges are built. On sale days the sponges,
cleaned and strung in uniform bunches, are brought into the
court and offered for sale. Large wool run twelve to the bunch,
small wool twenty-one, yellow eight, grass and wire seven. Sealed
bids that may be accepted or rejected are received and the sponges
go to the highest bidder provided the high bid warrants a sale.
There is an exchange maintained at Key West also. With the
co-operation of the business interests of Perry one has just been
organized there by the spongers who practice hooking. They
have incorporated and now own a fleet of nine sloops. Offices
are maintained in the town of Perry.


SPONGE HOOKING SLOOP UNDER WAY.










SHELL FISH DIVISION


FISI HATCHERIES
The Commission for the past five years has operated two pond
hatcheries, one located at Welaka in Putnam County, the other
located at Okeechobee in Okeechobee County.
The Welaka Hatchery is supplied with water from the St.
Johns River, the pumping plant being located on the bank of
the river. Bass, bream and shad are hatched at this point.
PRODUCTION'
The hatchery at Okeechobee comes first into production, as
that body of water lies far enough South for the spawning to be-
gin earlier. This is of advantage as distribution may begin at
an earlier date and the growing period for the early hatch is,
of course, longer.
During the past biennium the production from the Welaka
Hatchery was as follows:
Black Bass and Bream ................... 1,660,923
Shad ................................... 707,000
The hatchery at Okeechobee, known as the John W. Martin
Hatchery is located on the water's edge of the lake. Equipment
here is similar to that used at Welaka, water being held in the
hatchery ponds by dykes.
The yield from the John W. Martin Hatchery for the biennium
was as follows:
Black Bass and Bream ................... 1,433,000
Shad .................................. 25,000
DISTRIBUTION
Distribution from these hatcheries is by shipment in large cans
carried by train or truck and always accompanied by an employee
from the hatchery whose duty it is not only to see that right
temperatures are maintained by icing while in transit but that
careful release is made into the waters for which they are
destined.
The railroads in a spirit of co-operation, transport the cans
free of charge. The greater part of the delivery, however, is
made in State-owned trucks.
The fish from these hatcheries were distributed in the various
waters of the State.
Some of the fish were assigned to specified waters on request
of the Department of Game and Fresh Water Fish. At the re-
quest of this Department 40,000 baby bass were sent to Clear-
water to be placed in a rearing pond at that point to be dis-
tributed to the waters of Pinellas County when they had grown
to fingerling size.












NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT






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SELL FISH DIVISION










NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


EDUCATION
More than six hundred species of fish have been identified in
Florida waters. The greater number of these are found in the
coastal waters of the State. A wider knowledge of these, of their
habits, their abundance, their availability, their value as food
and of methods of preparing them for the table would undoubt-
edly result in an increased interest in and utilization of this val-
uable resource. At the same time such information would deepen
interest in the conservation of the fish supply of the State. It
would secure greater, co-operation in the keeping of the laws reg-
ulating the taking of the various species. Through it comes a
realization of the need for this if the fishing industry is to be
maintained.
The Department has gladly supplied such information to the
press and civic organizations of the State. An exhibit, both of
live and mounted specimens of salt water fish and other marine
life as well as an attractive exhibit, under refrigeration, of pre-
pared dishes from seafoods was placed at the South Florida Fair,
during its last season, where these might be seen by the half
million people who visit this fair. Much more might be effective-
ly done along this line.
LAW ENFORCEMENT
Every effort has been made by the Shell Fish Commission to
reduce the number of law violations by securing the co-operation
of operators. Where this has failed, respect for the law has
been maintained through its enforcement.
In the work of enforcement some changes have been made,
notably in the substitution largely of sea skiffs and outboard
motors in coastal service for the fleet of larger boats once gen-
erally used. The extensive system of good roads developed in
this State has been a large factor in making this change prac-
tical. An enforcement officer can often travel from point to
point over a hard surfaced road, carrying on a trailer an out-
board motor and boat with him, in which to complete his trip.
A saving of time and expense results and at the same time it
is more difficult for the law violator to know the location of the
officer. This change, while reducing cost, has enabled men to
cover a much wider territory than it was possible for them to
do under the old plan, a very necessary attainment since lim-
ited revenue has made it possible for the Commission to employ
only eight full time deputies. These eight men are a picked force
and render good services. Their services have been supplemented
by part time services from other members of the Department.
The records of the Department show that one hundred and
seventy-one arrests were made and one hundred and sixty con-
victions were secured.


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SHELL FISH DIVISION 35












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SHELL FISH DIVISION


FINANCES
Since the appointment of the present Commissioner, January 1,
1930, the Shell Fish Commission has operated exclusively on
funds received from licenses and privilege taxes, with the excep-
tion of $2,596.51 used from the appropriation made by the 1929
legislature. An itemized statement of receipts and disbursements
during the biennium follows:

Shell Fish Fund
RECEIPTS
JANUARY 1ST, 1929, THROUGH DECEMBER 31ST, 1929
FISH INDUSTRY
Fish Dealers' Licenses .............. $ 24,245.00
Fish Boat Licenses .................. 9,799.30
Alien or Non-Resident Fishing Licenses 3,665.00
Alien or Non-Resident Boat Licenses .. 1,710.00
Purse Seine Licenses ................ 700.00
Excess Net Tags .................... 41.00
$ 40,160.30
OYSTER INDUSTRY
Oyster Dealers' Licenses .............$ 5,760.00
Canning Factory Licenses .... ....... 200.00
Alien or Non-Resident Oystering Li-
censes ......................... 160.00
Lease Rentals and Fees .............. 635.42
Oyster Measures and Tags .......... 21.50
6,776.92
Two CENT PRIVILEGE TAX
Two Cent Planting Fund ............ $ 1,859.17
S1,859.17
THREE CENT PRIVILEGE TAX
Three Cent Privilege Tax (Credit on
Loan) .......................... 2,425.61
2,425.61
SPONGE INDUSTRY
Sponge Boat Licenses ............... $ 301.95
301.95
MISCELLANEOUS
Sale of Confiscated Fish ............. $ 988.25
Sale of Shad ...................... 147.08
Sale of Junk Metal Taken from S. F.
C. No. 10 ..................... 300.90









NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Sale of Confiscated Fish Traps .......
Sale of Confiscated Shrimp Trawls ...
Sale of Confiscated Leads, Corks and
L ines ..........................
Empty Barrels Returned to Standard
Oil Company, Jacksonville, Fla....
Refund on Car of Oil Purchased 10-9-24
Witness Fees Paid Deputies on Various
Cases ........................
Refund Mileage on Futch Case .......
Sale of Old Ford Used by Deputy A. C.
M ason .........................
Refund on Undelivered Telegrams.....
Refund of Discount on Gasoline Pur-
chased from Standard Oil Company
through Tampa Office ...........

Total Receipts for Year Beginning Jan-
uary 1st, 1929, and Ending Decem-
ber 31st, 1929 ..................
Balance in Shell Fish Fund December
31st, 1928 ......................
Balance in Two Cent Planting Fund
December 31st, 1928 ............
Balance in Three Cent Sinking Fund
December 31st, 1928 ............
Collections December, 1928, entered
January, 1929 ..................

SHELL FISH FUND
EXPENDITURES
JANUARY 1ST, 1929, THROUGH JUNE
Traveling Expenses Deputies .........$ 1,
Printing, Stationery and Other Ex-
penses ......................... 1,
Rent, Purchase, Operation and Contin-
gent Expenses of Boats ......... 2,
Refund, Leases, Licenses, Legal and Mis-
cellaneous Expenses .............
Transferred from Shell Fish Fund to
Fish Hatchery Fund January 1st,
1929, through June 30th, 1929 .... 20,
Expenditures from Two Cent Planting
Fund, January 1st, 1929, through
June 30th, 1929 .................


14.00
30.00

52.00

10.00
71.01

52.00
8.75

30.00
3.69


45.40
1,753.08


53,277.03

14,999.34

285.46

11,180.80

9,443.33
$ 89,185.96


30TH, 1929
145.63

788.20

106.38


112.69


768.67


401.42


$ 26,322.99











SHELL FISH DIVISION


EXPENDITURES
JULY 1ST, 1929, THROUGH DECEM
Salary Shell Fish Commissioner ......$
Salary Bookkeeper ..................
Salary Secretary to Commissioner.....
Salary (3) Patrolmen and Inspectors..
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and In-
spector ........................
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and In-
spector ........................
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and In-
spector ........................
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and In-
spector ........................
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and In-
spector ........................
Salary Chief Engineer ..............
Salary Cook ........................
Salary Seaman .....................
Salary Seaman ....................
Traveling Expenses Commissioner ....
Traveling Expenses Deputies .........
P stage ............................
Printing, Stationery and Other Ex-
penses .........................
Rent, Purchase, Operation and Contin-
gent Expenses of Boats ..........
Refund Leases, Licenses, Legal and Mis-
cellaneous Expenses .............
Special Deputy Services During Closed
Season on Mullet ...............
Transferred from Shell Fish Fund to
Fish Hatchery Fund, July 1st,
1929, through December 31st, 1929
Expenditures from Two Cent Planting
Fund, July 1st, 1929, through De-
cember 31st, 1929 ..............



Balance in Shell Fish Fund, December
31st, 1929 ......................
Balance in Two Cent Planting Fund,
December 31st, 1929 ............


BER 31ST, 1929
3,000.00
999.96
1,050.00
2,700.00


900.00

900.00

900.00

854.00

900.00
1,200.00
120.00
450.00
450.00
283.24
2,723.10
200.00

800.60

4,515.84

573.45

234.69


6,676.17


201.20


$ 30,632.25

$ 56,955.24

9,931.70


1,715.13











NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Balance in Three Cent Sinking Fund,
December 31st, 1929 ............
Collections December, 1929-Included
in Distributions .............. .


13,892.30

6,691.59

$ 89,185.96


BUDGET APPROPRIATION
RECEIPTS
Balance in Budget Appropriation January 1st, 1929 $ 20,458.87
EXPENDITURES
JANUARY 1ST, 1929, THROUGH JUNE 30TH, 1929


Salary Commissioner ................$
Salary Bookkeeper ..................
Salary Secretary to Commissioner .....
Salary (3) Patrolmen and Inspectors..
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and In-
spector .......................
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and In-
spector .......................
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and In-
spector ........................
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and In-
spector ........................
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and In-
spector ............. ..........
Salary Chief Engineer ..............
Salary Cook .......................
Salary Seaman .....................
Salary Seaman .....................
Traveling Expenses Commissioner ....
Traveling Expenses Deputies .........
P stage ...........................
Printing, Stationery and Other Ex-
penses .........................
Rent, Purchase, Operation and Con-
tingent Expenses of Boats .......
Refund Leases, Licenses, Legal and Mis-
cellaneous Expenses .............
Balance Absorbed by General Revenue,
June 20th, 1929 ................


3,000.00
1,000.04
1,050.00
2,714.50


900.00

900.00

1,011.30

900.84

900.00
1,200.00
478.85
450.00
449.21
615.86
1,056.78
400.00

476.65

2,562.45

171.15

221.24


$ 20,458.87










SHELL FISH DIVISION


TWO CENT PLANTING FUND
RECEIPTS
JANUARY 1ST, 1929, THROUGH DECEMBER 31ST, 1929
Balance in Two Cent Planting Fund
January 1st, 1929 ......... .. ...$ 285.46
Collections January 1st, 1929, through
December 31st, 1929 ............ 2,032.29
$ 2,317.75
EXPENDITURES
Amount expended in replanting Public
Oyster Reefs in different parts of
the State, January 1st, 1929,
through December 31st, 1929 .....$ 602.62
Balance in Fund December 31st, 1929 1,715.13
$ 2,317.75

THREE CENT PRIVILEGE TAX
RECEIPTS
JANUARY 1ST, 1929, THROUGH DECEMBER 31ST, 1929
Balance in Three Cent Privilege Tax
Fund, January 1st, 1929 ......... $ 11,180.80
Collections January 1st, 1929, through
December 31st, 1929 (Credit on
Loan) ... ...................... 2,711.50
$ 13,892.30
EXPENDITURES
No Expenditures made from this Fund
January 1st, 1929, through Decem-
ber 31st, 1929-Balance in Fund
December 31st, 1929 ........... .$ 13,892.30
$ 13,892.30

SPECIAL SHELL FISH COMMISSION PLANTING FUND
RECEIPTS
JANUARY 1ST, 1929, THROUGH DECEMBER 31ST, 1929
Balance in Special Shell Fish Commis-
sion Planting Fund January 1st,
1929 ............................$ .62
By Appropriation June 17th, 1929 ... 50,000.00
$ 50,000.62
EXPENDITURES
No Expenditures made from this Fund
during year 1929 -Balance in
Fund December 31st, 1929 ......$ 50,000.62
$ 50,000.62










NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


SPECIAL SHELL FISH FUND FOR COUNTIES
RECEIPTS
JANUARY 1ST, 1929, THROUGH DECEMBER 31ST, 1929
Balance in Special Shell Fish Fund for
Counties, January 1st, 1929..... .$ 83.91
Collections January 1st, 1929, through
December 31st, 1929 ............ 16.00
$ 99.91


EXPENDITURES
No Expenditures made from this Fund,
January 1st, 1929, through Decem-
ber 31st, 1929-Balance in Fund
December 31st, 1929 ........... $ 99.91
$
FISH HATCHERY FUND
RECEIPTS
JANUARY 1ST, 1929, THROUGH DECEMBER 31ST, 1929
Balance in Fish Hatchery Fund, Janu-
ary 1st, 1929 ...................$ 5,320.01
Total amount transferred from Shell
Fish Fund to Fish Hatchery Fund,
January 1st, 1929, through Decem-
ber 31st, 1929, in accordance with
Chapter 10123, Acts of 1925 ..... 27,444.84


EXPENDITURES
Operation and Upkeep of Hatchery
No. 1 ..........................$ 3,801.00
Operation and Upkeep of Hatchery
No. 2 ................... ....... 6,496.23
Operation and Upkeep of Hatchery
N o. 3 ................... ...... 957.47
Operation and Upkeep of Hatchery
N o. 4 .......................... 8,371.37
Operation and Upkeep of Hatchery
No. 5 .......................... 8,939.90
Operation and Upkeep of Hatchery
N o. 6 ............. ........... 335.33
Balance in Fish Hatchery Fund De-
cember 31st, 1929 ............... 3,863.55


99.91


$ 32,764.85


$ 32,764.85










SHIELL FISH DIVISION


TRAVELING EXPENSES FISH HATCHERY
COMMISSION
RECEIPTS
JANUARY 1ST, 1929, THROUGH DECEMBER 31ST, 1929
Balance in Traveling Expenses Fish
Hatchery Commission Fund Janu-
ary 1st, 1929 ................... $ 772.37
$ 772.37
EXPENDITURES
Total amount expended for Traveling
Expenses Fish Hatchery Commis-
sion, January 1st, 1929, through De-
cember 31st, 1929 .............. $ 20.11
Balance in Traveling Expenses Fish
Hatchery Commission Fund De-
cember 31st, 1929 .............. 752.26
$ 772.37
SUMMARY
JANUARY 1ST, 1929, THROUGH DECEMBER 31ST, 1929
:RECEIPTS
Balance in all Funds January 1st, 1929 $ 53,101.38
Collections Fish Industry ............$ 40,160.30
Collections Oyster Industry ......... 6,776.92
Collections Two Cent Privilege Tax ... 1,859.17
Collections Three Cent Privilege Tax. 2,425.61
Collections Sponge Industry ......... 301.95
Miscellaneous Collections ............ 1,753.08
Collections Special Shell Fish Fund for
Counties ....................... 16.00
By Appropriation Special Shell Fish
Commission Planting Fund, June
17th, 1929 .................... 50,000.00
Collections December, 1928,
Entered in January, 1929 $9,443.33
Collections December, 1929,
Entered in January, 1930 6,691.59
2,751.74
$106,044.77

$159,146.15


4-S. F.


MOMMMMMIN,









NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


EXPENDITURES
JANUARY 1ST, 1929, THROUGH DECEMBER 31ST, 1929
Salaries and Expenses .............. $ 49,145.41
Expenditures from Two Cent Privilege
Tax Fund ..................... 602.62
Absorbed by General Revenue June
30th, 1929 ..................... 221.24
Expenditures from Fish Hatchery
Fund .......................... 28,901.30
Expenditures from Traveling Expenses
Fish Hatchery Commission ...... 20.11
Balance in All Funds December 31st,
1929 .......................... 80,255.47
$159,146.15
RECEIPTS
JANUARY 1ST, 1930, THROUGH DECEMBER 31ST, 1930
FISH INDUSTRY
Fish Dealers' Licenses ............... $ 25,784.00
Fish Boat Licenses ................. 9,899.80
Alien or Non-Resident Fishing Licenses 3,360.00
Alien of Non-Resident Boat Licenses.. 1,900.00
Purse Seine Licenses ................ 825.00
Dredge Boat Licenses ............... 25.00
Excess Net Tags .................... 45.00
$ 41,838.80
OYSTER INDUSTRY
Oyster Dealers' Licenses ............. $ 6,335.00
Canning Factory Licenses ........... 150.00
Lease Rentals and Fees ............. 1,141.21
Recording Fees ..................... 31.50
Oyster Measures and Tags ........... 5.75
7,663.46
Two CENT PRIVILEGE TAX
Two Cent Planting Fund ............ $ 1,233.02
1,233.02
THREE CENT PRIVILEGE TAX
Three Cent Privilege Tax (Credit on
Loan) ..........................$ 1,470.05
1,470.05
SPONGE INDUSTRY
Sponge Boat Licenses ...............$ 592.95
592.95










SHELL FISI DIVISION


MISCELLANEOUS

Sale of Confiscated Mullet ........... $ 502.20
Sale of Confiscated Trout ........... 46.40
Sale of Confiscated Pompano ......... 21.20
Sale of Confiscated Crayfish ......... 26.46
Sale of Confiscated Leads, Corks and
Lines .......................... 116.25
Sale of Confiscated Gill Net .......... 20.00
Sale of Pound Nets to Welaka Fish
Company, Welaka, Florida ...... 30.00
Sale of 2,822 gallons Distillate Fuel Oil
to Acme Packing Co., Apalachi-
cola, Fla ..................... 169.32
Sale of Old Boat and Miscellaneous
Junk at Cedar Key, Fla., to W. R.
Hodges ...................... 150.00
Sale of Boat "Elizabeth" to Sims Fish
Company, Titusville, Fla. ........ 100.00
Sale of Engine from Boat "Elizabeth"
to J. S. Shoesmith, New Smyrna,
Fla. ........................... 75.00
Sale of Boat "Irma L" to S. E. Coar-
sey, Bradenton, Fla. ........... 60.00
Refund on Salary Paid Ned Ferguson
(Hatchery man loaned Game and
Fresh Water Fish Department).. 32.26
Refund on Miscellaneous Material pur-
chased from Woodward, Wight &
Company, New Orleans, La ..... 5.25
Refund of Overcharge on Gasoline pur-
chased from Standard Oil Co.,
Tampa ........................ 3.15
Refund of Postage left in Postage
Meter after demonstration ...... .98
Witness Fees in various Court Cases.. 27.60
Refund on Empty Oil Barrels re-
turned to Standard Oil Co., Jack-
sonville ....................... 4.00
$ 1,390.07

Total Collections for Year 1930...... 54,188.35
Balance in Shell Fish Fund December
31st, 1929 ..................... 9,931.70
Balance in Two Cent Planting Fund
cember 31st, 1929 .............. 1,715.13


MMMOMME11i










NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Balance in Three Cent Privilege Tax
Fund December 31st, 1929 ...... 13,892.30
Collection December, 1929, entered in
January, 1930 ................. 6,691.59

$ 86,419.07
SHELL FISH FUND
EXPENDITURES
JANUARY 1ST, 1930, THROUGH DECEMBER 31ST, 1930
EXPENDITURES FROM SHELL
FISH FUND FOR FOLLOWING
NINETEEN ACCOUNTS IN AC-
CORDANCE WITH FIGURES AP-
PROVED BY BUDGET COMMIS-
SION:
Salary Shell Fish Commissioner .... $ 6,000.00
Salary Bookkeeper ................. 1,999.92
Salary Secretary to Commissioner.... 2,100.00
Salary (3) Patrolmen and Inspectors. 5,270.32
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and In-
spector ....................... 1,800.00
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and In-
spector ....................... 1,750.00
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and In-
spector ....................... 1,796.78
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and In-
spector ....................... 1,958.55
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and In-
spector ....................... 1,774.04
Salary Chief Engineer .............. 2,200.00
Salary Cook ....................
Salary Seaman ............ 900.00
Salary Seaman .............. .. ... 900.00
Traveling Expenses Commissioner.... 652.45
Traveling Expenses Deputies ........ 6,479.06
Postage ................. ... ....... 600.00
Printing, Srt.li r-ty and Other Ex-
penses ........................ 1,461.29
Rent, Purchase, Operation and Con-
tingent Expenses of Boats ....... 4,321.34
Refund, Leases, Licenses, Legal and
Miscellaneous Expenses ......... 782.52
----- $ 42,746.27


I










SHELL FISH DIVISION


EXPENDITURES FROM "SHELL FISH FUND"
Deputy Patrolman and Inspection Ser-
vice ..........................$ 1,051.62
Traveling Expenses Deputies ........ 1,189.77
Expenditures on Fish Hatchery No. 2 1,838.03
Expenditures on Fish Hatchery No. 4 980.50
Expenditures from Two Cent Planting
Fund ......................... 2,567.62
Refund Leases, Licenses, Legal and
Miscellaneous Expenses ......... 29.26
Transfer from Shell Fish Fund to Fish
Hatchery Fund January 1st, 1930,
through December 31st, 1930 .... 4,826.07
12,482.87

$ 55,229.14
Balance in Shell Fish Fund December
31st 1930 ...................... 9,444.60
Balance in Two Cent Planting Fund
December 31st, 1930 ............ 288.83
Balance in Three Cent Privilege Tax
Fund December 31st, 1930 ...... 15,201.95
Collections December, 1930-Included
in Distributions ................ 6,254.55
$ 86,419.07

TWO CENT PRIVILEGE TAX FUND
JANUARY 1ST, 1930, THROUGH DECEMBER 31ST, 1930
RECEIPTS
Balance in Two Cent Privilege Tax
Fund January 1st, 1930 ........ $ 1,715.13
Collections January 1st, 1930, through
December 31st, 1930 ............ 1,141.32
$ 2,856.45
EXPENDITURES
Amount expended in replanting Pub-
lic Oyster Reefs in different parts
of the State ...................$ 2,567.62
Balance in Fund December 31st, 1930 288.83
$ 2,856.45










NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


THREE CENT PRIVILEGE TAX FUND
JANUARY 1ST, 1930, THROUGH DECEMBER 31ST, 1930
RECEIPTS
Balance in Three Cent Privilege Tax
Fund January 1st, 1930 ........$ 13,892.30
Collections January 1st, 1930, through
December 31st, 1930 ............ 1,309.65
$ 15,201.95
EXPENDITURES
No expenditures made from this fund
January 1st, 1930, through De-
cember 31st, 1930-Balance in
Fund December 31st, 1930 .....$ 15,201.95
$ 15,201.95
SPECIAL SHELL FISH COMMISSION
PLANTING FUND
JANUARY 1ST, 1930, THROUGH DECEMBER 31ST, 1930
RECEIPTS
Balance in Special Shell Fish Commis-
sion Planting Fund January 1st,
1930 ......................... $ 50,000.62
$ 50,000.62
EXPENDITURES
Amount expended replanting public
oyster reefs in different parts of
the State January 1st, 1930,
through December 31st, 1930.... $ 2,596.51
Balance in Fund December 31st, 1930. 47,404.11
$ 50,000.62
SPECIAL SHELL FISH FUND FOR COUNTIES
JANUARY 1ST, 1930, THROUGH DECEMBER 31ST, 1930
RECEIPTS
Balance in Special Shell Fish Fund for
Counties January 1st, 1930 ...... $ 99.91
No collections made during 1930............
$ 99.91
EXPENDITURES
No expenditures made from this Fund
January 1st, 1930, through Decem-
ber 31st, 1930-Balance in Fund
December 31st, 1930 ............ $ 99.91
S $ 99.91










SHELL FISI DIVISION


FISH HATCHERY FUND
JANUARY 1ST, 1930, THROUGH DECEMBER 31ST, 1930
RECEIPTS
Balance in Fish Hatchery Fund Janu-
ary 1st, 1930 ..................$ 3,863.55
Total amount transferred from Shell
Fish Fund January 1st, 1930,
through December 31st, 1930,
in accordance with Chapter 10123,
Acts of 1925 .................. 4,826.07
Total amount transferred from Travel-
ing Expenses Fish Hatchery Com-
mission to Fish Hatchery Fund
June 28th, 1930 ................ 752.26


EXPENDITURES
Operation and Upkeep of Hatchery No.
2 January 1st, 1930, through De-
cember 31st, 1930 ..............
Operation and Upkeep of Hatchery No.
4 January 1st, 1930, through De-
cember 31st, 1930 ..............
Balance in Fish Hatchery Fund De-
cember 31st, 1930 ..............


$ 9,441.88



4,344.24


5,080.39


17.25


$ 9,441.88
NOTE: No expenditures made from Hatcheries Nos. 1, 3,
5 and 6.
SUMMARY
JANUARY 1ST, 1930, THROUGH DECEMBER 31ST, 1930


RECEIPTS
Balance in all Funds January 1st, 1930
Collections Fish Industry ........... $
Collections Oyster Industry .........
Collections Two Cent Privilege Tax..
Collections Three Cent Privilege Tax.
Collections Sponge Industry .........
Miscellaneous Collections ............
Collections December, 1929,
Entered in January,
1930 ................ $6,691.59
Collections December 1930,
Entered in January,
1930 ................ 6,254.55


41,838.80
7,663.46
1,233.02
1,470.05
592.95
1,390.07





437.04


$ 80,255.47












54,625.39

$134,880.86










NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


EXPENDITURES
JANUARY 1ST, 1930, THROUGH DECEMBER 31ST, 1930
Salaries and Expenses ..............$ 45,016.92
Expenditures from Two Cent Privilege
Tax Fund ..................... 2,567.62
Expenditures from Special Shell Fish
Commission Planting Fund ..... 2,596.51
Expenditures from Fish Hatchery
Fund ......................... 12,243.16
Balance in all Funds December 31,
1930 .......................... 72,456.65
$134,880.86



CONCLUSION

Florida fisheries bring to those who go to the waters of the
State for what they have to offer an annual income that approxi-
mates $20,000,000 or more; to the wholesale dealer a profitable
increase above this.
They furnish employment for thousands of people and a
valuable article of food to many more at a minimum cost. They
afford tonnage to be carried at a profit by transportation com-
panies.
These fisheries through wise methods of utilization, protection
and by the operation of hatcheries can and should be maintained
at a high level of production. At the same time wider utilization
of the products should be sought.