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Biennial Report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075935/00004
 Material Information
Title: Biennial Report
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Soil Conservation Board
Publisher: The Board
Place of Publication: <Tallahassee> Fla
Creation Date: 1963
Publication Date: 1956-1966
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Soil conservation -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Soil conservation districts -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: State Soil Conservation Board.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Jan.1,1955-Dec.31,1956-Jan.1,1965-Dec.31,1966.
General Note: At head of title: Conservation of Florida's soil and water through Soil Conservationa Districts.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002689294
oclc - 46604019
notis - ANF6612
lccn - 2001229408
System ID: UF00075935:00004
 Related Items
Preceded by: Biennial report ...of State Soil Conservation Board
Succeeded by: Biennial report

Full Text








SOILAND

f-ATER

JGONSER 4 TION

~THROUGH

FLORIDA'S SDTRIC TS


* ~irl8
P9~


JUN J6

SBiennial ,Reort,
< ~January 1, 1963 to December 31, 1964

State Soil Conservation Board,
S-. ,


MAY 1965


Z6. 5
fj/ $ S


P., z
~k~s~~: ''"


tke











FLORIDA SOIL CONSERVATION
1937-1964


YEAR ORGANIZED NO. DISTRICTS
1938-1942 15
1943-1948 :;;: 29
1949-1953 III 13
1954- 1964 3


DISTRICTS


.- .** ..


. D "A' ... :'..- .l

-ft ,,\ : ..- .".'* .-'[a I /

.:.-.: :.:.:.:.:.:.C:


6'
Cd)0 ?0









STATE SOIL CONSERVATION BOARD


Left to right: Nat H. Hunter, Wo Bradley Munroe, E. E. Carter,
Chairman; J. D. Wooten, Jr., and W. E. Burquest, Vice Chairman.
Picture courtesy office Commissioner of Agriculture.


The State Soil Conservation Board is pleased to submit the Biennial
Report for the period January 1, 1963 through December 31, 1964. It is
made to the Governor, Members of the Florida Legislature and to the citizens
of the state. The report covers major activities of the Board and sixty
(60) soil conservation districts in Florida during the period.

We are proud of the progress that has been made and grateful to the
supervisors of these districts for their leadership and direction of the
conservation program carried out. Special recognition is given to
representatives of local,county, state and federal agencies and organi-
zations for their good assistance in this work.

There remains much to be done in Florida on the treatment and manage-
ment of our soil and water resources. Much of the state's future depends
on how well we plan and use these resources. Your cooperation and assistance
is solicited in this matter.

L. M. Hollingsworth
Administrator


Acknowledgements

To the SCD Boards of Supervisors for providing Annual Reports for the
tabulation.

To the S.C.S. for data on applied conservation practices, watersheds
and most pictures.


A1








WHY FLORIDA'S SOIL AND WATER RESOURCES
MUST BE CONSERVED




Some answers concerning our soil and water resources is found in the facts and projections
of the Dare Report, listing agricultural resources and opportunities for development through 1975.

The area of the state is essentially the same as it was in 1845 and will probably remain
the same. The challenge is to treat these resources for maximum production and in such
a way that they will continue to produce indefinitely to meet our needs.

Our increasing population will make greater demands on our resources-land, woodlands,
water, food, fibre, shelter and recreation facilities. In 1963, Florida's density of popula-
tion per square mile was 104 persons, by 1975 this will be 151.

More intensive, wise and conserved use of land will be needed. This will involve an increase
of 65% acreage of cropland in citrus, vegetables and field crops. Improved pasture acre-
age will be increased by 10.2%. Potential expansion in growth possible by the application
of needed forestry practices on all forest lands. A reduced shift of acreage in forage,
temporary pasture, idle and other lands.

Plan, develop and manage our major watersheds to supply necessary water for agricul-
ture, municipalities, industry and recreation. This will reduce many of our flood hazards.

Conservation practices applied to our resources gives protection of the tax base in the'
state.

The increased gain in per capital income in the state offers a better market for the agri-
cultural products produced.

Conservation practices aid in producing greater production per acre thereby reducing the
cost per unit. This permits selling at lower cost to the consumer.

Increases in population and personal income with shorter working hours offer good oppor-
tunities for the development of outdoor private recreation enterprises.




The Dare Report- (1964)
University of Florida
Institute of Food & Agricultural Science







FLORIDA'S AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR DEVELOPMENT THROUGH 1975

PER CENT CHANGE ESTIMATED PROJECTION FOR 1975 AS COMPARED WITH 1960 1/


155 %


126 %


66 %


47 %


I -


PERSONAL
INCOME


FARM VALUE
AGRIC. PROD'TS
CONSUMED


PER CAPTA
INCOME


37 %


PER CAPTA EXP.
FOOD,BEV.& TOB.


MAJOR LAND USES 1960 1975


Ian- I


65.9 %






O
0

o XN
,^

CITRUS
VEGETABLES
FIELD
CROPS


10.2 %


0
0
U)
*


-33 %


FORAGE AND/OR
TEMPORARY
PASTURE


0 0
O) 0





-36.2 %


o 7\o .
0 0





IMPROVED
PASTURE


IDLE


0 0 0 0
0 0
S 0 0 0
1




-8.7 % -6.7 %
UNIMPROVED FOREST &
PASTURE WOODLAND


-31 %
OTHER
LAND


I I 1960

M 1975


1/ The Dare Report (1964)
University of Florida
Institute of Food & Agricultural Science


POPULATION









Biennial Report

State Soil Conservation Board

January 1, 1963 to December 31, 1964


The land and water resources of Florida are
among the basic assets of the state. Sixty soil
conservation districts covering most of 64 coun-
ties have been established by local people to de-
velop and carry out a conservation program on
these resources. The district program is adminis-
tered by five elected supervisors who serve with-
out pay. The supervisors are concerned with
making the best use of land and water resources
within the district, and provide for technical as-
sistance and on-the-farm study to meet this need.
The State Soil Conservation Board is the Agency
established to administer the Soil Conservation
Act of 1937 as an integral part of the Soil Conser-
vation District organization. It offers such assist-
ance as may be appropriate to the supervisors of
soil conservation districts in the carrying out of
their powers and programs.
The Board operates in conjunction with the
Florida Board of Conservation and has received
excellent cooperation and assistance from Randolph
Hodges, Director, and his staff during the period
of this report.
Members of the Board are appointed by the
Governor on staggered basis for term of four
years. New members appointed during 1963-64
were: W. E. Burquest and J. D. Wooten, Jr. Dur-
ing the period of this report the following were
members of this Board:
E. E. Carter, Vero Beach, Florida
Lyle C. Dickman, Ruskin, Florida to 11-5-63
D. R. Igou, Eustis, Florida to 8-5-64
Wm. Bradley Munroe, Quincy, Florida
W. E. Burquest, Sarasota, Florida appointed 11-6-63
J. D. Wooten, Jr., DeFuniak Springs, Fla., appointed 8-6-64
The Board has been delegated certain State
functions under the Watershed Protection and
Flood Prevention Act (Public Law 566, 83rd Con-
gress as Amended), which are: To receive and act
on applications; recommend priority for planning
to the Soil Conservation Service; and to review
the completed work plan for watersheds and ac-
cept or reject for the state.
Ten meetings of the Board were held in carry-
ing out their duties and responsibilities.


The office of the Board was maintained at the
University of Florida until September 1963. Dr.
M. O. Watkins, Director of Agricultural Extension
Service served as Administrator through June 30,
1963, with full time Executive Secretary and sten-
ographer to assist in carrying out necessary office
and field work.
Since July 1, 1963 the office of the Board as-
sumed all service relative to payrolls, vouchering
of bills for payment, maintained records on bud-
get, expenditures, etc. Previously this service had
been performed by the Agricultural Extension
Service without remuneration. The office was
moved to the Baird Building in September 1963.
Personnel of the office consisted of: L. M. Hol-
lingsworth, Administrator; Mrs. E. M. Dickens,
Clerk-Bookkeeper, and Mrs. O. M. Thomas, Sten-
ographer.
A second Watershed Planning Party was made
possible by funds appropriated by the 1963 Legis-
lature and in cooperation with the Soil Conserva-
tion Service. The Service personnel assigned to
Planning Party were: Robert G. Jessup, Work
Plan Staff Leader; C. Robert Horn, Hydrologist
Engineer; Lucian N. Norton, Agriculturist Econ-
omist and John F. Beach, Jr., Conservation En-
gineer Technician. Ernest V. Todd, Civil Engineer,
was added to the Party in June, 1964.
Major activities and accomplishments of the
Board are:

PL 566 Watershed Applications Received and Processed


Name
Big Alligator Lake-Rose
Creek
North Polk Watershed
California Lake Watershed
Coldwater Watershed
Alligator-Hickory Branch
Palatlakaha River
Brooker Creek
Frog Creek
Gamble Creek
Paynes Creek
Tsala Apopka
Water Oak Creek
West Seminole
Cracker & Cypress Branch
Hurrah Creek
Northeast Polk
Lake Placid West Chain
of Lakes


County(s)


Columbia
Polk
Dixie
Santa Rosa
Hardee
Lake & Polk
Hillsborough & Pinellas
Manatee
Manatee
Hardee & Polk
Citrus
Bradford & Clay
Jackson
St. Johns & Putnam
Hillsborough
Polk l


Highlands
Total


Acres

61,000
107,320
120,000
116,400
15,000
76,900
23,680
11,500
32,000
72,000
105,212
20,000
40,000
11,500
166,400
103,800


40,000
1,122,712








Seventeen watersheds were visited and evalu-
ated with assistance of Soil Conservation Service.
Priority for planning was recommended for
nine watershed applications; two completed Work
Plans were reviewed and approved.
The biennial election of supervisors was held
October 10, 1963. This election involved the pro-
cessing of 178 nominating petitions, preparation
of 58 legal notices arranging for 169 polling places
with managers, mimeographing 7,650 ballots,
checking and certifying all returns and notifying
the 137 elected supervisors.
Records in 29 districts were reviewed, obsolete
materials separated, revised system of filing es-
tablished and authority given for destruction of
obsolete materials.
Received annual plan of operation from 51 dis-
tricts.
Forty-nine districts made annual audits of re-
ceipts and expenditures.
Prepared and printed 7,190 copies of publication
"25 Years of Soil and Water Conservation in Flor-
ida's Soil Conservation Districts".
Assisted in organizing Palm Beach-Broward
Soil Conservation District covering an area of
1,328,420 acres. Supervisors elected for this 60th
district were: Jack C. Lee, Lake Worth, Fritz
Stein, Belle Glade, E. E. Cooper, Lake Worth,
Bruce Bitting, Canal Point and C. D. McClure of
Belle Glade.
Helped district boards of supervisors in carrying
out their duties and programs. This was accom-
plished by attending meetings of Boards, personal
visits, letters, supplying information, material
and publications.
Prepared and mailed to all supervisors following
each meeting of the Board, the "State Soil Con-
servation Board Highlights".
Association of Districts aided in developing pro-
gram and activities in the state.
Co-sponsored State Land Judging Contest and
presented certificates to 95 FFA Chapters and
4-H County teams and 378 contestants.
Presented Recognition Certificates to 18 super-
visors for 20 years service, and 15 for 15 years.
Provided office assistance in typing and mimeo-
graphing special and annual reports for districts.
The Board was represented at State, Southeast-
ern and National Annual Meetings of Supervisors.


Representatives of state and federal agencies,
organizations, groups and individuals working
with districts have attended meetings of the Board
and discussed progress and problems of programs.
The Soil Conservation Program was presented
at workshops for teachers in the study of re-
source-use education.
Informational work included the release of taped
programs for radio and news articles for news-
papers. Several panel exhibits were prepared and
used at special events, fairs and meetings of
supervisors.

State Appropriation 1963-65 (Biennial)


Salaries (3 persons)
Expenses
Operating Capital Outlay
Watershed Planning Party


$ 30,466
10,270
1,655
120,000


$162,391

Fiscal period July 1, 1963 to June 30, 1965 ...


BOARD MEETING
Left to right- L. M. Hollingsworth, N. H. Hunter,
Wm. Bradley Munroe, Doyle Conner, Comm. of
Agric., E. E. Carter, W. E. Burquest and J. D.
Wooten, Jr., Facing Board J. C. Butts and H. T.
Stanley.


*4 -.~'-.






TABLE I


SOME ACCOMPLISHMENTS BY SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS
IN FLORIDA AS OF SEPTEMBER 30, 1964 1/

Number Acres
District Cooperators 25,283 11,705,769

Soil Survey Completed 14,496,430


CONSERVATION PRACTICES



Cropland

Conservation, cropping system (acres)
Cover cropping (acres)
Contour farming (acres)
Stripcropping systems (acres)


7-1-62
to
6-30-64


291,539
503,264
33,110
462


Total
Accumulated
to 9-30-64


1,491,409
1,990,283
339,309
54,318


Grassland


Pasture improvement (acres)
Pasture planting (acres)
Proper range use (acres)


42,042
203,349
651,779


1,321,064
2,378,124
1,395,015


Woodland


Tree planting (acres)
Woodland improvement (acres)
Woodland protection (acres)


Wildlife


Fish pond treatment (number)
Wildlife area treatment (acres)
Wildlife Wetland Preservation (acres)

Water Control

Diversion construction (miles)
Grassed waterways (acres)
Erosion control structures (number)
Tile drains (miles)

Miscellaneous

Pond construction (number)
Terracing (miles)
Irrigations reservoirs (number)
Sprinkler irrigation system (number)
Drainage Main & laterals (miles)
Irrigation Pipeline (miles)

1/ Table I & II
Soil Conservation Service
Gainesville, Florida


86,520
18,886
18,302


780,445
1,051,757
2,392,667


1,136
156,442
30,982


5,271
458,260
57,087


6.7
228
21,341
133.1


139
5,106
37,130
1,238.1


485
173
309
322
141.7
53.6


3,678
15,365
5,810
3,259
270.5
62.6








TABLE II


SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS, ACREAGE, NUMBER OF COOPERATORS AND ACREAGE
January 2, 1965


Date No. of
Name of Organized Location Acres in District Acreage
District (Charter) (County District Cooperators


Alachua
Baker
Bay
Blackwater
Bradford
Brevard
Charlotte
Chipola R.

Choctawhatchee R.
Clay
Dixie
Duval
Flagler
Franklin
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Gulf
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes Creek

Indian River
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Levy
Madison
Manatee River
Marion
Martin
Nassau
Ochlockonee R.
Okeechobee
Orange
Orange Hill
Osceola
Palm Beach-
Broward 1/
Pasco
Peace River
Perdido River
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Santa Fe
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee River
Taylor
Tupelo
Union
Volusia
Wakulla
Yellow River


STATE TOTAL


4-5-44
3-23-53
8-25-52
3-17-42
3-13-50
2-5-45
4-6-44
5-24-40

3-21-40
10-5-49
7-23-47
7-10-53
2-3-52
1-27-53
6-20-41
8-7-45
7-17-47
11-13-43
8-7-46
6-16-44
5-29-44
2-5-42
8-5-46
1-7-38

1-29-45
7-25-40
9-20-48
4-21-44
7-10-47
9-29-47
6-26-41
5-15-45
12-31-41
5-6-50
5-5-50
7-17-40
1-11-51
7-23-45
4-3-40
10-9-50
6-4-64

4-9-46
4-27-44
3-20-40
11-15-43
2-19-45
1-22-45
9-14-55
9-21-50
12-14-42
7-14-47
11-7-47
2-16-43
3-4-42
12-15-55
2-3-45
3-12-48
6-19-43
7-3-50
6-20-41


Alachua
Baker
Bay
Santa Rosa
Bradford
Brevard
Charlotte
Jackson, Calhoun
& Liberty
Walton & W. Holmes
Clay
Dixie
Duval
Flagler
Franklin
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Citrus & Hernando
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Highlands
Hillsborough
E. Holmes &
N. W. Jackson
Indian River
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Levy
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Nassau
Leon
Okeechobee
Orange
Washington
Osceola
Palm Beach-
Broward
Pasco
De Soto
Escambia
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Columbia
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Gulf
Union
Volusia
Wakulla
Okaloosa


30,615,029 24,495 11,363,046


1/ New District


570,880
374,400
481,920
655,360
187,520
660,480
497,280
1,378,240

821,000
382,720
440,320
497,280
309,120
348,160
325,120
216,960
477,440
677,120
328,960
403,200
759,680
666,240
665,600
275,000

327,040
382,720
347,520
637,440
503,040
705,920
449,280
448,640
1,034,880
357,760
416,000
438,400
499,200
586,240
382,080
848,000
1,328,420

480,640
414,720
398,573
168,960
1,191,040
513,920
357,860
376,320
503,040
328,960
205,440
359,040
433,280
660,480
356,480
153,600
713,600
392,960
513,536


876
100
173
645
326
255
160
1,105

778
319
93
277
197
10
618
338
136
422
386
786
192
506
1,172
654

537
485
273
796
293
408
739
533
443
125
270
598
165
520
701
241
0

232
570
524
421
961
5
3
379
498
249
393
513
555
0
55
184
563
125
614


279,101
42,461
121,370
101,526
102,091
113,595
232,848
478,811

224,606
176,549
391,846
193,927
153,778
30,482
156,966
85,805
256,324
234,514
170,275
308,843
486,057
430,229
234,722
108,100

100,722
212,469
285,613
161,695
143,151
125,692
223,764
276,754
228,890
158,079
99,963
215,695
353,234
162,998
106,764
625,475
0

112,505
570,817
80,035
47,364
377,386
689
1,550
276,809
174,110
176,775
65,256
220,923
138,582
0
98,826
56,506
226,453
36,330
106,346







Soil Conservation Districts


Most of the state is now within organized soil
conservation districts. The organization of Palm
Beach-Broward unit in 1964 made 60 districts
covering 64 of the 67 counties. All are active with
the exception of Taylor District. The map inside
the cover sheet indicates the periods of their or-
ganization.

The District Board of Supervisors has the re-
sponsibility of developing and carrying out a pro-
gram of conservation on soil and water resources
within the district. It is used as a guide in pro-
moting and applying practices on cooperators'
farms. The final goal being a complete soil and
water conservation plan applied on every farm,
ranch, grove and watershed in the district.

Due to the many changes that have occurred in
agriculture in recent years supervisors have rec-
ognized the need for revising their district pro-
grams and recommendations to meet existing con-
servation needs in the area. Thirty-seven districts
have completed this work and signed new Memor-
andum of Understanding with U. S. Department
of Agriculture. Other district Boards of Super-
visors are in various stages of this work.

"Soil and water conservation by the people", is
the accepted principle in the operation of soil con-
servation districts. Unlike some units of govern-
ment, supervisors of districts do not have power
to levy taxes, hence funds for operating are ob-
tained from local sources, i.e., County Boards of
Commissioners, donations and in some instances
on the profit from the rental of certain equipment
to cooperators. Operating expenditures of districts
for this period of report totaled $141,615.

One important function of a district board of
supervisors is that of making available technical
assistance to landowners on problems of soil and
water conservation. Most problems require on-
the-farm study. This need is met through agree-
ments with U. S. Department of Agriculture and
the various state agencies to give assistance. The
Soil Conservation Service assigns one or more
technicians to each district for this work.


Most districts have agreements with Florida
Forest Service and the Florida Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission for help on forestry and
game management.

The Florida Agricultural Extension Service has
County Agricultural Agents stationed within each
district and assist in carrying out conservation
education. The agents have given special assist-
ance with the Land Judging and Speaking con-
tests sponsored by the districts and Florida As-
sociation Soil and Water Conservation District
Supervisors. In 47 districts they serve as Secre-
tary to the Board.

County Agricultural Stabilization and Conser-
vation Committees have assisted districts in the
conservation program. First, in the formulation
of practices for cost sharing. Supervisors have
been invited to meet with Committee for consid-
eration of these recommended practices. Second,
referrals were made to district offices in the state
on certain practices. These permanent practices
involve specifications which the Work Unit Con-
servationist assigned to district are required to
review and determine need for practice, make lay-
out, supervise installation and certify successful
completion. Records for 1963 on 16 of these prac-
tices in the state reveals 654 farms received this
assistance involving more than 21,000 acres. Par-
ticipation in 1964 was approximately the same.
The Agency allocated $100,000 additional ACP
funds for cost-sharing assistance on practices to
counties with authorized watersheds in 1963 and
$70,000 for this purpose in 1964.

Under the 1963 Agricultural Conservation Pro-
gram on practice A-7, Tree Planting-Forest, 471
farms planted 10,010 acres. This was accomplished
under the supervision and certification of Florida
Forest Service.

A new practice, G-4, Managing land to improve
Wildlife feed or habitat, was included in 1963 and
64, supervised and certified by Florida Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission.


(10)








The Farmers Home Administration made 47
soil and water loans accompanied by technical
management assistance to owners and operators
of farms, ranches and rural residents including
partnerships and corporations. These loans assist
in developing, conserving and making proper use
of their land and water resources. Twenty-five
loans to individuals totaling $140,180 and the
remaining 22 to groups or associations for
$3,743,330.

Districts have received good assistance from
departments of Vocational Agriculture. Instruc-
tions on recommended conservation practices have
been given to classes and supervision with empha-
sis given to students with projects involving con-
servation. Major help has been given by members
of the state staff and teachers in training and
conducting Land Judging contests. There are 213
departments of Vocational Agriculture located in
organized districts.

The staff members of Florida Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission have given valuable as-
sistance to districts and their cooperators. This
included help on game management, fish manage-
ment, furnished foundation stock for farm ponds
and materials for wildlife plantings. Cooperators
in 23 districts were assisted in securing materials
for wildlife food plantings in the following
amounts: 274,000 Lespedeza Thunbergii plants;
%/ ton of partridge pea seed, 1,253 lbs. common


lespedeza, 7,065 lbs. cowpeas and 9,621 Ibs. of
Browntop millet. This agency in cooperation with
the U. S. Department of the Interior Fish & Wild-
life Service helped in stocking 1,136 farm ponds.

The activities in districts have been stimulated
during 1963-64 as result of the assistance given by
County Boards of Commissioners to supervisors.
This has included: Co-sponsorship of watershed
projects, made application of conservation prac-
tices on county owned property, encouraged and
promoted conservation program for the county
and given financial help on conservation projects.
Supervisors in return have made available tech-
nical consultation assistance on problems concern-
ing the County Board of Commissioners, i.e., con-
trolling erosion on roads, drainage problems and
preventing flood water damage.

Many other groups, organizations and individ-
uals have cooperated and contributed to the suc-
cess of district conservation program. Some of
these being farm organizations, banks, civic clubs,
merchants, machinery dealers, manufacturers,
garden and women's clubs, sportsmen's clubs,
chamber of commerce, newspaper, radio and T.V.
stations, etc.

More than 1,000 new cooperators of districts
were added during the period bringing the total
in the state to 24,495 and covering in excess of
11 million acres.


(11)













Soil and water resources of Florida are among the
basic assets of the state. They are the principle
sources of our wealth and income. Careless use of
these resources picks our pay envelopes-no matter
what our occupation. Every citizen of the state has
a stake in the conservation of our soil and water
resources.


-. *.t.


SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS





Soil Conservation districts are local governmental
sub-divisions of the state. They are organized and
operated by local landowners. The district board is
composed of five elected supervisors who donate
their time and pay their own expenses.







The board determines the local conservation pro-
gram, develops a work plan and directs the activities
of the district. Funds for operating the district are
obtained from local sources. The technical assistance
for on-the-farm study, developing plans and instal-
ling practices is obtained by Memorandum of Under-
standing with USDA Soil Conservation Service and
with other Federal and state agencies.


DISTRICT BOARD OF SUPERVISORS MEETING



The ultimate goal of each district is to use each soil
and water resource according to its capability and to
treat it for its needs so that it will continue to pro-
duce indefinitely for our needs.


(12)


Lr.
i ~
-'i-







CROPLAND


CROP ROTATION AND CONTOUR PLANTING


RIGHT-Planting corn in stubble.



BELOW-Citrus-water furrows-two-way pump
system.


LOWER RIGHT-Staked tomato production
metering water control system.


WATERMELONS FOLLOWING BAHIA GRASS SOC


t*.' -
-.r;rft -r


- C rw^';


t*.






PASTURE AND HAY




Good pasture and nutritious hay is to cattle what
ham and eggs are to people. To produce these items
requires a combination of practices. These include:
Growing the adapted variety of grass; proper soil
preparation; fertilization; improved methods of
seeding; rotation of grazing; and the correct prac-
tices of water management. During this period Dis-
trict Cooperators have planted 203,347 acres of im-
proved pasture.
They also have used improved methods for proper
range management on 651,779 acres.




PLANTING PANGOLA GRASS CUTTINGS.



4 i




LEFT-Ditches with control structures for drainage
and irrigation.


^(, LOWER LEFT-Good range management-native
SMaidencane on a fresh marsh site.


LOWER RIGHT-Bailing Pangola grass hay.







WOODLANDS



About 90% of the forest land in Florida is privately
owned with 2/3 of this being held by farmers. Por-
tions of this acreage needs the application of recom-
mended forestry practices for maximum growth and
more intensive use. District Supervisors are aware of
this situation and have available technical assistance
to help cooperators with these problems.

Records for past two years reveal:
86,520 acres planted
18,886 improved
2,392,667 acres protected from fire, disease and
insects.









FARM PONDS & WILD LIFE

LEFT 1,136 farm ponds constructed providing
water for irrigation, livestock and recreation.

LOWER LEFT-Wild turkeys feeding on planted
strip.

LOWER CENTER Browntop mullet planted for
wildlife food.

LOWER RIGHT-Wild Canadian geese feeding on
improved pasture.








Land and Water Resources For Outdoor Recreation


During this period the need for more recreation
areas and facilities in soil conservation districts
have been recognized by supervisors. District pro-
grams were revised and included the development
of resources on cooperators' lands for recreational
use. Progress has been made on this subject and
a number of these farm recreation enterprises
were established. Interest in this subject is in-
creasing and more areas with facilities are an-
ticipated.

A survey made in Florida's SCD's on group use
of land and water resources for outdoor recreation
and related purposes, January 1964 revealed the
following:

1. Number of groups urban or rural-urban
people that own or have a lease or other type of
permit to use land, water and related resources
for outdoor recreation or purposes-259


2. Number receiving some degree of assistance
from S.C.D. on the land involved-135


3. Total number of people represented in these
groups-19,897

4. Number other different landowners or oper-
ators than groups owning their lands having leases
or permits with groups reported in item 1-170


5. Number of landowners and operators in-
cluded in item 4, receiving some kind of income
or economic return from such lease or permit
arrangement-164


6. Approximate number of acres of land in-
volved in the lease or permit arrangement entered
into by those groups reported in item 1-1,075,969






Structural Practices


173 MILES OF TERRACES BUILT.


1136 FARM PONDS LOCATED & CONSTRUCTED.


142 MILES DITCHES FOR DRAINAGE AND LAND LEVELED, BEDDED FOR CITRUS AND
IRRIGATION COMPLETED. IRRIGATION.


MAKING FINAL CHECK OF SYSTEM.


133 MILES TILE INSTALLED.







Other Distri


43 SCD'S SPONSORED CONSERVATION EXHIBITS
AT FAIRS, PUBLIC EVENTS & PROGRAMS.


STATE LAND JUDGING CONTESTS

Ninety-five teams participated in the two events
(54 FFA Chapters and 41 4-H County) Cottondale
FFA Chapter representing Chipola River S.C.D.
and Alachua 4-H representing Alachua S.C.D. were
winners in both contests. These teams took part
in the International Contest.
Picture courtesy-The Tampa Tribune.


7th & 8th GRADE STUDENTS ON TOUR TO
OBSERVE CONSERVATION PRACTICES.


42 SCD'S SPONSORED 283 TOURS OR CONSER-
VATION PROGRAMS WITH ATTENDANCE OF
12,120.
LEFT-66 recipients were selected by 20 SCD's for
Florida Banker's Association awards.






t Activities




RIGHT -Peace River SCD Board receives 1964
Goodyear Soil Conservation Award. Highland SCD
Board won second place; 30 SCD enrolled. In 1963
-Flagler SCD was first and Peace River SCD was
second.


SOIL STEWARDSHIP WEEKS
May 19-26, 1963
May 3-10, 1964





LEFT-District Board of Supervisors and Ministers
prepare for Soil Stewardship Week.

Eighty-one churches participated during these two
weeks, and more than 100,000 Floridians attended
services on this program.


RIGHT-Contestants' State Speaking Contest 1963.
During the two years 36 SCD sponsored public speak-
ing contests; 2,465 students participated in 217
high schools.






Water Shed Protection ani
PUBLIC


TAYLOR CREEK WATERSHED BEFORE PROJECT


District and other sponsoring agencies submit-
ted 17 applications for planning assistance under
the Watershed Protection and Flood Prevention
Act. (Public Law 566, 83rd Congress). These cov-
ered over one million acres.


A completed small watershed project is a com-
bination of all the needed conservation measures
applied to all the land draining into a small stream
(a watershed), supported by necessary structures
to regulate runoff to avoid destructive floods and
turn the water to planned beneficial uses.

In this biennium $1 million dollars have been
spent in constructing channels and structures to
control floodwaters in five projects in the state.
These works are designed to protect existing de-


velopments. A project cannot be approved to bring
new lands into production.

Farmers, ranchers and citrus growers have
spent an estimated $3 million installing needed
land treatment measures on their land. These
measures protect the project works or are to fur-
ther improve existing developments. Examples of
these measures are: tree planting, grass planting,
gully control, wildlife areas, terracing, drainage
irrigation, etc.

A well planned project is the basis for a unified
approach to solving or alleviating the soil and
water problems in the watershed in Florida. Local
governmental bodies and the landowners develop
a close working relationship which pays dividends
for many years in the future.


(20)






Flood Prevention Program

AW 566


TAYLOR CREEK WATERSHED AFTER PROJECT.


BELOW-Water control structure N. St. Lucie
River D.D.


I ^'^^ w
NORTH ST. LUCE RIVER DRAINAGE DISTW
WATERSHED PROJECT
SOUTH PUMP STATION
DRAINAGE AEA 6000 *CRES
DUMPIND CAQACIT' .*0 00 GALS;uIN.
NUMBER OF PUMPS 4
tNLET CAPACITV inRRInoAIOr evO4 a.L UIN4



i -
jNlT UNDER TE W^iTERSD QItKTII RM RWmR)ll"
aiO uBPess"" I wa, r Cl e }la.. aV n

...a.iinEn a /www


PUMPING STATION-NORTH ST. LUCIE RIVER
D. D. PROJECT.








Land Treatment


TREE PLANTING ON LAND BEST SUITED FOR
WOODLANDS.


MULTIPLE PURPOSE POND
IRRIGATION AND FISHING.

RIGHT-Water management

TOP LEFT-Gully control to
conserve land and reduce sediment







































APPLICATIONS WATERSHED PROTECTION
AND FLOOD PREVENTION (P.L.-566)
LOCATION AND STATUS

January 1, 1965

Authorized for Operations (Construction) County

1. East Chain of Lakes (Construction Compl) Highlands
2. Taylor Creek (In Construction) Okeechobee
3. Fisheating Creek (Construction Completed) Highlands
5. Pine Barren Creek (Construction Compl) Escambia
6. N. St. Lucie River D.D. (Const Compl) St. Lucie
8. Sebastian River D.D. (In Construction) Indian River
13. Upper Josephine-Jackson Creek (In Constr) Highlands
15. Sarasota Uest Coast (In Construction) Sarasota
17. South Sumter Sumter
18. Upper Tampa Bay Hillsborough
22. Jumper Creek Sumter
25. Istokpoga Marsh Highlands

Authorized for Planning

10. Mills Creek Nassau
11. Dry Creek (Suspended) Jackson
21. Big Four Sumter & Lak<
34. Big Slough Manatee-Sara;
37. Ft. Pierce Farms Drainage District St. Lucie
39. Big Prairie Sumter & Lak

State Priority Preliminary Investigations


Acres

12,500
89,500
51,200
61,200
60,220
33,930
32,700
154,680
54,700
71,808
53,000
26,200
701,638


39,680
100,000
e 71,700
sota-DeSoto 117,000
22,000
e 54,000
404,380


26. Little Manatee River
29. Lower Alafia River
35. Pond Creek
45. Palatlakaha River

Approved Applications Awaiting Priorities

20. Six Mile Creek
30. Pemberton Creek
31. Turkey Creek
38. Wetappo Creek
40. Big Alligator Lake-Rosa Creek
41. North Polk
42. California Lake
43. Coldwater Creek
46. Brooker Creek
47. Frog Creek
43. Gamble Creek
49. Payne's Creek
50. Tsala Apopka
51. Water Oak Creek
52. West Seminole
53. Cracker Branch
54. Hurrah Creek
56. Lake Placid West Chain of Lakes

Applications Disapproved. Found Not FeLsible


Hillsborough-Manatee
Hillsborough
Santa Rosa
Lake & Polk


135,000
48,000
164,000
76,900
423,900


Hillsborough 28,480
Hillsborough 36,000
Hillsborough 64,000
Gulf 100,000
Columbia 61,000
Polk 100,000
Dixie 120,000
Santa Rosa(Escambia,Ala)174,000
Hillsborough & Pinellas 23,680
SManatee 11,500
Manatee 32,000
Hardee & Polk 72,000
Citrus 105,212
Bradford & Clay 20,000
Jackson 40,000
St. Johns 11,500
Hillsborough & Polk 166,400
Highlands 40,000
1,205,772
SEtc.


*d2."" ^~


I,
#-e


4. Orange Lake
7. Lake Region
9. Tributaries to St. Mary's River
12. Bear Creek
14. Turnbull Mill Creek
16. Dead Lake
19. Bull Frog Creek
23. Little Fish & Minnow Creeks
24. Wrights Creek
27. Barley Barber Swamp
28. Haw Creek
32. Fellsmere Drainage District
33. Wekiva River
36. Econlockhatchee River
44. Alligator and Hickory Branch
55. Northeast Polk


Alachua
Putnam, Bradford
Baker
Bay
St. Johns
Gulf & Liberty
Hillsborough
Jackson
Holmes
Martin
Flagler & Volusia
Indian River
Orange & Seminole
Orange & Seminole
Hardee
Polk


Total 56 Watersheds


210,000
& Clay 92,000
191,000
80,000
56,000
95,000
25,216
20,000
100,000
24,000
190,000
46,100
97,325
156,167
15,000
103.800
1,501,608

4,237,298
















I