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Biennial Report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075935/00005
 Material Information
Title: Biennial Report
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Soil Conservation Board
Publisher: The Board
Place of Publication: <Tallahassee> Fla
Creation Date: 1965
Publication Date: 1956-1966
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Soil conservation -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Soil conservation districts -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: State Soil Conservation Board.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Jan.1,1955-Dec.31,1956-Jan.1,1965-Dec.31,1966.
General Note: At head of title: Conservation of Florida's soil and water through Soil Conservationa Districts.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002689294
oclc - 46604019
notis - ANF6612
lccn - 2001229408
System ID: UF00075935:00005
 Related Items
Preceded by: Biennial report ...of State Soil Conservation Board
Succeeded by: Biennial report

Full Text







SOIL
AND WATER
CONSERVATION
THROUGH FLORIDA'S
DISTRICTS
1965-66







& DPS. OFAGRICULtURE
NATIn"~ l AfDI'CFIP TIItmIItI ,:
DEC 21969
CIf""l "V "" l ^ ..






BIENNIAL REPORT
January 1, 1965-December 31, 1966


STATE SOIL CONSERVATION BOARD
MARCH 1967























THE CHALLENGE?


TO TREAT AND PROTECT FLORIDA'S SOIL AND WATER RESOURCES FOR

MAXIMUM USE AND PRODUCTION TO MEET OUR NEEDS NOW AND TOMORROW




OUR INCREASING POPULATION WILL MAKE GREATER DEMANDS ON OUR RESOURCES

FOR
LAND -----------------------WATER FOOD

WOODLANDS FIBRE ----- SHELTER


RECREATION FACILITIES







... r .... m n III I-Sant -",-
L x -I A ii







APPLIED SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION PRACTICES


Gives protection for continual use for production of needed food, feed & fibre.

Increases production per acre, reducing the cost per unit.

Developes small watersheds to supply necessary water for agriculture, municipali-
ties, industry and recreation. This will also reduce many of our flood and
drought hazards.

Aids in the development of needed private outdoor recreation enterprises.

Provides for the best overall use of resources.


1--oOD TOM0,9)
oEPVNDS 1VO t4
l SOIL TQLDAP


ONE FARM WORKER IN THE UNITED STATES
PRODUCED FOR 37 PERSONS (1965)


SHOPPING GUIDE
EXPENDITURES IOR FOOD (1964)
Ghana 58.7%
Japan 42.1
Canada 21.5
U.S. 19.8







STATE SOIL CONSERVATION BOARD


Seated left to right: W.E. Burquest, Sarasota, Vice-Chairman;
E.E. Carter, Vero Beach, Chairman; Lyle C. Dickman, Ruskin;
J.D. Wooten, Jr., De Funiak Springs; standing,L.M. Hollingsworth,
Gainesville, Administrator and Thomas T. Ford of Bryceville.
Picture courtesy Jim Floyd, Florida Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission.

To the Citizens of Florida:

This is your report on soil and water conservation program in Florida as
carried out by the Board and Soil and Water Conservation Districts. It covers
the period January 1, 1965 to December 31, 1966.

The State Soil Conservation Board is proud of the progress that has been
made and appreciate the leadership and direction of Soil and Water Conservation
District Boards of Supervisors. Special recognition is given to representatives
of local, county, state and federal-agencies and organizations for their
assistance in this work. Thanks goes to 25,455 District Cooperators who have
carried out the conservation practices and demonstrated their values.

As you read this report, determine your stake in the conservation of soil
and water resources, for: food, fibre, shelter and recreation facilities. We
solicit your cooperation on this subject in making Florida a better and more
prcperous place in which to live, work and enjoy.

L.M. Hollingsworth
Administrator

Acknowledgements

To the SCD Boards of Supervisors for providing Annual Reports for the
tabulation.

To the S.C.S. for data on applied conservation practices, watersheds and
most pictures.









BIENNIAL REPORT
State Soil Conservation Board
January 1, 1965 to December 31,1966


The State Soil Conservation Board
is the Agency established to administer
the Soil Conservation Act of 1937 as an
integral part of the Soil Conservation
District organization. It offers such
assistance as may be appropriate to the
supervisors of soil conservation districts
in the carrying out of their powers and
programs.

The Board operates in conjunction
with the Florida Board of Conservation and
has received excellent cooperation and
assistance from Randolph Hodges, Director,
and his staff during the period of this
report.

Members of the Board are appointed
by the Governor on staggered basis for
term of four years. Members appointed
during the period of this report were:
Thomas T. Ford, Bryceville; Lyle C.
Dickman, Ruskin; and E.E. Carter of
Vero Beach. Other members serving
included W.E. Burquest, Sarasota; Nat
H. Hunter, Ft. Myers; and J.D. Wooten,
Jr., of DeFuniak Springs. Board member
Wn. Bradley Munroe died May 8, 1965 and
J.D. Wooten, Jr. was appointed as re-
placement.

The Board has been delegated certain
State functions under the Watershed Pro-
tection and Flood Prevention Act (Public
Law 566, 83rd Congress as Amended), which
are: To receive and act on applications;
recommend priority for planning to the
Soil Conservation Service; and to review
the completed work plan for watersheds
and accept or reject for the state.

Thirteen (13) meetings of the Board
were held in carrying out their duties
and responsibilities. These were held
at Tallahassee, Tampa, Gainesville,
Sarasota and Jacksonville.


The office of the Board has been
maintained in Gainesville under the
direction of Administrator, with one
stenographer and one clerk-bookkeeper.

The Florida Board of Conservation
secured appropriation through the 1965
Legislature for $156,00 to reimburse
the Soil Conservation Service for
services of Watershed Planning Party.
As result of this the work on water-
sheds has been executed and provided a
much needed service. Complete status
on watershed work in the state is
included in the last portion of this
report.

MAJOR ACTIVITIES AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS
OF THE BOARD

Watershed Applications Received and
Processed Under Public Law 566


Name


County(s)


Joshua Creek
Telogia Creek

S.Fla.Conservancy
District
Lake Jackson Basin
Lafayette Alford
Basin
Lake Munson Basin
N.E. Holmes Creek

N.W. Holmes Creek

S.E. Holmes Creek
S.W. Holmes.Creek

Carter Creek
Mayo-Calf Creek-
Alton Lake


DeSoto
Liberty-
Gadsden
Palm Beach-
Broward
Leon
Leon

Leon
Jackson-
Washington
Holmes-
Houston (Ala.)
Washington
Washington-
Holmes
Highlands
Lafayette


Total


Acres


89,200
154,200

35,000

33,000
,oo000

64,000
79,350

25,750

122,100
58,950

26,832
35,000


777,382









Eighteen watersheds were visited
and evaluated with assistance of Soil
Conservation Service.

Priority for planning was
recommended for 20 watersheds: Work
plans for Big Slough and Ft. Pierce
Farm Drainage District Watersheds
were approved.

The biennial election of super-
visors was held October 12, 1965.
This involved the processing of 227
nominating petitions, preparation of
58 legal notices, arranging for 172
polling places with managers, mimeo-
graphing 8,235 ballots, checking,
certifying and notifying 168 elected
persons. An increase of 27% voter
participation was secured over that
obtained in the 1963 election.

Clay Soil and Water Conserva-
tion District led all districts in
the state with 363 voters participa-
ting. Other district receiving top
records in the number of votes were:
St. Lucie, Lake, Volusia, Manatee
River, Sumter, Lee, Alachua, Yellow
River, Blackwater River, Martin and
Chipola River.

Three special supervisors
elections were held, namely in:
Union, Lake and Palm Beach-Broward
Districts.

Eight area supervisor workshops
were conducted. Main subjects pre-
sented included duties and responsi-
bilities of supervisors, district
program, annual work plan and re-
lated activities. Each supervisor
was furnished with pocket folder
containing helpful information on
the various phases of conservation
program.

Assisted district boards of
supervisors in carrying out their
duties and programs. This was
accomplished by the Administrator
through attending meetings of
boards, personal visits, letters,


furnishing information, materials and
publications.

"State Soil Conservation Board
Highlights" have been prepared and mail-
ed periodically (Approximately bi-
monthly) to all supervisors.

Co-sponsored State Land Judging
Contest and presented participation
certificates to 93 teams (4-H and FFA
Chapters) and 361 contestants.

Presented Recognition Certificates
to 12 supervisors for completing 20
years of service and 9 for 15 years.

The Board was represented at State,
Southeastern and National Annual meetings
of Districts. Sponsored meeting of State
Soil and Water Conservation Boards,
Committees or Commissions and Executive
Secretaries for 13 Southern states at
Clearwater, September 12-14th, 1965.
Also attended the National Watershed
Congress held at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Prepared and published the follow-
ing: Brochure "Small Watershed Develop-
ment in Florida January 1965., 5,000
copies, similar one for January 1966,
5,000 copies; Brochure, "Why, What and
How of Soil and Water Conservation Districts
in Florida", October 1965, 5,000 copies;
A Guide for Soil and Water Conservation
District Supervisors, November 1965;
Soil and Water Conservation Through'
Florida Districts, Biennial Report,
January 1, 1963 to December 31, 1964,
4,000 copies and amendments to Soil
Conservation Act, June 25, 1965, 600
copies.

Provided office assistance in typing
and mimeographing special and annual
reports for District Boards of Supervisors.

The Administrator contacted repre-
sentatives of state and federal agencies,
organizations, groups and individuals
working with districts and discussed
progress and problems of the program.
The Boards and Supervisors of districts
have received the best of cooperation











from these in carrying out of the
district program of conservation
and for this we are most grateful.

Jointly the Board and Florida
Association of Soil and Water Conserva-
tion District Supervisors sponsored
the making of "Inventory of Private
Outdoor Recreation Businesses" with-
in all districts in the state. The
forms for this inventory were
furnished by the National Associa-
tion of Districts, Recreation and
Wildlife Committee. District Boards
of Supervisors with assistance of
assigned Soil Conservation Service
personnel took the lead in securing
information and help from other
representatives of county, state
and federal agencies. The Florida
Recreational Planning Committee
supplied County maps for locating
the enterprises and made summary of
the inventory. Personnel of Florida
Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
were most helpful in assisting
Districts with this inventory. See
summary page 16 ,

The Board assisted with "Inventory
of Services and Facilities for the
Development of Farm Forestry" in
Districts. The inventory was made
with the approval of District Boards
of Supervisors and the form was
completed by personnel of Soil
Conservation Service, Florida
Forest Service and forest industry.

Perdido River Soil and Water
Conservation District added approxi-
mately 21,927 acres to the district
in 1965. The Board processed the
petition, held public hearing, con-
ducted the referendum and assisted
the supervisors with this activity.

A number of colleges in Florida
have included in their curriculum
courses or special work shops on
the subject of resource use educa-
tion during summer terms. The
enrollment in these has been pre-
dominately teachers. A pocket
folder containing materials on the


conservation program in Florida was
prepared by the Boards' Administrator
and furnished for each individual
enrolled.


The State Association of
were aided in the development
and activities for the state.
were assisted in the carrying
these.


Districts
of program
Districts
out of


State Appropriation 1965-67 (Biennial)


Salaries (3 positions

Expenses


$35,307

14,515


Operating Capital Outlay 325


Total


21 SUPERVISORS
SERVICE TO


20 Years -












15 Years -


$50, 17


RECOGNIZED FOR 375 YEARS
DISTRICTS.


I.B. Lewis Blackwater
T.J. Fletcher Suwannee River
Ralph Taylor Gilchrist
E.E. Carter Indian River
Roy Blair Hamilton
Joe E. Howell Hamilton
J.E. Mitchel Hamilton
Lyle C. Dickman Hillsborough
Henry C. Carlton Hillsborough
L.A. Delp Jefferson
D.E. Cannon Pasco
Grady Baggett Yellow River

L.E. Bradley Ochlockonee River
J.D. Wooten, Jr. Choctawhatchee R.
Wendall Click Glades
W. Donald Conkling Lake
Brock Cantrell Okeechobee
C.C. Partin Osceola
E.E. Hollingsworth Santa Fe
J.W. Gaston Suwannee River
E.E. O'Rielly Volusia











Florida's Soil and Water Conservation Districts
1937-1966


YEAR ORGANIZED NO. DISTRICTS
1938--1942 15
1943- 1948 :;; 29
1949-1953 llll 13
1954-1966 3


DISTRICT OFFICE ---






TABLE I


SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS, ACREAGE, NUMBER OF COOPERATORS AND ACREAGE


Date
Organized
(Charter)


December 31, 1966

Location Acres in
(County) District


No. of
District
Coonerators


Acreage


Alachua
Baker
Bay
Blackwater
Bradford
Brevard
Charlotte
Chipola R.

Choctawhatchee R.
Clay
Dixie
Duval
Flagler
Franklin
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Gulf
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes Creek

Indian River
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Levy
Madison
Manatee River
Marion
Martin
Nassau
Ochlockonee R.
Okeechobee
Orange
Orange Hill
Osceola
Palm Beach-
Broward
Pasco
Peace River
Perdido River
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Santa Fe
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee River
Taylor
Tupelo
Union
Volusia
Wakulla
Yellow River


4-5-44
3-23-53
8-25-52
3-17-42
3-13-50
2-5-45
4-6-44
5-24-40

3-21-40
10-5-49
7-23-47
7-10-53
2-3-52
1-27-53
6-20-41
8-7-45
7-17-47
11-13-43
8-7-46
6-16-44
5-29-44
2-5-42
8-5-h6
1-7-38

1-29-45
7-25-40
9-20-48
4-21-44h
7-10-47
9-29-47
6-26-41
5-15-45
12-31-41
5-6-50
5-5-50
7-17-4o
1-11-51
7-23-45
4-3-40
10-9-50
6-4-64

4-9-46
4-27-44
3-20-40
11-15-43
2-19-45
1-22-45
9-14-55
9-21-50
12-14-42
7-14-47
11-7-47
2-16-43
3-4-42
12-15-55
2-3-45
3-12-48
6-19-43
7-3-50
6-20-41


Alachua
Baker
Bay
Santa Rosa
Bradford
Brevard
Charlotte
Jackson, Calhoun
& Liberty
Walton & W. Holmes
Clay
Dixie
Duval
Flagler
Franklin
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Citrus & Hernando
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Highlands
Hillsborough
E. Holmes &
N.W. Jackson
Indian River
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Levy
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Nassau
Leon
Okeechobee
Orange
Washington
Osceola
Palm Beach-
Broward
Pasco
De Soto
Escambia
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Columbia
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Gulf
Union
Volusia
Wakulla
Okalmsa


Name of
District


570,880
374,400
481,920
655,360
187,520
660,480
497,280
1,378,240

821,000
382,720
440,320
497,280
309,120
348,160
325,120
216,960
477,440
677,120
328,960
403,200
759,680
666,240
665,600
275,000

327,040
382,720
347,520
637,440
503,040
705,920
449,280
448,640
1,034,880
357,760
416,000
438,400
499,200
586,240
382,080
848,000
1,328,420

480,640
414,720
420,500
168,960
1,191,040
513,920
357,860
376,320
503,040
328,960
205, 440
359,0140
433,280
660,480
356,480
153,600
713,600
392,960
513,536
30,636,956


$23
115
193
694
336
309
160
1,270

811
359
86
330
193
15
658
320
145
321
424
786
201
533
1,128
657

546
511
273
766
356
428
645
574
508
161
310
609
173
558
738
260
242

231
377
137
319
715
428
204
333
466
287
384
511
588
0
54
188
579
132
582
2l*,9l6


230,662
100,143
127,135
106,917
103,125
157,779
254,834
531,570

260,821
218,603
391,840
200,988
169,257
31,437
167,384
85,998
254,963
233,492
177,812
292,997
524,495
405,428
23, 601
115,666

105,195
202,923
285,537
152,075
151,807
154,921
191,299
266,748
228,784
196,256
119,720
226,785
367,687
171,077
112,914
596,436
186,760

106,354
314,858
14,369
34,820
335,240
168,251
90,152
263,861
226,644
179,156
61,750
222,714
149,086
0
99,157
51,463
231,645
36,343
157,691
11,838,435




TABLE II


SOME ACCOMPLISHMENTS BY SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION
IN FLORIDA AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1966 1/


DISTRICTS


Number Acres
District Cooperators 25,5 11,942,736

Soil Survey Completed 14,719,876


CONSERVATION PRACTICES


Cropland

Conservation, cropping system (acres)
Cover cropping (acres)
Contour farming (acres)
Stripcropping systems (acres)


Grassland

Pasture improvement (acres)
Pasture planting (acres)
Proper range use (acres)

Woodland

Tree planting (acres)
Woodland improvement (acres)
Woodland protection (acres)


Wildlife

Fish pond treatment (no.)
Wildlife area treatment (acres)
Wildlife Wetland Preservation (acres)

Water Control

Diversion construction (miles)
Grassed waterways (acres)
Erosion control structures (no.)
Tile drains (miles)

Miscellaneous

Pond construction (no.)
Terracing (miles)
Irrigations reservoirs (no.)
Sprinkler irrigation system (no.)
Drainage Main & Laterals (miles)
Irrigation Pipeline (miles)

1/ Table I and II
Soil Conservation Service
Gainesville, Florida


7-1-64
to
6-30-66


263,524
273,931
44,973
1,797


51,348
229,705
597,074


88,569
5,468
8,870


1,431
115,769
20, 452


8.3
470

156.7


463
305.1
91
308
141.7
779


Total
Accumulated


1,771,806
2,287,888
386,604
56,115



1,374,665
1,641,819
2,014,076


875,893
111,424
1,405,032


7,083
636,1,67
79,169


148.9
5,654
56,477
1,,451



4,318
451.6
5,911
3,596
442.7
1,469






* AN WAT CONSEVAT *DSRCS


The 60 organized soil and water
conservation districts in the state
covers most of 64 counties. All are
active with the exception of Taylor
District. Periods of their organiza-
tion indicated on map page
8 Each district is
directed by five (5) elected super-
visors, who serve without pay. A
"District Program and Plan of Work"
for the conservation of soil and
water resources in the district
has been developed by the Board of
Supervisors. This is used as a
guide in the farm planning and
application of practices on coopera-
tors lands. The ultimate goal being
a complete soil and water conserva-
tion plan applied on every farm,
ranch, grove and watershed in the
district.

District Programs and Plans of
Work are reviewed at least annually
to determine if changes are needed.
This procedure has resulted in a
number of revisions being made in
District Programs and activities.

Providing technical assistance
to landowners on problems of soil and
water conservation is one important
function of the District Board of
Supervisors. This assistance is
obtained through signed Memorandum
of Understanding with U.S.D.A.,
State and County agencies. The
Soil Conservation Service #USDA)
assigns one or more technicians to
each district for on-the-farm study
and development of basic conservation
plan and practices. The recommenda-
tions of "District Program" is used
as guide for this work.

Special problems in forestry,
game and fish management requiring
professional help is available
through the district by signed
agreements. This assistance on
forestry is given by theFlorida
Forest Servicef and on game and
fish management by the Florida Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commission.


The Florida Forest Service assisted
District Boards of Supervisors in making
inventory of "Services and Facilities
for the Development of Farm Forestry."
This information has been most useful
to supervisors and others concerned with
the development of farm forestry program.
A state summary of the inventory was made
and copies made to all persons interest-
ed in this subject.

In consideration of the interest
in private recreation businesses,
districts made an inventory of existing
outdoor recreation businesses. This
was made with assistance from: Florida
Association of Districts, National
Association of Districts (supplied the
forms), State Soil Conservation Board,
Florida Outdoor Recreation Planning
Committee (tabulated, furnished county
maps and made summary), Florida Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commission
(Located businesses and assisted in
securing information), Soil Conservation
Service, Florida Extension Service and
local interested citizens.

Districts and their cooperators
have been assisted by staff members of
Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission in: game management, fish
management, furnishing foundation stock
for farm ponds and in securing materials
for wildlife food plantings. This agency
in cooperation with the U.S. Department
of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service
helped in stocking 1431 farm ponds.

The Florida Agricultural Extension
Service has County Agricultural Agents
stationed within each district and assist
in carrying out conservation education.
The agents have given special assistance
with the Land Judging and Speaking con-
tests sponsored by the Districts and
Florida Association Soil and Water Con-
servation District Supervisors. In 47
districts they serve as Secretary to the
Board.

The Agricultural Conservation
Program (ACP), administered by local
farmer elected Agricultural Stabilization







and Conservation County Committees,
helpsDistrict Boards of Supervisors
carry out their District Program of
Work. Cost-sharing assistance is
offered for performing approved soil,
water, woodland and wildlife conser-
vation practices. District supervi-
sors work in an advisory capacity
with County ACP Development Groups
in formulating county ACP programs.

The Soil Conservation Service is
assigned technical responsibility for
certain ACP practices, particularly
those requiring engineering assistance.
This technical responsibility includes
(1) a finding that the practice is need-
ed and practicable on the farm, (2) site
selection, other preliminary and layout
work, (3) supervision of the practice in-
stallation, and (4) certification that the
practice as performed meets required
specifications. ASC county committees re-
imburse the Soil Conservation Service for
the time the technicians spend servicing
the ACP practices referred to them.

Special ACP assistance is provided
counties with approved PL 566 watershed
projects. The ASC State committee
allocated additional ACP cost-share funds
da $70,000 to such counties under the 1965
ACP and $50,000 in 1966.

During the 1966 fiscal year (July 1,
1965 June 30, 1966) 11,036 Florida
farms and ranches participated in the ACP.
Total assistance, including the amounts
transferred to other agencies for technical
service, amounted to $3,039,775. During
the most recent 5-year period (1962-66)
20,140 different farms and ranches in the
State carried out approved ACP practices.

Certain permanent practices under
this program involving specifications and
supervision of construction are referred
to the Work Unit Conservationist (SCS)
assigned to the District for special
handling.

The Farmers Home Administration
made 42 soil and water loans accompanied
by technical management assistance to
owners and operators of farms, ranches
and rural residents including partnerships
and corporations. These loans assist in
developing, conserving and making proper
use of their land and water resources.
Twenty-four loans to individuals totaling
$134,720 and the remaining 18 to groups
or associations for $2,636,840.

The loans to associations assisted
22 communities and 6,000 families in having


for the first time an adequate supply of
portable water. Prior to the loan, many
of the residents in these communities were
purchasing water in five-gallon bottles,
or were hauling water from other areas.

Districts have received good
assistance from Departments of Vocational
Agriculture. Instructions on recommended
conservation practices have been given
to classes and supervision with emphasis
given to students with projects involving
conservation. Major help has been given
by members of the State Staff and teachers
in training and conducting Land Judging
contests. There are 223 departments of
Vocational Agriculture located in organiz-
ed districts.

Unlike some units of government,
supervisors of districts do not have the
power to levy taxes, hence funds for
operating expenses are obtained from local
sources. These include: Donations from
cooperators, banks, businesses, civic clubs;
rental of certain equipment and authorized
expenditures from Boards of County
Commissioners. During theperiod of this
report the total operating expenditures
of all districts in the state has been
$150,912.

The 12 applications listed as being
processed by the State Board were co-
sponsored by District Boards of Supervi-
sors with County Boards of Commissioners
or Boards of Directors of Special Drain-
age Districts. $1,574,944.00 in watershed
construction has been developed within the
two year period. As of December 31, 1966,
construction has been completed or under-
way on eleven (11) watershed projects
totaling $3,074,306.

Special appreciation is extended to
many groups, organizations and individuals
in Florida for their cooperation and con-
tributions to the conservation programs of
districts. Some of these are: civic clubs,
county farm bureaus, banks, merchants, farm
machinery dealers, manufacturers, garden and
women clubs, sportsments associations,
chamber of commerce, newspapers, radio and
T.V. stations, etc.


The 1965 Florida Legislature amended
Soil Conservation Act (Chapter 582)
authorizing changing the name of
Soil Conservation Districts to Soil
and Water Conservation Districts.
Included in this change was specifically
authorizing certain works of improve-
ment in water management.






* .. ..,


273,931 ACRES PLANTED AS COVER CROP
FOR SOIL IMPROVEMENT.


263,524 ACRES IN ESTABLISHED CONSERVATION
CROPPING SYSTEM.


CROPLAND


CORN FOLLOWING BAHAIA GRASS
7,069 ACRES GRASS SOD USED
FOR CROPS DURING 1966.


LAND LEVELED
OF CROPS.


FOR IRRIGATION


HAIRY INDIGO PLANTED IN YOUNG CITRUS
GROVE AS SOIL IMPROVEMENT .


U4,973 ACRES USED IN CONTOUR
FARMING.







The planting of improved varieties of
grasses for conservation and the best
use of land is an important practice
being followed by district cooperators.
1,374,665 acres have been planted.

During recent years increased emphasis
has been given on the management of
native range in South and Central dis-
tricts of Florida. Brush control and
deferred grazing have been the applied
practices. Following the chopping of range
it is given a complete growing season.
This deferment permits creeping blue-
stem and other grasses to recover.
Wildlife habitat was materially improved
at the same time.




PASTURE

Planted grasses and clover with
seepage irrigation.

Left -Brush control on 38,492 acres. Tandem
choppers on saw palmetto


Lower left --Range deferred grazing following
brush control.


Lower right Proper use of native grasses -
"take hall and leave half". 597,073
acres were used accordingly by district
cooperators .







Woodlands in Florida produce raw materials
for a billion dollar business. Tree farm-
ing is now accepted by districts as a sound
and profitable conservation land use. Idle
acres can produce "tree crops". District
cooperators are provided with technical
assistance on this work.

District cooperators:

88,569 acres tree planted
5,468 acres woodland improvement
1,405,032 acres protected





WOI






















In 1966 all District Board of Supervisors
with the cooperation of personnel of Florida
Forest Service and Soil Conservation Service
nade"Inventory of Services and Facilities
For the Development of Farm Forestry." The
state summary of this inventory reveals the
following ;

)2 District Program and Work Plans includes
woodlandd development, however 26 of these
reportedd they needed revision and 37
indicated that more action was needed.

4 Districts have Memorandum of Understand-
ag with the Florida Forest Service.


IDLANDS

Available for assistance on farm forestry
are: 48 Professsional Soil Conservationists,
52 Foresters and 2 Ag. Extension Specialists,
112 Forest Industry and 25 private consultants.

Number of nurseries: State 3 and Industry 4.

Number of planting machines owned and avail-
able: District 11, State 5, Industry 138,
and 169 by other.

Number of machines for site preparation:
District 1, State 21, Industry 75 and other 243

Number of tree injectors: State 84, Industry
37 and other 48.

Organized fire protection is provided for
14,071,251 acres and needed for 4,951,652 acres

Markes are available for: charcoal wood 15;
fence posts 47; fence rails 10; corral poles
6; mine props 4; Christmas trees 47 and
Christmas greens 22.

Number of tree marking services available:
State 120; Industry 185; Institutions 1 and
others 12.

Timber marking services available from State
52; Ag. Extension 2; Industry 127; Consultants
25 and others 5.

Markets available for: Pine poles, saw timber,
pulp wood, pilings, stumps, veneer, stakes,
crates, xmas trees, fence posts, cross ties,
naval stores and cross arms.






Land and Water Resources For Outdoor Recreation


To meet the enlarging needs of
Florida's growing population an in-
creasing number of landowners and
operators are converting all or part
of their land and waters to income
producing recreational enterprises.
An inventory of private outdoor
recreation businesses was made by
District Bards of Supervisors during
April and May 1965 with assistance
of representatives from local,
state and federal agencies. The
summary was made of these inven-
tories by the Florida Outdoor
Recreational Planning Committee in
Tallahassee.

A total of 1,062 enterprises
were reported in the Districts. No
businesses located within the
corporate limits of cities were
listed in this inventory.

The first appraisal of the
potential for Outdoor Recreation
Development was conducted in 1966
in Alachua County. Assisting in
making the appraisal were representa-
tives of the Alachua County Commission,
Alachua S.C.D., Florida Outdoor Rec-
reation Planning Committee, Florida
Agricultural Extension Service,
Florida Forestry Service, Florida
Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
and USDA's Soil Conservation Service.


Enterprises Reported Statewide:
By Kind of Enterprise


Kind


Number
Reported


Fishing areas 775

Golf courses 61

Water sports areas 59

Riding stables 45

Cabins and cottages 41

Natural, scenic and 27
historic areas

Camping areas 17

Shooting preserves 14


Youth camps

Hunting areas

Gun Clubs

Dude ranches and
vacation farms

Field sports areas

TOTAL


1,062


Per cent
Reported
#statewide)
73.0o

5.7

5.6

4.2

3.9


1.6

1.3


100.0%





Structural Practices


i -i


156.7 miles tile installed.


463 farm ponds located and constructed.


--
-
S .^S'- -_ yt

^ **.r ^ yJ


141.7 miles mains and laterals
designed and built.


Drainage and water control
essential in growing trees.


.-- g r --^^
r, ar


18,478 Control structures constructed


Land leveled for irrigation


1~ .
;. .c. ~ ~-~
.ri: ..
~
2~`--
-:
-


t--fX.





















JUDGING
STATE LAND JUDGING CONTEST

April 2, 1965 Brandon, Florida
April 1, 1966 Ocala, Florida


Other Distr


LAND JUDGING CONTEST

33 Districts sponsored Land Judging
Contests with 2,168 student
contestants. 93 teams participated
in two State Contests. 1st place
winning teams that went to the
National Contest were:

1965
Cottondale F.E.A. Chapter
Alachua 4-H Clubs
1966
Alachua 4-H Clubs
Lafayette F.F.A. Chapter


TOUR ON RANGE MKNAGEMNT


237 Tours were conducted in Districts
to observe conservation practices,
10,465 persons attended.


THOU SHALL CHERISH THE SOIL AND KEEP IT
SOIL STEWARDSHIP WEEK

"Challenges of Growth" May 22-23, 15

"Crisis in the Countryside"
May 15-22, 1'

974 Churches cooperated with
District Board. 102,519 persons
attended services.


51 District Cooperators receive
Bankers Conservation Award.






t Activities


PUBLIC SPEAKING CONTEST


28 Districts held public speaking
contests in 1966 with 1399 students
contestants from 82 schools.
Seven area winners participated in
the state contest.


Pres. Ford,FACD and Chn.McCall,Fla.Chapter
Comm.presenting Roy Whidden Ist.place award
State Speaking Contest.($300 scholarship)
Other winners were sWanda Webster 2nd.,Stev
Rosin 3rd. and 4th.John Wayne Wooten,Jerry
Harvey,Kathy Cannon and Carol Rosenberger.


Hillsborough Supervisors receiving
Goodyear Soil Conservation Award for
196$. Second place award went to
Manatee Hiver District. Presented in
1966. Lee Board won first place for
1964 and Sarasota received second place.


Third grade student observe
delivery of fingerlings for
stocking farm ponds.


,P-.


Conservation is taught in all Schools.

Right Districts assisted 320 Scout
Troops.







Water Shed Protection an(

PUBLIC


ilL


Small watershed projects have
moved ahead at a good rate. These
projects, made possible by assistance
under the Watershed Protection and
Flood Prevention Act (Public Law
566, 83rd Congress), are becoming a
way of life in the communities they
serve and in the State as a whole.

Twelve new applications have
been received and approved by the
Board in this biennium. These cover
777,382 acres.

Five new planning authorizations
were granted by the Administrabr, Soil
Consertion Service.

Four new authorizations for con-
struction were approved by the
Committees of Congress.

$1, 574,944 has been spent in
actual construction. $351,311 of
this was local money. Rights-of-
way and easements valued at $1i million
were provided by the local sponsors.


Projects are justified by damages caused by
flooding, poor drainage, or need for water
conservation.










Land treatment distinguishes these
projects from other water resource manage-
ment projects. With accelerated technical
assistance from the Soil Conservation Ser-
vice and financial assistance from the
Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation
Service, fields are terraced, pastures
seeded, trees planted, gullies plugged,
irrigation and drainage systems installed,
crops rotated, and many other conservation
practices are applied to the land. These
are the trademakrs of soil and water re-
sources being used wisely and efficiently.

COMMENTS

"I can truthfully say that the county really
appreciates the fine work that was accompli
in the Pine Barren Creek Watershed .."

"Anyone who wishes to see how the North St.
Lucie River Drainage District Watershed
works is invited to make inspection thereof
and see the benefits derived."

"Since the Lake Placid East Chain of Lakes
Project was completed we have had no floods
and the water has been controlled perfectly




Flood Prevention Program

LAW 566










Right Completed Channel at Work
Upper Josephine-Jackson Creek


Right Center Structure Under Construction









I


- a


Main Channel Construction. Upper Tampa
Bay Watershed.





Right Completed Structure.
68 feet wide with 13 foot drop
in elevation.


r L


.
.1
;. c.
,. I
3~- ~wsRll~ru

c'

1





INTENSIFIED


Land Treatment
In
Watersheds


Left Highly improved pasture with water
control is typical land treatment.


Water control is made possible for
landowners by watershed projects.


Planting trees on land best
22 suited for woodlands.








































APPLICATIONS WATERSHED PROTECTION
AND FLOOD PREVENTION (P.L.-566)
LOCATION AND STATUS

January 1, 1967

Authorized for Operations (Construction) Count Acres

1. East Chain of Lakes (Construction Completed) Highlands 12,500
2. Taylor Creek (In Construction) Okeechobee 89,500
3. Fisheating Creek (Construction Completed) Highlands 51,200
5. Pine Barren Creek (Construction Completed) Escambia 61,600
6. N. St. Lucie River D.D. (Const. Compl.) St. Lucie 60,220
8. Sebastian River D.D. (In Construction) Indian River 33,930
10. ills Creek Nassau 39,700
13. Upper Josephine-Jackson Creek (In Const.) Highlands 32,700
15. Sarasota West Coast (In Construction) Sarasota 154,680
17. South Sumter (In Construction) Sumter 54,700
18. Upper Tampa Bay (In Construction) Hillsborough 65,720
22. Jumper Creek Sumter 53,000
25. Istokpoga Marsh (In Construction) Highlands 26,200
3h. Big Slough Manatee-Sarasota-DeSoto 121,l00
37. Ft. Pierce Farms Drainage District St. Lucie 29,300
45. Palatlakaha River Lake-Polk 140,100
1, 026,750

Authorized for Planning

11. Dry Creek (Suspended) Jackson 100,000
21. Big Four Sumter-Lake 71,700
35. Pond Creek Santa Rosa 164,000
38. Wetappo Creek Gulf 100,000
39. Big Prairie Sumter-Lake 54,000
42. California Lake Dixie 120.000
609,700


State Priority-Preliminary Investigations

26. Little Manatee River
29. Lower Alafia River
30. Pemberton Creek
31. Turkey Creek
40. Big Alligator Lake-Rose Creek
41. North Polk
03. Coldwater Creek
46. Brooker Creek
18. Gamble Creek
50. Tsala Apopka
52. West Seminole
51. Hurrah Creek
56. Lake Placid W. Chain of Lakes
57 Joshua Creek
58. Telogia Creek
59. S. Fla. Conservancy District
60. Lake Jackson Basin
61. Lafayette Alford Basin
62. Lake Munson Basin


Approved Applications Awaiting Priorities

51. Water Oak Creek
53. Cracker Branch
63. N.E. Holmes Creek

64. N.W. Holmes Creek
65. S.E. Holmes Creek
66. S.W. Holmes Creek
67. Carter Creek
68. Mayo Calf Creek-Alton Lake



Applications Disapproved, Found Not Feasible, Etc.

h. Orange Lake
7. Lake Region
9. Tributaries to St. Mary's River
12. Bear Creek
1. Turnbull-Mill Creek
16. Dead Lake
19. Bull Frog Creek
20. Six Mile Creek
23. Little Fish-Minnow Creeks
2b. Wrights Creek
27. Barley Barber Swamp
28. Haw Creek
32. Fellsmere Drainage District
33. Wekiva River
36. Econlockhatchee River
L4. Alligator-Hickory Branch
17. Frog Creek
19. Paynes Creek
55. Northeast Polk


Hillsborough-Manatee 135,000
Hillsborough L8,000
Hillsborough 36,000
Hillsborough 64,000
Columbia 61,000
Polk 100,000
Santa Rosa (Escambia,Ala)174,000
Hillsborough-Pinellas 23,680
Manatee 32,000
Citrus 105,212
Jackson 40,000
Hillsborough-Polk 166, 00
Highlands 40,000
DeSoto 89,200
Liberty-Gadsden 154,200
Palm Beach-Hendry 35,000
Leon 33,000
Leon Sh,000
Leon 614000


Bradford-Clay 20,000
St. Johns 11,500
Jackson & Washington 79,350
(Houston Co., Ala.)
Holmes (Houston Co.,Ala.) 25,750
Washington 122,100
Washington & Holmes 58,950
Highlands 26,832
Lafayette 35000
379,12


Alachua
Putnam-Bradford-Clay
Baker
Bay
St. Johns
Gulf-Liberty
Hillsborough
Hillsborough
Jackson
Holmes
Martin
Flagler-Volusia
Indian River
Orange-Seminole
Orange-Seminole
Hardee
Manatee
lardee-Polk
Polk


Total 68 Watersheds


210,000
92,000
191,000
80,000
56,000
95,000
25,216
28,180
20,000
100,000
21,000
190,000
16, 100 O
97,325
156,167
15,000
11,500
72,000
103 800
1,o

5,081,212


Ii


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