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Biennial report...of State Soil Conservation Board
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075937/00003
 Material Information
Title: Biennial report...of State Soil Conservation Board
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Soil Conservation Board
Publisher: The Board
Place of Publication: <Tallahassee> Fla
Creation Date: 1947
Publication Date: -1954
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Soil conservation districts -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Soil conservation -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -Jan.1,1953-Dec.31,1954.
General Note: Description based on: Jan.1,1943-Dec.31,1944; title from cover.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001474678
oclc - 10764572
notis - AGY6484
lccn - 2001229407
System ID: UF00075937:00003
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Biennial report

Full Text


BIENNIAL REPORT

January 1, 1947 December 31, 1948
of

STATE SOIL CONSERVATION BOARD


FLORIDA SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS

H. S. MCLENDON H.G. CLAYTON
Soil Conservationist, Administrator,
Florida Agricultural Extension State Soil Conservation Board
Service and Director of Extension

















SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS
IN FLORIDA 65 1.506
As of December 31, 1948
(See List of Districts on Page 10) 0,
194 748







FOR WORD

This biennial report covers the calendar years 1947 and 1948, except
that the financial statement covers the fiscal period July 1, 1947, to June
30, 1949.
Activities of Soil Conservation Districts of Florida are given for the
State Soil Conservation Board, according to the State Soil Conservation
Districts Act, Chapter 582, Acts of 1939. New districts which have been
organized or shown in some of this work are just getting under way.
Therefore, no actual accomplishments are shown.
According to authority of the Act and action by the Board, the Director
of the Florida Agricultural Extension Service Serves as Administrator
to the Board. Responsibility delegated to the Administrator includes
that of assisting groups of people in the State in organizing soil conser-
vation districts and the coordination of activities and operation after
organization. All actions are subject to review and approval by the State
Soil Conservation Board.
The Extension Soil Conservationist, a cooperative employee of the
Florida Agricultural Extension Service and the U. S. Soil Conservation
Service, is administratively responsible to the Director of the Florida
Agricultural Extension Service. The Extension Soil Conservationist
heads up the educational work in the districts before organization, during
organization, and after initial organization is completed.
After landowners have determined that a soil conservation district
is desirable and will contribute to the agricultural development of an
affected area, the State Soil Conservation Board authorizes the organ-
ization of the district. Then the County Agent assumes the responsibility
for educational work on a county level. All the new districts have been
organized on a county boundary basis.

H. S. AlcLENDON,
Extension Soil Conservationist





State Soil Conservation Board

J. Thomas Gurney, Orlando, Chairman
N. B. Jordan, Quincy
Thomas W. Bryant, Lakeland
J. Henson Markham, Jacksonville
Hollis Rinehart, Miami
W. F. Powers, Tallahassee, Secretary







BIENNIAL REPORT

STATE SOIL CONSERVATION BOARD

January 1, 1947, to December 31, 1948

The 44 soil conservation districts organized under the
Soil Conservation Districts Act, Chapter 582, Acts of 1939,
cover 22,681,320 acres in 47 counties. Listed below are the
new districts organized during the period covered by this
report and the dates on which the charters were issued.
District Date Charter Issued

Hendry May 29, 1947
Sarasota July 14, 1947
Seminole July 16, 1947
Glades July 17, 1947
Lee September 26, 1947
Levy September 29, 1947
Union March 12, 1948
Lafayette September 7, 1948
Several of these districts are located in the lower penin-
sular area of the state. The major agricultural problem of this
area is water control and management. Other new districts are
located in the general farming area, where there are large
acreages of light sandy lands. Some of this land has been
continually planted to row crops over a period of years. One
of the outstanding conservation needs in this area is improved
land-use practices. Better rotation should be practiced. There
is a serious need for the growing of more summer and winter
legumes. Part of the land which has been grown to row crops
year after year needs to be converted to permanent pasture.
The U. S. Soil Conservation Service has entered into a
cooperative agreement of understanding with the Board of
Supervisors in each of the Soil Conservation Districts. This
agreement enables the Soil Conservation Service to assign
soil and water conservation technicians to each district. These
technicians then work with the individual cooperators of the
district. They help these cooperators in planning and carry-
ing out soil and water conservation and improved land-use
practices. At the end of the period covered by this report
(December 31, 1948) there were 117 technicians working with







districts on this basis, 88 of whom were assigned to districts
and 29 to work groups.
This technical assistance is administrated through the
State office of U. S. Soil Conservation Service located in
Gainesville. There are seven work group administrative units
located in the State. Each work group is headed by a supervis-
ing officer who has charge of the technicians assigned to a
district.
The Production and Marketing Administration, the Florida
Forest and Park Service and the Florida Commission of Game
and Fresh Water Fish have rendered valuable service to many
of these districts. Local groups and organizations, such as
boards of county commissioners, chambers of commerce, Farm





















Bureau, civic clubs, schools, and trade and professional or-
ganizations have cooperated with the districts in planning
and carrying out their programs. The Florida State Road De-
partment, U. S. Geological Survey, and U. S. Engineers have
cooperated by furnishing needed essential information.
In the southern peninsular area, and on both Gulf and At-
lantic coasts, the outstanding conservation work has involved
pasture improvement. The Agricultural Conservation Program
of the Production and Marketing Administration has been of
considerable help in carrying out this pasture improvement
work. Through their assistance landowners in the districts






who comply with the specifications and conditions of payments
have been able to recover a considerable part of the actual
cash cost of establishing in:proved pastures.
Continued high prices of beef cattle and dairy products
have encouraged landowners to undertake soil and water con-
servation programs, especially with pasture improvement.
Large quantities of lime and fertilizers have been used.
These cooperators are growing more and better grasses per
acre, as well as greatly increasing the acreage in pastures.
Good clover sods and a considerable acreage of summer leg-
umes have been established in a number of these pastures.
By the addition of legumes the protein content of the grazing
is increased and the fertility of the soil improved.
In the citrus area considerable conservation work is being
carried on with grove owners. A number of groves have been
planted on the contour by cooperators who received technical


assistance. Growing legume cover crops in citrus groves has
been encouraged. Engineering assistance has been furnished
both grove and vegetable cooperators for drainage and irriga-
tion improvements.






In Northwest Florida, where the first districts were organ-
ized, soil and water conservation work has continued. Part of
the area in some of these districts includes lands with con-
siderable slope. There are a number of fields where the slope
is steep enough to need terraces, to prevent or stop erosion,
which has already set in. This is the area where most of the
terraces have been erected in the districts. In this part of
the State there are large acreages of open land which has
been cultivated to row crops continually over a long period
of years. This has brought about a depleted soil condition,
as well as allowing soil erosion to get started. A system of
crop rotation has been worked out for this area which makes
use of soil-building crops in the rotation. Some fields have
been taken out of row crop production and put into permanent
pastures. An effort is being made to get both summer and
winter legumes established in a number of these pastures.
Part of this depleted acreage is being planted to pine trees.
Considerable effort is being made to get an increased acreage
in both summer and winter legumes on this land. In a number
of the districts there has been a noticeable increase in corn
yields as a result of growing legumes by the district cooper-
ators.
Farm forestry is being given special attention in a number
of the districts. Interest in forestry seems to be increasing and
wood lots on many farms are being managed better. A number
of fields which were showing considerable erosion have been
planted in pines. The County Agent, the personnel assigned
to the districts by Soil Conservation Service, and District
Boards of Supervisors are giving this phase of conservation
more attention each year.
Results of soil and water conservation work are noticed
in all the districts, especially in the older districts. However,
in some of the newer districts in the southern peninsular part
of the State, substantial improvement is seen where some
engineering work has first been done to help control surplus
water. Heavy equipment has been used to put rough land in
such condition that good pastures can be established. This
work is enabling cattlemen to improve the type of cattle they
keep and to increase the number of cattle that can be carried
per acre.
Conservation farm planning is being put into practice on
more cooperator farms. These farmers are learning to treat
their land according to its needs and use it according to its
capabilities. Farmers are learning that conservation n.eans
proper use and care of the land and that each field or acre







must be put to its best use and protected according to its
needs, before complete soil and water conservation is secured.
We have not yet reached this aim in Florida districts. However,
progress in that direction is being made.
Considerable interest has been shown in farm fish ponds
and a number have been constructed in districts throughout
the State. Since shade tobacco growers are beginning to put
in irrigation there has been a very active demand for farm fish
pond construction in the Gadsden District. These ponds are
being used as catch basins to conserve water for irrigation
and for producing fish.
The following statistics cover major accomplishments in
all districts.


Farm and Ranch Conservation Plans
Applications received this period, 5,815
Applications received to date, 12,983
Applications received this period, acres, 1,580,279
Applications received to date, acres, 5,886,716
Active applications to date 3,254
Active applications to date, acres, 2,032,995
Plans prepared and signed this period, 2,890
Plans prepared and signed to date, 9,573
Plans prepared and signed this period, acres, 907,176
Plans prepared and signed to date, acres, 3,244,059
Active conservation plans to date, 8,937
Active conservation plans to date, acres, 3,052,713
Combined treatment this period, acres, 549,676
Combined treatment to date, acres, 1,406,436

Activities in Organized Soil Conservation Districts


Contour Farming Acres
Planned this period, 45,346
Planned to date, 237,432
Applied this period, 38,690
Applied to date, 163,257
Cover Crops Acres
Planned this period, 114,495
Planned to date, 255,710
Applied this period, 101,783
Applied to date, 184,063
Crop Residue Management Acres
Planned this period, 119,947
Planned to date, 268,663
Applied this period, 95,935
Applied to date, 188,888

Strip Cropping Acres
Planned this period, 5,408
Planned to date, 20,537
Applied this period, 8,357
Applied to date, 13,712


Pasture Improvement Acres
Planned this period, 286,994
Planned to date, 931,581
Applied this period, 77,463
Applied to date, 225,762
Seeding of Range Acres
Planned this period, 1,986
Planned to date, 12,671
Applied this period, 3,027
Applied to date, 3,308
Seeding of Pasture Acres
Planned this period, 115,583
Planned to date, 720,398
Applied this period, 52,121
Applied to date, 153,486

Wild Life Area Improvement Acres
Planned this period, 76,811
Planned to date, 207,794
Applied this period, 70,011
Applied to date, 189,009








Range Improvement Acres
Planned this period, 97,173
Planned to date, 207,631
Applied this period, 69,661
Applied to date, 81,166
Tree Planting Acres
Planned this period, 13,095
Planned to date, 35,167
Applied this period, 4,077
Applied to date, 9,871
Farm and Ranch Ponds Number
Planned this period, 93
Planned to date, 361
Applied this period, 72
Applied to date, 197
Terraces Miles
Planned this period, 3,630
Planned to date, 22,044
Applied this period, 1,629
Applied to date, 9,977
Field Diversions Miles
Planned this period, 69
Planned to date, 115
Applied this period, 52
Applied to date, 94

Farm Drainage Acres
Planned this period, 214,775
Planned to date, 866,930
Applied this period, 148,164
Applied to date, 331,441
Closed Drains Linear Feet
Planned this period, 423,160
Planned to date, 426,020
Applied this period, 251,020
Applied to date, 251,020
Opened Drains Miles
Planned this period, 1,382
Planned to date, 2,572
Applied this period, 909
Applied to date, 1,057
Irrigation Land Preparation Acres
Planned this period, 15,881
Planned to date, 19,992
Applied this period, 13,510
Applied to date, 17,609
Improved Water Application Acres
Planned this period, 11,205
Planned to date, 100,152
Applied this period, 10,747
Applied to date, 45,891


Woodland Management Acres
Planned this period, 241,733
Planned to date, 805,688
Applied this period, 209,409
Applied to date, 584,556
Field Windbreaks Miles
Planned this period, 14
Planned to date, 28
Applied this period, 4
Applied to date, 4
Crop Rotations Acres
Planned this period, 99,733
Planned to date, 496,584
Applied this period, 105,071
Applied to date, 388,638
Water Disposal Areas Acres
Planned this period, 786
Planned to date, 6,147
Applied this period, 400
Applied to date, 2,581
Kudzn Acres
Planned this period, 1,952
Planned to date. 24,592
Applied this period, 635
Applied to date, 7,901

Sericea Acres
Planned this period, 1,963
Planned to date, 3,692
Applied this period, 265
Applied to date, 967
Alfalfa and Permanent Grass Acres
Planned this period, 5,409
Planned to date, 29,945
Applied this period, 5,181
Applied to date, 11,366
Firebreaks Miles
Planned this period, 1,246
Planned to date, 6,678
Applied this period, 1,067
Applied to date, 2,550
Fish Ponds Number
Planned this period, 113
Planned to date, 528
Applied this period, 78
Applied to date, 224


Soil Conservation, Other Surveys and Flood Control Acres
Farm planning A this period, 756,317
Farm planning A to date, 4,911,421
Farm planning B this period, 1,319
Farm planning B to date, 1,394,888
Reconnaissance this period, 185,709
Reconnaissance to date, 1,305,020










STATE FUNDS MADE AVAILABLE UNDER CHAPTER 23941 No. 327


(HOUSE BILL No. 304)

1st and 2nd Release Amount Balance
to Districts Organized Spent as
as of July 1, 1947, and and of
Name of District January 1, 1948 Obligated July 20, 1949

Alachua $ 2,579.37 2,579.37 S .00
Brevard 2,579.37 2,579.37 .00
Blackwater 2,579.37 2,579.37- .00
Charlotte 2,579.37 2,577.48 1.89
Chipola River 2.579.37 2,219.37 360.00
Choctawhatchee River 2,579.37 2,566.54 12.83
Dixie 1,190.47 1,185.50 4.97
Gadsden 2,579.37 2,579.37 .00
Gilchrist 2,579.37 2,579.37 .00
Glades 1,190.47 1,150.00 40.47
Gulf 2,579.37 2,577.00 2.37
Hamilton 2,579.37 2,545.00 34.37
Hardee 2,579.36 2,262.94 316.42
Hendry 2,579.37 2,569.37 10.00
Highlands 2,579.37 2,364.65 214.72
Iillsborough 2,579.37 2,450.00 129.37
Holmes Creek 2,579.37 2,579.00 .37
Indian River 2,579.37 1,885.89 693.48
Jefferson 2,579.36 2,579.36 .00
Lake 2,579.37 2,579.37 .00
Lee 1,190.47 1,190.47 .00
Levy 1,190.47 1,186.75 3.72
Madison 2,579.37 2,579.37 .00
Marion 2,579.37 2,510.35 69.02
Manatee River 2,579.37 2,579.37 .00
Ochlockonee River 2,579.37 2,499.37 80.00
Orange 2,579.37 2,460.58 118.79
Orange Hill 2,579.37 2,579.37 .00
Pasco 2,579.37 2,579.37 .00
Peace River 2,579.37 2,579.37 .00
Perdido River 2,579.35 2,569.45 9.90
Pinellas 2,579.36 2,099.45 479.91
Polk 2,579.36 2,579.36 .00
Putnam 2,579.36 2,579.36 .00
Santa Fe 2,579.36 2,574.36 5.00
Sarasota 1,190.47 1,094.75 95.72
Seminole 1,190.47 1,166.39 24.08
Sumter 2,579.36 2,579.36 .00
Suwannee River 2,579.36 2,450.26 129.10
Tupelo 2,579.36 2,555.50 23.86
Volusia 2,579.36 2,504.94 74.42
Yellow River 2,579.35 2,579.35 .00

TOTAL $100,000.00 $97,065.22 $2,934.78












PROGRESS IN CONSERVATION SURVEYS AND FARM PLANNING, FLORIDA DISTRICTS, January 1, 1947, to December 31, 1948.


(Reported by State Office, U. S. Soil Conservation Service, Gainesville, Florida)
Soil Conservation Surveys Conservation Farm Plans
Total Total
Date Location Acres in No. No.
Organized Name of District (County) District Acres Total Acres No. Acres Plans Acres


Perdido River
Blackwater
Yellow River
Choctawhatchee R.

Orange Hill

Holmes Creek

Chipola River

Tupelo
Gadsden
Ochlockonee R.
Jefferson
Madison
Suwannee River
Sante Fe
Hamilton
Alachua
Gilchrist
Putnam
Marion
Gulf

Sumter (J. Creek)
Pasco
Pinellas
Hillsboro
Volusia


Escambia
Santa Rosa
Okaloosa
Walton &
W. Holmes
Washington
& Bay
E. Holmes &
NW Jackson
Jackson &
Calhoun
Gulf
Gadsden
Leon
Jefferson
Madison
Suwannee
Columbia
Hamilton
Alachua
Gilchrist
Putnam
Marion
Citrus &
Hernando
Sumter
Pasco
Pinellas
Hillsboro
Volusia


365,880
656,640
376,960

836,480

951,240

275,000

754,000
356,480
345,600
457,600
377,400
460,160
442,880
503,040
328,960
570,880
216,960
513,920
1,100,160

677,120
312,960
480,640
168,960
665,600
713,600


6,526
5,320
8,294

15,002

3,427

0

23,720
300
17,775
40,930
17,185
13,441
31,828
20,818
10,894
22,680
390
44,700
34,510

16,120
79,790
61,072
0
185,809
58,783


127,085
172,745
494,530

201,122

300,151

269,440

735,335
20,525
143,716
238,688
591,047
144,980
153,229
154,383
19,566
146,730
23,930
111,000
179,614

140,577
233,913
146,212
177,088
233,893
299,857


4,724
2,565
8,521

10,821

18,631

14,014

33,640
2,844
8,905
34,883
45,256
15,433
19,025
17,310
7,854
20,691
4,258
23,865
7,308

5,707
22,623
21,878
8,078
21,522
79,026


3/20/40
3/17/42
6/30/41
3/21/40

4/3/40

4/3/40*

5/24/40

2/3/45
6/20/41
7/17/40
6/25/40
6/26/41
3/4/42
12/14/42
8/7/46
4/5/44
8/7/45
1/22/45
12/31/41
11/13/43

2/16/43
4/8/46
11/15/43
7/8/46
6/19/43


63,620
37,109
63,402

97,443

66,555

115,583

126,485
5,574
71,486
108,666
155,645
80,013
65,044
83,242
13,851
108,765
32,596
29,953
95,739

45,574
81,770
27,320
45,414
21,759
183,844


612

479

946

460
19
355
405
275
324
272
241
38
231
132
46
195

169
246
69
218
74
--~s1s




9/21/44 Lake Lake 637,440. 31,890 123,555 126 25,793 5 82,393
7/23/45 Orange Orange 586,240 83,099 111,039 125 89,013 155 99,206
2/5/45 Brevard Brevard 660,480 88,807 217,647 134 10,826 355 90,572
1/29/45 Indian River Indian River 327,040 17,721 57,839 103 39,209 194 51,739
2/19/45 Polk Polk 1,191,040 106,050 218,210 117 52,236 328 85,206
2/5/42 Highlands Highlands 666,240 96,642 597,257 58 38,537 297 276,956
6/16/44 Hardee Hardee 403,200 83,425 211,350 144 42,531 237 123,000
5/15/45 Manatee River Manatee 448,640 0 0 106 75,317 164 100,156
4/27/44 Peace River DeSoto 414,720 40,181 332,961 121 54,437 246 258,182
4/5/44 Charlotte Charlotte 497,280 28,780 295,060 2 22,874 57 208,823
5/29/44 Hendry Hendry 759,680 32,040 131,240 18 12,040 55 37,711
9/29/47 Levy Levy 705,920 8,760 8,760 5 480 5 480
6/26/47 Lee Lee 521,000 41,160 57,960 15 6,493 15 6,493
7/17/47 Glades Glades 477,440 12,640 17,920 0 0 0 0
7/23/47 Dixie Dixie 440,320 2,165 2,165 2 690 2 690
7/14/47 Sarasota Sarasota 328,960 2,903 2,903 0 0 0 0
3/12/48 Union Union 153,600 0 0 0 0 0 0
7/16/47 Seminole Seminole 205,440 0 0 0 0 0 0
9/7/48 Lafayette Lafayette 347,520 0 0 0 0 0 0

TOTAL 22,681,320 1,395,577 7,845,222 2,916 929,888 9,573 3,248,059

* Holmes Creek Soil Conservation District was operating in 1937.

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