<%BANNER%>
Biennial report...of State Soil Conservation Board
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075937/00005
 Material Information
Title: Biennial report...of State Soil Conservation Board
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Soil Conservation Board
Publisher: The Board
Place of Publication: <Tallahassee> Fla
Creation Date: 1951
Publication Date: -1954
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Soil conservation districts -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Soil conservation -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -Jan.1,1953-Dec.31,1954.
General Note: Description based on: Jan.1,1943-Dec.31,1944; title from cover.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001474678
oclc - 10764572
notis - AGY6484
lccn - 2001229407
System ID: UF00075937:00005
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Biennial report

Full Text






Biennial Report


January 1, 1951 to December 31, 1952

of


State Soil Conservation Board




Florida Soil Conservation Districts










As of December 31, 1952





(See List of Districts on Pages 12, 13) V,
.'-. 1 \. _. .- ., : ,(-.. ,







s o December 31 1952 .
Soil Conservation Districts in Florida as of Decem-"' .' :


ber 31, 1952.

S II








FOREWORD

This biennial report covers the calendar years 1951 and
1952. The districts operate on a calendar-year basis. Activities
of Soil Conservation Districts of Florida are given for the State
Soil Conservation Board, according to the State Soil Conserva-
tion District Act, Chapter 582, Acts of 1939.
According to authority of the Act and action by the Board,
the Director of the Florida Agricultural Extension Service
serves as Administrator to the Board. Responsibility delegated
to the administrator includes that of assisting groups of people
in the State in organizing soil conservation districts and the
coordination of activities and operation after organization. All
actions are subject to review and approval by the State Soil
Conservation Board.
The Extension Soil Conservationist, a cooperative employee
of the Florida Agricultural Extension Service and State Soil
Conservation Board, is administratively responsible to the Di-
rector of the Florida Agricultural Extension Service.
The Extension Soil Conservationist heads up the educational
work in the district before organization, during organization
and after organization is completed. After landowners have
determined that a soil conservation district is desirable and
will contribute to the agricultural development of an affected
area, the State Soil Conservation Board authorizes the organ-
ization of the district. Then the County Agent assumes the
responsibility for educational work on a county level. All the
new districts have been organized on a county basis.
H. S. McLENDON,
Extension Soil Conservationist


STATE SOIL CONSERVATION BOARD
Frank M. Harris, Chairman, St. Petersburg
Hollis Rinehart, M;ami
George J. White, Sr., Mt. Dora
Eli H. Fink, Jacksonville
W. Glenn Miller, Monticello
George W. English, Jr., Ft. Lauderdale
Mrs. Jessie B. du Pont, Jacksonville
W. F. Powers, Secretary, Tallahassee
H. S. McLendon H. G. Clayton
Soil Conservationist, Administrator,
Florida Agricultural Extension State Soil Conservation Board
Service and Director of Extension










Biennial Report


State Soil Conservation Board

January 1, 1951 to December 31, 1952

The 54 soil conservation districts organized under the Soil
Conservation District Act, Chapter 582, Acts of 1939 cover
26,673,757 acres in 57 counties. Listed below are the new dis-
tricts organized during the period covered by this report and
the dates the charters were issued. There was a petition re-
S ceived requesting a district be organized to serve all lands lying
within the boundaries of St. Johns County. However, the land-
owners of the area, at a referendum, voted by a large majority
against the creation of the district.
District Date Charter Issued
Okeechobee January 11, 1951
Flagler February 3, 1952
Bay August 25, 1952
One of these new districts is located in Northwest Florida
along the Gulf coast, the other two are located in the peninsular
area of the State-one on the upper East Coast and the other
on the north border of Lake Okeechobee. One of the agricul-
tural problems in the area where each of these districts is
located is water control and management. A large portion of
the land in both Bay and Flagler Districts is now growing pine
trees. It is possible this will remain the most profitable crop
for that land. Even if this is true, some water control will
prove worthwhile. In the other new district pastures, livestock
raising and truck production are the principal agricultural oper-
ations. With pasture and truck crop production, irrigation is
being used to good advantage. Wherever irrigation is used, if
full benefit is received there is need for careful and accurate
engineering.
One of the important conservation needs in each of these
new districts, as well as in the older districts, is improved land-
use practices. The land needs to be used according to its capa-
bility. There is a constant need for more vegetable matter and
humus in all the sandy soils of Florida. This is best secured
by growing legume crops and turning them into the soil and
practicing a good rotation system.
3








Pasture Development
The outstanding conservation work on both the Gulf and
Atlantic coasts and in the southern peninsular part of the State
has been increased acreage devoted to pastures, pasture improve-
ment, water control and management, and irrigation. The
Agricultural Conservation Program of the Production and Mar-
keting Administration has provided financial aid to landowners
in carrying out pasture improvement and a wide variety of soil
building practices. Landowners who comply with the specifica-
tions and conditions of payments have been able to recover part
of the actual cash cost of establishing improved pastures, ap-
plication of lime and phosphate, seeding cover crops, planting
forest trees, building terraces and a number of other soil-build-
ing and soil-conservation practices.
Continued high prices of beef cattle and dairy products,
especially during 1951, encouraged landowners to undertake and
continue pasture improvement, including soil and water con-
servation. In a number of cases irrigation systems are being
installed to assist these improved pastures in giving more graz-
ing per acre over a longer period.

Fig. 1.-Pasture improvement, with the growing of winter legumes such
as the Hubam clover shown here, has been one of the notable soil conserva-
tion advances of recent years.


KR .' uf-uNN







There has been an increased acreage in clovers and summer
legumes in a number of these pastures. Legumes increase the
protein content of the forage and improve the fertility of the
soil by the addition of nitrogen and humus.

Work in Older Districts

The first districts organized in Florida were in the north-
western part of the State. Soil and water conservation work
is continuing in this area. In some of these districts a large
number of the farms have a conservation plan completed on
them. In this area, part of the land has a slope steep enough
to justify terraces. A number of terraces have been erected
and more are still being constructed. These terraces will assist
in stopping and preventing erosion. In this part of the State
there are a number of farms, with a large total acreage, which
have been in cultivated row crops continuously for a number
of years. This has brought about a depleted soil condition and
erosion. It has been necessary to take some fields out of row
crop production, at least for a period. Some of these eroded

Fig. 2.-Clovers growing with pasture grasses increase the protein content
of the forage and improve the fertility of the soil.
't .








fields have been put into permanent pastures, some others have
been planted to pine seedlings. On the fields left in cultivation
a system of crop rotation and full use of cover crops is recom-
mended to make use of soil building crops in the rotation. A
continuing effort is being made to get an increased acreage of
both summer and winter legumes on both crop land and where
permanent pasture is being or has been established. In most
districts there has been a very noticeable increase in corn yields
per acre as a result of using higher yielding varieties, more
fertilizer and growing legumes in connection with practicing a
better system of crop rotation.

Farm Forestry
In a number of the districts farm forestry is being given
special and increased attention. Several districts have purchased
tree planters, which they rent to their cooperators, to assist
them in getting more pine seedlings planted. General interest
in forestry is increasing and woodlots on many farms are being
managed better. A number of fields which were showing con-
siderable erosion have been planted to pine seedlings. The
county agent, the district Soil Conservation Service personnel,
and district boards of supervisors are giving this phase of con-
servation more attention each year. Along with the forestry
work goes wildlife management. On most farms of any size

Fig. 3.-Crimson clover grows well on common Bahia pasture in western
Florida, providing both forage and soil improvement.








there are some areas which will be best suited to wildlife man-
agement.
Citrus Work
In the citrus areas considerable soil and water conservation
work is being carried on with grove owners. A number of grove
owners are now also in the livestock business. These need good
improved pastures. Many cooperators of the districts are get-
ting conservation plans made, especially of their undeveloped
lands, before they decide where they will plant a new grove or
establish a pasture. This tends to avoid trying to establish a
grove or pasture on land not suited for that purpose. A number
of groves are being planted on the contour, where the slope of
land is steep. Where the grove is planted on the contour the
cooperator can get engineering assistance from the technicians
assigned to the local district. Growing legume cover crops in
groves is being encouraged, especially in young groves. Engi-
neering assistance has been furnished both grove and vegetable
cooperators for irrigation and drainage improvement.

Farm Planning
Conservation farm planning is being put into practice on
more cooperators' farms. These farmers are learning to treat
their land according to its needs and to use it according to its

Fig. 4.-These 1,200 16-year-old citrus trees were transplanted from
straight rows to the contour to avoid erosion. Hairy indigo provided a
fine summer cover.








capabilities. Farmers are learning that conservation means
proper use and care of land and that each field or acre should
be put to its best use and protected according to its needs before
complete soil and water conservation is secured. We have not
yet reached this in Florida districts. However, progress is being
made in that direction.
Results of soil and water conservation work can be noticed
in all organized districts, where work has begun. This work
is further along in the older districts. Some of the newer dis-
tricts in the southern part of the State show substantial im-
provement. Particularly is this true where engineering work
has been done for water control and heavy equipment has been
used to put rough and low land in condition to establish good
pastures. This work is enabling cattlemen to improve the type
of cattle they keep and to increase the number of cattle which
can be carried on a given acreage of pasture.

Farm Ponds
In a number of districts considerable interest has been shown
in farm ponds, and many have been constructed. Engineering
information and supervision of the construction work has been
furnished the cooperator in the completion of these farm ponds.
As more irrigation is being installed, a dependable source of
water is needed for this purpose. This has resulted in the con-
struction of a number of new farm ponds in the shade tobacco

Fig. 5.-The farm pond provides water for livestock and irrigation, as
well as a home for fish.







growing area of the State. Water from these farm ponds has
three uses on the farm-for irrigation, for recreation and pro-
duction of fish, and to furnish a good, lasting supply of water
for livestock.
The U. S. Soil Conservation Service enters into a cooperative
agreement of understanding with the Board of Supervisors in
each of the Soil Conservation Districts. This memorandum of
understanding enables the Soil Conservation Service to assign
soil and water conservation technicians to each district. These
technicians then work with the individual cooperators of the
districts. They help these cooperators in planning and carry-
ing out soil and water conservation and improved land-use prac-
tices. It also makes available to the cooperators of districts
the services of agricultural engineers and soil science men well
trained in their fields. At the,end of the period covered by this
report, December 31, 1952, there were 155 technicians working
with districts on this basis, 125 of whom were assigned to dis-
tricts and 30 to areas.
This technical assistance is administrated through the State
Office of U. S. Soil Conservation Service, Gainesville, Florida.
There are seven administrative areas in the State. Each area
is headed by a supervising officer who has charge of the tech-
nicians assigned to his area and the district within his area.
The Production and Marketing Administration, the Florida
Forest Service and the Florida Commission of Game and Fresh
Water Fish have rendered valuable service to a number of these
districts. Local organizations and groups, such as boards of
county commissioners, chambers of commerce, Farm Bureau,
civic clubs, schools and trade and professional organizations,
have cooperated with the districts in planning and carrying out
their programs. Especially is this true when a field tour is
being arranged. The Florida State Road Department, U. S.
Engineers and U. S. Geological Survey have cooperated by fur-
nishing needed essential information.
FARM AND RANCH CONSERVATION PLANS
Applications received this period, 4,417
Applications received to date, 22,223
Anpli-ations received this ner'od, acres. 2 450.723
Applications received to date, acres, 10,418,991
Plans prepared and signed this period, 3.291
Plans prepared and signed to date, 16,526
Plans prepared and signed this period, acres, 1,304,480
Plans prepared and signed to date, acres, 6,004,041
Active conservation plans to date 14,330
Active conservation plans to date, acres, 5,242.082
9









Combined treatment this period, acres, 262,104
Combined treatment to date, acres, 2,998,471


Initial and advanced
Initial and advanced
Initial and advanced
Initial and advanced


agreement this period, 1,707
agreement to date, 1,683
agreement this period, acres, 1,196,066
agreement to date, acres, 1,199,916


Plans being applied this period, 7,800
Plans being applied to date, 13,910

ACTIVITIES IN ORGANIZED SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS


Contour Farming-Acres
Planned this period, 28,758
Planned to date, 311,894
Applied this period, 33,141
Applied to date, 239,899

Cover Cropping-Acres
Planned this period, 145,942
Planned to date, 589,977
Applied this period, 148,028
Applied to date, 474,541

Stubble Mulching-Acres
Planned this period, 78,025
Planned to date, 498,385
Applied this period, 85,519
Applied to date, 411,467
Strip Cropping-Acres
Planned this period, 5,622
Planned to date, 22,862
Applied this period, 3,043
Applied to date, 12,987

Range Improvement-Acres
Planned this period, 155,589
Planned to date, 696,395
Applied this period, 70, 592
Applied to date, 354,261
Pasture Improvement-Acres
Planned this period, 531,120
Planned to date, 1,811,449
Applied this period, 368,122
Applied to date, 812,160

Seeding of Range-Acres
Planned this period, 3,916
Planned to date, 20,773
Applied this period, 1,536
Applied to date, 7,435
Seeding of Pasture-Acres
Planned this period, 511,184
Planned to date, 1,639,218
Applied this period, 318,339
Applied to date, 652,176

Wildlife Area Improvement-Acres
Planned this period, 6,421
Planned to date, 119,569


Applied this period, 4,427
Applied to date, 101,211
Woodland Management-Acres
Planned this period, 248,200
Planned to date, 1,355,678
Applied this period, 211,028
Applied to date, 1,144,798

Tree Planting-Acres
Planned this period, 18,647
Planned to date, 66,633
Applied this period, 13,229
Applied to date, 35,206
Farm and Ranch Ponds-Number
Planned this period, 419
Planned to date, 1,047
Applied this period, 326
Applied to date, 755
Terraces-Miles
Planned this period, 2597.0
Planned to date, 25343.0
Applied this period, 1268.7
Applied to date, 13935.2

Field Diversions-Miles
Planned this period, 145.9
Planned to date, 382.3
Applied this period, 107.7
Applied to date, 271.2

Farm Drainage-Acres
Planned this period, 348,114
Planned to date, 1,599,667
Applied this period, 203,725
Applied to date, 702,647

Closed Drains-Linear Feet
Planned this period, 183,700
Planned to date, 1,819,260
Applied this period, 200,570
Applied to date, 1,508,450

Open Drains-Miles
Planned this period, 6632.2
Planned to date, 14488.5
Applied this period, 4857.3
Applied to date, 10841.3








Irrigation Land Preparation-Acres
Planned this period, 64,565
Planned to date, 142,570
Applied this period, 38,601
Applied to date, 76,886

Improved Water Application-Acres
Planned this period, 72,206
Planned to date, 232,001
Applied this period, 42,645
Applied to date, 145,767
Field Windbreaks-Miles
Planned this period, 163.2
Planned to date, 296.6
Applied this period, 90.7
Applied to date, 152.6

Crop Rotation-Acres
Planned this period, 90,378
Planned to date, 689,270
Applied this period, 91,711
Applied to date, 607,740

Water Disposal Areas-Acres
Planned this period, 551
Planned to date, 7,759
Applied this period, 437
Applied to date, 3,501

Kudzu-Acres
Planned this period, 639
Planned to date, 21,867


Applied this period, 303
Applied to date, 9,214

Sericea-Acres
Planned this period, 1,380
Planned to date, 5,967
Applied this period, 544
Applied to date, 2,139

Permanent Grass-Acres
Planned this period, 3,834
Planned to date, 27,414
Applied this period, 3,806
Applied to date, 13,675

Woodland Protection-Acres
Planned this period, 413,404
Planned to date, 931,926
Applied this period, 341,854
Applied to date, 696,359

Fish Ponds-Number
Planned this period, 398
Planned to date, 1,244
Applied this period, 337
Applied to date, 839
Contour Citrus Groves-Acres
Planned this period, 77
Planned to date, 16,221
Applied this period, 31
Applied to date, 10,234







PROGRESS IN CONSERVATION SURVEYS AND FARM PLANNING FLORIDA DISTRICTS
January 1, 1951 to December 31, 1952
(Reported by State Office, U. S. Soil Conservation Service, Gainesville, Florida)


Name of Date
District Organized


Location
(County)


Acres in
District


Soil Conservation Survey


Conservation Farm Plans


This Per I I To Date
This Period I To Date I This Period I To Date


Acres


Acres


No. I


Acrpes


I No.
I Plans


No.
Acres


Alachua .................
Bay*
Bradford ..............
Brevard .................
Blackwater .........
Charlotte ................
Chipola River** ....

Choctawhatchee R.

Clay
Dixie
Flagler* ...............
Gadsden ................
Gilchrist ................
Glades
Gulf

Hamilton .............
Hardee ...................
Hendry ....................
Highlands ...........
H illsboro ................
Holmes Creek .......

Indian River ........
Jefferson ...............
Lafayette ................
Lake
Lee


4/5/44
8/25/52
3/13/50
2/5/45
3/17/42
4/5/44
5/24/40

3/21/40

10/6/49
7/23/47
2/3/52
6/20/41
8/7/45
7/17/47
11/13/43

8/7/46
6/16/44
5/29/44
2/5/42
7/8/46
1/7/38

1/29/45
7/25/40
9/20/48
9/21/44
7/10/47


Alachua
Bay
Bradford
Brevard
Santa Rosa
Charlotte
Jackson,
Calhoun &
Liberty
Walton &
W. Holmes
Clay
Dixie
Flagler
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Citrus &
Hcrnando
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Highlands
Hillsboro
E. Holmes &
N.W. Jackson
Indian River
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee


570,880
481,920
187,520
660,480
656,640
497,280


1,380,240

836,480
103,711
440,320
309,120
345,600
216,960
477,440

677,120
328,960
403,200
759,680
666,240
665,600

275,000
327,040
377,400
347,520
637,440
503,040


14,829
5,549
14,817
15,131
18,475
28,602


10,849

12,749
28,442
2,450
1,000
17,895
8,846
33,311

16,335
40,030
23,125
42,428
116,673
0

0
21,920
11,045
12,930
17,657
39,437


194,355
23,252
14,872
250,561
210,770
394,599


272,304

105,368
48,942
15,135
1,000
187,764
46,816
159,257

176,192
88,286
276,771
369,628
517,760
0

269,440
119,093
229,660
27,900
168,155
185,573


26,406
698
4,242
37,769
4,281
29,306


13,302

12,898
44,193
3,504

18,424
10,147
26,051

17,809
25,490
44,316
145,951
71,276
30,749

10,543
6,232
19,265
13,436
12,772
33.837


441
34
29
508
297
110

671

785
107
47

519
247
97

337
202
601
145
408
285

1,088
317
379
98
466
183


162,132
10,978
4,242
204,480
50,462
260,746


176,865

128,000
43,144
11,268

111,440
58,768
119,085

77,589
65,945
256,648
273,280
401,357
28,245

136,983
81,891
184,937
23,618
112,839
116,174


Ace No Pln Acre


I


..






PROGRESS IN CONSERVATION SURVEYS AND FARM PLANNING FLORIDA DISTRICTS (Continued)
January 1, 1951 to December 31, 1952
(Reported by State Office, U. S. Soil Conservation Service, Gainesville, Florida)


Name of Date
District I Organized


Levy
Madison .................
Manatee River ......
Marion ................
Martin ....................
Nassau ....................
Ochlockonee R .
Okeechobee* .........
Orange ..................
S Orange Hill ............
W Osceola* .................
Pasco
Peace River ..........
Perdido River .......
Pinellas ...............
Polk
Putnam ....................
St. Lucie* ............
Santa Fe ................
Sarasota .................
Seminole ..................
Sumter ...................
Suwannee River ....
Tupelo ..................
Union
Volusia .......... ........
Wakulla .................
Yellow River .........


9/29/47
6/26/41
5/15/45
12/13/41
5/6/50
5/5/50
7/17/40
1/11/51
7/23/45
4/3/40
1/11/51
4/8/46
4/27/44
3/20/40
11/15/43
2/19/45
1/22/45
9/21/50
12/14/42
7/14/47
11/7/47
2/16/43
3/4/42
2/3/45
3/12/48
6/19/43
7/3/50
6/20/41


Location
(County)



Levy
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Nassau
Leon
Okeechobee
Orange
Washington
Osceola
Pasco
DeSoto
Escambia
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Lucie
Columbia
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Gulf
Union
Volusia
Wakulla
Okaloosa


Soil Conservation Survey


Acres in
District This Period
Acres


705,920
460,160
448.640
1,034,880
357,760
416,000
457,600
499,200
586,240
382,080
848,000
480,640
414,720
365,880
168,960
1,191.040
513,920
376,320
503,040
328,960
205,440
359,040
442.880
356,480
153,600
713,600
392,960
376,960


62 673 751 1


25,282
6,635
0
37,220
76,459
26,365
14,785
45,320
14,890
19,712
5,150
20,603
9,765
4,692
0
27,741
28,520
1,365
17,741
0
22,247
14,809
10,230
5,355
8,928
28,910
9,700
26,629


1.063.578


To Date


Acres


69,820
167,070
0
243,787
76,459
26,365
311,928
45,333
180,404
111,500
30,342
198,197
352,092
137,964
177,080
277,940
139,768
1,365
197,894
81,028
56,391
264,633
184,028
29,820
34,692
275,596
18,610
159,400


I 8.202.959


Conservation Farm Plans


This Period


No. I


Acres


To Date


No.
Plans


27,040
16,513
24,472
18,569
52,057
19,781
63,224
36,040
22,194
19,640

18,551
37,654
14,627
12,621
28,152
39,777

58,791
14,460
23,098
16,536
18,119
939
9,785
11,546
15,668
13,071


3.252 1.295.822


16.526


* Newly organized district.
** Inclusion of additional territory 4/22/50 and 12/14/51.


NO.
Acres


65,627
114,355
155,939
134,350
52,057
19,781
220,805
36,040
138,554
90,531

67,024
450,127
82,782
64,874
176,219
109,934

165,608
48,019
28,709
112,807
105,307
8,686
28,407
256,876
15,668
89,839


5.940.041


|
I


: --


Acres No.


~ -----'------









FINANCIAL REPORT FOR FLORIDA SOIL CONSERVATION
DISTRICTS
January 1, 1951 to December 31, 1951


Districts



Alachua
Blackwater
Bradford
Brevard
Charlotte
Chipola River
Choctawhatchee River ............
Clay
Dixie
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Gulf
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Highlands
Hillsboro
Holmes Creek
Indian River
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Levy
Madison
Manatee River
Marion
Martin
Nassau
Ochlocknee River ...................
Orange
Orange Hill
Pasco
Peace River
Perdido River
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
Santa Fe
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee River
Tupelo
Union
Volusia
Wakulla'
Yellow River


TOTAL


Receipts
(Including
Balance
Brought
Forward)


$ 20,302.45
3,486.43
31.80
2,060.96
1,280.66
4,250.44
1,521.27
516.36
551.00
4,746.86
2,745.17
1,341.59
441.30
1,560.71
5,840.92
4,850.61
7,872.65
727.59
2,364.59
2,948.50
4,991.08
2,205.16
5,192.65
6,058.25
1,505.25
3,910.19
4,299.38
4,217.45
375.00
1,020.50
7,101.73
694.99
3,450.14
804.30
7,067.59
1,274.21
1,252.19
6,196.65
947.86
5,441.38
274.69
603.93
2,587.75
1,596.37
1,104.49
850.08
3,719.23
936.60
2,352.14


Expenditures I


$11,556.57
1,507.69
15.00
953.60
189.45
798.29
688.21
193.80
259.72
4,321.94
2,161.68
536.35
59.64
1,218.96
5,673.56
3,008.67
2,196.25
283.93
2,255.52
1,512.80
1,079.58
1,172.59
1,916.25
6,014.45
415.62
3,660.07
3,311.42
3,353.68
237.50
922.25
5,895.42
337.02
2,586.40
323.29
6,116,65
447.67
500.02
416.07
588.93
5,316.00
189.29
504.64
2,383.82
783.17
1,098.05
697.56
1,422.67
918.60
2,295.99


$151,473.09 $94,296.30


Balance
Carried
Forward


$ 8,745.88
1,978.74
16.80
1,107.36
1,091.21
3,452.15
833.06
322.56
291.37
424.92
573.39
805.24
381.66
341.75
167.36
1,841.94
5,676.40
443.66
109.07
1,435.70
3,911.50
1,032.57
3,276.40
43.80
1,089.63
250.12
987.96
863.77
137.50
97.55
1,206.31
357.97
863.74
481.01
950.94
826.54
752.17
5,780.58
358.93
125.38
85.40
99.29
203.93
613.20
6.44
152.52
2,296.56
18.00
56.15


$56,966.08








FINANCIAL REPORT FOR FLORIDA SOIL CONSERVATION
DISTRICTS
January 1, 1952 to December 31, 1952
Receipts I
(Including | Balance
Districts Balance Expenditures I Carried
Brought II Forward
Forward)

Alachua $ 27,537.28 $20,905.90 $ 6,631.38
Bay*
Blackwater 2,470.60 461.62 2,008.98
Bradford 574.75 138.78 435.97
Brevard 1,399.80 102.80 1,297.00
Charlotte 1,630.92 1,166.73 464.19
Chipola River 3,870.41 1,291.08 2,579.33
Choctawhatchee River ............ 2,830.66 2,056.97 773.69
Clay 410.31 389.20 21.11
Dixie 533.27 286.84 246.43
Flagler*
Gadsden 3,870.41 1,291.08 2,579.33
Gilchrist 1,789.89 1,097.62 682.27
Glades 2,947.72 2,851.26 96.46
Gulf 392.16 55.00 337.16
Hamilton 1,612.20 775.03 837.17
Hardee 3,993.77 3,879.95 113.82
Hendry 4,180.34 2,138.46 2,041.88
Highlands 8,138.80 3,149.81 4,988.99
Hillsboro 729.49 45.67 683.82
Holmes Creek 2,381.56 1,952.62 428.94
Indian River 1,879.70 733.27 1,146.43
Jefferson 4,087.69 865.06 3,222.63
Lafayette 1,209.95 799.45 410.50
Lake 5,367.25 654.93 4,712.32
Lee 7,209.02 4,223.51 2,985.51
Levy 1,642.13 512.52 1,129.61
Madison 3,132.26 2,831.32 300.94
Manatee River 1,545.21 114.69 1,430.52
Marion 935.33 87.66 847.67
Martin 597.50 187.35 410.15
Nassau 2,209.89 1,117.49 1,092.40
Ochlockonee River ................. 9,934.06 6,199.59 3,734.47
Okeechobee 251.00 82.81 168.19
Orange 432.57 215.72 216.85
Orange Hill 3,992.38 3,122.92 869.46
Osceola 243.85 0 243.85
Pasco 807.66 287.63 520.03
Peace River 4,728.28 3,903.33 824.95
Perdido River 2,127.29 167.50 1,959.79
Pinellas 1,143.67 68.18 1,075.49
Polk 5,787.58 254.04 5,533.54
Putnam 924.69 314.34 610.35
St. Lucie 80.00 0 80.00
Santa Fe 9,685.44 9,107.66 577.78
Sarasota 1,148.77 853.16 295.61
Seminole 1,335.33 508.53 826.80
Sumter 2,333.83 121.63 2,212.20
Suwannee River 1,583.24 900.43 682.81
Tupelo 1,953.47 1,552.93 400.54
Union 1,285.63 808.23 477.40
Volusia 1,399.80 102.80 1,297.00
Wakulla 1,577.06 1,456.92 120.14
Yellow River 1,119.88 715.33 404.55


$154,985.75 $86,907.35 1 $68,068.40


TOTAL
* Newly formed district.