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Biennial report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075936/00001
 Material Information
Title: Biennial report
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Soil and Water Conservation Board
Publisher: The Board
Place of Publication: <Tallahassee> Fla
Creation Date: 1967
Publication Date: 1968-
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Soil conservation -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Soil conservation districts -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Soil and Water Conservation Board.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Jan.1,1967-Dec.31,1968-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002689295
oclc - 46604064
notis - ANF6613
lccn - 2001229409
System ID: UF00075936:00001
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Preceded by: Biennial report

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UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA
LIBRARIES











FLORIDA STATE
SOIL AND WATER
CONSERVATION BOARD


JAN. 1,


1967 DEC. 31, 1968


BIENNIAL REPORT


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THE IMPACT OF ONE RAINDROP


IMPACT FOR DESTRUCTION


IM PACT FOR CONSERVATION









Deceased Julv 11 1969


W. c. DUKIUUrI
Vice Chairman


J. D. WOOTEN, JR.


TO THE GOVERNOR


To the Governor, the State Board of Conservation and the People of Florida:
It is my honor, on behalf of the State Soil and Water Conservation Board, to present this biennial
report of the Board.
Created by the Legislature in 1937 our Board was established to give the State of Florida di-
rection and control of Florida's Soil and Water Conservation District program. Initially this was largely
an erosion control program because of the necessity and demands at that time.
The control of raindrop water washing soil away and of high wind blowing it away are still
basic important functions of our Districts. However, with our urban and rural development, floods
become more of a problem, soil surveys are more urgently needed and our broadening program
requires more and more assistance.
There is no adequate way of measuring the benefits accruing to the State through this program.
However, look at our countryside today there is beauty there-look at the ribbons of green paralleling
our ribbons of concrete and asphalt. From our beginning we have played a large part in making all
this possible.
Our conservation program in Florida's Soil and Water Conservation Districts is a continuing day
to day task. Changing economic conditions, new developments and advancing technology require con-
stant vigilance to protect the basic natural resources of Florida and to achieve the utilization of each
acre of land for its highest capability.
The State Soil and Water Conservation Board pledges its fullest cooperation with all State and
local agencies in this never ending and ever wider-spreading job and we solicit yours.
In our brief review undoubtedly we have made many omissions. Additional data on any specific
project or information on any phase of our Soil and Water District program will be gladly furnished
on request.

Sincerely yours,



.d / "
//7 s /y^- ^-^-^


W. E. BURQUEST
Vice Chairman


E. E. CARTER
Chairman


L. C. DICKMAN














) YEARS OF ACCOMPLISHMENT





The principal responsibility of the State Soil and Water Conservation Board is the voice of the State to
encourage soil and water conservation practices by all people who own and use the land for whatever
purpose. The more than 26,200 farmers, ranchers and growers cooperating with Florida's 60 Soil and
Water Conservation Districts and the rural beauty of Florida attests to the success of this program.
The monumental accomplishment of the Florida State Road Department in lining all road shoulders with
Pensacola Bahia grass makes Florida's highways stand out among all States. This program was initiated
with consultive advice from the technical arm of the Districts program-USDA's Soil Conservation Service.
The deep-rooted erosion controlling grass was spread throughout Florida through the Districts program.
Soil surveys made by the Soil Conservation Service have been in great and increasing demand during the
biennium.
With financial assistance from County Commissions, surveys for Pinellas County and Lake County have been
completed. The final field review was held for Pinellas County on February 21-25, 1968 during the bien-
nium and in Lake County on December 18-29, 1968. Lake County had a fine ceremony to celebrate com-
pletion of the survey.
During the biennium, 1,337,312 acres have been mapped. To date, 10,454,254 acres of Florida's land has
been surveyed.
Soil scientists employed by the Soil Conservation Service have been in great demand. It has been
necessary to concentrate their efforts in areas where the demand is the greatest.
Soil survey interpretations for non-farm uses have been in demand during the biennium, far beyond the
capability of the Soil Conservation Service to supply. Areas of rapid expansion in growth have been the
most active. During the biennium special reports for interpretations of non-agricultural uses of soils have
been made for Duval, Palm Beach, Manatee, Osceola, Pinellas, Lake and Charlotte Counties and the Avon
Park Bombing Range. In addition, interpretations for non-farm uses of soils have been furnished to all
Districts in Florida.
All Soil and Water Conservation Districts in Florida have stepped up their youth programs knowing that
this is the best way to build conservation for the future.
The Bay Soil and Water Conservation District took a statewide commanding lead in this direction by spon-
soring the first Youth Conservation Fair in June, 1968. This event was the brainchild of "Mr. Bay Soil and
Water Conservationist" Joe T. Saunders. Joe has for years vigorously promoted all phases of conservation
among the young people of the county.
Among the products of this effort was Miss Linda Voss who was named National Youth Conservationist of
the year in 1967 in a nation-wide contest sponsored by the National Wildlife Federation. Pretty Miss Voss
brought honor and glory to Florida through this effort.















.. . . .TEAMWORK




Undoubtedly greater strides-giant strides have been made in local cooperation between District Super-
visors and County Commissioners than ever before.
In our rapidly expanding economy and the mounting pressures and demands upon counties and their
elected commissioners, the Soil and Water Conservation District is filling a unique role. A role never im-
agined when Districts were first created by an Act of the Florida Legislature.
County planning people, more evident today than ever before-and needed-are seeking information about
soils and land use that only Districts can furnish.
The Florida Forestry Service has readily and willingly entered into memorandums of understanding with
Districts that guarantee assistance in fire control, furnishing trees for planting, and guidance in the man-
agement of farm forests.
The Florida Agricultural Extension Service and its County Agent system, has given close cooperation in
furnishing all kinds of valuable assistance. In many counties the Agents act as secretaries to the Board of
Supervisors.
On the Federal side of the picture, USDA's Soil Conservation Service is the central provider of technical as-
sistance to Districts. This assistance is made possible with individual District memorandums of understand-
ing with the SCS and the United States Department of Agriculture, with the approval of the State Soil and
Water Conservation Board. Such technical assistance includes: Soil Survey's; assistance in engineering-
including water control, irrigation and drainage; Agronomy introduction and spread of soil conserving
grasses and legumes; Forestry-including furnishing trees for planting and woodland management; Wild-
life-including pond management, aquatic weed control and upland game management for Quail, Wild
Turkeys, Doves and Deer; and Income Producing Outdoor Recreation-site selection and design of facilities.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service furnishes Large Mouth Black Bass, Bluegill Bream and Channel Catfish
for stocking farm ponds. District Cooperators enjoy a high priority with this Service in pond stocking.
Fish are delivered by the Service from the hatchery at Welaka, Florida and to west Florida from Marion,
Alabama.
USDA's Farmers Home Administration has given invaluable financial assistance to Districts, particularly
in the areas of Small Watershed Development and in community and individual outdoor recreational de-
velopments.
USDA's Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service has also assisted financially in the establishment
of permanent soil and water conservation practices.
In Teamwork, special appreciation is whole-heartedly given to the Florida Bankers Association, the Florida
Farm Bureau, local civic clubs, banks, merchants, farm machinery dealers, Garden Clubs & Women's Clubs,
Sportsmens Associations, local Chambers of Commerce, newspapers and radio and T.V. Stations.
Grateful acknowledgement is made to USDA's Soil Conservation Service for all pictures used in this
publication.




























THE NEW CONSERVATION


In the biennium we have already begun Conservation for the 70's. Demands by Florida's people and our
changing times have made us well aware of the new and complex problems that our Soil and Water
Conservation Districts can help answer.
Metropolitan Florida is moving into rural Florida. Our urban cities are expanding into the countryside.
These complex problems involve the well being of hundreds of thousands of families. Normally,
unfortunately, these families are not concerned with soil and water conservation. They do not realize
as the farmers, ranchers, and growers do that these resources must be cared for and protected. So then
these problems, like a pebble cast into a pond, become ever-widening circles of community, city and county
areas of responsibility.
While Districts were not basically organized with these problems in mind today they are not shirking their
responsibility for the care of our soil and water resources.
District Supervisors who are locally elected, non-salaried, landowners give freely of their time in directing
all the available technical help-Local, State and Federal to assist people and their authorized governments
at any level.
Supervisors know well that how the land is used affects all interrelated resources of timber, game, fish,
wildlife and outdoor recreation.
However, in terms of our Florida land a very large share is still being and will continue to be used for
growing citrus, trees, cattle, and vegetables. Soil and Water Conservation then is basic to the well being
of our agriculture, of our communities, towns and yes-all metropolitan complexes.
Therefore to a very large degree the future quality of our Florida environment will be determined with how
we use-or abuse-our countryside.
Most people in our cities do not realize that this, our Florida countryside, is 82% privately owned.








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SMALL WATERSHED PROTECTION
AND FLOOD PREVENTION
PUBLIC LAW 566

The State Soil and Water Conservation Board has the
responsibility of establishing priority for all Small Water-
shed applications submitted to them under the authority
of U. S. Public Law 566.
With limited federal funds available your Board has
based its judgment on its knowledge of need in each
locality where local people have presented a need for
assistance.








STATUS OF PL-566 WATERSHED APPLICATIONS FLORIDA


Authorized for Operations (Construction)
1. East Chain of Lakes (Completed)
2. Fisheating Creek Marsh (Completed)
3. Pine Barren Creek (Completed)
4. N. St. Lucie River D. D. (Completed)
5. Sebastian River D. D. (In Construction)
6. Taylor Creek (In Construction)
7. Upper Josephine-Jackson Creek (In Construction)
8. Sarasota West Coast (In Construction)
9. South Sumter (In Construction)
10. Upper Tampa Bay (In Construction)
11. Istokpoga Marsh (In Construction)
12. Jumper Creek
13. Mills Creek (Surveys for 1st Const.-Complete)
14. Big Slough (Complete)
15. Ft. Pierce Farms D. D. (In Construction)
16. Palatlakaha River (In Construction)


Authorized for Planning
17. PondCreek (Work Plan Complete)
18. Wetappo Creek
19. California Lake (Work Plan Completed)
20. Joshua Creek
21. Brooker Creek
22. S. Florida Conservancy District
23. Loxahatchee Sub-Drainage District


-State Priority-Preliminary Investigations
24. Little Manatee River
25. Lower Alafia River
26. Pemberton Creek
27. Big Alligator Lake-Rose Creek
28. North Polk
29. Coldwater Creek
30. West Seminole
31. Lake Placid West Chain of Lakes
32. Telogia Creek
33. Lake Worth-Acme Drainage District
34. Turkey Creek
35. Prairie Creek


Applications Awaiting Priority
36. Cherry Lake
37. Thompson Branch
38. Water Oak Creek
39. Cracker Branch
40. Hurrah Creek
41. LaFayette Alford Basin
42. Lake Munson Basin
43. N. E. Holmes Creek


N. W. Holmes Creek
S. E. Holmes Creek
S. W. Holmes Creek
Carter Creek
Mayo-Calf Creek-Alton Lake
Upper Waccasassa River
Ritta Drainage District


County
Highlands
Highlands
Escambia
St. Lucie
Indian River
Okeechobee
Highlands
Sarasota
Sumter
Hillsborough
Highlands
Sumter
Nassau
Manatee-Sarasota-DeSoto
St. Lucie
Lake & Polk


Santa Rosa
Gulf
Dixie
DeSoto
Hillsborough & Pinellas
Palm Beach & Hendry
Palm Beach



Hillsborough & Manatee
Hillsborough
Hillsborough
Columbia
Polk
Santa Rosa (Escambia, Ala.)
Jackson
Highlands
Gadsden & Liberty
Palm Beach
Hillsborough
DeSoto-Highlands-Glades-Charlotte



Madison
Hardee
Bradford & Clay
St. Johns
Hillsborough & Polk
Leon
Leon
Jackson & Washington
(Houston County, Ala.)
Holmes (Houston Co., Ala.)
Washington
Washington & Holmes
Highlands
Lafayette
Levy & Gilchrist
Palm Beach


Acres
12,500
51,200
61,600
60,220
33,930
89,500
32,700
154,680
54,700
65,720
26,200
53,000
39,700
121,400
29,300
140,400

1,026,750

164,000
100,000
129,000
89,200
23,680
35,000
6,496

547,376

135,000
48,000
36,000
61,000
100,000
174,000
40,000
40,000
154,200
82,000
64,000
156,500

1,090,700

86,320
4,240
20,000
11,500
166,400
54,000
64,000
79,350

25,750
122,100
58,950
26,832
35,000
85,160
7,683

847,285














SOME ACCOMPLISHMENTS BY SOIL AND WATER
CONSERVATION DISTRICT IN FLORIDA AS OF JULY 1, 1968
District Cooperators (No.) Approx. 25,612 (Acreage) Approx. 12,000,000
CONSERVATION PRACTICES
Total
Cropland F.Y. 67 F.Y. 68 Accumulative
Conservation, cropping system (acres) 39,683 43,130 1,837,746
Cover cropping (acres) 48,418 66,518 2,381,150
Contour farming (acres) 7,664 5,943 397,889
Stripcropping systems (acres) 4,087 ................ 60,202

Grassland
Pasture Improvement (acres) 7,382 11,942 1,391,736
Pasture Planting (acres) 73,415 76,434 2,757,678
Proper range use (acres) 134,850 116,484 2,243,423

Woodland
Tree planting (acres) 34,557 31,459 935,030
Woodland improvement (acres) 2,360 3,073 116,658
Woodland protection (acres) 4,814 1,867 2,408,218

Wildlife
Fish pond treatment (no.) 1,298 1,253 9,253
Wildlife area treatment (acres) 26,652 15,572 656,253
Wildlife Wetland Preservation (acres) 4,188 2,586 84,313

Water Control
Diversion construction (miles) 1.8 3.0 152.2
Grassed waterways (acres) 177 256 6,009
Erosion control structures (no.) 8,268 5,543 69,419
Tile drains (miles) 78.3 76.6 1,549.7

Miscellaneous
Pond construction (no.) 315 425 4,881
Terracing (miles) 172.2 294.5 827.6
Irrigations reservoirs (no.) 26 42 5,969
Sprinkler irrigation system (no.) 83 81 3,731
Drainage Main & Laterals (miles) 379.0 294.2 943.7
Irrigation Pipeline (miles) 2.8 275.8 1,683.9






SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS, ACREAGE NUMBER OF COOPERATORS AND ACREAGE
December 31, 1968


Name of
District
Alachua
Baker
Bay
Blackwater
Bradford
Brevard
Charlotte
Chipola R.
Choctawhatchee R.
Clay
Dixie
Duval
Flagler
Franklin
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Gulf
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes Creek
Indian River
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Levy
Madison
Manatee River
Marion
Martin
Nassau
Ochlockonee R.
Okeechobee
Orange
Orange Hill
Osceola
Palm Beach-
Broward
Pasco
Peace River
Perdido River
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Santa Fe
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee River
Taylor
Tupelo
Union
Volusia
Wakulla
Yellow River


Date
Organized
(Charter)
4- 5-44
3-23-53
8-25-52
3-17-42
3-13-50
2- 5-45
4- 6-44
5-24-40
3-21-40
10- 5-49
7-23-47
7-10-53
2- 3-52
1-27-53
6-20-41
8- 7-45
7-17-47
11-13-43
8- 7-46
6-16-44
5-29-44
2- 5-42
8- 5-46
1- 7-38
1-29-45
7-25-40
9-20-48
4-21-44
7-10-47
9-29-47
6-26-41
5-15-45
12-31-41
5- 6-50
5- 5-50
7-17-40
1-11-51
7-23-45
4- 3-40
10- 9-50
6- 4-64

4- 9-46
4-27-44
3-20-40
11-15-43
2-19-45
1-22-45
9-14-55
9-21-50
12-14-42
7-14-47
11-7-47
2-16-43
3- 4-42
12-15-55
2- 3-45
3-12-48
6-19-43
7- 3-50
6-20-41


Location
(County)


Location
(County)


Acres in
District


No. of
District
Cooperators


Acreage


Alachua
Baker
Bay
Santa Rosa
Bradford
Brevard
Charlotte
Jackson, Calhoun & Liberty
Walton & W. Holmes
Clay
Dixie
Duval
Flagler
Franklin
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Citrus & Hernando
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Highlands
Hillsborough
E. Holmes & N.W. Jackson
Indian River
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Levy
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Nassau
Leon
Okeechobee
Orange
Washington
Osceola
Palm Beach-Broward

Pasco
De Soto
Escambia
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Columbia
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Gulf
Union
Volusia
Wakulla
Okaloosa


570,880
374,400
481,920
655,360
187,520
660,480
497,280
1,379,240
821,000
382,720
440,320
497,280
309,120
348,160
325,120
216,960
477,440
677,120
328,960
403,200
759,680
666,240
665,600
275,000
327,040
382,720
347,520
637,440
503,040
705,920
449,280
448,640
1,034,880
357,760
416,000
438,400
499,200
586,240
382,080
848,000
1,328,420

480,640
414,720
420,500
168,960
1,191,040
513,920
357,860
376,320
503,040
328,960
205,440
359,040
433,280
660,480
356,480
153,600
713,600
392,960
513,536
30,636,956


664
112
206
733
347
370
147
1,295
792
391
89
337
185
16
631
330
148
387
433
764
223
610
1,070
657
512
527
324
716
348
388
676
669
560
190
278
568
205
609
773
292
388

301
383
591
233
783
447
217
418
384
322
375
537
699
35
51
147
606
135
581
26,205


206,462
99,634
155,816
132,581
102,324
171,968
253,719
602,909
285,439
226,566
392,008
201,706
219,252
30,107
164,792
89,623
277,716
235,971
138,096
276,657
504,903
472,656
223,753
113,669
73,959
196,506
301,290
149,481
126,785
161,873
181,570
292,924
237,564
212,117
111,857
233,764
398,401
181,094
118,590
595,541
269,667

115,431
273,507
98,252
33,044
334,909
179,350
92,278
277,062
207,740
168,788
58,812
224,951
169,995
17,445
98,412
52,337
351,357
36,818
134,064
12,345,862




































CABBAGE SEEPAGE IRRIGATION


BEANS SUNFLOWER WINDBREAKS


Our Winter Vegetable Basket for the nation requires water and water control.
Our fertile muck requires wind control. Conservation measures are a daily
necessity.

SWEETCORN SEEPAGE IRRIGATION







WATER
CONTROL
p



























,TILE
IRRIGATION














SEEPAGE
IRRIGATION










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THE RESULTS



The demand for citrus land far exceeds the supply of
good land. Conservation-soil and water management
methods are a necessity and have been for years. Soil
and Water Conservation Districts have provided technical
help.



















Florida's fantastic continuous
production of pulpwood, naval
stores and timber is helped by
the technical assistance provided
by the Florida Forestry Service
and the Soil Conservation Serv-
ice. Districts by their day to day
local assistance in all forestry
problems give needed help to
local farmers, professional fores-
ters and industrial forests.


Tree roots must have air and soil
space to help trees grow.


Planted pines protect the soil
and insure timber products for
the future.


































THE SOIL SURVEY


Our remaining cropland is of vital im-
portance to all of our people.












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Desirable native grasses and legumes are a vital forage resource on 2,700 Florida ranches. Tech-
nical assistance to these landowners through Soil Conservation Districts recognizes conservation
treatment for a balanced forage and wildlife program.


30 percent or 10 million acres of Florida is
used for range and grazeable woodlands by
cattlemen. Wildlife and recreation are of equal
value and a recognized additional income.


Conservation treatment is applied to 250,000
acres annually by District Cooperators. Bush
control for palmetto is needed on 7 million
acres. Grazing management is needed on 9
million acres.












































Outdoor, Income Producing, tax-paying recreation has provided city people with relaxed countryside
atmosphere and enjoyment at nominal cost. It has provided country people who pay the taxes with
additional income.
All people in the cities like to escape the noise, the air pollution and just TOO many people.





















































Florida's Wildlife and its enjoy-
ment whether for aesthetic rea-
sons or for sport-fishing and
hunting can be enjoyed with
technical assistance provided by
Florida's Soil and Water Conser-
vation Districts.






































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THE GOODYEAR CONTEST
Annually the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company presents an Award to the Soil and Water C6nservation
District that has done the best local job in its assistance to local people in this bootstrap operation.
In 1967, this Award went to the newly organized but highly productive, Palm Beach-Broward Soil
and Water Conservation District. In 1968, the Award went to the Chipola River Soil and Water Con-
servation District. Your Board assists in the selection of the winner.

ANNUAL SPEAKING CONTEST
The Florida Association of Soil and Water Conservation District Supervisors annually sponsors in the
High Schools of our State, a Public Speaking Contest. The subject of this contest is related to the use
of our land and water resources. In 1968, 75 High Schools participated in this contest with 334 of our most
talented young people. In 1967 young Paul Strickler of Alachua won the State Contest. In 1968, it was
Curtis Clyatt from Levy County who won the Award. Your State Board assists the FACD in this Annual Award.

SOIL STEWARDSHIP WEEK
The National Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts annually sponsors the recognition of
Soil Stewardship Week. A week devoted throughout our land to the recognition of the fact that man
is the Steward of our Soil and Water resources.
Since its inception, every Governor of Florida has proclaimed by public announcement that this week
be observed by all of the citizens of Florida. In 1968, 467 churches, both country and city, partici-
pated in this annual observance.

LAND JUDGING CONTEST
This annual contest sponsored jointly by the Florida Agricultural Extension Service, the Florida Future
Farmers of America, The FACD, Channel 13 Tampa, Florida Agriculture Research Institute and your
Board has had a high degree of participation and enthusiasm by local 4-H Clubs and FFA Chapters.
In 1967 in the 4-H Division the Alachua County Team won the State Championship; also the FFA Team
from Alachua County. Both teams repeated their winning ways in 1968. Here something must be said
probably for the presence in Alachua County of the University of Florida.




U. OF F. LIBRARY











U, OF F. LIBRARY