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Biennial report...of State Soil Conservation Board
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075937/00001
 Material Information
Title: Biennial report...of State Soil Conservation Board
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Soil Conservation Board
Publisher: The Board
Place of Publication: <Tallahassee> Fla
Creation Date: 1943
Publication Date: -1954
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Soil conservation districts -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Soil conservation -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -Jan.1,1953-Dec.31,1954.
General Note: Description based on: Jan.1,1943-Dec.31,1944; title from cover.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001474678
oclc - 10764572
notis - AGY6484
lccn - 2001229407
System ID: UF00075937:00001
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Biennial report

Full Text
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BIENNIAL REPORT

January 1, 1943 December 31, 1944

of

STATE SOIL CONSERVATION BOARD




FLORIDA SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS


K. S. MCMULLEN
Soil Conservationist,
Florida Agricultural Extension
Service


A. P. SPENCER
Administrator,
State Soil Conservation Board,
and Director of Extension


SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS
IN FLORIDA
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1944
(See List of Districts on Page 9)





Territory covered by organized soil
conservation districts.
Territory in which organization of
soil conservation districts in
progress.

651.4506

F656b

S194/4A+







FOREWORD
This circular gives a biennial report covering the years 1943-
44 on the activities of soil conservation districts for the State
Soil Conservation Board, according to the State Soil Conservation
Districts Act, Chapter 582, Acts of 1939. Though the informa-
tion given emphasizes accomplishments during the period 1943-
44, it also reflects the activity status of districts from the date
of organization through 1944.
The Act is administered by the State Soil Conservation Board,
whose membership is the same persons as those constituting
the State Board of Control. According to authority of the Act
and action by the State Board, the Director of the Agricultural
Extension Service serves as Administrator to the Board. Re-
sponsibility delegated to the Administrator includes that of
assisting groups of people in the State in organizing soil con-
servation districts and the coordination of activities and opera-
tions after organization. All actions are subject to review and
approval by the State Soil Conservation Board.
The Extension Soil Conservationist is a cooperative employee
of the Florida Agricultural Extension Service and the U. S. Soil
Conservation Service, and is administratively responsible in a
dual capacity to the Director of the Extension Service, who is
also Administrator to the State Soil Conservation Board. The
Extension Conservationist heads up the educational work in dis-
tricts before organization, during organization and after initial
organization is completed.
The county agent in each county likewise assumes such re-
sponsibilities on a county level, when landowners have determined
that a soil conservation district is desirable and will contribute
to the agricultural development of the affected area. Practically
all districts are organized on a county basis, making it convenient
and logical that the county agent serve as secretary to the board
of supervisors.
K. S. MCMULLEN,
Extension Soil Conservationist



State Soil Conservation Board
H. P. Adair, Jacksonville, Chairman
Thomas W. Bryant, Lakeland
N. B. Jordan, Quincy
T. T. Scott, Live Oak
M. L. Mershon, Miami
J. T. Diamond, Tallahassee, Secretary









BIENNIAL REPORT
STATE SOIL CONSERVATION BOARD
January 1, 1943, to December 31, 1944
Soil conservation districts organized under the Soil Conserva-
tion Districts Act, Chapter 582, Acts of 1939, now number 25
and cover 13,208,938 acres in 28 counties. The first district
organized was Perdido River (Escambia County) March 20,
1940, and the last district organized (covered by this report),
is Lake (Lake County), September 21, 1944. Four districts-
Jumper Creek (Sumter County), Volusia (Volusia County), Gulf
(Citrus and Hernando counties), Pinellas (Pinellas County)-
were organized in 1943 and 6 districts-Charlotte (Charlotte
County), Alachua (Alachua County), Peace River (DeSoto
County), Hendry (Hendry County), Hardee (Hardee County),
Lake (Lake County)-were organized in 1944. At the end of
1944 there were 7 districts-Putnam, Indian River, Polk, Bre-
vard, Tupelo (Gulf County), Lee, Manatee, and an annexation
(part of Highlands County)-in the process of organization. All
other districts were organized during the years 1940, 1941 and
1942.
Soil conservation district supervisors visit cover-crop plots at the University
of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Gainesville.







The organization of districts began in western counties, grad-
ually moving through the central counties into the peninsular
section of the State. This geographical pattern has been a
natural incident. The assistance extended to farmers through
districts in their initial activation was primarily that of con-
trolling erosion, together with emphasis on cover crops, crop
rotations, perennial and
annual legumes, pastures,
Wildlife and farm fores-
try. As the program has
expanded to include as-
sistance on water control
and management, dis-
tricts have been estab-
lished in the southern
area of the State. Nine
of the ten districts or-
ganized in 1943 and 1944
and 6 of the 7 districts
in the process of organ-
ization at the end of 1944
are located in peninsular
Florida. The agricultural
problem number 1 of this
area is water control and
water management.
The Agricultural Ex-
tension Service has as-
sisted districts in an edu-
cational and organization
A water control canal between a series capacity. The application
of lakes to regulate the water level and
provide protection to crops against either of the Districts Act in
flooding or drouth. Water control gates organizing and coordinat-
will be installed. Volusia Soil Conservation
District. ing activities of districts
is administered by the
Director of the Extension Service, a responsibility so delegated
by the State Soil Conservation Board. The Extension Conserva-
tionist, a cooperative employee of the Extension Service and the
Soil Conservation Service, working under the direction of the
Extension Service, heads up the educational work in districts
during the period of organization as well as after initial organ-
ization is completed. On a county level, the County Agent as-







sumes this responsibility in his individual county and takes the
initiative in creating a district when landowners have determined
that such an organization is desirable. Practically all districts
are organized on a county basis and in every district except 1
the County Agent serves as Secretary to the Board of Super-
visors.
The U. S. Soil Conservation Service has entered into a co-
operative agreement with the governing bodies of 23 of the 25
existing districts. It is anticipated this cooperation will be
extended in the near future to the 2 additional districts now
organized and new districts as they may be organized. These
employees are soil and water conservation technicians who pro-
vide technical assistance to district cooperators in planning and
carrying out soil and water conservation and improved land-use
practices. The total number working with districts on this
basis as of December 31, 1944, was 96, of which 69 were assigned
to districts and 26 to work groups. This assistance is adminis-
tered through the State office of the Soil Conservation Service
located in Gainesville, Florida, with work group administrative
units located over the State, each being headed by a supervising
officer who has charge of several districts.
The Florida Commission of Game and Fresh Water Fish,

Blue lupine is fast becoming the most important winter cover crop to
add plant food and organic matter to soils of western and central Florida.
Around 12,000 acres were grown during the winter of 1944-45.

f :-.--: _* :
$ 2o _J U-...







Florida Forest and Park Service and the Agricultural Adjust-
ment Agency have rendered valuable assistance in wildlife, for-
estry and other conservation work. Local organizations, such
as boards of county commissioners, farm bureaus, chambers of
commerce, civic clubs, trade and professional organizations, and
schools have been very cooperative in the planning and carrying
out of district programs. The U. S. Geological Survey, Florida
Geological Survey and U. S. Engineers have likewise cooperated
to furnish needed and essential information.
The district approach to solving soil and water conservation
and land-use problems is entirely cooperative and voluntary, as
well as scientific and practical. Conservation surveys (soil
maps) are made as a basis of determining capabilities, manage-
ment and proper land use. Contour and topographic information
is likewise provided when water control and management are
involved. Based on this information and the type of farming
involved, detailed conservation farm plans are developed with
the landowner for the best use and conservation of the land.
Execution of such plans extend over a period of time consistent
with economical but progressive farming operations.
A tabulation of the activities in accomplishing soil and water
conservation and improved land-use by soil conservation dis-
tricts will be found on the following pages of this report.

A class of 4-H club boys learn the identification of grass and legume pasture
plants at the State 4-H Wildlife and Conservation Camp.








TABULATION OF ACTIVITIES FOR ALL DISTRICTS

1. Educational Activities
Educational Meetings-
1943 and 1944: 289-attendance 6,003
Total to date: 378-attendance 11,957


Field Tours-
1943 and 1944: 19-attendance
Total to date: 55-attendance
Field Demonstrations-
1943 and 1944: 71-attendance
Total to date: 152-attendance
Leader Training Meetings-
1944: 10-attendance
Total to date: 86-attendance
Group Planning Meetings-
1944: 10-attendance
Total to date: 58-attendance
Exhibits-
1944: 5
Total to date: 10
Radio Talks-
1943 and 1944: 0
Total to date: 10
News Articles-
1943 and 1944: 415
Total to date: 698


519
929

936
3,304

60
1,229

215
780


2. Conservation Practices
Crop Rotations-
1943 and 1944:

Total to date:

Strip-Cropping-
1943 and 1944:

Total to date:

Kudzu-
1943 and 1944:

Total to date:

Perennial Lespedeza-
1943 and 1944:

Total to date:

Perennial Grasses-
1944:

Total to date:


Planned 73,021 acres
Established 56,145 acres
Planned 171,968 acres
Established 97,836 acres


Planned 4,275 acres
Established 1,274 acres
Planned 9,049 acres
Established 3.709 acres


Planned
Established
Planned
Established

Planned
Established
Planned
Established

Planned
Established
Planned
Established


7,058 acres
2,759 acres
16,934 acres
5,237 acres

572 acres
287 acres
1,178 acres
467 acres

466 acres
198 acres
611 acres
223 acres








Terracing-
1943 and 1944: Planned 50,035 acres
Established 32,429 acres
Total to date: Planned 129,149 acres
Established 59,555 acres


Water Disposal Areas-
1943 and 1944: I

Total to date: I

Pasture Improvement-
1943 and 1944:

Total to date: I

Wildlife Areas-
1944:

Total to date: I

Farm Fish Ponds-
1944:
]
Total to date: I

Farm Drainage-
1943 and 1944: 1

Total to date:

Woodland Improvement-
1943 and 1944: 1

Total to date:

Tree Planting-
1943 and 1944:

Total to date:


Planned
Established
Planned
Established


1,224 acres
458 acres
3,413 acres
1,258 acres


Planned 57,497 acres
Established 12,294 acres
Planned 93,907 acres
Established 23,034 acres


Planned
Established
Planned
Established

Planned
Established
Planned
Established


700 acres
627 acres
1,100 acres
660 acres

32 ponds
4 ponds
32 ponds
4 ponds


Planned 31,007 acres
Established 15,063 acres
Planned 31,128 acres
Established 15,103 acres

Planned 92,346 acres
Established 77,368 acres
Planned 160,283 acres
Established 92,336 acres

Planned 4,453 acres
Established 1,023 acres
Planned 7,307 acres
Established 2,668 acres


Combined Treatment-
1944: Established 87,001 acres
Total to date: Established 225,004 acres

Financial Statement-
Balance January 1, 1944 $ 9,189.96
Receipts, 1944 34,787.97
Expenditures, 1944 27,774.00
Balance, December 31, 1944 16,210.34

NOTE: Statement reflects money realized from activities initiated and
projected by individual districts. Such money in each district is handled
by the Board of Supervisors.







SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS IN FLORIDA
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1944
(Numbers indicate order in which districts were organized. See map, p. 1)
1. Perdido River Soil Conservation District.
(Escambia County-Certificate of Organization issued 3-20-40)
2. Choctawhatchee River Soil Conservation District.
(All Walton and part Holmes Counties-Certificate of Organization
issued 3-21-40)
3. Orange Hill Soil Conservation District.
(Washington and Bay Counties-Certificate of Organization issued
4-3-40)
4. Holmes Creek Soil Conservation District.
(Parts of Holmes and Jackson Counties-Certificate of Organization
issued 4-3-40) (Began operations 1937 under Act of 1937)
5. Chipola River Soil Conservation District.
(Part Jackson and Calhoun Counties-Certificate of Organization is-
sued 5-24-40)
6. Ochlockonee River Soil Conservation District.
(Leon County-Certificate of Organization issued 7-17-40)
7. Jefferson Soil Conservation District.
(Jefferson County-Certificate of Organization issued 7-20-40)
8. Yellow River Soil Conservation District.
(Part Okaloosa County-Certificate of Organization issued 6-20-41)
9. Gadsden Soil Conservation District.
(Gadsden County-Certificate of Organization issued 6-20-41)
10. Madison Soil Conservation District.
(Madison County-Certificate of Organization issued 6-26-41)
11. Oklawaha Soil Conservation District.
(Marion County and Oxford area Sumter County-Certificate of Or-
ganization issued 12-13-41)
12. Istokpoga Soil Conservation District.
(Part Highlands County-Certificate of Organization 2-5-42)
13. Suwannee River Soil Conservation District.
(Suwannee County-Certificate of Organization 3-4-42)
14. Blackwater Soil Conservation District.
(Santa Rosa County-Certificate of Organization issued 3-17-42)
15. Santa Fe Soil Conservation District.
(Columbia County-Certificate of Organization 12-14-42)
16. Jumper Creek Soil Conservation District.
(All Sumter County not included in Ocklawaha District-Certificate
issued 2-16-43)
17. Volusia Soil Conservation District.
(Volusia County-Certificate of Organization issued 6-19-43)
18. Gulf Soil Conservation District.
(Citrus and Hernando Counties-Certificate of Organization issued
11-13-43)
19. Pinellas Soil Conservation District.
(Pinellas County-Certificate of Organization issued 11-15-43)

9




A








20. Charlotte Soil Conservation District.
(All of Charlotte County and two townships in Sarasota County-
Certificate of Organization issued March 20, 1944)
21. Alachua Soil Conservation District.
(All of Alachua County-Certificate of Organization issued March 20,
1944)
22. Peace River Soil Conservation District.
(DeSoto County-Certificate of Organization issued April 9, 1944)

23. Hendry Soil Conservation District.
(Part of Hendry County-Certificate of Organization issued May 15,
1944)

24. Hardee Soil Conservation District.
(All of Hardee County-Certificate of Organization issued May 15,
1944)
25. Lake Soil Conservation District.
(All of Lake County-Certificate of Organization issued September
21, 1944)
Counties where the organization of soil conservation districts is in
progress but not completed: Putnam, Indian River, Polk, Brevard, High-
lands (annexation), Gulf, Lee, Manatee.






























The crotalarias are increasing yields to help meet the feed shortage
throughout Florida. The use of crotalaria spectabiliss) on the field shown
has increased the yield of corn from 17 bushels to 35 bushels per acre.







ACTIVITIES OF SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS


Districts*


1. Perdido River ........
14. Blackwater .......
8. Yellow River ..........
2. Choctawhatchee R.
3. Orange Hill ............
4. Holmes Creek ........
5. Chipola River ........


Gadsden ..................
Ochlockonee River..
Jefferson ................
Madison ..........


9.
6.
). 7.
S10.


13. Suwannee River ....
15. Santa Fe ................
21. Alachua ................
11. Oklawaha ................
18. Gulf
16. Jumper Creek ........
19. Pinellas ....................
17. Istok)oga ................


12. Volusia ....................
25. Lake
24. Hardee ...............
22. Peace River ............
20. Charlotte ................
23. Hendry ..................
TOTALS ...............


Soil Conserva-
Total tion Surveys
Area in (Acres)
Dis- Total Total
tricts as of as of
(Acres) Feb. 29, Dec. 31,
1944 1944


365,880
656,640
376,960
836,480
951,240
275,000
1,099,880
345,600
457,600
377,400
460,160
442,880
503,040
570,880
1,100,160
677,120
312,960
168,960


327,2001


713,600
637,440


64,000
44,160
44,800
122,240
87,040
269,440
149.120


89,600
104,320
94,720
144,000
114,560
269,440
155,520


74,240 81,920
98,560 146,560
109,440 139,520
75,520 84,480
74,880 78,720
5,120 12,800
0 15,360
60,800 94,720
0 7,040
3,840 44,160
0 35,200


151,0401 168,3201
14,080 47,3601
0 0


22- 9,349
12- 2,226
44- 8,116
31- 7,262


Conservation Farm Plans
(Number-Acres)


1944


33- 5,379
30- 7,160
37- 6,708
31- 6,033


Total
1943
and
1944


55- 14,728
42- 9,386
81- 14,824
62- 13,295


Total
Since
Organiza-
tion


182-
42-
155-
258-


Soil Conserva-
tion Service
Employees as of
12/31/44


Dis-
tricts


40,609
9,386
30,997
52,059


Work
Groups




3


26- 2,7341 51- 6,772 77- 9,506 209- 26,864 5
62- 10,222 79- 9,040 141- 19,262 608- 81,297 8 3
63- 17,391 21- 4,213 84- 21,604 177- 60,688 8


42- 9,865
32- 5,289
21- 17,020
40- 8,722
31- 9,142
0


29-
24-
20-
33-
26-
12-


8,666
5,257
19,756
12,794
6,0221
5,0401


71- 18,531[
56- 10,5461
41- 36,776
73- 21,516
57- 15,164
12- 5,040


125- 30,719
119- 35,898
120- 71,065
113- 30,793
67- 18,315
12- 5,040


0 0 0 0
43- 13,478 35- 32,739 78- 46,217 93- 49,770
0 9- 1,8041 9- 1,804 9- 1,8041
4- 2,752 14- 12,678 18- 15,430 18- 15,430
0 9- 1,043 9- 1,043 9- 1,043
0 i 6- 15,3651 6- 15,3651 6- 15,3651


S12- 1,6741


403,200 0 0 0
414,720 0 96,00 0
497,280 0 0
236,658 0 0
113,208,93811,448,32012,024,320 173-123,5681511


12- 1.6741


12- 1.674


3
3
4
3
2
1
1
S 2
1
1
1
2
5


3


2

3

3

2


0 0 I 0 1 4
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 1 4
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0
-168,1431894-291,71112,334-578,8161 69 27


* Numbers indicate order in which districts were organized.


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.


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