Group Title: Biennial report of the Florida Forest and Park Service
Title: Report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075934/00006
 Material Information
Title: Report
Alternate Title: Work of the Florida Forest Service
Florida forestry
Florida forestry and park progress
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 18-28 cm.
Creator: Florida Board of Forestry
Florida Board of Forestry
Florida Forest Service
Florida -- Forest and Park Service
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Forests and forestry -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1st- 1928/30-
Numbering Peculiarities: Period covered by reports ends June 30.
Issuing Body: Reports for 1928/30, 1934/36, 1940/42-1946/48 issued by the board under an interim name: Board of Forestry and Parks.
General Note: Some vols. have also distinctive titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075934
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001746447
notis - AJF9242
lccn - a 59002387 //r

Full Text











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UNIVERSITY

OF FLOP'"




Cover:

Florida's "burning" question is illus-
trated in the contrasting cover pictures.
The slash pine plantation at the top was
burned by wildfires killing many and seri-
ously damaging the rest of the saplings.
The bottom plantation has fast healthy
growth resulting from protection from fire.
Both plantations are six years old.














FLORIDA FOREST SERVICE

Tenth Biennial Report

July 1, 1946 June 30, 1948





Under the guidance of the Florida Board
of Forestry and Parks, the Florida Forest
Service cooperates with the Federal Govern-
ment, Counties, Landowners, and wood-using
industries to the end that idle acres may be
stocked with timber and the products utilized
at a profit. Adequate forest protection and
good woodland management will further con-
serve soil and water, provide cover for wildlife
and replenish the natural beauty of the State.












THE FLORIDA BOARD OF FORESTRY AND PARKS:


-ei


THE BOARD (left to right): Henry N. Camp,
Ocala, Vice President; J. H. Sherrill, Pensacola;
A. B. Edwards, Sarasota, President; X. L. Pellicer,
St. Augustine, Secretary; Jack W. Simmons, Tal-
lahassee.



THE FLORIDA FOREST SERVICE:


State Forester .............
Chief, Fire Control......


....... ......C. H Coulter
......... Owen R. Douglass


Chief, Management .............R. A. Bonninghausen


Chief, Information and
Education .. .........

Fiscal Agent .. .......


...Wm. S. Chambers, Jr.

........... George S. Kilner











Preface:


The Florida Forest Service, created by
legislative act of 1927 and activated in 1928,
"became of age" during the 1946-48 biennium.
Recovery from the handicaps of war-time con-
ditions in the preceding years was reflected in
the accomplishments attained and the prepara-
tions made for future progress.

This report briefly depicts the nature and
magnitude of the services rendered through
this period.

The cooperation of Florida's citizens and
other state agencies in helping make possible
these accomplishments was of great inspira-
tion and assistance. Much was done during the
biennium; much more remains to be accom-
plished by cooperative effort.

A. B. EDWARDS
President
Florida Board of Forestry
and Parks




















Index:


Preface . . 3

In General . . 5

Fire Control . . 6

Management . .. 11

Information and Education 16

Fiscal . . .. 19

District Directory . 21








In


General:


The Florida Forest Serv-
ice is composed essentially
of two parts-its fire control
program and its work in
forest management and re-
forestation. S u p p o r t i n g
these parts are necessary
fiscal operations and an in-
formation a n d education
program. PLYMOUTH TOWER
The Fire Control Branch
has the responsibility of protecting from wild fire the forest lands
of Florida for which counties, groups, or individuals enter into pro-
tection agreements. It operates the communications network and
fire investigation program.

The Management Branch carries on planting, woodland man-
agement and utilization programs through direct assistance to
landowners. It operates the state nurseries and state forests.

Through news releases, programs in the public schools, and
other means, the Information and Education Branch informs the
citizens of Florida of the problems involved in forestry and of the
assistance and services available from the Florida Forest Service.

The Fiscal Branch is responsible for purchasing, inventories,
payrolls, and budgetary controls.








Fire

PREVET Contr o1:

QWnF eEQ In 1947-48, a new low
fire record was attained.
I IE Dii lOnly 1.453% of the land
. protected was burned. A
new low for the time of
S2.1 e/ had been set the previ-
v ous year. While 1947-48
was marked by several un-
usually wet periods, it is felt
that the record was due in
34 part to other factors such
". as greatly increased public
.. awareness of the need for
vae 9 forest protection, positive
action against law violators,
METAL ROADSIDE SIGN
and more efficient communi-
cations a n d suppression
methods.
For the period when the new low fire record was set, there
were 3,274 fires which spread over 101,135 acres doing damage
valued at $91,295.23. On unprotected woodlands, representing
about twice as much acreage, about 33% was burned by over
15,000 fires which caused about $5,000,000 damage.
Incendiary burning continued to be the major cause of woods
fires during the biennium. About 70% were intentionally set,
with these burning a proportionate area causing 55% of the
damage. Other major causes of fires were: Brush burning, 8% ;
smokers, 5.6% ; railroads, 3% ; lumbering, 2.8% ; lightning, 2.2% ;
and campers 1.4%. Miscellaneous and unknown causes were re-
sponsible for the other 6.1% of the fires.
Organized forest fire protection was established during the
biennium in five new counties-Alachua, Calhoun, Escambia,
Madison and St. Johns-with 6,952,822 acres under state pro-
tection, an increase of 1,090,552 acres over the previous period.
Seven county units were in operation in 1946. Another 20 coun-
ties were preparing to vote upon the establishment of units, 18
of them later passing the local proposals. The potential increase
during the next biennium is to at least 30 counties and about
12,000,000 acres under protection.

























Although the wooden tower is old, the other facilities at the
county headquarters of the new Alachua County unit are typical of
those in use by the four other new county units established during the
biennium. From the left, the buildings are the ranger's house, combi-
nation shop and warehouse, dispatcher's house, tower, and unit office.




This combination shop and warehouse building at Madison
is standard for new unit headquarters. Similar buildings are being
added at the older unit sites.


ELI.1_,riP.,c


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N.Ul 16 Ahwwwis






This modern, four-wheel
drive truck carries the tools
and water for fire fighting
and "mopping up." A
Swinch-raised "fire buster"
plow efficiently cuts fire
lines during suppression Af-
forts. Nineteen new truc ks
of this type were put into
service in the last two years.







The heavy duty fire-fight-
ing equipment is this trans-
port truck which speedily
carries tractor and plow to i -- 4
large fires to support small- I I
er units. It is also used for
fire-line plowing throughout
the state. Nineteen were
added during the biennium.




This type of plow, mount-
ed on the rear of a heavy
tractor, rides the transport
above. Apart from fire-line
plowing in actual suppres-
sion of fires, similar equip-
ment plowed 55,667 miles of
fire-lines during 1946-48 to
reduce woods fires danger.
This included 17,576 miles
plowed by cooperators.







Quickly tagged as the "Fire-
bug." this two-seat. 85 i.p.
C e s s II a Iionol)laine %waI
bouLght ill 194 fo flr fir dlttec'-
tionll anlld ob-( i'iatOfl a. Weill
as for the a plpl'ehlnil)I of
fir setters. A sulpllmelt to
transportation oIf l lpres- -
sionl cle' vs \\. a Illotor Iat lt
for the St. Joe Unit %% which
has areas inaccestil,le .by
triuc k.





WVhere "rough" is heavy and
saplings are over 10 feet
tall, controlled burning pic-
tured here insures the stand
against destruction by wild-
tires. Note the flares less
than t\wo feet high backing
into the %\ind. A number of
landonelrs practice t Ih is
wise use of fire on .specially
selected areas under proper
conditions of wind and mois-
tulre anid during the dormant
season.




During the biennium, the
value of the law enforce-
ment program begun in
early 1946 became appar-
ent. Investigations w e r e
made on 476 fires and 56
cases resulted in court con- .
victions. Another 29 cases
were settled out of court and
five ended with acquittals.
T h e s e investigators are -
checking plaster casts for
clues at the scene of a fire. 6 W






Addition of 6 radio base sta-
tions, like this one at Madi-
son, gave the service 15 base
stations for its radio com-
munications network. There
were 79 mobile transmitters
and 236 receivers in use in
June, 1948. Use of two-way
radio by fire-fighting crews
and the dispatching head-
quarters has greatly increas-
Sed the efficiency of sup-
pression efforts.














The "eyes" of the service al-
ways will be the faithful
men and women who spend
long hours above the tree-
tops on the lookout for
woods fires. With 5 new
towers built during the peri-
od, the service was operat-
ing 104 of its own towers
and 4 privately owned tow-
ers at the end of the bien-
nium. By telephone and ra- -
dio the towerman quickly re-
ports fires for immediate ac-
tion by t h e suppression
crews.











Manage-
ment:




McCOLSKEY PLANTATION NEAR LAKE CITY

Planting, thinning, selective cutting, insects and diseases and
other problems were investigated and on-the-ground assistance
given to thousands of landowners in solving them.

Seedling production for the second year reached a record of
11,360,600 trees, mostly slash pine. Re-opening of the second
nursery at Munson and expansion of the Olustee nursery made
possible this production and the 20,000,000 crop planted for the
1948-49 season.

Taylor and Escambia counties became the first to cooperate
in the employment of county foresters to particularly aid the
small woodland owners in their management problems. Seven
farm foresters, employed cooperatively with the U. S. Forest
Service were giving similar assistance in an additional 22 coun-
ties. Further expansion of this essential service is anticipated
through cooperative agreements involving two or more counties.
Several already are being considered.

The four state forests-Blackwater River, Cary, Pine Log and
Myakka River-were operated collectively at a net profit through
sale of timber and grazing leases.

A naval stores agent assisted in profitable gum farming enter-
prises throughout North and Central Florida.







Through practical guidance
and actual assistance, such
as the measuring of timber
at the left, the county and
,.. farm foresters helped 1527
Blandowners gross $1,319,092
from the sale of forest prod-
ucts cut wisely. The demand
for such assistance has con-
sistently exceeded t h a t
Which could be given.







Good practices in fire con-
trol, planting, cutting and
utilization b y woodland .TRmOL T
owners resulted in the e-
award of 39 Florida Tree
Farm certificates covering
925,521 acres. This program
began a few days before
the biennium opened. Cere-
monies like that at the
right recognized outstand-
ing forestry work done.







Use of acid, to stimulate
gum production and reduce
labor costs was stressed in
the naval stores assistance
program. Gum farming also
was emphasized in the farm
forestry and Tree Farm pro-
grams. Gum farming proj-
ects were started on several
school forests.







An Olustee nursery crew
lifts slash pine seedlings for
packing and immediate ship-
ment to landowners for re-
planting poorly stocked
lands. Nearly 65,000,000
trees from the state nur-
series have been planted
since 1930.


Excellent growth of timber
can now\V be seen in some of
the older Inash pimnt plant-
ing, piiontored by the service
in the 1.:311's. Their success
ha., beten anl elnlCO t-ragement.
t landolltvner \\ho a\'. nowV
ai:,plying for ilmore seedlings
than can be grlo\nll, e\'en
w\it.h expanded niureries.


Various types of tree-plant-
ing machines gained land-
owner adoption during the
last two 'years %with about 51i
of them to be used during
the 1948-49 planting season.
Planting speed has been in-
creased by several thousand
trees a day- for a two-man
(re llw.


'i


W.l







Besides expanding the seed-
ling beds at the nurseries to
get greater production of
young trees, efforts are also
being made to grow better
quality trees. One of the suc-
cessful experiments was this
use of a mineral spirits spray
to kill the grass between the
rows.








The slat-house at the Lake-
land nursery produces prom-
ising semi-tropical trees. Ex-
perimentally gr o w n and
planted out in different soil,
moisture and climatic condi-
tions, many species are be-
ing tested for their use and
possibilities.







Australian pine in the back-
ground is outgrowing the na-
'tive pine (foreground) in
this South Florida location.
Mahogany, "punk tree," cy-
press-pine, silk-oak and oth-
ers are being studied for
South Florida adaptation.









Four crews of two foresters
each are making a county
by county survey of the
state's forest resources. The
project began in June, 1948
and the field phase is expect-
ed to be finished within a
year. The U. S. Forest Serv-
ice is jointly sponsoring the
survey.


Worked out and defective
trees are cut selectively on
Blackwater River State For-
est. The state forests are
practical examples of good
forest management which
provides continuous crops
for employment of labor and
use by industry. Part of the
state forest land is set aside
for game breeding purposes.


This one-acre slash pine
plantation i s additional
proof that "Planted Pines
Pay." When it was 17 years
old, 16 cords were cut and
19 left. The pulpwood value
at $3.50 per cord was $56;
stumpage value of the tim-
ber left was $66.50; with
costs of land, plowing, plant-
ing, etc., deducted, the av-
erage annual net profit for
the acre would be $6.05.


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Information

and

Education:



LEON COUNTY FAIR FLOAT



Work with children and adults-in schools, and many public
groups-for prevention of wild fires and sound forestry manage-
ment is the major task of the information and education program.
Every important project in fire control or management was pre-
ceded or accompanied by information and education work.
The methods are both direct and indirect. Through speeches,
motion pictures, demonstrations, Forestry Training Camp, per-
sons of all ages were directly reached. This included 539 speeches
to groups totalling 47,536 persons and the showing of motion
pictures on 745 occasions to 121,661. Five new forestry films were
put to use.

Personnel and facilities limit the number of intensive direct
contacts. Therefore indirect methods are employed extensively.
Frequent news stories and feature articles are released to the
State newspapers, regular and special radio broadcasts made,
literature distributed widely, and many exhibits presented.

The "Florida Forest Service News" is now being printed month-
ly and distributed to service personnel and a limited number of
others.








With fure-ter present to an-
swer cqueiietii-n. 49 fair ex-
hibits were .-ei-n I:iy ;'il.:o)tlt
440,(000 er'n1-1. Anotlier 23
exhillits in 1hank Il:hiie- and
store windlu were seen lI'
an additional li o.ooI.i.


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g^ ?*-. 7.,
^-^^*-^


Practical I teXj.-' it*.nc' in Ood
fore-try i- tile Oliective of'
nilir' tha:in 3110 Zschool ft'irl'- ts
nianaiged l.y Lchlapteir of the
Future Farmerq- of America.
Practical f:'orest ry instruc-
tion i- a part of the Voca-
tional AgriIculture program.


'~~Z~*


Outstanding students at the
Forestry Training Camp,
held each summer at Camp
O'Leno, are awarded prizes
for their practical accom-
plishments. Florida pu 1 p
mills, saw mills, and turpen-
tine operators contribute the
funds to finance the camp
expense.


,. .n- 3.-.


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1r


The Tallahawsee anld (listrit
OMCO: ,LlI-niittee d DISSi(ne~
fl iII feat ile al'ticeS.




w'ei~- pi~~liaed. .A p)Opularfl
tIhiii \ithrL jlluIil~atio~ns v tcr


the 959 brief rfillor items oil
et zi t rY.


Gentlrally rive minutte- ill
length and O.f the quiz type
program, thf tf r\ice. tVt e
stationss throughout t h e
state, made 9214 Iroadcentl .
lMo t of the e \vere "live'"
programlls. In addition. radio
Spot a-ll1Ci01neelle n lt oin time-
ly .i- biect.-t \\t-r' -t-e it mninth-
ly to all stations. These to-
talled 338.


About 1,250,000 pieces of
literature, including posters,
were distributed. Many of
these were new or reprinted
Florida Forest Service publi-
cations such as those pictur-
ed as well as an Arbor Day
guide, the previous biennial
report, and a popular com-
parative study called "Flori-
da's Future Wildfires or
Wealth?"


Triea Iipm







Fiscal:


Throughout the years since the Florida Forest Service was created
in 1927, its growth and increasing importance has been reflected in
the constantly greater cash receipts from all sources. Although a state
agency to whom appropriations are made through the Florida Board
of Forestry' and Parks, less than 40 per cent of the funds for the
operation of the forest service have come from the state. government.
The table shows an interesting comparison of receipts from the prin-
cipal sources.

CASH RECEIPTS OF THE FLORIDA BOARD OF FORESTRY AND PARKS
BY SOURCE SINCE IT WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1927
(Reported in dollars only)


Fiiscal
Year


1927-28
1928-29
1929-30
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-4.0
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46*
1946-47
1947-48


Total


$ 15,380
62,334
124,308
165,341
126,046
153,861
167,333
166,028
269,481
289,249
372,996
398,627
485,554
523,168
628,036
642,011
846,167
845,597
779,625
1,148,260
1,212,029


Landowners' Assess-
State U. S. ments & Other
Appropriation Government Sources


$ 12,500
12,500
60,320
60,320
40,000
40,000
44,000
44,000
134,200
134,200
170,000
170,000
210,000
210,000
300,000
270,000
300,000
300,000
250,015
329,507
428,290


$ 903
38,258
40,285
78,230
68,036
68,683
69,260
70,610
69,235
72,280
73,714
100,282
105,456
105,564
124,640
202,434
335,883
291,791
273,118
430,818
431,527


$ 1,977
11,575
23,703
26,791
18,010
45,178
54,073
51,418
66,046
82,769
129,282
128,345
170,097
207,603
203,395
169,577
210,283
253,805
256,490
387,933
352,211


*Beginning with Fiscal Year 1945-46, amounts shown are for Forestry purposes only.







FINANCIAL REPORTS

July 1, 1946 June 30, 1947

STATE APPROPRIATION Debit
1946-1947 ................................................................ $ 329,506.00
Receipts (Refund on travel request) ...................... 1.73
D isbursem ents .................. .......................................
Balance- June 30, 1947..................... ............
$ 329,507.73
INCIDENTAL FUND
Balance July 1, 1946.............................. ................... $ 81,911.88
Receipts-U. S. Government................................... 430,818.43
Receipts-Landowners and Counties.......................... 272,253.39
R eceipts- N ursery ........................................................ 8,850.97
Receipts-State Forests ...................................... 71,791.17
Receipts-Garage Operation .................................. 13,873.88
Receipts-Miscellaneous ..................................... 20,317.55
D isbu rsem ents ..............................................................
Balance- June 30, 1947....................... .... ........
$ 899,817.27
REPLACEMENT FUND
Am ount A llotted ......................................... ...... ... .........$ 1,500.00
D isbursem ents ................ ................... ....... .....
Allotment Withdrawn ....................................

$ 1,500.00
Total A ll Funds....................... ................................... $ 1,230,825.00



July 1, 1947 June 30, 1948

STATE APPROPRIATION Debit
1947-1948 ...................................................... ..... $ 428,275.00
Receipts (Refund on travel request) ..................... 15.75
D isbursem ents ..................................... .... .............
Balance- June 30, 1948..........................................
$ 428,290.75
INCIDENTAL FUND
Balance-July 1, 1947.........................................$ 90.17
Receipts-U. S. Government........................................ 431,527.68
Receipts-Landowners and Counties.......................... 223,273.27
Receipts-Garage Operation ................................... 14,302.27
Receipts- N urseries .................................. ................. 25,822.35
Receipts-County Forest Projects........................... 2,116.61
Receipts-State Forests ........................... ........ 56,072.04
Receipts- M icellaneous ......................................... 30,624.60
D isbursem ents ...... ........ ..................................
Balance- June 30, 1948.............................................

$ 783,828.99
Total A ll Funds..........................................................$ 1,212,119.74


Credit


$ 328,154.53
1,353.20

$ 329,507.73







899,727.10
90.17

$ 899,817.27


846.90
653.10

$ 1,500.00
$ 1,230,825.00


Credit


$ 351,419.79
76,870.96

$ 428,290.75

$ *






777,211.02
6,617.97

$ 783,828.99
$ 1,212,119.74




6122 ,/


FLORIDA FOREST SERVICE

DISTRICTS


DISTRICT 1:



COUNTIES:




DISTRICT.2:



COUNTIES:




DISTRICT 3:



COUNTIES:




DISTRICT 4:



COUNTIES:


J. E. Moore, District Forester
P. O. Box 188
Panama City, Florida (Tel. 940)
Escamb'ia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Holmes,
Washington, Bay, Jackson, Calhoun, and Gulf.



B. C. Leynes, District Forester
320 Caldwell Building
Tallahassee, Florida (Tel. 1480)
Franklin, Liberty, Gadsden, Leon, Wakulla, Jefferson,
Madison, Taylor, Dixie and Lafayette.



J. Frank Lee, District Forester
P. O. Box 243
Lake City, Florida (Tel. 890-W)
Suwannee, Hamilton, Columbia, Baker, Union, Brad-
ford, Nassau, Duval, Clay and St. Johns.



E. L. Molpus, District Forester
P. O. Box 521
Ocala, Florida (Tel. 878)


Gilchrist, Alachua, Putnam, Levy,
Marion, Citrus, Hernando, Sumter,
Orange, Brevard (N. Half)


Flagler, Volusia,
Lake, Seminole,


DISTRICT 5:



COUNTIES:


E. W. Kreher, District Forester
P. O. Box 53
Lakeland, Florida (Tel. 3-6384)
Brevard (S. half), Indian River, Osceola, Polk, Pasco,
Hillsborough, Pinellas, Manatee, Sarasota, Hardee, De-
Soto, Monroe, Highlands, Okeechobee, St. Lucie, Martin,
Glades, Charlotte, Lee, Hendry, Palm Beach, Collier,
Broward, and Dade.





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