Group Title: Biennial report of the Florida Forest and Park Service
Title: Report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075934/00005
 Material Information
Title: Report
Alternate Title: Work of the Florida Forest Service
Florida forestry
Florida forestry and park progress
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 18-28 cm.
Creator: Florida Board of Forestry
Florida Board of Forestry
Florida Forest Service
Florida -- Forest and Park Service
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Forests and forestry -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1st- 1928/30-
Numbering Peculiarities: Period covered by reports ends June 30.
Issuing Body: Reports for 1928/30, 1934/36, 1940/42-1946/48 issued by the board under an interim name: Board of Forestry and Parks.
General Note: Some vols. have also distinctive titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075934
Volume ID: VID00005
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001746447
notis - AJF9242
lccn - a 59002387 //r

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NINTH BIENNIAL REPORT


July 1, 1944- June 30, 1946



A State Organization directed by the Florida
Board of Forestry and Parks, cooperating
with the Federal Government in rendering
assistance to the landowners and forest in-
dustries in applied forestry and forest pro-
tection, and in the preservation and use of
Florida's outstanding scenic, historic and
recreational areas.



















The Florida Board of Forestry and Parks


Above are (left to right) A. B. EDWARDS, Vice President;
BASIL E. KENNEY, President; MRS. LINWOOD JEFFREYS,
Secretary; and HENRY N. CAMP, board member. JACK W.
SIMMONS, board member, was not present when the pic-
ture was taken.








Preface


This, the Ninth Biennial Report, covers two
years of work of the Florida Forest Service and the
Florida Park Service, from July 1, 1944 to June
30, 1946. The period embraced both war and
peace and in the reconversion we were hampered
by shortages of manpower, equipment and sup-
plies. Despite the hindrances, both Services have
intensified their efforts and with available facili-
ties have made substantial advancements. The
report clearly states the picture of what has been
accomplished during these two years.

We acknowledge with thanks the tolerant
spirit of cooperation evidenced by citizens during
this difficult period.


BASIL E. KENNEY
PRESIDENT
Flori,la Board of Forestry and Parks













3
206103



















Index



Preface -- ------ 3

Florida Forest Service

Fire Control Branch -- 7

Applied Forestry Branch 13


Florida Park Service 17

Public Relations Branch 23

Fiscal Branch - 28

Special Notes BACK COVER











4








Florida


Forest

Service





Forest Fire Control

Applied Forestry




The Florida Forest Service is divided broadly
into two branches Fire Control and Ap-
plied Forestry. The Fire Control Branch has
the responsibility of protecting that acreage
in Florida which comes under their super-
vision through agreements signed with indi-
viduals, groups, and counties. Applied For-
estry deals with the State Nursery, Planting
Programs, State Forests, and proper manage-
ment of small and larger woodlands.





















































Fast Growing Timber Florida's Valuable Crop!

6








Fire

Control

Branch ;--

I- i
1



















Fire towers over part of Florida provide the
"eyes of the service" in spotting woods fires.
At the beginning the Fire Control Branch
had 5,305,261 acres under their supervision
for protection. At the end of the second fis-
cal period, a total of 5,862,170 acres were
being protected an increase of 556,909
acres.























,4














A total of 8 radio stations were maintained
by the Service with one new headquarters
being added during 1945-46. Radio com-
munications play an important part in fire
fighting for dispatching up-to-the-minute
news. The Service maintains 110 mobile re-
ceivers and 32 mobile transmitters through-
out the five districts.










A towerman sights
with a fire finder.
With two or more
such sightings a tri-
angular fix can be
made and the fire eas-
ily located on a map.
At the end of June
1946 the Service
manned 99 of their
own towers and four .
private towers in 43
counties in the State.










During this period a
total of 141 miles of
new telephone line
were constructed and
2,341 miles were con-
S. stantly maintained.










To aid successful seeding,
reduce fire hazards, and
for other reasons 241,205
acres were controlled
burned in the State during
this period. This was in co-
operation with 110 wood-
land owners who partici-
pated under the Forest Fire
Protection System.


Above an investigator and an extension ranger
begin work on evidence found in a recent wild
fire on protected land. At the end of the fiscal
year in 1946 two investigators were employed
with more to follow to aid in bringing about a
decline in man-caused woods fires, and enforce
the Forest Fire Laws.









This is one type of
equipment used in
suppression of wild
fires in Florida. The
tank holds 120 gal-
ions of water and
the pressure pump
is driven by the
truck motor.


A two-disc suppression plow and crawler tractor are in the
process of being loaded on a long wheel-base transport
truck. This speeds up the moving of equipment to suppress
wild fires.








11 J L114


During the two year period the Forest Service plowed 55,160
miles of fire lines as a precaution against wild fires on protected
woodland areas. In addition landowners plowed 13,103 miles of
their own fire lines.


Not all fires are fought with mechanized equipment. Above are
shown some of the hand tools which men use to fight many wild
fires.







Applied


Forestry

Branch




















At the start of this period 50,700,000 seed-
lings had been planted in Florida. Some
4,300,000 were added during the two year
period. Farm foresters assisted 1,142 small
and larger woodland owners in thinning,
marking, gum farming and harvesting
$644,126.00 worth of forest products.







































Naval stores production in Florida is a profitable woods operation. Gum farmers,
small and large, are assisted in their problems by the Naval Stores Agent, who is co-
operatively employed by the Bureau of Agricultural and Industrial Chemistry and
the State.


This 13 year old field of slash pine planting grew two cords per acre per
year. At $2.00 per cord this is a total of $52.00 per acre in 13 years or
$4.00 per acre per year. Here it is being thinned for pulpwood.

A total of 4,398,072 seedlings were produced in the Olustee nursery
during the two year period.










Clear cutting of timber-
land is bad practice un-
less it is to be farmed or
used for some other pur-
pose. It removes the trees
which produce seed for
natural reproduction.
Above is a good example
of the result from seed
trees for natural refor-
estation.


Pulpwood, sawlogs and poles are cut from a selectively
marked woodland area. This assures the owner of good
prices and a future crop in a few years.





















Florida's Tree Farm System began June 1, 1946 when Gov-
ernor Millard Caldwell launched it by presenting the first
certificate. The System is sponsored jointly by the Florida
State Chamber of Commerce and the Florida Forest Service.
During the month of June three certificates were presented
in the State totaling 78,947 acres of woodland.


The West Bay demonstration plot shows why forest fire
protection pays. The land shown at left has 5 surviving
trees on a quarter acre plot and was burned annually, while
at the right the land was not burned during the same period
and has over 200 trees on the quarter acre plot.







Florida


Park

Service





















Pictured here is Gold Head Branch, a spring-
fed stream which meanders along the bottom
of a beautiful ravine 65 feet deep, from
which Gold Head Branch State Park takes its
name.
























Florida Caverns, near Marianna, is one of the State
Park System's finest assets. During the last two
years a total of 38,277 visitors saw the Caverns.


The O'Leno Recreation Area, near High Springs,
is the only group camp in the Florida Park System.
In the last two years 17,387 persons attended group
camps at O'Leno which can handle up to 150 persons
at one time.























Historic old Fort Clinch near Fernandina drew
14,509 visitors in the two years. This is the main
office. Fort is in background.


^iri L ,, .. .. "-.


Gold Head Branch State Park, near Keystone
Heights, a popular recreation area for outdoor
lovers, attracted 41,060 visitors in the two years.




























Myakka River State Park, near Sarasota, is one of Florida's finest wild-
life sanctuaries, and during the two years was seen by 23,210 people.


A total of 41,864 persons visited Highlands Hammock State Park, near
Sebring, during the last two years.
























During the two years a
total of 251,747 persons
visited Florida's seven op-
erating State Parks. Re-
ceipts amounted to $38,-
124.56. Florida's State
Parks provide historic,
scenic, recreational and
botanical features to citi-
zens.


IyY~+-~~-31) I





























Hillsborough River State Park, near Zephyr-
hills, recorded the largest number of visitors
of any of the State Parks during the two
years with 76,440.



Undeveloped Parks:

Collier-Seminole State Park
Hugh Taylor Birch State Park
Pan-American State Park
Suwannee River State Park
Tomoka State Park
Torreya State Park








Public

Relations

Branch .







... -- -









Working with children and adults the Public Relations Branch
handles the education and information program of the Florida
Forest Service and the Florida Park Service. Newspapers, radio,
pictures, bulletins, pamphlets, and personal contacts, are the
media used. Newspapers over the State cooperated with the
Service in carrying 181 news stories on a variety of subjects
dealing with Forestry and Parks.



























Fire Prevention and Conservation material included 445,000
bookmarks, 130,500 leaflets, 80,000 Hunting license envelopes,
50,000 fans, 40,000 rulers, 37,500 posters. These reached
284,836 children and an estimated 200,000 adults in our State.


During the two years a total of 24 radio programs were presented
on forestry and park subjects. Movie programs totaling 306
were presented to approximately 30,314 children and adults
over Florida.


Through 99 speeches made by personnel before Civic clubs,
schools, and various groups, a total of 6,538 people were reached.


























A total of 7 fairs were participated in at Tampa, Miami,
Jacksonville, Orlando, Wauchula, Panama City, and Mari-
anna. Examples of fair exhibits are shown above and below.





































Eight different bulletins totaling 106,000
copies were printed during the two years,
ranging in material suitable for small chil-
dren to technical subjects for woodland
owners.










26















417


Vocational Agriculture
boys are shown at work
in the Forestry Training
Camp held each year by
the Florida Forest Serv-
ice. In two years 215 boys
attended. In 1946 the
S12th camp was held and
financed by pulp mills in
Florida.


I l


I,



























Fiscal


Branch




The fiscal branch handles purchases, pay-
rolls, and provides expense statements for
proper budget control. The picture shows
the modern bookkeeping machines used to
speedily render bi-monthly reports on vari-
ous department expenditures.










Annual Report


Fiscal Branch

June 30, 1946


An interesting study of the cash receipts of the Florida Board of
Forestry and Parks by source since its inception in 1927 is pre-
sented in the table below. This table gives a graphic picture of
the growth and importance of this agency of the government
since it was created nineteen years ago. It is interesting to note
that the state government furnished approximately 40 per cent
of the funds used to operate this department.


CASH RECEIPTS OF THE FLORIDA BOARD or FORESTRY AND PARKS
BY SOURCE SINCE IT WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1927


STATE U. S. LANDOWNERS' OTHER
TOTAL APPROPRIATION GOVERNMENT ASSESSMENTS SOURCES


$ 15,380.74
62,334.00
124,308.59
165,341.21
126,046.42
153,861.23
167,333.15
166,028.97
269,481.28
289,249.49
372,996.07
398,627.91
485,554.43
523,168.25
628,036.55
S642,011.93
846,167.16
845,597.31
942,984.56


$ 12,500.00 1
12,500.00
60,320.00
60,320.00
40,000.00
40,000.00
44,000.00
44,000.00
134,200.00
134,200.00
170,000.00
170,000.00
210,000.00
210,000.00
300,000.00
270,000.00"
300,000.00
300,000.00
393,478.94


38
40
78
68
68
69
70
69
72
73
100
105
105
124
202
335
291
273


903.71 $ 1,977.03 $
,258.93 11,575.07
,285.54 23,066.72
,230.00 23,269.64
,036.12 15,090.49
,683.18 42,914.20
,260.00 45,377.74
,610.00 46,678.17
,235.00 53,816.12
,280.00 66,639.59
,714.00 110,629.22
,282.00 99,931.83
,456.90 136,233.02
,564.72 155,141.07
,640.65 143,317.54
,434.06 126,326.24
,883.53 167,357.92
,791.49 161,190.47
,118.78 185,520.62


636.33
3,521.57
2,919.81
2,263.85
8,695.41
4,740.80
12,230.16
16,129.90
18,652.85
28,414.08
33,864.51
52,462.46
60,078.36
43,251.63
42,925.71
92,615.35
90,866.22


* At the request of Governor Spessard L. Holland, appropriation expenditures
for 1942-43 were reduced by 10% to help the existing emergency.


FISCAL
YEAR


1927-28
1928-29
1929-30
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46








Financial Report


July 1, 1944 June 30, 1945


STATE APPROPRIATION DEBIT


CREDIT


1944-1945 - -- $300,000.00 $
Receipts (Refunds on travel requests) 25.50
Disbursements - 300,025.50
Balance -June 30, 1945 -- .00

$300,025.50 $300,025.50


INCIDENTAL FUND


Balance July 1, 1944 -
Receipts U. S. Government
Receipts Landowners -
Receipts Nursery -
Receipts State Forests -
Receipts Miscellaneous
Disbursements -
Balance June 30, 1945 -


- $ 97,691.23 $
- 291,791.49
- 161,190.47
7,344.87
34,330.20
S 17,997.26


$610,345.52


518,661.46
91,684.06

$610,345.52


STATE PARK FUND


Balance July 1, 1944 - -
Receipts From State Park Operation
Disbursements - -
Balance -June 30, 1945 -


Total Forestry & Parks -


$ 2,686.92 $
32,917.52


$ 35,604.44

- $945,975.46


15,326.17
20,278.27

$ 35,604.44

$945,975.46








Financial Report


July 1, 1945 June 30, 1946


STATE APPROPRIATION DEBIT


1945-1946 -
Receipts (Refunds on travel
requests) -
Disbursements -
Balance June 30, 1946


- $ 393,546.04 $


15.40
393,561.44
.00

$ 393,561.44 $ 393,561.44


INCIDENTAL FUND


Balance July 1, 1945 -
Receipts U. S. Government
Receipts Landowners -
Receipts Nursery -
Receipts State Forests -
Receipts Miscellaneous
Revenue -
Disbursements -
Balance June 30, 1946 -


$ 91,684.06 $
273,118.78
185,520.62
5,276.54
45,278.93


20,399.43
539,366.48
81,911.88

$ 621,278.36 $ 621,278.36


STATE PARK FUND


Balance July 1, 1945 -
Receipts State Park Operation
Receipts Miscellaneous
Revenue --- ---
Disbursements - -
Balance June 30, 1946 -. -


20,278.27 $
19,758.42


137.50


33,334.26
6,839.93


$ 40,174.19 $ 40,174.19

Total Forestry & Parks $1,055,013.99 $1,055,013.99


CREDIT








SPECIAL NOTES
(Continued from Inside Back Cover)

WOODLAND ASSISTANCE
A cooperative gum market handled 10,500 barrels of gum
netting $182,000.00 to farmers in the Lake City territory; near
Graceville a fire control cooperative with 39 farmers protected
over 4,000 scattered acres of farm woodlands; and five treating
plants to preserve fence posts, construction timber, and other
farm timbers, were established. These activities were a part of
the cooperative marketing project of which the U. S. Forest
Service financed half the cost. An additional 611 woodland own-
ers were assisted by other personnel in cutting, thinning, mar-
keting, cruising and pruning their woods.

STATE FORESTS
Four State forests totaling 206,035 acres were operated along
approved forestry lines. Receipts of $82,373.00 were received
from these forests during the two years from sale of forest
products and grazing.

SEEDLING DISTRIBUTION
The Container Corporation of America for the fifth year,
and the International Paper Company, and Florida Pulp and
Paper Company for their third consecutive years continued the
free distribution of seedlings in their respective territories in the
interest of reforestation. In 37 counties during the two years
these pulp mills in the first year distributed 1,464,905 seedlings
to 290 cooperators while during the second year gave 924,584
seedlings to 172 cooperators.

STATE PARKS
During the period several areas were added to existing State
Parks, and several new areas acquired. Twenty acres were added
to Fort Clinch State Park, 22 acres added to Suwannee River
State Park, 3,460 acres were transferred to Myakka River State
Park from Myakka River State Forest, 100 acres in Clay County
were acquired for addition to Gold Head Branch State Park, and
1,837 acres were acquired in the vicinity of Seventeen.Runs for
addition to Hillsborough River State Park.






206103

SPECIAL NOTES
(Continued from Back Cover)

The fire record for the past four years has improved as shown
below:
FISCAL ACREAGE DAMAGE % PROTECTED PROTECTED
YEAR NO. FIRES BURNED AREA BURNED AREA
1942-43 5,621 282,994 $480,949 5.61 5,038,873
1943-44 3,438 176,049 204,318 3.31 5,305,261
1944-45 4,620 258,526 368,989 4.67 5,539,641
1945-46 3,073 126,785 82,855 2.16 5,862,170
Only 5,862,170 acres or less than /3 of the 22,000,000 acres
of Forest land are under organized forest fire protection. During
this two year period Florida had 7,693 wild fires on protected
acreage burning 385,311 acres. Only 3.29% of the protected
acreage was burned. On unprotected acreage the burn ran from
30 to 60% on approximately 15,000,000 acres of unprotected
lands caused by an estimated 50,000 fires.
LAW ENFORCEMENT
Results in law enforcement in 1944-45 were lamentable.
From a total of 29 investigations, two court cases resulted in
convictions and fines, 2 cases bound over, 1 found guilty and
settled out of court, 1 paid damages out of court and 1 nolle
pressed. The Board authorized employment of Forest Fire Law
Investigators and in February, 1946, a Chief Investigator was
employed, and an assistant hired in June 1946. In the period
1945-46 there were 37 investigations with 11 arrests resulting
in 5 convictions, 2 no true bills, 1 case dropped, 2 pending and
1 nolle pressed.
COMMUNICATIONS
The communications engineer spent considerable time set-
ting up radio frequency channels for increased efficiency with
other states.
CONTROLLED BURNING
In the first period 46 cooperators used 1,021 fires to burn
73,633 acres to reduce fire hazards on their land. This represents
only 1.33'. of the protected acreage. During the second period
64 cooperators used 578 fires to burn 167,572 acres representing
2.96% of the protected acreage.


(Continued on Page 32)







SPECIAL NOTES

BOARD MEETINGS
The Florida Board of Forestry and Parks held ten meetings
during the two years to discuss important questions for the
good of the service and to make decisions on policy.
With the resignation of Mr. Alex Collins during the first
year the Board continued with four members who handled all
matters during the rest of that year. Mr. Henry N. Camp of
Ocala was appointed the following year to fill the vacancy on
the board and Mr. Jack W. Simmons was reappointed for a four
year term.
Mr. Henry J. Malsberger, State Forester, resigned March 1,
1945, and Mr. C. H. Coulter was appointed in his place. /
The Florida Park Service became a separate entity by an act
of the 1945 Legislature. The Legislature provided for the estab-
lishment of a Park Service separate from the Forest Service.
Policy of the Park Service remained with the Florida Board of
Forestry and Parks, and supervision came under Mr. Lewis G.
Scoggin, State Park Director.
LEGISLATION
Three bills sponsored by the Board passed the legislature.
They were: An amendment to the County Fire Control law
providing for a majority vote on the question and ratifying
previous county fire control elections; making the Park Director
answerable direct to the Board; and establishing the third Friday
in January as State Arbor Day.
FUNDS
The General Appropriations Bill of the State allowed for
$600,000 annually for Forestry and Parks, an increase over the
previous authorization. But $225,000 of this amount was ear-
marked "Emergency-not to be expended without approval of
the Budget Commission". The Board received $23,478.00 of
emergency funds in addition to $375,000.00 of regular State
appropriations.
FIRE CONTROL
Seven counties voted on Fire Control in November 1944.
Five of them ratified the issue and two defeated it.


(Continued on Inside Back Cover)




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