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... Biennial report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075939/00008
 Material Information
Title: ... Biennial report
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Shell Fish Division
Florida -- Shell Fish Commission
Publisher: T.J. Appleyard
Place of Publication: Tallahassee <Fla.>
Creation Date: 1927
Publication Date: <1915>-
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Shellfish trade -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Fisheries -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Aquaculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1st (1913/1914)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased with 10th (1931/1932)?
General Note: Third and fourth issues called reports of the Florida Shell Fish Commission.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001750196
oclc - 45623059
notis - AJG3100
lccn - sn 00229152
System ID: UF00075939:00008

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
    Front Matter
        Page 6
    Main
        Page 7
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LIBRARY
OF THE
UNITED STATES
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Class ..... .-_ ----
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EIGHTH BIENNIAL REPORT


SHELL FISH DIVISION

OF THE


Department of Agriculture

OF THE


State of Florida
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FOR THE YEARS 1927-1928


T. J. APPLEYARD, INC., TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA



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LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL


Department of Agriculture, State of Florida,
Commissioner's Office

Shell Fish Division

To His Excellency,
Doyle E. Carlton,
Governor of the State of Florida.

Sir:

We have the honor to submit herewith the Biennial
Report of the Shell Fish Division of the Department of
Agriculture for the years 1927 and 1928.

Respectfully submitted,

T. R. HODGES,
Shell Fish Commissioner.

NATHAN MAYO,
Commissioner of Agriculture.








Summary of Work Accomplished
During Years 1927-1928
ESTABLISHED five Fish hatcheries and hatched and
distributed in the fresh and salt waters of the State
of Florida forty-one million five hundred and seven-
ty-five thousand fish and spiny lobsters.
Replanted the public oyster reefs of the State with one
hundred thirty-seven thousand one hundred and fifty-one
bushels of oysters and shell and increased the shell fish
production seventy thousand six hundred and seventeen
bushels over last biennial period. Total increase in value
Shell Fish seventy thousand six hundred and seventeen
dollars.
Enforced the fish and shell fish laws in such manner as
to increase the fish production twenty-five million three
hundred twenty-six thousand eight hundred four pounds
for the biennial period, one hundred ninety-eight million
three hundred seventy-eight thousand three hundred sev-
enty-eight pounds of fish being handled during the past
two years, valued approximately at thirty-nine million
six hundred seventy-five thousand six hundred seventy-
five dollars and sixty cents. Total increase in value fish,
five million sixty-five thousand three hundred and sixty
dollars and eighty cents.
The yield of sponge has been materially increased, six
million eight hundred and thirty thousand four hundred
and sixty-five sponges being handled during the past two
years, valued at two million four hundred and eighty-two
thousand three hundred and thirty-one dollars and seven
cents. This shows an increase of one million nine hundred
and two thousand and ten sponges, valued at seven hun-
dred and three thousand seven hundred and forty-three
dollars and seventy cents.
The collections made by the Department have increased
seventeen thousand eight hundred thirteen dollars and
twenty-nine cents over the las biennial period, the total
collections being one hundred and eight thousand seven
hundred and seventy-three dollars and fifty-seven cents
for the past two years.
Three hundred and three arrests were made for viola-
tions of the laws and two hundred and ninety-three con-
victions were secured.












Summary of Report

PROPERTY AND CREDITS ACQUIRED

JANUARY 1, 1927, THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 1928


C a sh in T rea su ry ........................... ...................... .................
Cash in Bank to be Deposited in Treasury Jan.
1 1 9 2 9 ............... .......... ... ................... ........ .... .. .. .....
Balance in Two Cent Planting Fund ....... ......
Balance in Three Cent Sinking Fund ...................
Balance in Special Shell Fish Commission
P lan tin g F u n d .......................... ........ .....................
Balance in Special Shell Fish Fund for Coun-
ties ................... ...... ....... .. ...... ..
Balance in Fish Hatchery Fund ........ ......................
Balance in Traveling Expenses Fish Hatchery
C o m m mission .................................... ... ........ ............... .
Construction and Operation of Six Fish
H a tc h er ie s ............... ............................ .......
Office Equipment Acquired ....................... ...........
Replanting Public Oyster Reefs ....................................
B oat E quipm ent A acquired .........................................


$ 14,999.34

9,443.33
285.46
11,180.80

.62

83.91
5,320.01

772.37

88,968.91
719.67
20,574.89
1,639.66

$153,988.97

















Hatchery Ship Acquired

T HROUGH Act of Congress a splendid steel hull
ship was acquired without cost and now has estab-
lished on board the largest and most modern me-
chanical or jar hatchery in the United States, capable of
producing one million fish daily.
The "S. F. C. 10," the name of the hatchery ship, is a
sturdy vessel of 170 feet in length and 22 feet beam and
is of light draft, suitable for navigating the shoal waters
of the Gulf and at the same time insuring the safety of
the crew during heavy weather. The ship is equipped
with all necessary steam power, pumps and machinery
for operating the hatchery besides having ample quarters
for those engaged in the fish hatchery operations.
The Shell Fish Commissioner has an office on board
the S. F. C. 10 and correspondence and other depart-
mental business is handled direct from there when the
Shell Fish Commissioner is on board.


























































































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Fish Cultural Work
THE DEPARTMENT has been active in the estab-
lishment of fish hatcheries and carrying on fish cul-
tural work in connection with the U. S. Bureau of
Fisheries. Under the direction of fish culturists from the
Bureau this Department successfully hatched and planted
thirty-eight million nine hundred thousand spiny lobsters
within six weeks at Key West and advices from the U. S.
Fish Commissioner are that the U. S. Bureau will send
fish culturists to Florida to supplement the work of
hatching spiny lobsters May first at cost to be borne by
the Federal government.
The Shell Fish Department has constructed during the
past year a large hatchery on Lake Okeechobee and this
hatchery produced seven hundred and seventy-five thou-
sand bass and bream which were distributed in the vari-
ous fresh water streams of the State. Three floating
hatcheries have been established and will be in operation
during the next spawning season of the stone crab and
spiny lobster. March first the Department will begin the
hatching of shad in the St. Johns river, assisted by an
expert fish culturist from the Bureau of Fisheries at
Washington.
The pond hatchery at Welaka on the St. Johns river
produced two million black bass and bream during the
past biennial period for distribution in the fresh water
streams of the State. These young fish were distributed
through the agency of the American Legion, Izaak Walton
League, C('hli.l"-r. of Commerce and private citizens and
we have wonderful reports of the life and growth of
same.
The two pond hatcheries cover a water area of sixty
acres and have in addition to this valuable land surround-
ing same.
Big mouth black bass, crappie and bream have been
produced very successfully at these two hatcheries during
the past two years.










20

The roe of an adult bass contains about sixteen thou-
sand eggs and the time required for incubation is from
four to eight days, according to the temperature of the
water. The spawning season is from the middle of March
until the middle or latter part of June and in some cases
later. The spawning season of the catfish is about the
same, while bream spawn from March to October.
The mode of distribution of baby fish is by shipment in
large cans, accompanied by a messenger, who carries ice
and a thermometer. At intervals ice is placed in the
cans in order to keep the water at a temperature suffi-
ciently cold to insure the safe carriage of the fish alive.
The railroads handle them free as baggage and the only
cost of distribution is the messenger's expense and ice.



























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Crayfish (Florida's Spiny Lobster)
and Crabs

C RAYFISH (Florida's Spiny Lobster) inhabit the
rocky coast of Florida from Sarasota county south
on the West Coast to Broward county on the East
Coast, and are caught in great numbers and shipped to
Northern as well as local markets.
They are protected by a closed season during the
spawning period, and it has only been necessary for this
Department to make a few arrests and seizures to discon-
tinue violations of the law for their protection.
Stone and blue crabs are found over the entire coast
of Florida and are gathered for local market only and
not for shipment. The stone crab has a limited protec-
tion by local laws, but should be protected by a general
law.
One million six hundred and thirty-four thousand seven
hundred and ninety-three pounds of crayfish were caught
and shipped during the biennial period, valued at three
hundred and twenty-six thousand nine hundred and fifty-
eight dollars and sixty cents. Increase over last biennial
period of one million four hundred and fifty-nine thousand
six hundred and seventy-one pounds, valued at two hun-
dred ninety-one thousand nine hundred thirty-four dol-
lars and twenty cents.
















Fish Census Taken
SECTION 12 of Chapter 10123, Acts of 1925, provides
that the Shell Fish Commissioner shall gather data
of the commercial fisheries and prepare the data bi-
ennially so as to show the real abundance of the most
important commercial fish and to make investigation of
the various species of fish as will guide in the collection
and preparation of the statistical information necessary
to determine evidence of over-fishing.
There has been a healthy increase in all species of fish,
according to a census taken by this Department for the
biennial period. Frequent gluts of the market on mullet
and trout indicates an oversupply of stock.
One hundred and ninety-eight million three hundred
and seventy-eight thousand three hundred and seventy-
eight pounds of fish were caught and shipped during the
past two years, valued at thirty-nine million six hundred
and seventy-five thousand six hundred and seventy-five
dollars and sixty cents.
The census shows a total increase of twenty-five million
three hundred and twenty-six thousand eight hundred
and four pounds of fish produced during the biennial
period, valued at five million sixty-five thousand three
hundred sixty dollars and eighty cents.
Various species of fish produced are as follows:


M ullet ................. .............
T rout ............ ....................
M ackerel .... .....................
B lue Fish .........................
King Fish .................... ......
Red Fish .. ...................
Sheephead ........... ................
Flounders r................................
Red Snapper .................. .....
G rouper .............................
Pom pano ............. ....... ..........
Shad .... ......................
H erring ............. ............ ..
C atfish ........... .... .........- .........
B ream ......... ....... .. ..............
Black Bass ................... ....................
C rappie .............. ..............
Shrimp ...................................
Crayfish (Spiny Lobster) .............
Other Bottom Fish ...........................


.......................... 75,263,958
.. ............ ........ 11,163,362
......................... 16,178,324
... ... ... ........ 3,246,152
..... ...... ........ 6,056,336
..... .......... ... 2,276,730
-.- ....-....- ..... 1,326,850
.... ..... ... 492,297
....-............-....... 21,897,714
.......................... 10,193,474
... .... .. ........ 2,843,732
.... ...... ......... 1,746,284
.... ......... ........ 1,195,502
........................... 6,842,739
.......................... 11,173,284
... ................ 2,845,729
.... ..... .... .... 3,135,825
.......................... 15,097,338
..... .............. 1,634,793
... ....... ..... 3,767,955

198,378,378


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Resources of the Sea

THAT the resources of the sea are of paramount
importance in feeding our present and largely in-
creasing population is borne out by the fact that
the United States Navy (Hydrographic Department) is
engaged in a definite plan of oceanographical research.
Instead of charting the waters for navigation of ships,
they will survey and chart them for the benefit of the
fishing industry.
Many things may be learned and taught as to the migra-
tory movements of fish and the cause of such migration
and other problems, dealing with deep sea and shallow
water fishing.
Bread, meat and fish have been the staple articles of
food for man since the creation of the world, and while
grazing lands are decreasing, which makes it almost im-
possible to enlarge the world's supply of meat sufficiently
to fill the demand of the rapidly increasing population,
the wide waters of the sea have a food-producing area
which is practically unlimited.
Florida is blessed with more sea-food producing terri-
tory than any State in the Union and might be correctly
termed the storehouse of America for luxuries as well as
necessities.
During the long winter months, when fishing grounds
are frozen over in the North and East, large demands are
made for fresh sea foods from Florida waters.

ENFORCEMENT OF CONSERVATION LAWS

The enforcement of conservation laws, as a general rule,
is a difficult matter-first, on account of the vast terri-
tory to be policed, and secondly, on account of the lack of
appreciation of the importance of such enforcement by
the public generally. Conservation laws are enacted for
the benefit of the people, as the primary object of their
enactment is to encourage, protect and build up some pub-
lic resource in order that the people of the State may









52

enjoy more fully the fruits of the particular industry con-
served.
The poultryman does not kill the setting hen or destroy
all the eggs or sell all the small chickens. If he did, he
would not maintain a poultry farm very long. The same
rule can be applied to the conservation of the fish. We
stood by and saw our other natural resources disappear;
but, fortunately, the note of warning was sounded in time
to save our salt water fishing industry.
A recent publication by the United States Bureau of
Fisheries at Washington places Florida at the head of the
list in conservation of her mullet industry, which is the
greatest money-producing fish we have.

























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Conservation of Shell Fish
LORIDA is leading all other oyster producing States
in the conservation of her natural oyster reefs. She
is the first State to own and operate her own dredge
and planting machinery. During the past biennial period
the Department has been able to accomplish some real con-
structive work in replanting the barren oyster reefs of
the various coast counties of the State. During this
period the Department has planted one hundred thirty-
seven thousand one hundred fifty-one bushels of oysters
and shell on the public reefs for the free use of the public
and ninety per cent of the available supply of oysters
today can be attributed as the direct results of this re-
planting.
The Department has acquired one of the best and most
modern oyster planting dredges and other oyster planting
equipment, aggregating in value $19,367.89. With this
splendid equipment and funds available, replanting opera-
tions will continue. The dredge has a planting capacity
of 2,100 bushels daily.
The sworn statements of shell fish dealers filed in the
office of the Shell Fish Commissioner show number of
barrels of oysters and clams handled as follows:
Number of barrels'oysters handled, 1927 .................. 64,700
Number of barrels clams handled, 1927 .................... 22.366

T otal, 1 927 ..................... ........... ...... .... ........... .......... 87,0 66
Number of barrels oysters handled, 1928 .................. 102,808
Number of barrels clams handled, 1928 ..................... 14,137

T o ta l, 1 9 2 8 ............................................... ..... ...................... 1 1 6 ,9 4 5
Total increase of oysters handled in 1928 over
1927 .............................. .... .. .... ............. 3 8,10 8
This substantial increase in oysters handled can be
directly attributed to the extensive planting operations
carried on by the Department during the past four years.











The Oyster

T HE OYSTER may be determined as an edible mol-
lusk, one of the Lamellibranchiate Mollusca. It be-
longs to the genius Ostrea, family Ostraeidac, the
members of which are distinguished by the possession of
an inequivalve shell, the one half, or valve, being larger
than the other. The shell may be free, or attached to
fixed objects, or may be simply imbedded in the mud.
The fry or fertilized ova of the oyster are termed "spat"
and enormous numbers of the "spat" are produced by
each individual oyster during the spawning season.
Oysters will spawn in the Florida waters during every
month in the year, but the spawning season is generally
considered to be the best from March until September in
Southern waters.
A normal oyster is supposed to spawn sixty million eggs
or "spat." The "spat" being discharged, each embryo
is found to consist of a little body inclosed within a
minute but perfectly formed shell, and possessing vibra-
tile til.im. nr-, or cilia, by which the young oyster at first
swims freely about until it comes in contact with some
kind of clean cultch, such as shell, posts, or any object in
the water that is not covered by mud or slime.
The young oyster grows very rapidly in the waters of
this State for the first twelve months, attaining a length
of three or more inches from hinge to bill. Of course this
rapid growth is more marked at certain locations along
the coast, according to the feeding matter contained in
the waters. Ordinarily an oyster will attain its growth
to a marketable size of from three to five inches within
two years, the second year's growth being considerably
less than the first year. If undisturbed, oysters will grow
to a length of from six to twelve inches.
Oysters have practically the same food value as meat
and are even more easily digested and therefore an im-
portant part of the invalid's diet. In buying beef, mutton,
poultry or fish, there is always considerable waste in the
form of bones, inedible portions, feathers, etc. In a cut











of steak, for instance, the waste often runs as high as 30
to 60 per cent. In the oyster there are no bones or
feathers and no inedible portions. It is all meat, and
particularly rich in those elements which go to repair
overworked brains and nervous systems.
It is estimated that a quart of oysters contains on an
average about the same quantity of actual nutritive sub-
stance as a quart of milk, or three-fourths of a pound of
beef, or two pounds of fresh codfish, or a pound of bread.
The nutritive substance of oyster contains considerable
protein and energy-yielding ingredients.
Prof. Frederick P. Gorham, Associate Professor of Bi-
ology of Brown University and sanitary expert of the
Rhode Island Shell Fish Commission, says: "There is no
reason today why we should not give the oyster prominent
place in our dietary as a cheap, delicious, nutritious,
healthful and pure food product."
It is a well-known fact that every food product has ad-
vanced in price, while the oyster or clam market has not
changed. It cannot be "cornered" by the rich, and the
rich and poor alike may enjoy them.















































































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Sponge Industry
THE SPONGE grounds are located along the West
Coast of Florida from Franklin county south and
around on the East Coast as far up as Dade county.
They are taken inside the jurisdiction of the State by
hook and beyond by divers. They are of the finest quality
and are of quick growth in Florida waters.
The United States Bureau of Fisheries has carried on
extensive artificial propagation in Florida waters and
demonstrated the fact that a sponge of commercial size
can be grown in thirty-five months from a small cutting.
A sponge is really a marine plant and grows rapidly from
a small piece cut from the green sponge.
Those versed in sponge culture state that the sale of
a cargo of small-size sponge, five inches in diameter, bring-
ing sixty-five cents a bunch, would sell for four dollars a
bunch if allowed to remain in the waters and grow for
another year.
Six million eight hundred thirty thousand four hundred
sixty-five sponges were marketed in Florida during the
biennial period. Valued at two million four hundred and
eighty-two thousand three hundred and thirty-one dollars
and seven cents. The protection afforded the sponge in-
dustry by this Department prevents the taking or gather-
ing of sponges less than five inches in diameter.

TOTAL NUMBER SPONGES HANDLED 1927-1928
L arge w ool .......... .......................... ...... .. ...... 3,767,076
Small wool ...... .... .... 1,726,809
Y ello w ..................... .. .. .. .......... ....... .. ........................ 8 60 ,52 0
G rass .................... ... ....... ............. ........ ........ 3 80 ,2 32
W ir e ...................... ...... ......... ........................................ .................. 9 5 ,8 2 8

T o ta l .... .. ........ .. .. ............................ .. ..................... 6,8 3 0 ,4 6 5
Increase in biennial period ................................................ 1,902,010
Increase in value over last biennial period...... $703,743.70
The bulk of the sponge marketed in the State is sold
at Tarpon Springs, which is considered the largest sponge











market in the world, at which point a mammoth exchange
building is located. There is also an exchange at Key
West.
The Tarpon Springs sponge exchange building is con-
structed of brick with a large cement court in the center
in which the various kinds of sponge are piled on sale
days. Individual rooms with iron gratings are built along
this court in which the sponge from various ships are
stored until sold.
The sponge buyers place sealed bids for each lot of
sponge sold and the highest bidder secures the sponge,
provided the exchange does not withdraw it from sale
account of bids being too low. Of course, some sponge is
sold independent of the exchange.
The large wool sponge are graded in bunches contain-
ing about twelve sponge, while the small wool contains
about twenty-one to the bunch. Yellow sponge runs about
eight, while grass and wire run at seven and six to the
bunch. Of course, the wool sponge is the most valuable,
while yellow sponge is of less value.
























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Boat Service

IN ORDER to properly police the salt waters of the
State, including the St. Johns river, Doctors Lake,
Lake George, Lake Okeechobee, Suwannee river up to
East and West Passes, Carrabelle and New rivers and
Wacasassa river up to Cow creek, covering a territory of
approximately forty-five hundred miles, boat service is
necessary.
The Department owns and operates twenty-one large
and small vessels, one of which is the steam patrol and
hatchery vessel, S. F. C. 10. This vessel is worth ap-
proximately three hundred thousand dollars and was pre-
sented to the Department by Act of Congress. The S. F.
C. 10 replaces the steam patrol boat S. C. 144, which was
not suitable for the service and is out of commission and
for sale.
The boat service is not expensive as those employed are
used for various other kinds of work in connection with
the Department when needed. The Commissioner holds
U. S. Steamboat Master's papers and acts in the capacity
of captain of the steam vessel, thereby saving the salary
of an expensive man. The engineer acts as mechanic and
overhauls the machinery of the other vessels when needed.
Six other men are used in the boat service exclusive of
the eight deputies, who are boatmen.











Automobile Service
HE Shell Fish Department owns two trucks that are
used in connection with the pond hatcheries at We-
laka and Okeechobee and one Fordson tractor that
is used in connection with same work at both stations,
also one Ford touring car and one Studebaker sedan. The
Ford car was bought second-hand at a cost of thirty-five
dollars and is used in the deputy service. The Studebaker
sedan is practically a new car, having been in the service
about two months, and is used in the deputy service as
well as by the Shell Fish Commissioner in visiting the
fish hatcheries and covering the territory from East to
West Coasts. A Studebaker car that had been driven
thirty-four thousand miles, was traded in and $1,100.00
paid in exchange for the new car.
Cars are rented for use of the deputies when needed at
twenty-five dollars per month, which is considered
cheaper than paying the regular mileage charge.
The Shell Fish Commissioner has traveled by car in
the biennial period seventy-five thousand two hundred
and twenty-eight miles exclusive of boat travel in order
to properly cover the territory under his jurisdiction.



































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PLACING DIVING HELMET ON DIVER WITH AIR HOSE
ATTACHED.
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DIVER GOING BELOW TO GATHER SPONGE

















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SPONGE DIVER IN STIT WITH ST'ONGE NET.








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HOOKS WITH WHICH SPONGE ARE TAKEN.








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Sheepswool sponge 35 months old, grown on spindles, in Cape Florida
Channel from a cutting about the size shown. Weight, dry and thor-
oughly cleaned, 1 1-3 ounces. Nine-tenths natural size.






























































Sheepswool sponge not over 48 months old, grown on a cement disk
at Anclote Key from a cutting about the size shown. Weight, dry and
thoroughly cleaned, 212 ounces. Nine-tenths natural size.













S--S. F.








115

Violations, Arrests and
Convictions
HE PROVISIONS of laws for the protection of the
industry under the jurisdiction of this Department
have been well enforced. Those engaged in the in-
dustry realize the importance of law enforcement as a
protection to themselves and have given valuable informa-
tion and assistance to the Deputy Shell Fish Commission-
ers that has enabled them to arrest and convict those who
violated the law.
The records of the Department show that the total ar-
rests made for all violations amounted to 303 and 293
convictions were secured.
The fish and shell fish laws are more closely observed
and better obeyed than any other laws on the statute
books of Florida.





















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SPONGES GROWING ON CEMENT TRIANGLES USEI IN
EXPERIMENTAL PLANTS OF CUTTINGS.










Raw and Canned Shrimp
HE shrimping industry has greatly increased during
the past two years. Fifteen million ninety-seven
thousand three hundred and thirty-eight pounds of
shrimp were shipped raw and canned during the past two
years.
The fishing grounds for shrimp have been extended as
far south as Cape Canaveral and Fort Pierce on the East
Coast and packing houses established at New Smyrna,
Canaveral and Fort Pierce. Extensive shrimp canneries
are operated at Fernandina and St. Augustine and raw
shrimp are shipped extensively from these points in north-
east Florida. Large canning plants are also operated at
Apalachicola for shrimp and Franklin county is the
shrimp producing territory on the Gulf side. The waters
of Escambia county also produce a splendid grade of
shrimp which are shipped in the raw state.



































































LARGE SHRIMP OR PRAWN. COMPARE WITH SIZE OF HAND.




























































































9--S. F.


















Shell Fish Fund
RECEIPTS
January 1st, 1927, through December 31st, 1927.

FISH INDUSTRY
Fish Dealers' Licenses ............ $26,535.00
Fish Boat Licenses .............. 10,269.85
Alien Boat Licenses ............. 2,315.00
Alien Fishing Licenses........... 1,740.00
Excess Net Tags................. 37.00
Purse Seines .................... 275.00
Dredge Boat Licenses ............. 50.00
$41,221.85

OYSTER INDUSTRY
Oyster Dealers' Licenses ..........$ 6,855.00
Canning Factory Licenses......... 150.00
Lease, Rentals and Fees.......... 699.50
$ 7,704.50

TWO-CENT PRIVILEGE TAX
Two-Cent Planting Fund..........$ 1,741.55 $ 1,741.55

THREE-CENT PRIVILEGE TAX
Three-Cent Privilege Tax (Credit on
Loan) ......................$ 1,915.60 $ 1,915.60
SPONGE INDUSTRY
Sponge Boat Licenses .............$ 481.65 $ 481.65

MISCELLANEOUS
Sale Measures and Tags .............$ 27.25
Recording Fees .................... 1.50
Refund-Damage done on Boat "Bull
Dog" ........................... 8.00
Refund-Salary paid C. V. Carnes. .13.00
Confiscated Nets ................... 25.00
Refund-Express Charges paid by T. R.
Hodges .......................... 11.48









136

Sale Solar Oil...................... 156.88
Sale Confiscated Fish. ................ 315.20
Empty Oil Barrels Returned......... 14.00
Sale Leads, Corks and Lines .......... 25.00
Sale Shad--Shad caught in connection
with S.I.I1 Hatchery work......... 394.18
-- $ 991.49
Total receipts for year beginning January 1st,
1927, and ending December 31st, 1927........ $54,056.64
Balance in Shell Fish Fund December 31st, 1926. 18,631.02
Collections December, 1926, entered January,
1927 ................................... 5,211.94
Balance in Two-Cent Planting Fund December
31st, 1926 .............................. 2,732.14
Balance in Three-Cent Sinking Fund December
31st, 1926 ...................... ......... 6,292.19

$86,923.93












SHELL FISH FUND

EXPENDITURES
January 1st, 1927, through December 31st, 1927.
Printing, Stationery and other Ex-
penses .......................$ 1,680.22
Telephone and Telegrams .......... 218.21
Freight and Express .............. 47.84
Postage ........................ 300.00
Legal Expenses .................. 285.00
Traveling Expenses Deputies....... 2,188.17
Rent, Purchase and Operation Boats 653.20
Transferred to Fish Hatchery Fund 48,019.49 4,..' l1

Balance in Shell Fish Fund Dec. 31st, 1927.. 15,900.41
Balance in Two-Cent Planting Fund Dec. 31st,
1927 .................................. 4,402.13
Balance in Three-Cent Sinking Fund ........ 8,093.24
Collections December, 1927-Included in Dis-
tributions ................. ......... 5,136.02

$86,923.93











BUDGET APPROPRIATION

RECEIPTS

Total balances in Different Accounts December
31st, 1926 ............................ $19,866.51

EXPENDITURES

January 1st, 1927, through June 30th, 1927.

Salary Commissioner ............ $ 2,000.02
Salary Clerk-Bookkeeper ......... 950.02
Salary Secretary to Commissioner.. 900.00
Salary (3) Patrolmen and Inspectors 2,709.50
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and
Inspector ..................... 900.01
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and
Inspector ..................... 900.00
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and
Inspector ..................... 899.95
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and
Inspector ..................... 902.00
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and
Inspector ..................... 925.52
Salary Chief Engineer ........... 1,200.00
Salary Cook .................... 375.80
Salary Seaman .................. 360.00
Salary Seaman .................. 334.36
Traveling Exl.-ii-, Commissioner. 593.99
Traveling Expenses Deputies...... 1,199.43
Printing, Stationery and other Ex-
penses ........................ 295.93
Rent, Purchase, Operation and
Contingent Expenses of Boats. 3,879.28
Refund, Leases, Licenses, Legal and
Miscellaneous Expenses......... 537.98
Balance absorbed by General Rev-
enue June 30th, 1927 ........... 2.72
$19,866.51











SPECIAL SHELL FISH COMMISSION PLANTING
FUND

RECEIPTS

Balance in Special Shell Fish Com-
mission Planting Fund January
1st, 1927 ..................... $14,092.62

EXPENDITURES

Replanting Public Oyster Reefs in
different parts of the State...... $13,287.64
Balance in Fund December 31st,
1927 ......................... 804.98
$14,092.62

SPECIAL SHELL FISH FUND FOR COUNTIES

RECEIPTS

January 1st, 1927, through December 31st, 1927.

Balance in Special Shell Fish Fund for Coun-
ties, January 1st, 1927 ................... $ 49.21
Collections January 1st, 1927, through De-
cember 31st, 1927 ........................ 1,566.00

$ 1,615.21

EXPENDITURES

Total amount expended in Escambia,
Santa Rosa, Okaloosa and Walton
Counties in enforcing laws from
January 1st, 1927, through De-
cember 31st, 1927 .............$ 1,460.43
Balance in Fund December 31st, 1927 154.78
$ 1,615.21












FISH HATCHERY FUND

RECEIPTS

January 1st, 1927, through December 31st, 1927.

Balance in Fish Iatchery Fund
December 31st, 1926 ...........$ 7,526.67
Amount transferred from Shell Fish
Fund to Fish Hatchery Fund
January 1st, 1927, through De-
cember 31st, 1927, in accordance
with Section 9, Chapter 10123,
Acts of 1925 .................. 48,019.49
$55,546.16

EXPENDITURES

Construction and Operation of Six
Fish Hatcheries ............... $42,791.84
Balance in Fish Hatchery Fund
Fund December 31st, 1927....... 12,754.32
-- $55,546.16











Shell Fish Fund
RECEIPTS
January 1st, 1928, through December 31st, 1928.
FISH INDUSTRY
Fish Dealers' Licenses ........... $25,080.00
Fish Boat Licenses ............... 9,969.50
Alien Boat Licenses .............. 2,120.00
Alien Fishing Licenses.......... 2,920.00
Excess Net Tags ................ 274.00
Dredge Boat Licenses............ 25.00
Purse Seine Licenses ............ 275.00
$-- 40,663.50

OYSTER INDUSTRY
Oyster Dealers' Licenses........ $ 6,070.00
Canning Factcry Licenses........ 350.00
Alien Oystering Licenses......... 70.00
Lease, Rentals and Fees.......... 327.00
Oyster Tub Tags ................ 2.75
$ 6,819.75
TWO-CENT PRIVILEGE TAX
Two-Cent Planting Fund .......... $ 2,466.40
$ 2,466.40
THREE-CENT PRIVILEGE TAX
Three-Cent Privilege Tax (Credit
on Loan) .....................$ 3,253.10
$ 3,253.10
SPONGE INDUSTRY
Sponge Boat Licenses ............$ 392.70
$ 392.70

MISCELLANEOUS
Sale of Laurel Hill Fish Iatchery to
State Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission ................... $5,356.59











Refund of Ferriage paid by D. J. Owens
to V. D. W ells...................
Sale of 230 Gallons of Solar Oil to Cap-
tain Wing of Wihg Boat Line, March
11th, 1928 ......................
Sale Leads, Corks and Lines.........
Empty Barrels returned to Standard
Oil Company, Jacksonville, Fla.. ..
Redeposit Warrant No. 113667, J. D.
Points ............. ............
Sale Shrimp Trawls .................
Refund on Warrant No. 120522, J. B.
Ellis, Chief Engineer, as deposits
on lights and water used during
work on S. F. C. No. 10 while in Phil-
adelphia ........................
Sale of Fish caught during Experi-
mental Work at Fish Hatchery No. 4
Sale of Copper from S. F. C. 10......
Refund on Warrant No. 113705 for
$500.00 issued to Navy Department
during work on S. F. C. 10 while in
Philadelphia ....................
Sale of Confiscated Nets.............
Refund on Telegrams..............
Sale of Mullet and Roe caught during
Experimental Work at Fish Hatch-
ery No. 6........................
Sale of Lumber from Fish Hatchery
N o. 2 .........................
Sale of House at Hatchery No. 2....
Sale of Confiscated Fish.............
Extra Net Tax ....................
Sale of Oyster Lease No. 276, owned by
Geo. Matheny & Son to Louise W.
Cum m er .......................


1.50


16.35
52.84

5.00

3.54
50.00





10.89

19.60
5.00




135.19
10.00
2.43


34.47

200.00
300.00
74.62
.05


200.00


--- $6,478.07
Total receipts for year beginning January 1st,
1928, and ending December 31st, 1928. .....$ 60,073.52











Balance in Shell Fish Fund December 31st,
1927 .................................. 15,900.41
Balance in Two-Cent Planting Fund, December
31st, 1927 .............................. 4,402.13
Balance in Three-Cent Privilege Tax Fund,
December 31st, 1927 ...................... 8,093.24
Collections December, 1927, not entered until
January, 1928 ........................... 5,136.02

$ 93,605.32











SHELL FIBS FUND

EXPENDITURES

January 1st, 1928, through December 31st, 1928.

Office Supplies and Expense......$ 43.95
Telephone and Telegrams......... 119.79
Freight and Express .............. 215.97
Rent, Purchase and Operation Boats 955.90
Deputy Patrolman and Inspection
Service ...................... 1,486.21
Refund, Leases, Licenses and Miscel-
laneous Expenses .............. 34.50
Purchase of Car for use in Depart-
mental W ork ................. 1,100.00
Expenditures at Fish Iatchery
No. 1 ........................ 273,63
Expenditures at Fish Hatchery
No. 2 ......................... 1,363.39
Expenditures at Fish Iatchery
No. 4 ......................... 906.71
Expenditures at Fish Hatchery
N o. 5 ......................... 6,554.19
Expenditures at Fish Hatchery
No. 6 ......................... 696.10
Transferred from Shell Fish Fund
to Fish Iatchery Fund during
year 1928 .................... 37,463.16
Expenditures from Two-Cent Plant-
ing Fund ..................... 6,482.89
$57,696.39











Balance in Shell Fish Fund December 31st
1928 .................................. $14,999.34
Balance in Two-Cent Planting Fund, Decem-
ber 31st, 1928 ........................... 285.46
Balance in Three-Cent Sinking Fund, Decem-
ber 31st, 1928............................. 11,180.80
Collections December, 1928, included in dis-
tributions .............................. 9,443.33

$93,605.32
BUDGET APPROPRIATION

RECEIPTS

By appropriation July 1st, 1927, through June
30th, 1929 ................................ $98,640.00

EXPENDITURES

July 1st, 1927, Through December 31st, 1928.

Salary Commissioner ............$ 9,000.00
Salary Clerk-Bookkeeper ......... 2,999.96
Salary Secretary to Commissioner. .3,150.00
Salary (3) Patrolmen and Inspec-
tors .......................... 8,085.08
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and
Inspector .................... 2,700.00
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and
Inspector ..................... 2,698.00
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and
Inspector ..................... 2,587.70
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and
Inspector ..................... 2,698.59
Salary (1) Deputy Patrolman and
Inspector ..................... 2,700.00
Salary Chief Engineer ... ....... 3,600.00
Salary Cook ............ ....... 960.00
Salary Seaman ................. 1,350.00
Salary Seaman ................. 1,349.35
10-S. F.











Traveling Expenses Commissioner.. 1,567.65
Traveling Expenses Deputies...... 8,936.15
Postage ................ ...... 1,000.00
Printing, Stationery and other Ex-
penses ....................... 3,522.92
Rent, Purchase, Operation and Con-
tingent Expenses of Boats...... 17,435.56
Refund, Leases, Licenses, Legal and
Miscellaneous Expenses ........ 1,828.32
Balance absorbed by General Reve-
nue, July 31st, 1928 ............ 11.85
Balance in various Funds December
31st, 1928 ..................... 20,458.87
-$98,640.00

SPECIAL SHELL FISH COMMISSION PLANTING
FUND

RECEIPTS

Balance in Special Shell Fish Commission
Planting Fund January 1st, 1928 ............$ 804.98

EXPENDITURES

Replanting Public Oyster Reefs in
different parts of the State. .....$ 804.36
Balance in Fund December 31st, 1928 .62 $804.98

TWO-CENT PLANTING FUND

RECEIPTS

January 1st, 1927, through December 31st, 1928.

Balance in Two-Cent Planting Fund January
1st, 1927 ............................... $ 2,732.14
Collections January 1st, 1927, through Decem-
ber 31st, 1928 ............................ 4,036.21

$ 6,768.35











EXPENDITURES

Amount expended in replanting
Public Oyster Reefs in different
parts of the State January 1st,
1928, through December 31st, 1928.
(No expenditures during year
1927) ...................... $ 6,482.89
Balance in Fund Dec. 31st, 1928.. 285.46
$ 6,768.35

SPECIAL SHELL FISH FUND FOR COUNTIES

RECEIPTS

January 1st, 1928, through December 31st, 1928

Balance in Special Shell Fish Fund for Coun-
ties January 1st, 1928 ..................... $ 154.78
Collections January 1st, 1928, through Decem-
ber, 1928 ................................ 18.00

$172.78

EXPENDITURES

Total amount expended in Escambia,
Santa Rosa, Okaloosa and Walton
Counties in enforcing laws from
January 1st, 1928, through De-
cember 31st, 1928..............$ 88.87
Balance in Fund December 31st, 1928 83.91
$ 172.78










FISH HATCHERY FUND

RECEIPTS

January 1st, 1928, through December 31st, 1928.

Balance in Fish Hatchery Fund De-
cember 31st, 1927 .............. $12,754.32
Amount transferred from Shell Fish
Fund to Fish Hatchery Fund in
accordance with Section 9, Chap-
ter 10123, Acts of 1925 .......... 37,463.16
$50,217.48

EXPENDITURES

Construction and operation of Six
Fish Hatcheries ............... $44,897.47
Balance in Fish Hatchery Fund De-
cember 31st, 1928 .............. 5,320.01
$50,217.48

TRAVELING EXPENSES FISH HATCIIERY COIM-
MISSION

RECEIPTS

January 1st, 1927, through December 31st, 1928.
Balance in Traveling Expenses Fish Iatchery
Commission Fund January 1st, 1927 .........$ 846.96

EXPENDITURES

To amount expended for Traveling
Expenses Fish Hatchery Commis-
sion through December 31st, 1928,
in accordance with Section 10,
Chapter 10123, General Laws 1925 $ 74.59
Balance in Fund December 31st, 1928 772.37
$ 846.96


















































































ST. MARKS LIGHT, WHICH HAS BEEN A GUIDE TO THE FISH-
ING FLEET SINCE EIGHTEEN-THIRTY.


1